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February 6, 1910

INVASION FROM KANSAS.

Boys Rush by Collector on Viaduct
but Police Intercepted Them.

Lieutenant Kennedy of station No. 2 and his flying squad, consisting of Officers Scanlon and Hogan, repelled an invasion from Kansas City, Kas., by way of the Intercity viaduct about 9:30 o'clock last night. A report was received at the station that over 100 men had rushed past the toll collector of the Kansas end of the viaduct without stopping to pay the customary toll and the flying squad was sent to the Missouri end of the structure to intercept the invaders. Although greatly outnumbered the Kennedy forces allowed only four or five of their adversaries to negotiate a getaway into Missouri without payment of toll . The crowd was made up entirely of boys bent on a charivari.

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November 2, 1908

SKATING KIDS PUZZLE COPS.

Youngsters Smuggle Themselves On
Viaduct Under Farm Wagons.

"I had to do somethin' a few days ago that I hated worse'en anything I've done for a long time," said a member of the police force a few days ago. "You know the kids have been just crazy over this roller skatin' business. Course, we try t' let 'em have all the fun they kin, long as they don't bother nobody. A few days ago the people in charge of the intercity viaduct got to complainin' 'bout three kids that managed to git onto the viaduct some way, an' stay out there the livelong day doin' nothin' but skate.

"Well, I couldn't see how that was hurtin' the viaduct, but we got orders to keep the kids off. Well, sir, I laid for them kids for 'bout a week tryin' to catch 'em, but we couldn't find where they got on. We'd put a man at each end an' keep a careful watch, even looked in two or three wagons, but never found no boys. Just the same they'd show up and keep on skatin. I finally give it up, 'cause it didn't amount to much, anyway. Just by accident, two or three days ago I got onto the scheme. You see, the kids git up about Fifth and Minnesota avenue in Kansas City, Kas. They wait till a farm wagon comes along. Then one of 'em sneaks under the wagon, just sits on his skates and is hauled out onto the viaduct. The watchman never thinks of lookin' under the wagon. Of course I had to put a stop to their fun, 'cause orders is orders, but I hated to do it."

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October 3, 1908

TAFT TO BE HERE TOMORROW.

Republican Presidential Candidate Will
Spend Sunday in City.

The train bearing William H. Taft from Topeka to Kansas City is expected to arrive tomorrow morning at 7 o'clock where a reception committee consisting of Senator William Warner, Congressman E. C. Ellis and W. S. Dickey will meet the presidential candidate and escort him to the Baltimore hotel.

In the morning Mr. Taft will attend the Beacon Hill Congregational church and will then lunch at the home of W. S. Dickey. In the afternoon he will go to the Independence Avenue M. E. church, where he will address the Y. M. C. A. at 3:30 o'clock. His subject will be "The Foreign Work of the Association."

Monday morning Mr. Taft will be taken over the intercity viaduct to Kansas City, Kas., where he will address the populace from the steps of the public library.

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June 18, 1908

CITY IN MOVING PICTURES.

Films Will Be Exposed in the Retail
Section Today.

If your wife's new directoire is finished, dress her up and parade her in the downtown district this afternoon.

That is a duty a good citizen owes Kansas City today, of all days in the year, for today the town goes on the motion picture films to be exhibited all over the world.

A special street car carrying the phenomenal machine which puts you and your smile on the films will start at 1:30 o'clock from Thirteenth street and Grand avenue. If you chance to be strolling from the postoffice about this time the face you turn toward the machine will be exhibited in Hale's Tours in amusement places in many countries.

Here is the route of the car: From the start at Thirteenth street and Grand avenue the first run will be on Grand avenue to Fifth street, west on Fifth street to Walnut street. The car will start south on Walnut street at 1:45, 2 o'clock it will run north on Main street to the city hall and at 2:30 o'clock it will run from Wyandotte and Eighth streets east to Oak street. This will end the first day's film making.

Of course this is going to be done only provided the weather is clear. Next week, probably Saturday or Sunday, the machine will be placed on an automobile and pictures made of the boulevards. When the flood waters recede pictures will be made of the manufacturing district in the West Bottoms and later interior views of the banks and other large institutions will be made.

The films are made in sections. As the Kansas City film will appear it will show Kansas City from an inbound Wabash passenger train, giving a glimpse of the intercity viaduct.

The pictures will be made and exhibited by the International Publicity Company.

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June 12, 1908

POLICE WILL PATROL
RIVER IN LAUNCHES.

Mounted Men Guard Flooded Whole-
sale District -- Peril of the
East Bottoms.

Chief of Police Daniel Ahern and Captain Walter Whitsett yesterday afternoon drove through the flooded East and West bottoms. Complaint had been made that sightseers and others had been breaking into unprotected houses and stealing.

Last night mounted men were stationed all over the West bottoms with orders to patrol the flooded district carefully. If the water goes any higher police will be placed in launches to patrol. Now an officer on horseback can reach the most important part of the wholesale district.

It was also reported to the police that in the trees near Harlem many dead cattle, horses and hogs have become lodged. The citizens in that vicinity fear the result if the animals are left there after the flood goes down. Today police in motor boats will be sent over the river to dislodge any dead stock and see that it gets into the current.

Near the Kelly mills in the East bottoms twenty-five or thirty men are at work night and day watching to see that the water does not break through the dike formed by the embankment of the Kansas City Southern railway.

"That is really the key to the East bottoms," Captain Whitsett said. "If the water once gets through there it means lots more trouble, especially for truck gardens, Currents would be quickly formed and all of that loose rich soil would go down the river as it did in 1903."

Wednesday night and last night fifteen or twenty families, by special permission, slept on the hillsides below North Terrace park. In the day the people go down and watch their property.

William Mensing, 10 East Fourth street, called at police headquarters last night and offered five or six furnished rooms for the benefit of the flood sufferers. In 1903 Mensing had a rooming house at Fourth and Main streets. While his rooms could have been rented at good prices, Mensing gave up a dozen or more to poor families and even took two families into his home.

"These rooms I have are not for men who can hustle for themselves," he said last night. "As before, I prefer to let women and children occupy them."

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., chairman of the police board, informed the department yesterday that tents could be secured at the Third regiment. They are to be used for poor and needy families if the worst comes.

Today two gasoline launches will be placed in commission for use of the police. They will be expected to patrol the river below the Hannibal bridge and render aid to people on both sides of the river if the emergency calls for it.

The crowd on the Intercity viaduct last night -- most of the people were sightseers -- was so great that Captain Whitsett stationed four men under Sergeant Robert Greely at the entrance. Their business was to be on the lookout for crooks and to keep the people moving. Three patrolmen were placed at the Mulberry street pay station to keep order and see that no one used the "center rush" method to get through the crowd without paying.

Last night several police were patrolling the river bank from the foot of Grand avenue east. It had been reported that thieves had been breaking into wholesale houses through windows, loading their boats and landing further down the river

The police were asked last night to be on the lookout for Antonio Travesse, 6 years old, an Italian boy living at 410 Holmes street. His father, Carlos, greatly excited, reported the missing boy. He said that when last seen his baby was going toward the river.

Harlem could not be reached by telephone last night. In the afternoon it was said that the water there had flooded the only remaining stores. Last night's report from there was that the river was getting lower, and that most of the wise citizens over there, who had passed through the terrible 1903 flood, will save all of their household goods and stocks of merchandise. Some were moved to this city and some of the stocks are still there, very high up with the counters and shelves nailed down.

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September 11, 1907

LIGHT UP THE AVENUE.

Movement Afoot to Install More
Street Lamps on Minnesota.
Lighting for Minnesota Avenue.
To make Minnesota avenue, now the main business channel of Kansas City, Kas., a well lighted thoroughfare is the idea of at least a half dozen prominent buisness men of that city. The plan is to install two parallel rows of lights, the posts fifty feet apart, from Fourth street and Minnesota avenue, or from the end of the intercity viaduct, to Tenth street. Each post will carry three large light bulbs, decoratively arranged, to be furnished with gas, and, it is said, should supply enough illumination to make the darkest night day on the avenue.

The promoter of the project is Max Holzmark, a furniture dealer on the avenue. He says his plans are entirely altruistic, and that he will contribute largely to the enterprise.

"I am modeling the lighting after Michigan avenue, Chicago," said mr. Holzmark. "With three lights to a post the illumination ought to make the sun ashamed to come out."

Mr. Holzmark intends that business men shall pay for the installation of the poles and fixtures and leave the expense of operation to the city, a matter of about $15 per pole.

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April 18, 1907

CAME WEST TO KILL BUFFALO.

Virginia Boy, Disappointed, Started
on the Way Home.

Clark Freeland, 13 years old, from New Martinsville, Va., came west to hunt buffalo and fight Indians. He landed here in April 5 and was first brought to the notice of the police when he tried to beat his way over the new inter-city viaduct. He had been told that the buffalo were all on the other side of the river and he had spent the 75 cents with which he landed.

Yesterday a telegram with money for a ticket home came to the police for the buffalo and Indian hunter from his father, Dr. W. P. Freeland. The police went out and gathered in Clark again and last night he was sent back to the effete East, a disheartened boy.

"I hate to go back," he said, "without having killed a single buffalo. And I haven't seen an Indian either."

"The buffaloes are all hibernating now," he was told by Lieutenant H. W. Hammil, "and the Indians are all out trapping and hunting furs for your Eastern people to wear." The boy said that was too bad, and left.

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