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November 6, 1909

'RED MILL' KIDDIES 'STOLEN.'

Loaded Into Auto and Taken to Ban-
quet at the Elks' Club.

When the "Red Mill" company, which is to play at the Grand next week, came through Kansas City on its way to Leavenworth at 9 o'clock yesterday morning, seven of its members, consisting of the six children who appear as the Dutch kiddies and Jocko, the monkey, who has a place on the programme, were kidnaped for a few hours, loaded into the automobile of City Treasurer William Baehr, which was in waiting, and transported to the Elks' Club. There a breakfast was served, a separate table being provided for the monk. After breakfast the little show folk were shown the sights of the city.

The "Red Mill" company played at the Soldiers' home last night and the kiddies were there in time for the performance. The feature of their day's outing was a ride to Leavenworth in the motor car.

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October 12, 1909

MOTHER KIDNAPER PRISONER.

Foster Parents Regain Child and
Cause Arrest of Iowa Woman.

Charged with kidnaping her own baby from its foster parents in Des Moines, Mrs. Laura McConkey passed through Kansas City yesterday in charge of Iowa authorities on the way to Des Moines, where she will stand trial. Rev. A. D. Horne, the foster father, took the little girl home in his arms yesterday to his wife, who anxiously awaited the return of little 3-year-old Marguerite, whom she loves as much as if it were her own child.

In destitute circumstances about eighteen months ago, Mrs. McConkey found a home for the child with the family of the minister and signed the adoption papers. She was allowed the privilege of visiting the child. On the last visit, in August, the mother love asserted itself and two weeks later she spirited Marguerite away. the police over the country were notified. At last Mr. Horne found the baby with its mother in Altamont, Mo. A warrant was sworn out for the mother's arrest, and she was brought to Kansas City. She agreed to go to Iowa without extradition papers.

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August 4, 1909

ALLEGED KIDNAPER
CAUGHT; BOY FOUND.

HARRY JACOBS WAS WITH
UNCLE, CLARENCE CRAFT.

Stepfather Locates Stolen Child,
Dressed in Girl's Clothing, on
Train -- Craft to Be
Prosecuted.

The alleged kidnaper of little 4-year-old Harry Jacobs, who was coaxed from the home of T. H. Jacobs, his "grandpa," 1508 Olive street, about 1 o'clock Monday afternoon, was so unsuccessful in covering up his tracks that the child was gone from home but seventeen hours. He was returned to his mother about 8 o'clock yesterday morning. As soon as Mrs. Jacobs heard a description of the suspected kidnaper she thought of her brother, Clarence M. Craft of St. Joseph, Mo. Little Harry had lived three years with Mrs. Frank M. Baker, mother of Mrs. Jacobs and Craft.

FOUND CHILD ON TRAIN.

After the search in this city had been in vain, Harry Jacobs, the stolen boy's step-father, decided to leave for St. Joseph Monday evening. He wired for detectives to meet him at the train there at 11 p. m., intending to go to the home of the baby's grandmother, Mrs. Baker.

Soon after the train had left Leavenworth, Kas., Jacobs, suspecting that the kidnaper might have gone to that city by the electric line, started to walk through the train. In the coach immediately ahead of the one in which he had been sitting Jacobs saw Craft, Frank M. Baker, Craft's step-father, and the baby. Little Harry was dressed as a girl.

Jacobs approached and asked what was meant by spiriting the child away. He says Craft replied that it was none of his business as he was not the boy's father. As the train slowed up at the Union depot in St. Joseph, Jacobs says Craft attempted to escape with the child by running around the baggage room. He was caught and turned over to Detectives Parrott and Gordon of the St. Joseph police force.

CRAFT IS LOCKED UP.

"I saw that Craft was placed safely behind the bars," said Jacobs yesterday afternoon. "At the packing house I learned that Baker had been at work there at 1 o'clock Monday afternoon so he was released. He had gone to Leavenworth to meet Craft."

Jacobs asked that Craft be held. Yesterday he went before the prosecutor here and swore to a complaint charging kidnaping. Justice John B. Young issued the warrant which was turned over to Chief of Police Frank Snow with instructions to send a man to St. Joseph after the alleged kidnaper. Mrs. Jacobs, who was greatly alarmed over the absence of her child, says she will prosecute her brother.

In an attempt to learn where little Harry's clothes had been changed the boy was taken out yesterday morning by his step-father. He led the way through the alley in the rear of the house at 1508 Olive street, from whence he was taken, to Fifteenth street. When they reached the fountain at Fifteenth street and the Paseo, which little Harry calls "the flopping water," he stopped. He said that he was taken into a house near there which had a broken porch. His clothes were taken off and girl's apparel substituted.

BOY'S CLOTHES THROWN AWAY.

After leaving the place, t he little boy said, his overalls, waist, etc. of which he had been divested, were wrapped in a piece of paper and thrown over a fence. The house could not be located. The child said several people were present when the shift was made. Candy and the promise of a long ride on the choo choo cars," is what lured the boy away from home.

Jacobs and the stolen boy's mother have not been married long. Mrs. Jacobs was first married in St. Joseph several years ago to Harry Burke from whom she was later divorced. For three years she left her child with her mother, who later married Frank M. Baker, a packing house carpenter. The grandmother and Baker became greatly attached to the child and did not want to give him up when the mother remarried. Jacobs is a cook.

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August 3, 1909

MOTHER FAINTS WHEN
CHILD IS KIDNAPED.

4-YEAR-OLD LURED AWAY
BY STICK OF CANDY.

Police of St. Joseph Think
They've Found Him.
Four-Year-Old Harry Jacobs, Kidnaped.
HARRY JACOBS.

Lured by a stick of candy, Harry Jacobs, 4 years old, was kidnaped yesterday afternoon from in front of his stepfather's parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Jacobs, 1508 Olive street. The kidnaper, who worked for two hours before accomplishing his end, meets a description of the boy's uncle.

Half crazed at the the loss of her boy, from whom she had been separated for over three years, Mrs. Jacobs collapsed at the Union depot yesterday afternoon while searching for him. Dr. M. W. Pichard, who attended her, said her condition was serious. No trace of the child was found.

At 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon the missing child was seen at the Union depot by a waiting passenger. In the mean time a dozen relatives, assisted by the police, scoured the city for the little fellow all afternoon and evening, but up to a late hour last night had found no trace of him.

Almost four years ago Della Craft of St. Joseph, Mo., was married to Harry Burke of that place. They were divorced a few months later. Mrs. Burke would not live at home, and she could not find employment where she could keep her boy with her, so she arranged with her mother to care for him. She says that she paid her mother $10 a month to care for the child.

BECOMES ATTACHED TO BOY.

Three months ago at Horton, Kas., Mrs. Burke married Harry Jacobs, a cook. Before the ceremony he promised her that she could have the boy live with her.

In the meantime Mrs. Jacob's mother married Frank Baker, who became greatly attached to the boy and did not want to give him up. The child was finally given to his mother and her husband, and they departed for Eastern Kansas. They came to Kansas City about two weeks ago.

For the first few days they stopped at the home of Jacob's parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Jacobs, 1508 Olive street. They then found apartments at 1613 Park Avenue.

Little Harry Jacobs developed a fondness for his new "grandma" and spent much of his time at her house, only a short distance from his home. Yesterday morning a man who, the mother declares, was her brother, appeared in the neighborhood of the Olive street address. A tinner was doing work on an adjoining house. The stranger asked the boy if he could not help him and the tinner gave him a dime for assistance in carrying tools and tin to the roof.

CHILD IS LURED AWAY.

A few minutes after 1 o'clock Mrs. Jacobs received the news that her son had been kidnaped She was told that a man who answers the description of her brother had lured the child away with a stick of candy. The child, she was told, recognized the man and willingly accompanied him.

Mrs. Jacobs ran to her step-mother's home. Neighbors hurried to her aid. Jacobs was summoned from his work and he called for his father. The quartette, accompanied by neighbors, hastened to the Union depot. There Mrs. Jacobs was told by a waiting traveler that a boy answering the description of her son accompanied by a man who she says she believes to be her brother and a woman whom she thinks is her mother, had been seen in the station just a short while before.

At that Mrs. Jacobs became hysterical and collapsed. She was carried to the invalids' room in the depot, where Dr. M. W. Pickard was summoned to attend to her. In the meantime friends had organized searching parties and the police of both Kansas City and St. Joseph were notified.

BELIEVES BOY IS IN ST. JOE.

ST. JOSEPH, MO., Aug. 2. -- The police of South St. Joseph investigated this end of the kidnaping story of Harry Jacobs in Kansas City today, and believe the kidnaped boy is now at the home of Frank Baker, 225 West Valley street, South St. Joseph. The police say they have no official request from Kansas City to make an arrest.

Frank Baker is a carpenter, who has been employed by Swift & Co. at the packing plant for several years. The police claim not to know Clarence Craft, said to be a brother of the kidnaped child's mother.

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January 10, 1909

GIRL ASKS $25,000 DAMAGES.

Claims She Was Decoyed Into a Dis-
orderly Resort.

Claiming that she was detained for eighteen day in the resort of Jennie O'Neill, 205 West Third street, Ceicel Grady, 16 years old, brought suit against the woman yesterday. Damages to the amount of $25,000 are asked in the petition which was filed with the clerk of the circuit court. The suit is brought through Mrs. Mollie Woodward, mother of the girl.

Ceicel says she went to Mrs. O'Neill's place at the woman's invitation, as a domestic. When she discovered the real nature of her surroundings she tried to leave, but her clothing was hidden from her by the defendant, it is alleged.

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September 26, 1908

MOTOR CAR USED
IN A KIDNAPING.

MRS. THOMAS SPIRITED HER SON
OUT OF LEAVENWORTH.

BROUGHT CHILD TO
THIS CITY.

ATTORNEY JOHN HAYES, JR., AR-
RESTED BY KANSAS OFFICERS.

Was Mistaken for a Detective Who
Had Gone With Mrs. Thomas
When She Kidnaped
Her Child.
Mrs. Agnes Boss Thomas,who Kidnaped Her Child in an Automobile
MRS. AGNES BOSS THOMAS.
Kansas City Woman Who Kidnaped Her Child in Leavenworth Yesterday,
Guarded by a Detective in an Automobile.

Agnes Boss Thomas, who was a witness in the Humes-Richards alienation of affection suit, yesterday, under guard of a private detective patrol, went to Leavenworth in an automobile and carried off her baby, Theodore C. Thomas, Jr., while the 5-year-old child's school teacher looked on, powerless to do anything. Mrs. Thomas brought the baby to her home, 119 East Thirty-fourth street, where Theodore, Jr., is still resting and awaiting a probable habeas corpus proceeding. The little fellow's attorneys, Kelly, Brewster & Buchholz, are in waiting, too, and John Hayes, Jr., who was mistaken for a detective by the Leavenworth police force, is out on bond.

Mrs. Thomas was divorced from her husband in July, 1906. Mr. Thomas received the divorce while his wife was abroad, both being represented by attorneys. In the settlement by the court at Pawnee, Ok., it was stipulated that Mr. Thomas was to have the custody of the child except one month in each year and that if the mother wished the child during this month she should go after and return him at the proper time.


Young Theodore C. Thomas, the Kidnaped Child.
THEODORE C. THOMAS.
The Kidnaped Child

Recently when Mr. Thomas wished to go to Mexico he left Theodore, Jr., with the child's grandmother in Leavenworth. When the time rolled around for Mrs. Thomas to have the child for her one month of the year, the baby's grandmother decided she should not have him. On account of her connection with the Humes-Richards case, the grandmother said Mrs. Thomas could not have the baby for the one month provided for by Judge Baynard T. Hainer in the Oklahoma courts.

Yesterday Mrs. Thomas decided to get her baby, and employed an automobile and a bodyguard and went after him. Living strictly up to the letter of the decree, which said she could get the baby by going after him, Mrs. Thomas employed F. H. Tillotson of the Hayes-Tillotson Detective Agency, to see that no force was used against her. The two went to Leavenworth and called at the school house where the baby, Theodore, Jr., is receiving his first lessons. Mrs. Thomas stepped to the door, asked the child's teacher to see him, and then simply carried him home, as she claims the court said she has a right to do.

In the meantime, John Hayes, Jr., an attorney of Kansas City and son of former Kansas City Police Chief John Hayes, was in Leavenworth on legal business. The police force of Leavenworth, recalling that the big man in the automobile was of the Hayes-Tillotson agency, just arrested young Hayes and held him for ransom. He proved his innocence and was finally let go on bond.

Mrs. Theodore Thomas, the mother of the child, was formerly Agnes Boss, the daughter of a prominent Congregational minister here, and was reputed to be the most beautiful and most accomplished girl in the city. After being educated in the high school here she went to Vassar. She was a splendid musician, an artist of some ability, and was a leader of society here.

She was married to Theodore Thomas, son of a wealthy and very prominent Leavenworth physician, about eight years ago. Six years ago the son was born to them. At that time Mr. Thomas was conducting an ice plant in Atchison, Kas. Later they moved to Oklahoma, and at Pawnee, Ok., a divorce suit was instituted by the husband.

The decree was granted Mr. Thomas, giving him also the custody of the child.

After the divorce, Mr. Thomas brought his boy to Leavenworth and placed him in the care of his mother, Mrs. M. S. Thomas. She has become very much attached to the child and was prostrated with grief this afternoon. The little boy was just 6 years old a few weeks ago and started going to school last Monday. The mother has come here on several occasions with different attorneys and attempted to get the grandmother to give up the child.

Several months ago Mrs. Theodore Thomas came into prominence by starting to lecture on theosophy. She is well educated and speaks well, and it is said she made quite a hit. Mrs. Thomas is still a very beautiful woman.

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March 10, 1908

BABY HAS NOT BEEN FOUND.

Mrs. Pansy Gaulter Says Husband's
Mother Made the Trouble.

Mrs. Pansy Gaulter, whose baby was snatched from her arms by her husband, Loren Gaulter, at Sixth and Central streets Saturday afternoon, said last night that no trace had yet been found of either Gaulter or the child. The last she saw of him was when he ran down Central street to Fifth street and through a building at 306 West Fifth. He is said to have met a woman at Fourth and Broadway and to have later taken a Leavenworth electric car The kidnaping was reported to the Humane Society, and W. H. Gibbbens has a warrant for Gaulter.

It was a mistake to say that my mother caused any trouble between us," said Mrs. Gaulter. My mother-in-law caused all the trouble and she had made trouble before. Finally I told y husband I would not live with his people any more, and he then wanted me to live with his uncle. When I refused that also caused trouble. It was his people, not mine, that caused our separation."

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March 8, 1908

HE STOLE BABY FROM
ITS MOTHER'S ARMS.

FATHER ESCAPED, ALTHOUGH
PURSUSED BY A MOB.

Mysterious Case, in Which the Prin-
cipals, After Causing a Grand
Furor, All Dropped
Out of Sight.

To kidnap a baby from the arms of its mother on a public street at high noon, run several blocks pursued by 250 people and the frantic mother and to finally make good his escape through a basement on West Fifth street, was the record made by a father yesterday.

A woman was walking on Sixth street near Central at noon yesterday, carrying her baby. As she neared the corner a man appeared, grabbed the child from its mother's arms and ran north on Central street -- the baby under his coat. At Fifth street he turned west as far as the Coca-Cola Bottling Company, 302 West Fifth street. In the door he darted, slamming it after him. The kidnaping caused great excitement and the man with the baby was pursued by a mob which jammed about the door.

The woman from whom the baby had been snatched was a blonde, tall and wore a brown cloak and a small hat with a white veil. As she ran she cried to the pursuers, "Stop him! He's my husband and has got my child and will kill it. I know he sill. Stop him!"

An elderly woman dressed in black appeared on the scene, from where no one seemed to know, and overtook the fleeing mother. Several times she tried to detain her, but when frantic efforts failed, the woman in black grabbed a small hand satchel from the other woman and gave up the chase.

Charles E. McVey, desk sergeant at police headquarters, was passing and saw the crowd. The woman in brown appealed to him to get her baby which was being stolen, saying again that it would be killed. McVey ran into the bottling works and took a freight elevator to the top floor, having been told that the man with the baby had gone that way. When he descended, however, he was informed that the man had left by the basement door in the rear.

J. B. Jewell, manager of the bottling works, said: "The man who went through here with the baby in his arms was Loren Gaulter, who formerly worked here. The woman who pursued him was his wife. They have been married about two years and the baby is probably 6 months old. They last lived in Independence, Mo., but I never knew of their having had any family troubles."

Until five days ago, Gaulter was employed in the mail department at the Union depot as a truck handler. At that time he quit suddenly and what became of him no one there knew.

The man with the baby ran through an open lot in the rear of the bottling works and made his way to Fourth and Broadway, where, witnesses said, he was met by another woman The two were later seen to board a Leavenworth car, it was said. McVey had trouble in dispersing the crowd, and when quiet was restored all the principals in the affair had disappeared.

The distracted mother made her way around the block and through the alley by which the man and baby had escaped. To a man loading a car in the rear of the Richards & Conover Hardware Company's store she appealed to help her. That man, who said he knew the woman, gave the name of Young. He said she was Mrs. Gaulter, but he did not know where she lived. Harry Williams, a negro porter in a barber shop at 316 West Fifth street, saw the man with the baby under his coat leave the bottling works by the rear basement door. When he called out, "That man's stolen that baby," he said the man ran faster than ever.

Jewel said that after all the excitement was over a young woman, known to him as Gaulter's sister, called on him. She asked where "the folks" had gone, Jewel said, and intimated, that she would have gone with them. The wife was heard to remark that if her husband got out of town, she new he would take the baby to Iowa.

The kidnaping was not reported to the police or to the Humane Society, consequently neither worked on the case.

Mrs. Belle Slaughter, who formerly lived at 1639 Washington street, is the mother of Mrs. Gaulter. Until two days ago the Gaulter's lived at 612 East Ninth street, and appeared to be happy, neighbors say, until Mrs. Slaughter appeared. It is thought that Mrs. Slaughter is the woman who appeared and took Mrs. Gaulter's handbag during the chase after the husband and child.

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September 12, 1907

SAYS SHE WAS KIDNAPED.

Chicago Woman Appeals to Police to
Locate Her Father.

Ida Mahoney, 6949 May street, Chicago, has written to Daniel Ahern, chief of police, asking for assistance in finding her father, from whom she says she was kidnaped twenty-four years ago by her uncle, a Frenchman. Her father was Irish, and that was the cause of the kidnaping. The letter reads:

Chief of Police -- Dear Sir: Would you please help me to find Samuel Mahoney, a painter by trade, who was last seen in Kansas City about fifteen years ago . I was kidnaped from him in Chicago by my uncle and put out to a farmer. I heard he cou ld not find me and left Chicago in despair. I have not seen my father in twenty-four years. I was 10 years old when I last saw him.

Please do all you can for a poor, broken-hearted daughter. In Chicago he was a painter and contractor. My mother died in Indianapolis before we came to Chicago.

My father was Irish, and my uncle was a Frenchman and did not like him. My name is Ida Mahoney, 6249 May street, Chicago, Ill.

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September 3, 1907

DIDN'T HAVE $1,000 WITH HIM.

Detective McAnany Held on Charge
of Attempted Kidnapping.

SEDAN, KAS. (SPECIAL.) -- Mrs. James C. Barclay, foster mother of the "incubator baby" of Lawrence fame, and Detective Thomas S. McAnany, of Kansas City, were arraigned before Justice Speed this afternoon on a charge of attempting to kidnap the child of Mrs. Charlotte Bleakley at Elgin last Saturday.

The defendants waived a preliminary hearing and were bound over to the district court, which convenes here tomorrow morning. Bail was fixed at $1,000 each. McAnany was unable to give it and is tonight in the county jail. It is understood tonight that Mrs. Barclay regrets the steps she has taken and is willing to compromise with Mrs. Bleakley to stop the prosecution. It is also said that the latter is firm in her determination to push the case. County Attorney Mertz is securing all the evidence he can get to use when the case comes to trial.

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April 8, 1907

NO TRACE OF MISSING BOY.

Police Unable to Locate Charles
McNeese Who Disappeared Friday.

As yet the police have been unable to locate Charles H. McNeese, the 6-year-old son of C. C. McNeese, 2305 Brighton avenue. The lad has not been heard from since he left home Friday morning to go to the Ashland school at Twenty-fourth street and Elmwood avenue. The suspicion that the boy was kidnaped by two women who appeared near the school house in a closed carriage both Thursday and Friday mornings, was substantiated by a man who saw them talking to the boy just before they drove away Friday morning. That was the last seen of him in the neighborhood of his home or the school.

A description of one of the women in the carriage tallies with that of the boy's mother, from whom his father secured a divorce about three years ago. The police are searching for the missing boy, and descriptions of him have been sent out to police departments of other cities.

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February 26, 1907


BY A LAWYER'S AID.

ATTORNEY HELPED MRS. ROBINSON
KIDNAP HER CHILD.
AN OLD MYSTERY CLEARED UP.


CHILD WAS TAKEN FROM CHACE
SCHOOL LAST JUNE.

Mother and Father Had Separated and Courts Had Awarded HimCustody of Gertrude, 7 Years Old--Humane Officer Suspected.

When little Gertrude Robinson, 7 years old, was kidnaped from the basement of the Chace school by her mother on June 1 last year many persons, especially Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Weaver, 1404 Troost avenue, who were keeping the child, believed that Colonel J. C. Greenman, Humane agent, had aided Mrs. Robinson. A woman, well known as a local temperance worker, appeared at Colonel Greenman's office yesterday afternoon, however, and admitted that she and a lawyer had planned the whole thing. Mrs. Robinson, she said, came on here from Chicago and stopped at her home. The lawyer was called in and the three planned the kidnaping, which was successful.

Just after little Gertrude entered the basement steps at the school the morning of Friday, June 1, 1906, a woman was standing in the shadow. "Hello, Gertrude," she said. "Why, hello, mamma," replied the child. The mother threw a black cloak over her child and ran to where a carriage was standing on the Paseo. With mother and child the carriage was driven rapidly south to Fifteenth street and west. Then it was seen no more.

It was believed that Mrs. Robinson had stolen her own child, but this could not be proved. Woman-like, however, she had to tell it. Two days later a Frisco conductor came in from his run and reported that a woman with a little girl, described as the missing one, had boarded his train in Rosedale. He paid no attention to her, but she had told the train butcher her story. She said that after getting possession of Gertrude the hack had driven to the Southwest Boulevard and Wyandotte street. All that had been planned out beforehand. There she left the vehicle and boarded a Rosedale car, getting out there just in time to meet the ongoing Frisco passenger for Springfield, Mo. She left Springfield for St. Louis and went from there to Chicago, getting home the next day.

The child was not missed by the Weavers until noon. Then they instituted a search on their own accord, and the kidnaping was not reported to the police until 2 p.m., five hours after it occurred. All of the outgoing trains were watched by detectives, but the shrewd little mother with her babe was many, many miles from Kansas City railway stations. She knew they would be watched, that is, she, her woman friend and the lawyer.

Little Gertrude was the daughter of Harry G. Robinson. He secured a divorce from his wife by default, the notice of the suit having been printed in an Independence paper, which the wife never saw in her Chicago home. When she heard of it she came here and tried to get the decree set aside, but failed. The court had given the custody of the child to Robinson. Colonel Greenman had advised the woman in both suits and that was how he came to be suspected of advising the kidnaping.

The mother came here once," said the colonel yesterday, "and visited with her child at the Weaver's for a week. I suspected something wrong at the time and went so far as to make Mrs. Robinson leave her return ticket and all her money, but a small amount, with me, and saw her to the train when she left. She had visited at my house then and I knew if she got away with her baby I would have to bear the blame. When she did come here and succeed in kidnaping it I had no idea she was out of Chicago -- but I got the blame nevertheless of advising her to take it in the manner in which she did. I wouldn't use my office for breaking the law and am glad that Mrs. Blank has set me right."

The woman who helped to plan the kidnaping said she was going to tell the Weavers how it was all done -- some day, when she got a chance.

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