Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

February 8, 1910

'A SWEDE IN PERIL'
IS WARD WAR CRY.

Scandinavians Flock to the
Standard of Gus Pearson.

"A Swede is in peril!"

That was both the watchword and the reason assigned for the meeting last night at the Stockholm hotel at 1024 West Seventeenth street, where about 300 Second ward Republicans indorsed Gus Pearson for another term as city comptroller.

The Scandinavian settlement in Kansas City has had two city comptrollers, and each has made good with his party, and the present comptroller, Gus Pearson, made good with the Democratic administration, too, but they have never had other representation, and now they are out for a member in the upper house of the council.

Last night these Second warders met to indorse Mr. Pearson and have a lunch, and they listened to Fred Coon and Judge Harry G. Kyle while they were awaiting the adjournment of the city council and a chance to tell Gus Pearson that they are for him.

Charley Lawson, who was chairman of the meeting, sounded the watchword: "A Swede is in peril."

Lawson and other speakers told how Pearson is to be rolled at the Republican convention February 25 because, as they declared, he has incurred the enmity of party bosses.

It appeared to be the sense of the meeting that Pearson is to be "rolled" by the bosses because he remained under a Democratic administration and the speakers declared that these same bosses offered to go into the courts to protect their places in the service when the Democrats ousted all of them but Pearson and kept Pearson merely because he is competent.

JUDGE KYLE TALKS.

Judge Harry G. Kyle, who expects to carry the Second ward with the aid of Mr. Pearson's friends there, said in part:

"The freeholders, in drafting the new city charter, and in creating the hospital and health commission department of municipal government brought the city government close to the needs and wants of the people. This department will have control of the city hospital and all institutions now or hereafter owned or controlled by the city for the care of sick and injured persons; for the confinement, support and maintenance of insane persons.

"This commission will have a competent man to act as superintendent of the hospitals and other kindred institutions. It will also have a competent health commissioner to direct inspection of every part of the city, with a view to maintaining good sanitary conditions; also to inspect dairies, meat, food stuffs and water supplies for drinking purposes and to enforce all pure food laws."

Labels: , , , ,

February 7, 1910

A WALKING HABERDASHERY.

Overdressed Man Imagines He's
Hunted Magnate.

Robert C. Kainz, a young man who says he is an Englishman recently imported to this country, went to police headquarters about 3 o'clock Sunday morning and demanded to know why he had been locked out of jail. The desk sergeant apologized for the oversight and sent him to the holdover.

When searched Kainz was found to be a walking haberdashery, with everything from a clean collar to an extra suit of clothes on his person. Aside from the assortment of dry goods and men's furnishings were:

One ruby ring, three boxes of Egyptian cigarettes, several cigar lighters, a half dozen packages of chewing gum, two pairs of new horsehide gloves and several neckties.

Kainz wore two overcoats, two complete suits of clothes, a jersey sweater and two vests, besides two shirts and some under garments. His feet were protected by three pair of hose, each a different color, and two silk mufflers were wrapped around his neck.

Investigation revealed that he had been living at the Salvation Army hotel on Fifth street. For a time he is said to have imagined that he was the president of a great insurance company, who feared that the United States government might prosecute him for selling bad "policies." He had a quantity of sample insurance policies and a rate book in his pocket.

Kainz was turned over to Colonel J. C. Greenman yesterday and his mental condition will be looked into.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

February 4, 1910

NORWEGIANS TO TEXAS
PANHANDLE.

Party of Thirty-Five Who Will Try
Dry Farming There.

Armed with a combination of horns and cowbells, a crowd of thirty-five Norwegians passed through the Union depot last night en route to Hansford, in the Texas Panhandle. They are going to a Norwegian settlement there to farm. The settlers are all of the well-to-do class of farmers. They have purchased from 160 to 640 acres of land and are equipped with machinery and stock. churches and schools have been established and the move will be more in the nature of a transplanting operation.

Labels: , , , ,

February 3, 1910

TO CELEBRATE THE NEW YEAR.

Kansas City's Chinese Colony Be-
ginning to Make Arrangements.
Happy Chinese New Year

"Vely fine happee New Year" will be the common greeting in the Chinese world next Wednesday which marks the beginning of another twelve months for the Mongolian race. The Kansas City colony, the seat of which is West Sixth street, is already making elaborate preparations for the annual festivities. The Moys, the Sings, the Chins, the Lees, the Wahs, the Lungs and all the rest of the representatives of the various provinces of China are combining their efforts to make themselves conspicuous, despite the fact that there are comparatively few Chinamen here.

Spaghetti, Irish stew and bean chili must all sink into the caverns of oblivion as toothsome dishes for a day at least and good, old chop suey, with noodles on the side, together with gloutchew, Oriental prunes and other equally palatable things from the Celestial standpoint, will be in evidence. A large shipment of Chinese fruits, vegetables and wines arrived Monday and is held in readiness for the celebration.

"We feel much glad on New Year," said Kwong Sang, a tea merchant at 113 West Sixth street yesterday afternoon. "We can't have so much big time here as in New York and San Francisco, because there's not enough Chinamen. All same we have much feast and music."

Kwong Sang has commenced to hang decorations in his store and his wife was busy all day yesterday arranging the rear of the room for a banquet table. They expect to entertain a number of their countrymen. The little Sang children have caught the spirit of the occasion and are already crying for goodies they can have only on New Year.

Shung Fung Lung, a dealer in fancy Chinese goods at 123 West Sixth street, has also sent out invitations to several of his out-of-town friends and will assume the role of host in a brand new silk suit just received from China.

"We like the fireworks on New Year," he said yesterday, "but no allow it here. Much sorry."

The warring Tongs, the Hop Sings and the On Loongs, of which there are a few of each here, have apparently patched up their differences sufficiently to permit speaking terms of one day, if no longer. The Yongs, most of whom are laundrymen, are showing a disposition to be clannish and are said to be planning some exclusive parties on East Twelfth street, but their doings will not worry the wealthier merchants and importers of the North End. There is no likelihood of any serious quarrels and it is safe to bet that the local Orientals enjoy a peaceful advent of their New Year.

Labels: , , , , ,

February 3, 1910

SUDS MAKERS ON CARPET.

Police Board Investigates Heim De-
liveries in East Bottoms.

The Heim Brewing Company was called on yesterday to explain the presence of twenty-five cases of its beer in the house of a Belgian in the East Bottoms near the Milwaukee bridge. This with a large quantity of whisky and wine was found there Sunday, January 23, by police from No. 8 station. They were disguised as railroad men and reported that they had no trouble in getting whatever they wanted, the Belgian's wife waiting on them as bar maid.

"It is not unusual," said a driver for the brewery who delivers in that district, "for five or six cases of beer to be left at one Belgian home on Saturday, especially where they keep boarders. One Belgian will easily consume a whole case over Sunday. All sales are cash and many times one person will buy several cases saying they are for different parties who left the money with him because he lived near the road."

An agent for the brewery explained that if the sales had been made in any other part of the city but the East Bottoms it would have caused suspicion and an investigation.

"But who would suspect a bootlegging joint down among the Belgians?" he said. "We never thought of such a thing and therefore the sales caused no remark."

"But the driver who sold the beer is still in your employ, I see," insisted Commissioner Thomas R. Marks. "Does that show good faith with this board?"

"We do not think the driver is to blame," said the agent. "It was an everyday occurrence. And how is the company to blame?"

"Well," said Mr. Marks, "we have no right to try the driver. This board now is holding up two of the Heim licenses on account of sales made to the Buffalo Club, a lid-lifting organization, and I think when it holds up about three more next July you will keep an eye on where your beer goes when delivered to other than saloons."

Judge R. B. Middlebrook made no remark other than to say that the case would be taken under advisement and decided later.

Labels: , , , , ,

February 2, 1910

SIGNORA TO JOIN ISNARDI?

She Is Happy at Sumptuous Dinner
on Eve of Departure.

Since Peter Isnardi left "Little Italy" three weeks ago, the residents of that section have employed their time chiefly in simmering down their financial losses so as to present them to the county attorney and wondering where the delinquent consular agent went when he left here. Opinion seems to be almost equally divided, some holding that he committed suicide by throwing himself into the Missouri river, and others that he dropped inconspicuously across the line into Mexico where the law would protect him from any embezzlement charge preferred by his enemies.

Those inclined to the latter theory felt themselves vindicated yesterday when it was learned that Signora Marguerite Isnardi also was preparing to leave the city and refused to tell anybody where she was bound.

Before the consular agent left he borrowed heavily from his friend and among those who lost in this manner was Antonio Sansone, living close to the consulate at 653 Cherry street. In part payment of what Isnardi owed Sansone, the signora yesterday turned over to him all her furniture. With her grips and trunk packed she then repaired to a restaurant and had a sumptuous dinner in which it is said wine figured. Several of her friends were present. She was happy.

"Where are you going?" someone asked the signora.

"I am going away; who knows where?" she answered with a characteristic shrug. "Perhaps I will be back soon, perhaps not."

The conversation lagged after that vague bit of information for the simple reason that one party to it could not speak very many English words.

"I am convinced that Signora Isnardi is going to join her husband," said J. P. Deo, editor of the Osservatore, an Italian newspaper at 210 East Fifth street. "Of course, we don't blame her for that, but we are naturally curious as to her destination and she certainly won't tell.

"Since Isnardi left here so suddenly people have been coming to light every day who have lost all the way from $10 to $1,000. The amount of money loaned or entrusted to the care of the man really is enormous when you come to think about it all coming from poor folks.

"A reward of $300 will be offered by the Italians for information leading to the location of Isnardi. First, however, I want to look into the law governing his case. I may also write an open letter to Guido Sabetta, the consul to Chicago."

Labels: , , ,

January 30, 1910

BELIEVE ISNARDI
DEAD OR FUGITIVE.

LITTLE ITALY DIVIDED AS TO
THE FATE OF MISSING CONSUL.

Only Charge Which Might
Be Brought Against Him
Not Extraditable There.

As days pass and there is no sign of Peter Isnardi, the missing Italian consular agent, the theory gains force in "Little Italy" that he has either taken his own life or else gotten well out of the country. In line with the latter belief comes a statement from Judge Ralph S. Latshaw of the criminal court that in Mexico the crime of embezzlement is not extraditable. Embezzlement is the only charge Isnardi has to fear from his enraged fellow countrymen.

Since he took "French leave" two weeks ago yesterday, Signora Isnardi declares she has had no word from her husband. She was a little calmer yesterday than she has been at any time since the occurrence, but still refuses to discuss any of the affairs that might serve to incriminate the man to whom she had been a helpmate for twenty-five years.

It is rumored about the Italian quarter that the signora is one of those who believes that the delinquent consular agent has taken his life. This idea was first suggested by Father Charles Delbecchi of the Holy Rosary Catholic church, and it is now becoming general.

"I believe Isnardi went down to the Missouri River the night he left and threw himself in," said Antonio Sansone, who lent the agent $1,000 two weeks before he dropped out of sight. "Isnardi was what you Americans call a good fellow. He was rather extravagant and believed firmly in keeping his head up, whether or not he had the money to justify his pretensions. He was not dishonest at heart.

CONSUL APPEARED WORRIED.

"During the two weeks preceding his departure he acted queerly about his office, seeming at times to be almost beside himself with worry. There is no doubt in my mind that his delinquencies finally drove him to suicide."

Signora Isnardi yesterday gave Sansone a written order to take possession of the fixtures in the consulate. They are worth about $200.

Notwithstanding the pressure brought upon the prosecutor's office to issue a complaint against Isnardi, nothing of the kind has been done nor will be done, it was stated yesterday, until the charges assume a more concrete form.

Speaking of the case, Judge Latshaw said he incline to the belief that Isnardi has taken flight in Mexico or Canada.

"He has had plenty of time to reach other of these countries," the judge said, "and if he has, he is safe from extradition. I can quote many instances where men in danger of arrest on charges of embezzlement or obtaining money under false pretenses have gone to Mexico and openly gone into business there. If Isnardi feared that it would be construed that his business had not been altogether fair to his clients here, he may have taken the precaution to drop across the frontier until matters quiet down."

The consulate remained locked up yesterday, and the private papers of the consul were not examined.

Labels: , , ,

January 28, 1910

HARD TOIL, MONEY
AND BANKER GONE.

"LITTLE ITALY" AROUSED OVER
THE DISAPPEARANCE OF
PETER ISNARDI.

Many Italians Deposited
Savings With Missing
Consular Agent.

Little Italy was never before stirred as it was yesterday, when the announcement was made that Peter Isnardi, consular agent of the United States government, had left for parts unknown. Several hundred Italians are worried about sums aggregating about $12,000, the savings of years, which they had deposited with him. Most of those who entrusted their money to Isnardi were railroad section hands and laborers, recent arrivals from Sunny Italy, and unable to speak the English language. Some had been saving to pay the passage of wives or sweethearts to the land of promise; others that they might some day return to their old homes in Italy and to pass the sunset of their lives among friends and amid familiar scenes and surroundings.

A subscription paper will be started today by J. P. Deo, publisher of an Italian newspaper at 210 East Fifth street, to raise money with which to hire lawyers and detectives to seek Isnardi. A committee of Italians will call upon the United States district attorney today to learn what can be done in the matter.

"We intend to secure an order tomorrow from the prosecuting attorney," said Deo last night, "to open Isnardi's safe. He kept all his books locked in it. Not until we can see the books will we know the facts in the case."

A telegram was sent to the minister of foreign affairs at Rome to find whether or not the money that Isnardi was to forward to the bank at Rome was ever received there.

The Italian consul-general at Chicago announced yesterday that the Kansas City office would be abolished. Roma Ladife, vice consul at Chicago, arrived here yesterday to close the office. He took possession of the Italian flag, which hung in front of the agency at 512 East Fifth street, also the seal of the Italian government and the coat-of-arms. Consul Guido Sabetta, in Chicago, that the Italian government funds were not involved.

OPERATED PRIVATE BANK.

In addition to occupying the office of consular agent, Isnardi operated a private bank. This was wholly outside of his official duties, and for any losses that might occur the Italian government is in no way responsible. The consular agent is supposed to have received nearly $8,000 in savings of Italians in the three and one-half years he has held the office. The remaining $4,000 is money he collected for steamship tickets and to be sent to Italy, to be deposited in the bank of Rome.

Local Italians were opposed to Isnardi from the day he was appointed. charges have been filed against him several times with the Chicago office. Though there were rumors among Italians in Kansas City regarding the consular agent, deposits continued to come from those who lived in the country or in railroad camps.

Ten per cent interest was offered by Isnardi on deposits. This was more than the Italian Central bank at Rome pays, which they had all known in Italy. The Italian bank pays 3 1/2 per cent on time deposits. Those who did not want to send their money to Rome could deposit it with their consular agent, Peter Isnardi, in his private bank.

The office of consular agent pays no salary. It is an honorary position. Isnardi had no other business here, and no apparent private income. The Italians say his sole income was from money he collected from his private bank.

APPOINTMENT WAS PROTESTED.

Isnardi succeeded G. G. Lanvereri as consular agent in Kansas City. Isnardi was appointed by Count A. L. Rozwadowski, who died shortly after the appointment. His office was in Chicago. Signor Sabetta succeeded him. A committee of Italians went to Chicago when the count died and asked for the removal of Isnardi. Charges of dishonesty were made against him, but Sabetta refused to act without first having an investigation.

Before his appointment as consular agent here, Isnardi was a traveling book agent. H represented an Italian publishing house and sold his books for $10 each. His home was then in Pueblo, Col. Isnardi was in Kansas City when the question of a vice consul arose.

Isnardi went immediately to Chicago. Count Rozwadowski and he had known each other in Italy. Against the protests of a committee of Kansas City Italians, who wanted a man from here appointed, Isnardi returned two weeks after the dismissal of Lancereri with the commission of consular agent. His appointment, though recommended by the consul at Chicago, was made directly by the foreign minister at Rome.

The consular agent is an American citizen. A consul general, however, must be a subject of the king. This being the case, as an American citizen, the Italians here think that Isnardi can be prosecuted under the laws of this state, in case the funds are not intact. The consul general, under the extra-territorial provision of international law, is immune from arrest and prosecution in the country where he represents his government.

PROSECUTOR WILL ACT.

"I will thoroughly investigate these charges," said Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, last night. "If I find that consular agents are amenable to the laws of this state, Isnardi will probably be arrested and prosecuted."

A dozen complaints have been made the past two months at the prosecuting attorney's office against the consular agent. Isnardi was charged with taking money from Italians to send to the bank at Rome, and appropriating it to his own use. Two weeks ago today the consular agent was called to the prosecutor's office. There he was told that if he did not refund $800 to an Italian who gave him the money for deposit, that criminal action for embezzlement would be begun. He was given until March 1 to refund the money.

Isnardi left Kansas City January 16. His wife said yesterday he had gone to Chicago, but reports from that city say he has not been seen by the consul general. Mrs. Isnardi has been conducting the business since her husband left.

When the news that the office had been closed spread among the Italians in the North End a crowd of 200 m en and women, most of them depositors in the consular agent's private bank, gathered in front of Isnardi's office. At dark the crowd dispersed. when the door to the office would rattle a dog's bark could be heard. The dog had been turned loose in the office to prevent the angry foreigners from making a forcible entrance.

"What will you do if he does come back?" was asked one in the crowd.

"String him up," was the prompt answer of an Americanized Italian.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

January 27, 1910

FATHER'S FEARS UNFOUNDED.

Italian's Effort to See Girl Starts
Black Hand Story.

Fearing that he was about to become a victim of a Black Hand plot, Petro Marsala, a wealthy Italian living at 410 Oak street, appealed to the police for protection yesterday. Detectives immediately investigated the case and reoprted that Marsala's apprehensions were for the most part unfounded.

Petro has a 13-year-old daughter whose name is Dora. She recently had an ardent suitor, Sam Valenta, who proposed marriage to her. The father promptly interposed an objection and ordered Sam to desist his attentions. Volenta's feelings were hurt and it is said that he wrote imploring letters to Dora and finally formed the habit of frequenting the Marsala premises in an effort to see the girl.

Then Marsala seemed to take alarm. He had heard that Valenta had relatives who were said to be members of the Black Hand society. Neighbors told him they had heard rumors to the effect that Sam and some accomplices plotted to kidnap Dora. No arrests have been made.

Labels: , , , , ,

January 24, 1910

DEAD MAN'S HOARD
HIS LAST PILLOW.

FIFTEEN THOUSAND DOLLARS
IN SECURITIES IN CASHBOX
UNDER HIS HEAD.

Body of Oscar Schoen, Aged
70, Found Amid His
Savings.

With his head pillowed on a cash box containing $15,000 worth of negotiable securities, mostly government bonds and money orders, Oscar Schoen, a retired shoemaker, 70 years old, was found dead in bed in a squalid room at Missouri avenue and Main streets yesterday morning.

The old man's hand clutched a half emptied phial of morphine tablets while at his side lay a loaded 38-caliber revolver. One of the cartridges had been snapped but had failed to ignite.

Coroner Harry Czarlinsky, who was summoned, stated that death was due to morphine poisoning, whether taken as an overdose or with suicidal intent he was unable to state. He ordered the body taken to Freeman & Marshall's undertaking establishment.

MONEY ALSO IN ROOM.

Although Schoen had occupied the same room in which he was found for over two years, little or nothing was known about him by the owner of the rooming house. He was last seen alive on Thursday morning by Guy Holmes, the janitor of the premises. He told Holmes that he was feeling sick and that if it were not for the expense he would visit a doctor. He used to retire regularly at 6 o'clock every evening and rise at 8 in the morning, when he would go out and buy the daily papers, return and stay in his room. Rarely he made trips up to town.

Police headquarters was notified of the old man's death and Patrolman John P. McCauley, who was sent to investigate, made a further search of the room. Concealed behind an old stove in which Schoen had done his cooking was found $60 in bills and silver, and in an old carpetbag apparently discarded and thrown under the bed, the officer located several abstracts and deeds to Kansas City property in the vicinity of Thirty-first and Troost avenue, which are supposedly of considerable value.

WILL IN POCKETBOOK.

Schoen's last will and testament was also found in an old pocketbook. By its provisions all his property is bequeathed to relatives by the name of Goetz living in Kempsvile, Ill. Charles A. Schoen, a brother at Darlington, Ind., was named as executor. The police have telegraphed to all parties concerned.

One of the witnesses of the will was the manager of a local real estate firm, through whom Schoen had conducted his business. He stated that he know that the old man owned a great deal of property. Schoen at one time conducted a cobbler's shop at 2442 Broadway, but left there about four years ago, giving his reason for selling out and moving the fact that robberies were too common in that part of town.

Naturalization papers dated 1872 and taken out at Darlington, Ind., were found among Schoen's effects, together with several applications to different German provident associations.

Schoen had lived in Kansas City about twenty-two years. He has a sister, Mrs. Bertha H. Goetz, at Kempsville, Ill., and a niece, Mrs. Agnes Yak Shan, residing in Alaska.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

January 24, 1910

TINY TOT TELLS THE TRUTH.

Assures Court He Never Sells Papers
After Six O'clock.

Tony Grapes is the name of a diminutive Italian boy. He says he is 8 years old, but looks no more than 6. A few days ago he approached Judge E. E. Porterfield on a Brooklyn car and wanted to sell him a paper. Yesterday Tony and his father were in the juvenile court.

"Do you remember seeing me?" asked the judge.

"Yep," smile Tony, showing his white teeth. "I sell you paper."

"Do you remember when I asked you how late you quit selling papers and you said, 'Any old time?'"

"I quit all the time at 6 o'clock," said Tony, who had evidently been informed that little boys are not allowed to sell papers later than that.

Tony said he had made 15 and sometimes 25 cents a day and that he gave the money to his moth er. Tony acted as interpreter when the judge told the boy's father he must not sell papers any more until the youth is older

"You are sure you are telling your father exactly what I say to you?" asked the court.

"Sure," said Tony. "He says he no like me to sell papers. He 'fraid the cars run off my legs and arms and hands and feet. Then I wouldn't have any to sell papers when I get big."

Labels: , , , ,

January 24, 1910

BLESSES WATERS OF KAW.

Custom of Greek Catholics Carried
Out by Priest.

Clad in the rich silken robes of his office and surrounded by a number of vested altar boys, the Rev. John Markowitch, pastor of the Servian Greek Catholic church of St. George, at First street and Lyons in Kansas City, Kas., knelt before an improvised alter near the middle of the Central avenue bridge yesterday morning and invoked a blessing on the Kaw river. One thousand parishioners attended the ceremony. After blessing the river the priest sprinkled each one of the church members present with water drawn from the river and administered the sacrament to them.

The congregation met in the church yesterday morning and marched from there to the bridge. The procession was led by six vested altar boys, who carried candles. They were followed by the priest, who was dressed in rich robes and carried a crucifix. Following the priest was a brass band which led a column of about 600 men. After the ceremony, which lasted about one hour, the participants marched back to the church.

Later the priest visited the homes of each of his parishioners and sprinkled their door posts with the blessed water. The custom of blessing rivers, while comparatively new in Kansas City, is an old one in Servia. The rivers are blessed there once a year, and the water used for baptisms taken from them.

Father Markowitch, who conducted the ceremony yesterday, is 52 years old. He came to Kansas City, Kas., two years ago, and in January, 1908, performed a ceremony similar to that performed yesterday, which was the first of the kind in Kansas City. The parish has grown from 800 to more than 2,000 communicants since he took charge.

Labels: , , , , ,

January 21, 1910

WHEN ELMAN WAS POOR.

Charles Grossman Was a Childhood
Playmate of the Violinist.
Charles Grossman, Kansas City Playwright.
CHARLES GROSSMAN.

There is one person in Kansas City who is awaiting with unusual interest the coming of Mischa Elman, the violinist who will be heard here in concert for the first time at the Willis Wood next Friday afternoon. He is Charles Grossman of 3212 Charlotte street, a young sketch writer, who was a childhood playmate of Elman and shared his clothes and even meals with the infant prodigy, destined to be one of the world's greatest violinists. Elman's father was a man of brilliant education but desperately poor and lived next door to the Grossmans. The younger Grossman is eagerly awaiting the violinist's coming to exchange reminiscences with him. They have not met for a dozen years and in the meantime the 7-year-old concertist of the parting has become at 19 one of the wonderful players of all time.

"I am two years older than Elman," said Mr. Grossman yesterday. "I well recall the time when I first heard little Mischa play his father's violin at the age of 4 years. In my childish way I thought to have him punished and I told his father he was playing the instrument, which was about the only thing of value in the Elman home. The father was at first angry, but soon recognized the hitherto unsuspected skill of his son. He had no means to educate him, however, but my father gave him his first start by placing him under teachers in our home town of Tolnoe. Later he was sent to Schapola where a Jewish millionaire named Bodsky became interested in him and sent him to Odessa, where Professor Auer of the St. Petersburg conservatory took him up. the story of his phenomenal rise is history, but I know that he will be glad to see his playmate of the old days. He was the guest of my brothers in New York, one of whom is a rabbi and the other an attorney. I hope to have Elman as my guest next week.

"Incidentally I do not see why Elman should be called the Russian violinist. He is a Jew and though the czar himself has given him a medal and other honors Russia is the prosecutor of this race, and Elman himself was not allowed by law to live in St. Petersburg until he had secured the august permission of the czar."

Young Grossman himself bids fair to attain a high degree of success in his chosen profession and may yet be a dramatist who will shed luster on the Jewish race, as he is already the author of many successful plays.

Labels: , , , , ,

January 20, 1910

OLD FIRE CAPTAIN DIES.

James O'Sullivan Was Member of
Department Twenty Years.

James O'Sullivan, captain of hose company No. 21 of the city fire department, died at his home, 6616 Independence avenue, at 4:45 o'clock yesterday morning. A widow and four children survive. Captain O'Sullivan was born in Ireland in 1865 and came to America when only a few years old.

On May 18, 1990, he was appointed to the Kansas City fire department and assigned to No. 2 hose company. One year later he was transferred to No. 5 hose company, where he served as hoseman until the establishment of hose company No. 21 in March, 1904 to which he was transferred and promoted to captain, which position he held with a splendid record until his death. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus.

Captain O'Sullivan was the inventor of the combination spanner and life-saving belt which was adopted by the department about two months ago.

The funeral services will be in St. Stephen's church, corner of Eleventh street and Bennington avenue, at 9:30 o'clock Friday morning. Interment will be in Mount St. Mary's cemetery.

Labels: , , ,

January 19, 1910

LIVED IN ABDUL'S HOUSEHOLD.

Kullujian Will Disclose Some Bloody
Secrets of Yildiz Kiosk.

Thomas H. Kullujian, the Armenian exile, who is said to be the greatest living authority on Oriental rugs, will lecture to 1,600 pupils of Central high school, in the school auditorium, at 10 o'clock Friday morning. The lecture is not open to the public.

Mr. Kullujian will tell something of the history of the Oriental rug, its beautiful romance, the somber tragedies recorded in the wonderful figures. He will tell of the slow and painful years, centuries, sometimes, that go into the weaving of a real Oriental rug.

Mr. Kullujian will lecture in Convention hall on the night of Tuesday, January 22, exposing the world-wide swindle practiced on dealers and the general public alike, by makers of fake Oriental rugs. In his Convention hall lecture he will also tell some of the terrible, bloody secrets of the Yildiz Kiosk, the palace of the sultan of Turkey.

Mr. Kullujian lived in the household of the Sultan Abdul Hamid many years, from childhood to youth, until a plot against his life made it necessary for him to escape from the country.

Labels: , ,

January 9, 1910

LIVED HERE FIFTY YEARS.

Mrs. Elizabeth Tobener, Widow of
Henry Tobener, Is Dead.

Mrs. Elizabeth Tobener, 73 years old, the widow of Henry Tobener, who operated a plug tobacco factory at Fifteenth street and Grand avenue for thirty three years, died late Friday night at her home, 2826 Woodland avenue, of acute pneumonia. She was born in Germany and had lived in Kansas City fifty years.

Mrs. Tobener is survived by four sons, Robert H., Frank W., William C. and Edward F. Tobener, and two daughters, Mrs. Dr. B. W. Lindberg and Mrs. Edward Oberholz. Burial will be in the family vault at Elmwood cemetery. The details of the funeral had not been made last night.

Labels: , , , ,

January 9, 1910

DYING FROM KNIFE WOUNDS.

Roommate of Isaac Dimich Held as
a Material Witness.

Isaac Dimich, a butcher living at 28 North James street, in Kansas City, Kas., is dying at St. Margaret's hospital as a result of two knife wounds. dimich and his fellow workman and roommate, Mike Wookas, attended a celebration of the Greek Christmas Friday night. Early yesterday morning, it is alleged, they quarreled and later the police officers found Dimich injured on the floor of his room. Dr. Mortimer Marder, a police surgeon, was summoned, and after he had given him emergency treatment he ordered the man taken to the hospital, where it was said last night that he could not recover.

Wookas was arrested at the packing plant of Morris & Co. yesterday morning and taken to No. 2 police station, where he is held as a material witness.

Labels: , , ,

January 4, 1910

RABBI BECOMES A CITIZEN.

Final Papers for Father of "Sammie
the Office Boy."

Fifteen aliens whose names had been posted for ninety days after the final application for citizenship papers had been made, were given their naturalization papers by Judge John F. Philips of the United States court yesterday. There were no Italians in the lot, the fifteen being distributed as follows: Six from Sweden, four from Russia, two from Roumania, and one each from Scotland, Germany and Hungary.

Among those who became citizens of the United States was Rabbi Max Lieberman, for years in charge of the Kenneseth Israel temple, synagogue of the Orthodox Jews, near Fifteenth and Oak streets. Rabbi Lieberman came to this country in 1891. He is the father of Samuel Lieberman, better known as "Sammy, the office boy," who died early in November last, after a brief illness. Sammy was an employe of The Journal, and it was here where he gained the name of "Sammy, the office boy," stories of his travels being published just as he had written them.

Labels: , , , , ,

December 31, 1909

PUGILISM OR NAIL EATING?

Pardon Board Doubtful Which Tends
More to Good Citizenship.

Terence O'Grady, the human ostrich, is free from the workhouse by action of the pardon and parole board yesterday afternoon. He was arrested several weeks ago at the insistence of his wife, who said that his dual role of prize fighter and crockery eater unfitted him for the more domestic one of providing for her and their children. He was fined $500.

Investigation by the board disclosed that O'Grady, if not always a hard working man, possessed a heart as good as his punch and as elastic as his stomach. He said and proved by receipts that he is supporting his widowed mother in Ireland whom he has not seen for more than twenty years. The last money sent to her by Terence was mailed from Kansas City November 4 in the shape of a check for $100. It was one of many such remittances.

"I'll either go back to the prize ring or the kerosene circuit as the human ostrich," said O'Grady to a member of the board who asked him what he would do if paroled. He then added, "It's immaterial to me which I follow. I leave the matter with the board entirely."

Mrs. Kate Pearson stated during the session yesterday that she was afraid O'Grady might swallow a shovel if he were put on the street force. William Volker and Jacob Billikopf could not even guess which of the two occupations named were the best from the standpoint of good citizenship, so the original proposition was remanded back to O'Grady for a decision.

Labels: , , , , , ,

December 30, 1909

FIND WOMEN IN A SALOON.

Italian Promises Police Board to
Bar Them in Future.

The board of police commissioners is having a hard time impressing upon the Italians of "Little Italy" the fact that their women must not frequent saloons. In the past some Italian women have b een as much at home in the saloon as in the home; in fact, many of them used to tend bar while their husbands were at meals.

Yesterday Mattaeo La Salla, who has a saloon at Missouri avenue and Cherry street, was before the board for permitting his wife and mother to frequent his saloon. It was some time before Judge Middlebrook could impress La Salla with the fact that there was a law in this state which prevents women from frequenting saloons. The Italian looked worried, puzzled, but he promised that his women folks would keep out of his saloon in the future.

Salino Defeo, 600 East Fifth street, and his bartender were seen twice, it is alleged , to serve a woman with a bucket of beer. Commissioner Marks was closing Defeo's saloon for two days, but, being Christmas week, Judge Middlebrook thought the board should be more lenient and a reprimand was given.

For having a man not in his employ in his saloon at 1:20 a. m. last Friday, John Honl, a saloonkeeper at 7306 East Fifteenth street, was ordered to close his place Friday and Saturday.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

December 19, 1909

HURRIES FROM GRAVE
TO LAUGH ON STAGE.

GIRL WIFE SINGS SCOTTISH DIT-
TIES, CHOKING SOBS.

As Orchestra Plays "Hearts and
Flowers" for Next Sketch the
"Two Macks" Mourn Death of
"Danny," Their First Born.

Unknown to the audience of the Gayety theater yesterday afternoon, while the orchestra playing the gladsome tunes suggestive of love and happiness, a drama was being enacted in the dressing rooms behind the scenes. In her room sat a wife of one year, her head buried in her arms and tears streaming down her face. Between sobs she could be heard to say: "My baby, my little boy."

Beside this woman sat a young man, barely out of his teens, trying in his way to console the heartbroken girl. Tears glistened in his eyes. His face was contorted with pain and anguish. He was the picture of despair.

The young man was Douglas McKenzie, 20 years old, of Dundee, Scotland. The girl was Mabel McKenzie, 18 years of age, his wife. The two are known to the stage world as the "Two Macks," and they have been playing a comic sketch in Scotch the last week at the Gayety. The two sat in the dressing room in their plaids and kilts, the same that they had appeared in a few minutes before on the stage.

The orchestra suddenly ceased its playing. The lights were turned low. The next sketch was a love scene and the orchestra in a low key softly began, "Hearts and Flowers." The young wife raised her head and listened. With her sleeve she brushed away the tears.

"I wonder if Danny is in heaven -- I know he is," she said, smiling. "I suppose the angels are now playing the same tune."

Danny was the name of their little boy, only a few weeks old, whom they had buried but two hours before. One year ago Mr. and Mrs. McKenzie were married in Scotland. They came to this country on their honeymoon trip and got a place on the vaudeville stage. They made a tour of Texas and Oklahoma. Two months ago they reached Kansas City.

A baby was born, Danny, they called him. There were doctor bills to pay and room rent. Last Thursday the little boy died. They had no money to pay for its burial. for two days the little body was kept in their rooms at the Wyandotte hotel, the undertakers refusing to take it until the burial expenses were advanced.

Yesterday morning Mr. McKenzie told Tom Hodgeman, manager of the Gayety, of his plight. Mr. Hodgeman immediately went to all the playhouses in the city. He told the young man's story to the actors. When he returned from his trip Mr. Hodgeman had $80, enough to pay the funeral expenses.

HURRY TO THEATER.

Yesterday afternoon the little body was buried. From the cemetery where they had laid to rest their first born the young pair hurried to the theater. They arrived barely in time to dress in Scotch costume for their sketch. The "Two Macks" came out on the stage. They danced the Scotch dances and sang the light and frivolous Scotch ditties. They smiled, they laughed and they joked. Little did the audience realize that behind the mask of happiness were two bleeding hearts, a man and wife who had just come from the cemetery after burying their baby boy.

The curtain was rung down and the two went to their rooms. Mrs. McKenzie broke down in tears. During the long minutes she had been on the stage playing the part of a Scotch lassie the minutes had been torture. "Danny" was dead. He was her first born.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

December 5, 1909

CAMPAIGN TO RESCUE
CHILDREN FROM WORK.

COMPLAINT MADE THAT STORE
EMPLOYS TWO, 4 YEARS OLD.

Picture Shows Where Girls, Under
16, Play and Sing and Will Be In-
vestigated by Dr. Mathias,
Chief Probation Officer.

Parents who permit their children to sing in picture shows in violation of the law, or to participate in any entertainment for which they receive pay, according to Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer, will be prosecuted in the juvenile court.

Heretofore prosecution of child labor cases has been almost entirely on the initiative of the local and state factory inspectors. But complaints have been made recently to the juvenile officers that the practice has not been entirely stopped. An investigation is to be made to find out whether the parents and theaters are obeying the law.

The law forbids children under 14 years of age to engage in any "gainful occupation." Children under 16 can not work for wages without first receiving a permit from the local factory inspector.

This does not forbid parents to allow their children to participate in church entertainments and the like, where they receive no pay.

COMPLAINT AGAINST STORE.

Complaint was made yesterday of a large department store, which is giving a Santa Claus entertainment. Two children, 4 years of age, take minor parts and their parents are paid for their time. With W. J. Morgan, factory inspector, a juvenile officer yesterday went to the store to investigate the complaint, and will report Monday in juvenile court to Judge E. E. Porterfield.

Several picture shows are reported to have employed girls under 16 years of age, without official permits, to play the piano and sing. These cases are to be investigated immediately.

"The child labor law, if anything, is not severe enough," said Dr. Mathias. "It should not only require children to remain in school until they have reached a certain age, but it should keep them in school until they have passed through the graded school into the high school.

"The trouble with the present law is that it is founded on the law of averages. The average boy or girl completes the grammar school at 14 years of age. But think of those who do not go beyond the third or fourth grade. Many children have not reached the high school at 14.

SHOULD HELP ABNORMAL.

"If there is any change in this law it should be re-framed for the benefit of the abnormal, or the child below the average. Every child should be compelled to stay in school until he or she had reached the high school. The child might be 16 or 18 years of age before he is graduated and permitted to go to work, but he would be a much better citizen than if allowed to quit at 14.

"Take for instance the foreigners who are rapidly migrating to Kansas City and other American towns. Many of them have been brought up to believe that a wife or a child is an asset, the same as the old slave holders used to think. Hardly before the child is able to walk and talk the father puts it to work. The boy gets a place in a shoe-shining parlor or holding the horse of some delivery man. The pay is $1 or $2 a week, which is given the parent.

"These foreigners average about one child a year. The more children, they know, the greater their income. If it were not for the child labor laws, these children would be permitted to grow up in ignorance, and their little bodies stunted from doing heavy work before they had gained physical strength."

Labels: , , , , , ,

December 5, 1909

ART IN A CROATIAN CHURCH.

Beautiful Paintings Now Adorn Edi-
fice of St. John the Baptist.

While the nuns were saying their evening prayers before the alter in St. John the Baptist Croatian Catholic church, at Fourth street and Barnett avenue in Kansas City, Kas., last night, workmen were busy in the rear of the church tearing away a great wooden scaffolding The scaffold has been used during the last six weeks by Oton Tvekovic, an artist, who has been decorating the church after the manner of the Catholic churches in Croatia.

In the alcove above the alter the artist has painted the figures of Jesus and the prophets Jeremiah, Isias and Elias. The figures are somewhat larger than life size and are skillfully executed. In the north alcove of the church the artist has executed a painting thirty-eight feet in length, which represents the prophets, Cyril and Methodus, on their presentation to Prince Rastislav of the Slavonic peoples. Thee picture tells the story of these two apostles who first carried the Christian religion to the Slavs at the close of the eighth century.

An unfinished picture in the south alcove will, when completed, represent the birth of Christ. In the ceiling of the church the pictures of the twelve apostles will be executed. Mr. Tvekovic is a native of Agrin, Croatia. He is a graduate of the Fine Arts institute in Vienna, and is a professor of art in the fine arts schools of Karlsruhe and Munich. He is staying with the Rev. M. D. Krmpotich, pastor of the church. Besides being a portrait painter, Mr. Tvekovic is a landscape artist of note. He has several sketches which he will place on display soon at 416 East Eleventh street, Kansas City, Mo.

Father Krmpotich said last night that his church was the first Croatian church in America to be decorated as are the churches in the mother country. Besides the pictures of the Biblical characters, the church has been decorated in the national colors of Croatia. Several designs peculiar to Croatia have been worked into the decorative scheme, and when finished the interior of the church will present a picturesque and pleasing appearance. Father Krmpotich organized St. John the Baptist parish seven years ago. Since that time a substantial brick church, a rectory and a school have been built. The parish now comprises more than 150 Croatian families, and is in a flourishing condition.

Labels: , , , , , ,

November 30, 1909

JEW AND ITALIAN
DRIVE OUT NEGRO?

DOCTOR SAYS HIS RACE IS LOS-
ING NORTH END.

Suggests 10th to 31st, Troost to
Montgall as Desirable Location,
But Learns It Is
Too Late.

The park board was told yesterday by Dr. M. H. Key, a negro, that there are 35,000 negroes already in Kansas city, and that in a few more years they will number at least 100,000. He said that the proper housing of the race was becoming a serious problem. It is his opinion that the only district left for them to locate in is between Troost, Montgall, Tenth and Thirty-first.

"The negroes are being driven from the West bottoms by the invasion of railroads; from the North end by Jews and Italians, and from other districts by the progress of industry and improvement," said the doctor.

PASEO EXTENSION PROTEST.

The purpose of Dr. Key's explanation was to protest against the condemnation of land occupied by negroes in the vicinity of Twenty-sixth and Spring Valley park for the extension of the Paseo. He feared that their property would be practically confiscated, and that they would not be sufficiently recompensed to find abodes elsewhere.

The members of the board assured Dr. Key that the valuations of the negroes' property would be protected, and that he had come too late with his objections, as both the board and council had approved the proceedings.up to the north park district..

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

November 29, 1909

ITALIANS FAVOR FRANCHISE.

Canvasser Says He Did Not Hear
Any Talk of Money Being Used.

Edward B. O'Dowd, 2404 Paseo, an insurance agent with offices in 501 Kemper building, is one of the legally appointed canvassers for the board of election commissioners in obtaining names of voters disfranchised by change of residence. It so happened that he and his colleague have just finished some of the precincts in the Seventh ward.

"When canvassers were appointed," said Mr. O'Dowd last night, "all were instructed that they were named for the sole purpose of finding out who had moved away. Under no circumstances were we to attempt to get the sentiment of the voters. A. C. Perkins, my colleague, and I have obeyed this instruction to the letter.

"Most of our work has been down in what is known as 'Little Italy,' " continued Mr. O'Dowd. "While neither of us asked for an expression of opinion many of the men volunteered their sentiments on the Metropolitan franchise question and without doubt the most of them appear to be in favor of it. During all of the canvass I never heard even the mention of money being used to buy votes in 'Little Italy" and, if it is such common talk down there some of 'the more ignorant sort,' as the Star calls these working men, certainly would have expressed themselves while we were making the rounds. while many were free to give expressions of favor of the four-cent fare franchise, as it appeared to appeal to them most, not one as much as suggested that money was being used."

Mr. O'Dowd said that the story printed in the Star is not true. The Star story was that "canvassers were told in 'Little Italy' that many of the Italian voters of the more ignorant sort are expecting to be well paid for their votes. One Italian leader said: 'Money will do most anything. It will carry this ward for the franchise.' "

Labels: , , , ,

November 24, 1909

SAY THEY WERE OPPRESSED.

Russian Jews Pass Through City,
Seeking "Promised Land" Homes.

A party of fifty Russian Jews passed through the city yesterday afternoon en route for Des Moines, Omaha, Lincoln and other cities in Iowa and Nebraska. Some of them came from Koavino, Russia, and others from Wilno.

None of the party could speak a word of English. They told the interpreter at the depot that they had been forced to leave Russia by the "Little Father." Practically all their property had been confiscated, and they had barely enough to pay their passage across the Atlantic. They came to America, the "Promised Land," of which their brothers, who came before, wrote about. The party came by way of Galveston, the cheapest way over.

There was only one woman in the party. The wives and children had been left behind. When they make their "stake," they told the interpreter they will send money to Russia to bring their families.

Labels: , , , ,

November 24, 1909

EMIGRANTS WILL MAKE WINE.

Party From France Stop in Kansas
City on Way to California.

From Bordeaux, France, to Southern California is the trip which a party of emigrants, headed by Jan D'Etinge, is making in the hope of finding a country where they will be able to use to advantage their knowledge of the culture of the grape for wine.

The party, consisting of eight adults and four children, stopped in the Union depot a short while last evening while waiting for the Santa Fe connection for California.

Labels: , , , ,

November 23, 1909

RAID WEDDING CELEBRATION.

Five Men Arrested, Including Bride-
groom, and Beer Confiscated.

Sheriff Al Becker. of Wyandotte county, with a force of deputies, raided a Croatian wedding celebration at Loscke's hall, Third street and Barnett avenue, in Kansas City, Kas. Five men were arrested, and ten kegs were confiscated. The five men arrested can speak but little English.

Their names as the jailer spelled them are as follows:

Mike Stepson, 318 Ann avenue; Paul Medleck, 23 Water street; Mike Balaska, 25 Water street; Mat Milsco, 31 Dugarro avenue; and Paul Pihel, the bride groom, of 310 North James street.

The men were arrested after persons living in the neighborhood had made a complaint. The Austrians in Kansas City, Kas., have held wedding celebrations in Kansas City, Kas., for years. They are accustomed to having beer in the old country, and can't understand why it should be denied them in Kansas.

They do not sell the beverage at the celebrations, but a bartender stands behind an improvised bar, and hands out large schooners to the dancers.

Labels: , , , , ,

November 15, 1909

A PRIEST WITHOUT AUTHORITY.

Giovanni Marchello Under the Ban
of the Bishop of This Diocese.

Giovanni Marchello, formerly an Italian priest stationed at Mazzara, Italy, and who was suspended by his bishop, M. Audino, on account of his roving disposition, has been in Kansas City off and on for the past three months trying to raise money with which to build a church. Marchello came to Kansas City from St. Louis. Marchello is denounced by the Kansas City Catholic bishop in the following letter:

"It is my duty to warn the Catholic people of the diocese of Kansas City that a certain Italian priest named Giovanni Marchello, now in Kansas City, does not belong to the diocese of Kansas City and has no permission or jurisdiction from me to celebrate mass or administer the sacraments. X JOHN J. HOGAN, Bishop of Kansas City."

Labels: , ,

November 11, 1909

NEW CLAIMANT FOR
HUNTEMANN ESTATE.

ANNA GESINE HEUER SAYS SHE
IS FIRST COUSIN.

Follows Over Two Hundred Claim-
ants for Eccentric Recluse's For-
tune -- Will Come From
Germany to Fight.

Another heir to the Adolph Huntemann estate, claiming to be the first cousin of the eccentric old bachelor who died nearly three years ago, leaving an estate valued at $250,000, appeared yesterday when Anna Gesine Heuer of Bremen, Germany, filed suit in the circuit court to have herself declared the sole heir.

If the German woman can establish her relationship with the late Adolph Huntemann, she will inherit the entire estate. Over two hundred claimants have applied for shares. Of these all have been cut out except eight distant cousins.

The suit is brought against R. S. Crohn, former public administrator, and the only one who now has charge of the estate. The petition says that all the debts against the estate have been paid and that it is now ready for distribution. The personal property is estimated to be worth $76,000, and the real estate, $175,000.

Anna Heuer is 44 years of age and married. She has never been to America. If the court refuses to accept her deposition at the trial of this case, she will come here to fight for the estate.

For years Anna Heuer has been writing to German friends who have settled in Kansas City. In the exchange of letters one of her former friends mentioned the Huntemann matter and told of the fight now being made among the heirs to secure possession of the estate. Anna Heuer investigated her family tree and decided that she was a first cousin.

Among the recent claimants to the Huntemann estate was Mrs. Minnie A. Shepard of Burlington, Ia., who secured affidavits from confederates in Chicago, St. Louis and other cities showing her to be an illegitimate child of the deceased.

Fraud was suspected, and Grant I. Rosenzweig, attorney for the estate, went to Burlington to investigate. Few discrepancies were found. The "tip" came from a woman who had been jilted by one of Mrs. Shepard's confederates. Affidavits were received from relatives to prove that Mrs. Shepard's mother was married, and that the Iowa woman's claims were fraud. When confronted by this evidence October 19, Mrs. Shepard admitted that her affidavits and claims were false.

Huntemann, who was a bachelor, died March 8, 1907, at his home, 4025 McGee street. He had been a recluse, and the amount of his wealth was not known until after he died. He came to this country from Germany in 1860, and settled in Kansas City two years later, without a dollar, and amassed a fortune by investments in Kansas City real estate.

Labels: , , , ,

October 29, 1909

PRIEST SUED FOR DAMAGES.

Italian Doctor Says He Was Called
Member of the Mafia.

Bendetto Tripi Rao, an Italian physician, filed suit in the circuit court yesterday to collect $10,000 damages from Charles Delbecchi, an Italian priest.

Dr. Rao sets up in his petition that he has a large practice among the Italians of the city and that on September 24, 1909, Father Delbecchi publicly charged Rao with being a member of the Mafia, said to be an Italian "black hand" society. According to the petition the priest also had a document, said to have borne a seal of the King of Italy, in which Dr. Rao was charged with being a quack and a swindler.

Labels: , , , , ,

October 19, 1909

WORKING MEN ATTEND SCHOOL.

Night School for Foreigners Is
Opened With 101 Enrolled.

The Jewish Educational Institute opened its night school for foreigners at 7 o'clock last night in its new building, Admiral boulevard and Harrison street, with 101 enrollments.

The purpose of the night school, which is open on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings of each week from 7 to 9, is to teach the foreign class of people in Kansas City the English language and to Americanize them as far as possible. Five different divisions are taught, mainly elementary English, arithmetic, civil government and architectural drawing, the latter being taught by Walter Root and Thomas Green.

The classes are composed mostly of working men and women between the ages of 20 to 45 years, most of them having a good foreign education, a few being unable to read or write a word of English.

This work has been carried on for the past six years under the same management at 1702 Locust street. Jacob Billikopf, superintendent of the institute, expresses himself pleased with the enrollment for the opening night, that he expects to increase it considerably in the next few weeks. A fee of $1 per month entitles the scholar to all the privileges of the institute, prominent among which is the gymnasium and shower baths.

Labels: , , , , ,

October 14, 1909

WELL-KNOWN SPORTSMAN DIES.

Frank J. Smith Was President of
Kansas City Gun Club.

Kansas City lost one of its oldest and best known sportsmen yesterday afternoon when Frank J. Smith, president of the Kansas City Gun Club, and also president of the Missouri State Fish and Game Protective Association, died at 12:55 of pulmonary congestion, at his home, 811 Troost avenue. Besides heading these two organizations he was an enthusiastic member of the Belt Line Gun Club and Missouri River Gun Club.

He leaves his wife, two daughters and a son. They are: Mrs. G. W. Baehr of 824 Schaefer avenue, Mrs. S. G. Parke of 2508 Chestnut avenue and Frank J. Smith, Jr., of St. Louis. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made. Burial will be in Forest Hill cemetery.

Born in Germany sixty-eight years ago, Mr. Smith came to this country when he was a young man and first settled at Troy, Pa. Later he came to Kansas City where he has lived for forty-four years.

Probably no other person has been so thoroughly identified with the sport of hunting in this vicinity. Sport for sport's sake was the motive that led him in his enthusiasm and he was among the first to agitate for better fish and game laws in this state. Nearly every winter he went down to the Gulf of Mexico to shoot duck and never missed attending a state shooting tournament. At the traps he was considered an expert.

Labels: , , , ,

October 13, 1909

BIG PARADE HELD IN
HONOR OF COLUMBUS.

ITALIAN SOCIETIES COMMEM-
ORATE DISCOVERY.

Replica of Santa Maria, With "In-
dians" Aboard, a Feature --
Music and Speeches at
City Garden.

Columbus day, commemorating the discovery of America on October 12, 1492, was celebrated in Kansas City yesterday for the first time. A bill making October 12 a legal holiday passed the last legislature.

As the great "Christopher Colombo" was an Italian, born in Genoa, Italy, the Italians of Kansas City took the lead yesterday in celebrating the day. Ever since July 4 last the representative Italians of the city have been working on a monster parade, and yesterday the people viewed the result of their labors. The parade formed at the Holy Rosary church, Fifth and Campbell streets, and was headed by a line of carriages. In the first were Mayor Crittenden, Justice Michael Ross and Michael E. Casey, the state senator who drew up the bill making October 12 a holiday. Judge Harry G. Kyle, W. H. Baehr, city treasurer, and other city officials were in the other carriages with representative Italian citizens. Following these were members of many Italian lodges and societies.

SANTA MARIA IN PARADE.

The most attractive feature of the parade was a replica of the Santa Maria, the boat on which Columbus sailed to America. On board were sailors and "Indians." Frank Bascone, dressed to represent Columbus, stood in the boat, telescope in hand, apparently searching for land. Four bands were in the line of march.

After forming at Fifth and Campbell the parade went south to Sixth street, east on Sixth to Gillis, north on Gillis to Fifth and west to Walnut street, thus traversing the very heart of the Italian quarter known as "Little Italy." Crowds lined both sides of the street through the entire North End.

The line of march was continued down Walnut street to Sixteenth, on that street to Grand avenue and thence to the City garden, about Nineteenth and Grand, where the real celebration was held. Mayor Crittenden, Senator Casey and Judge Kyle made speeches in English, the best they could do. Speeches in Italian were made by Professor G. G. Langueri, Rev. Father John Marchello and Rev. Maxdano, minister of the Italian Evangelist church.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

October 12, 1909

NIGHT SCHOOL OPENS.

FIRST EVENING 119 PUPILS ARE
IN ATTENDANCE.

Commercial Arithmetic Class So
Crowded It Is Divided Into
Two Sections -- Prim-
ers Distributed.

The opening of the night high school at the high school building in Kansas City, Kas., last night, was marked by the attendance of 119 pupils, whose ages ranged from 17 to 45 years. Principal E. L. Miller and the assisting teachers divided the pupils into 12 classes. The recitation periods were made from 7:30 to 8:20, and from 8:20 to 9:10 p. m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday nights.

The pupils were given the choice of two of the following twelve subjects: Chemistry, English, Latin, German, geometry and algebra, commercial arithmetic, grammar and spelling, penmanship, book keeping, stenography, woodwork and mechanical drawings.

The commercial arithmetic class was so crowded Mr. Miller had to make two sections of it. Book keeping, penmanship and chemistry were the next three most popular classes. A large number of graduates of the high school en rolled in the language classes to complete work they had failed to finish while in school.

NINE LEARNING TO READ.

The most interesting class of all was that of nine Polish young men, who are attending the school to learn to read and write the English language. The young men live in the neighborhood of St. Margaret's hospital, and work in the packing houses during the day. They became interested in the school through the efforts of Charles W. Szajkowski, a cabinet maker, who has lived in America nineteen years, and who received a training in English in the night schools of New York city.

A teacher had not been designated for this class and M. E. Pearson, superintendent of the schools, volunteered to start the class in their studies. He began by attempting to call the roll, but was forced to call Mr. Szajkowski to his aid.

The following were the pupils enrolled in this class: Andrzoj Kominick, Cypryan Lauter, John Pasik, Alex Mimeszkowski, Anton Catrowski, Stamstan Butklewicz, Joseph Wiskiewski, Michael Kryska, and John Balamat.

After the roll call Mr. Pearson distributed primers and prepared for foreign students, and after reading over simple sentences, had the class repeat them. Notwithstanding the fact that none of the class knew anything of English, within half a half hour they were reading such sentences as "Five cents make a nickel," and "Ten dimes make a dollar."

WRITE SIMPLE WORDS.

The class was next sent to the blackboard, and after Mr. Pearson had written simple words on the board, the class was told to copy them. It was surprising how well they wrote the words.

Mr. Pearson and Mr. Miller were gratified with the results of the first session of the school.

"I am certain the school will be a success," Mr. Miller said. "The pupils all appear earnest and I believe will improve their opportunity. At least fifteen pupils told me that they would bring another pupil with them at the next session."

Mr. Pearson was very much interested in the class of foreigners. "I am very glad, indeed, that we are enabled to take up this work," he said. "I studied night school for foreigners in the East two years ago and from what I learned there I know they pay."

BOYS ARE EARNEST.

"Our own American pupils will have to look out or the Polish boys will beat them when it comes to earnestness and ability to stick with their studies. Mr. Szajkowski told me after class tonight that he expects to have at least seventy-five Polish young men enrolled within two weeks."

All of the students attending the school pay a monthly tuition of $2. This fee will be used to pay the teachers, except Mr. Miller, who gives his services to the school. The pupils come from all over the city. One pupil enrolled from Mount Washington, a suburb of Kansas City, Mo. Several more enrolled from Kansas City, Mo., and one from Rosedale.

Labels: , , , ,

October 9, 1909

FREDERICK GEHRING DIES.

Editor of Staats Zeitung Passes
Away at 68 Years.

Frederick Gehring, editor of the Missouri Staats Zeitung, the offices of which are located at 304 West Tenth street, died at 7 o'clock yesterday morning at the German hospital. Mr. Gehring was 68 years old, having been born in Griessen, Germany, March 4, 1841. One relative, a son, Carl, employed by the Moore Transfer Company, survives.

The funeral services will be conducted from the home, 3152 Oak street, at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Burial in Mount Washington cemetery.

Mr. Gehring was secretary of the German-American Citizens' Association and a member of the Turner society. In both of these organizations his long residence in the city, his position as editor of the only German weekly paper in the country and his evident honest and ability as a worker for the good of the community gave him prestige.

Coming from Germany when he was 12 years old, Mr. Gehring's parents took him to Lafayette, Ind., where he grew to manhood. When the civil war broke out he enlisted in the Fifteenth Indiana Volunteer infantry June 14, 1861. He was mustered out of the service in June, 1864, carrying a scar from a minie ball wound with him into private life.

After marrying Miss Catherine May of Indanapolis, immediately after the close of the war, Mr. Gehring moved to Springfield, Ill., where he started the German Free Press. He was twice elected to the city council in Springfield, and from 1876 to 1877 was a member of the legislature.

Mr. Gehring came to Kansas City twenty-five years ago and established the Staats Zeitung, or State News, in 1894. His wife died last December.

A special meeting of the Turner Society will be called at 8 o'clock this evening to arrange for the funeral.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

September 28, 1909

SHOT A NEIGHBOR, THEN
ACTED GOOD SAMARITAN.

German Woman Gardner Attempted
to Frighten Victor Marten With
Gun That Wasn't Loaded.
Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, Who Shot Gardener.
MRS. MARY WILSDORF.

After emptying the contents of a shotgun into the left thigh of Victor Marten, a gardener, Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, 46 years old, wife of a gardener at Seventy-seventh street and Walrond avenue, yesterday afternoon got on a Marlborough street car and came to the city and gave herself up to Chief of Police Frank F. Snow.

Before leaving her home she gave the wounded man a glass of water and left him lying on the ground near her house in charge of her husband, Carl Wilsdorf, who was later arrested by Mounted Patrolman E. B. Chiles.

Mrs. Wildorf and Marten are neighbors, each owning a ten acre tract of land.

From the facts elicited from the woman through Dr. George Ringle, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, who acted as interpreter for the police, the shooting followed a quarrel, about Marten's horses getting into the truck garden of the Wilsdorf's.

She said the horses frequently trampled the vegetables. One of them wandered over from the Marten field yesterday to the Wildorf land and was locked up in the barn.

When Marten went to the Wilsdorf house to get his horse he was asked to pay a small amount of money for alleged damages. A dispute arose and Mrs. Wilsdorf said that Marten held aloft a potato digger and threatened to kill her.

She said she then ran into the house and got her husband's shotgun, and returned to the yard. When within five feet of Marten the gun was discharged and the contents of one barrel entered the left thigh of Marten. He fell to the ground and asked for a drink of water which was given to him by Mrs. Wilsdorf.

Her husband told her she had better go to town and give herself up to the police, which advice she took. when she first entered police headquarters she was a little excited, and, not being able to speak good English, was misunderstood. The patrolman she met believed her to say a man shot her in the leg, so he directed her to the Emergency hospital. At the hospital Dr. Ringle took her in charge, and, learning that she was the person who did the shooting, took her back to the police station. She was turned over to Chief Snow.

Mrs. Wilsdorf informed the police that the man was still lying in the yard at her home and needed medical attention. Dr. George Todd, 4638 Troost avenue, attended to the man's injuries. Dr. Todd called an ambulance from Freeman & Marshall's and had the man taken to the University hospital.

The woman told Captain Whitsett that she had never before handled a shotgun and did not know exactly how to use it. The one she got in the house was broken at the breech and as she was running with it toward Marten she was trying to replace it. Suddenly the gun snapped into place and was discharged. She said she really did not think it was loaded, but was only trying to scare Marten. She was locked up in the matron's room.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory