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February 12, 1910

BANKS AGAINST NEW HOLIDAY.

Lincoln Anniversary Too Near Feb-
ruary 22, Month Short.

One hundred and one years ago today Abraham Lincoln was born, and in fifteen states the anniversary of that event is observed as a holiday. Missouri, however, is not included in that list, which comprises New York, new Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Illinois, Oklahoma, Colorado, North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming, Nevada and Washington. Ten of these states have made February 12 a holiday since 1906.

A number of bankers yesterday expressed themselves in opposition to any more holidays, although they agreed that to the memory of Lincoln was due all the honor a republic could pay.

"As the years pass," remarked the cashier of one bank yesterday, "the figure of Abraham Lincoln looms large in history. Any honor to his memory that we could pay would be inadequate, but with Washington's birthday coming February 22, in the shortest month of the year, it seems almost too much to add another holiday."

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February 3, 1910

TO CELEBRATE THE NEW YEAR.

Kansas City's Chinese Colony Be-
ginning to Make Arrangements.
Happy Chinese New Year

"Vely fine happee New Year" will be the common greeting in the Chinese world next Wednesday which marks the beginning of another twelve months for the Mongolian race. The Kansas City colony, the seat of which is West Sixth street, is already making elaborate preparations for the annual festivities. The Moys, the Sings, the Chins, the Lees, the Wahs, the Lungs and all the rest of the representatives of the various provinces of China are combining their efforts to make themselves conspicuous, despite the fact that there are comparatively few Chinamen here.

Spaghetti, Irish stew and bean chili must all sink into the caverns of oblivion as toothsome dishes for a day at least and good, old chop suey, with noodles on the side, together with gloutchew, Oriental prunes and other equally palatable things from the Celestial standpoint, will be in evidence. A large shipment of Chinese fruits, vegetables and wines arrived Monday and is held in readiness for the celebration.

"We feel much glad on New Year," said Kwong Sang, a tea merchant at 113 West Sixth street yesterday afternoon. "We can't have so much big time here as in New York and San Francisco, because there's not enough Chinamen. All same we have much feast and music."

Kwong Sang has commenced to hang decorations in his store and his wife was busy all day yesterday arranging the rear of the room for a banquet table. They expect to entertain a number of their countrymen. The little Sang children have caught the spirit of the occasion and are already crying for goodies they can have only on New Year.

Shung Fung Lung, a dealer in fancy Chinese goods at 123 West Sixth street, has also sent out invitations to several of his out-of-town friends and will assume the role of host in a brand new silk suit just received from China.

"We like the fireworks on New Year," he said yesterday, "but no allow it here. Much sorry."

The warring Tongs, the Hop Sings and the On Loongs, of which there are a few of each here, have apparently patched up their differences sufficiently to permit speaking terms of one day, if no longer. The Yongs, most of whom are laundrymen, are showing a disposition to be clannish and are said to be planning some exclusive parties on East Twelfth street, but their doings will not worry the wealthier merchants and importers of the North End. There is no likelihood of any serious quarrels and it is safe to bet that the local Orientals enjoy a peaceful advent of their New Year.

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February 1, 1910

HOLIDAY LIBRARY HOURS.

Letter to Council Suggests Opening
Afternoons and Evenings.

An anonymous communication was read in the lower house of the council last night, asking that some one introduce an ordinance requiring the public library to pen from 2 to 10 o'clock p. m. on all holidays.

"Many men have no place to on on such days," said the letter, "and with the library closed they drift into the pool halls and saloons and come under evil influences. The library should be kept open part of the day for them."

The attaches of the library work from 9 o'clock a. m., to 10 p. m. every day and holidays are the only days they have for recreation. The letter was referred to the board of education, as that body controls the opening and closing hours of the library.

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January 17, 1910

DABNEY WAITS TO GET EVEN.

Wouldn't Trust His Temper After
Christmas Treat from Bartender.

Dabney had not been seen around the saloon near Eighth street and Grand avenue since Christmas. His absence was noticed by his friends, who asked the reason. Squires, the big, genial bartender, only smiled when anyone asked. "What's become of Dabney? I haven't seen him lately."

A few nights ago Dabney dropped in. He looked at Squires, and it plainly was evident that Dabney had something serious on his mind.

"I'll get even with you," he said, between clenched teeth, "if it takes the rest of my natural life and part of the hereafter."

The the cat was let out of the bag. It appears that the evil day for Dabney was Christmas night. He stood about the saloon most of the evening suggesting, "Most saloonkeepers give patrons a present on Christmas."

The proprietor was away, and Squires spoke of him as being the one to make gifts. Dabney persisted, however. It so happened that while he was making one of his curt suggestions Squires spied an empty whisky bottle beneath the bar. It was a dark red bottle and still had the "bottled in bond" stamp partly intact. The big bartender quietly filled the bottle from the water faucet. He replaced the cork and the stamp without being detected.

"Here," he said, as he wrapped up the bottle of water. "I will break the rules of the house in your case. Here is a quart of as fine a whisky as you ever tasted. Compliments of the house."

Dabney was delighted, for he recognized the brand. The following day was Sunday, and, being so well supplied, he did not take home is customary "life saver."

"Come up, boys," he said, inviting the house to the bar. "I will treat back when I get a quart of good booze like that."

He not only treated once, but twice. Carefully stowing the bottle of water away in his overcoat pocket, he set out for home. He is a bachelor, and a friend who was invited the next morning "to have a nip at some of the best stuff you ever tasted" told the rest.

"Dabney loves his hot toddy," said the friend. "He especially likes it on Sunday, because everything is closed tightly. On this day he called me and two others into his quarters to 'have a toddy' out of his Christmas present from 'Tom.'

"With great care he got his hot water, sugar and lemon all ready. The proper amount was pured into each glass. While the water was steaming and the smell of lemon was perfuming the air Dabney, with a great show of pride in his gift, unwrapped his bottle of 'whisky.' When the cork came out with a 'thop' Dabney smiled and said: 'Get ready for the big treat, boys.'

"After all that preliminary, what was our surprise when the contents of the bottle proved to be plain, old Missouri river water. We had no toddy, as hot and cold water, lemon and sugar make a very insipid drink. Dabney frothed at the mouth, he was so mad. He swore vengeance, for he had to wait until midnight before he could get a real drink -- but he never went to call on Squires that night. He said he feared he might lose his temper and spill blood."

Dabney is patiently waiting on his opportunity to "play even" with Squires. He swears he will "make somebody feel as they made me feel -- Sunday, the day after Christmas, and not a drop to drink."

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January 1, 1910

BIRTHDAY CAKE FOR JUDGE.

Seventy-Five Colored Candles, One
for Each Year of John F. Philips'
Life, Presented at Dinner Party.

The seventy-fifth birthday of John F. Philips, federal judge, was celebrated by a dinner party, at which there were many prominent guests, in the Mid-day Club rooms, yesterday evening. One of the features of the evening was the presentation to the judge of a mammoth birthday cake containing a colored candle for each year.

The coincidence of the judge's birthday with New Years eve afforded an opportunity to those present to stay the old year out at the club. The time was well taken up with speeches and was enjoyed thoroughly by all, not excluding the host, who is yet the better of his years.

Judge Philips was born on December 31, 1824, and has been a judge of the United States district court since June 25, 1888.

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January 1, 1910

HILARIOUS DINERS
HAIL THE NEW YEAR.

Thousands at the Hotels and
Cafes Watch Passing
of 1909.

"It's 12 o'clock," said "Billy" Campbell, electrician at the Hotel Baltimore.

Frank J. Dean, manager of the hostelry, whose hand was on one of the big switch levers, gave it a pull, and in an instant the lights in the five dining rooms, the Pompeiian room, the grill room and the lobbies were extinguished. Bands in the dining rooms struck up "Auld Lang Syne," 1,200 diners blew souvenir horns, congratulated one another, and the new year was on.

Capacity crowds filled the dining rooms and cafes of the hotels and restaurants of Kansas City last night. At the hotels the lights were extinguished for a minute at midnight to indicate to the diners that the new year had been born. Special orchestras furnished the music and at most of the hotels the old Scotch refrain was sung.

The crowds this year were larger than last. The hotels began making reservations for last night over two weeks ago. A week ago practically all of the lists had been filled. Even at that, last night found hundreds at the big hotels, who waited in lobbies for an opportunity to get into the dining rooms before midnight.

A check system similar to that used in theaters, in which the tables were numbered and the diners held numbered checks, was inaugurated at the Hotel Baltimore this year. This avoided confusion. After dinner scores of men were put to work on the dining rooms. The tables were arranged for their guests and the decorations were put in place. The favors or souvenirs consisted of horns, in the base of which were bits of confections. The color scheme was red, roses and carnations being used in the decorations.

COFFEE AT MIDNIGHT.

The doors to the dining room were opened at 10:30, but dinner was not served until 11:30. The dinner was timed to last half an hour, with the service of coffee on the tables just at midnight. Orchestras were hidden behind banks of palms and ferns in the dining rooms.

The largest crowd was in the Pompeiian room. It was also apparently the jolliest. Long before midnight hundreds of would-be diners thronged the lobby and pleaded vainly for room in one of the dining rooms. As the midnight hour approached the doorways were crowded by those who would look in, even though they could not cross the portals. The balconies above the marble room and the main banquet hall were crowded early in the evening by those who could only watch the revelers.

SING "AULD LANG SYNE."

At the Savoy hotel the dining rooms were thrown together and the orchestra was placed in the hall so that the grill room, with its quota of stags, could be entertained. Dinner was served here at 11 o'clock. At 12 o'clock the lights were extinguished and the familiar Scotch melody was sung.

The Hotel Kupper dining room was crowded an hour before midnight and those who could not gain entrance filled the lobby and joined in the chorus of "Auld Lang Syne" when the lights were turned up after midnight.

At the Sexton hotel the crowds overflowed the dining rooms and were taken care of in the grill room in the basement.

The actors and actresses about the city had their celebration at the Century hotel. Immediately after the curtains were rung down at the various show houses a rush was made for street costumes and the members of the "profession" gathered at the Century hotel. The tables had all been reserved, and an orchestra greeted the crowd from each theater as they appeared.

The cafe of the Coates house held a capacity crowd. It was quieter than those at the other hotels.

At the Densmore, the tables in the dining room had been reserved for several weeks. Scores were turned away last night. Special music was the rule here also.

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December 29, 1909

P. O. NEW YEAR'S SCHEDULE.

Carriers Will Make Morning De-
livery; Department Hours.

An extra force of clerks and carriers will be maintained at the postoffice the balance of this week to take care of the lag end of Christmas deliveries. For New Year's day the schedule will be as follows:

All carriers will make one complete delivery, leaving postoffice and carrier stations at 8:15 a. m.

Three collections of mail will be made in the business districts beginning at 7 a. m., 2 p. m. and 6 p. m.

Two collections of mail will be made in the residence districts beginning at 8:15 a. m. and 5 p. m.

General delivery, open all day.

Inquiry department, open from 8 a. m. to 11:30 a. m.

Registry division, open from 8 a. m. to 11:30 a. m.

Stamp division, open all day.

Money order division, closed.

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December 26, 1909

BEST OATS BRING
BIG HORSE LAUGH.

NEW MEANING GIVEN PHRASE
AT CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
POOR "COBS" AT HALL.

Rules Given Masters and "Black
Beauty" Books Also Distri-
buted by Humane Society.

A new meaning was given yesterday to the "horse laugh." From 1,000 to 1,500 horses in Kansas City not accustomed to a square meal stood in their stalls, free from work and protected from the weather, and munched full portions of the best oats the market affords.

And these horses laughed. It was Christmas day and they were enjoying a Christmas celebration planned especially for them.

The "feed' for poor work horses was given by the Kansas City Humane society as the result of a plan evolved by Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook and Mrs. E. H. Robinson, members of the board of the society.

For the purpose of carrying joy to the hearts of the poor animals which struggle under burdens on the streets of Kansas City every day and which are indifferently fed and kept, largely because of the poverty of their owners, the Humane society purchased a half dozen tons of the best white oats and did the grain up in five and ten pound sacks, giving out these packages to owners of horses whose cases had been investigated by the society and to whom tickets previously had been given.

THOUSAND TICKETS.

About 1,000 of these tickets were given out and sacks of the grain were also given to others who had not received tickets. Provision was also made for still other cases and an automobile furnished by the Kansas City Rapid Motor Transfer company will take "feeds" to the cases which were reported too late to be cared for as were the others.

It was at Convention hall that the Christmas dinners for the poor horses were given out and the committee in charge of the distribution was composed of Mrs. F. D. Hornbrook, J. W. Perkins and E. R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society.

The sacks containing the oats were placed on long tables and when horse owners applied for the "feeds" they were required to present their tickets, give their names and the names of their horses. They were then given the sacks of feed, a tag which they promised to read and a copy of "Black Beauty." Where owners had sick horses they were also given blankets for the disabled animals.

RULES FOR MASTERS.

The tag which each owner promised to read contained this "horse" talk:
"What is good for your horse is good for his master.
Your horse needs good care as well as good food.
Never work your horse when he will not eat.
Water your horse often. Water should always be given fifteen minutes before feeding grain.
Daily grooming will improve the health as well as the looks of your horse.
Give your horses rock salt, and head shelter from the heat.
Economize by feeding good oats and good hay.
Good drivers are quiet, patient and kind, and have little use for a whip..." and so on.

EXAMPLE IS SET.

"This horse dinner means a great deal more than most people think," said Mrs. Hornbrook. "It is intended to show the horse owners that their animals must be cared for and to set an example for them to follow. Some of the papers have made a humorous affair out of it, when it is anything but humorous and has a most humane object.

"It is not intended simply to fill the empty stomach of some poor animal for the time being," said Mr. Weeks, "but is to create a kindly sentiment for dumb animals. We show the horse owners what a sample meal is and that is something some of them know very little about. The ten pounds of oats we give them is a double portion of a standard feed. The owners of all the big fine animals we see hitched to drays on the streets feed their horses five pounds of the best oats at a meal. Along with the oats we give out, we also give the horse owners a copy of 'Black Beauty' and the tag containing advice about the care of horses an d we hope your Christmas dinner for the horses will do good."

To many horse owners, who called for feed at Convention hall between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m., Mr. Weeks, Mrs. Hornbrook and other workers agents of the Humane Society gave good advice. Some of the callers were persons with whom agents of the society had come in contact in their work and there were scores of promises, such as "well, we'll take better care of our horses from now on."

Posted about the corridor in Convention hall yesterday, were copies of new cards issued by the Humane society. They read, "Be kind to your horse. Do not forget his water, feed and shelter."

Christmas day was the most notable day for the poor work horse in the history of Kansas City. No wonder a new meaning was given to the slang expression, a "horse laugh."

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December 26, 1909

FREE LIQUOR, MANY SCRAPES.

Broken Heads and Knife Wounds
Result of Saloon Celebrations.

The North End saloons last night gave free liquor to their customers. The result is that there were several broken heads, some cutting scrapes, not to speak of the parched throats to come. A few of the Christmas celebrators were given free rides to the emergency hospital.

Edward Evans, 1077 Grand avenue, a dishwasher at Eighth and Main streets, was cut in the chest with a knife. His cheek also was slit, the knife blade entering his neck and barely missing the jugular vein. After being treated at the emergency hospital he was taken to the general hospital.

Only one saloon in Kansas City was known to be closed yesterday. "Wish you all a Merry Christmas. This place will be closed until Monday morning on account of Christmas day."

This is the inscription which greeted the would-be Christmas patrons of Jack Sheehan's saloon, 2340 Grand avenue. So far as is known, this is the only saloon which observed Christmas by closing.

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December 26, 1909

"LEAN" CHRISTMAS FOR COPS.

Only One Exception Was Made to
Order Prohibiting Gifts.

Yesterday, in the annals of the police department, went down as a lean Christmas. It was owing to the order issued by the board of police commissioners shortly after the members went into office last April.

On the official records it reads, "No member of the police force shall give or receive presents." Short and to the point it caused clouds of gloom to settle right around the city hall. This year the patrolman on the beat was forced to wave aside all offers of boxes of cigars, black bottles, etc., and the family turkey was bought from the officer's monthly stipend.

One exception to the rigid rule of the police commissioners was made yesterday, however, and the officer in question is not likely to be called upon to answer for infringement.

On "Battle Roy," known officially as Beat 7 and the roughest beat in the central district, an old shoe string peddler plies his trade. Worn and bent, the old man walked into headquarters last night and asked for Officer Herman Hartman who, for the past five years, has patroled out of headquarters.

"Yes, he saved my life once," he stated to the desk sergeant, Robert Smith. "He pulled me out of the way of a runaway team. I haven't got any money but I would like you to give him this half dozen pair of shoe laces."

The sergeant took the gift and placed it in an envelope for the officer, who is at present a member of the traffic squad and stationed at Eleventh and Walnut streets.

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December 25, 1909

AN OLD TIME CELEBRATION.

Prisoners at the Municipal Farm
Experienced Real Joy.

Two oranges, two bananas, half a pound of assorted nuts, one dozen cream cakes, a bunch of grapes, and one-half pound box of candy, all inclosed in a neatly decorated basket, is what the Christmas season brought each prisoner at the municipal farm, a mile and a half southeast of Leeds, last night.

A large Christmas tree, decorated in tinsel and Christmas bells, just like the Sunday school trees, was fitted up in the big farm house last night. A real live Santa Claus, with his customary tonsorial makeup, dressed in a red and white suit, presided over the tree and distributed the Christmas baskets.

Tonight for entertainment will be proved for the prisoners. Among the numbers on the programme will be "Semi Dempsy," a one-act comedy with three characters; "Pills of Merriment," a two-act farce introducing six characters; "The Oklahoma Traveler," a burlesque by Dowd McDonald, Dood and Jones, a negro team, and songs and dancing. A stage with elaborate settings, spot lights, hand-painted scenery, and all necessary adjuncts was constructed by the prisoners.

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December 25, 1909

8,000 KIDS YELL
SANTA GREETINGS.

POLICE IN BATTLE ROYAL WHEN
GIFTS ARE ANNOUNCED AS
READY FOR CHILDREN.

Officials of Mayor's Christ-
mas Tree Well Pleased
With Its Success.

Santa Claus, the magnanimous patron saint of good will, was the hero of the hour in Convention hall yesterday afternoon when 8,000 needy, little children were happy objects of his unbounded generosity.

For the second time the mayor's annual Christmas tree was brought forth loaded with playthings and goodies for the poor youngsters, who otherwise would not know of the joys of the giving spirit of the Yuletide. Every child, irrespective of color or race, was made the recipient of a sack filled with things that gladden the juvenile heart.

By 2 o'clock the bill hall was crowded with boys and girls from every portion of the city, and for fully an hour the expectant thousands were entertained by a band organ, furnished by the Hippodrome, and a clown band which marched about the hall playing the most tuneless tunes imaginable, but doing antics that amused all.

Mayor T. T. Crittenden was slated for a speech, but in the attempt failed, owing to the impossibility of inducing the anxious auditors to desist in their yelling. However, the mayor was able to yell "A Merry Christmas" occasionally during the distribution of presents, and this laconic well-wishing accomplished all that could be asked, for every child left the hall with smiling faces which revealed the joyousness they were experiencing.

MAYOR SATISFIED.

"Isn't this going some?" smiled the mayor as he took a view of the remarkable scene. "Just so every one of these poor children get something, I will be satisfied. It is a grand sigh and a gloriouis manifestation of the great Kansas City spirit, which we all love to see.

"It's a greater success than ever," declared Steve Sedweek, a member of the executive committee. "It is one of the biggest charitable undertakings in the country to care for so many needy children, and I am sure the whole committee feels gratified in noting the remarkable demonstrations in evidence here this afternoon."

At times during the big event it was not an easy task to keep the guests properly marooned for their own safety and comfort. Every child present wanted to get his or her present first and the police, under the direction of Sergeant Charles Edwards, had their troubles, but handled the crowds well. Most of the officers present were attired in Santa Claus make-up. In fact, Saint Nick was there six times strong in the persons of Jack Darnell, S. F. Cox, James F. Campbell, A. D. Royer, Joe McCormick and Elvin Gray.

The idea of having a mayor's tree for the poor children every Christmas was conceived by Steve Sedweek, who outlined his plan at an Eagle banquet over a year ago. Mayor Crittenden forthwith promulgated the scheme, and now the affair is to be annual and of increasing success, no doubt.

Yesterday afternoon there were representatives from twelve different cities of the Middle West present to witness the distribution of gifts to the poor. These men came with the view of seeing how Kansas City made its needy ones happy on Christmas and to take the idea back home in the hopes of starting the same kind of wide-spread charity. The mayor's tree is strictly a Kansas City institution and bids fair to be in vogue in many other cities ere many years.

POLICE WERE BUSY.

It was no easy matter even for a dozen military policemen under the careful personal direction of their drill master, Sergeant Charles Edwards, to keep the 8,000 children in their places in the hall yesterday when the line was formed for the distribution of presents. Between boxes, in which the visitors sat, and the gallery seats, where those really interested in the affair were penned in, was a four-foot fence of iron. It did not look very high to the boys, but it looked even smaller to the cops. To the latter it looked infinitely long, however, for at the first call for gifts a scrambling mass of children swept over it, inundating the boxes below and surging out into the hall. For a space of a minute the line seemed actually in danger. The policemen rushed forward, brandishing their clubs and shouting. A dozen members of the reception committee joined hands and formed a wall near the threatened quarter. The mayor raised his deep bass voice in mild disapproval.

Just then, at the crucial moment, the reserves threw their ponderous weight into the fray and the regiments of insurgents broke for cover like the old guard in the rout of Waterloo. The victorious newcomers were the six big officers doing duty as Santa Claus close to the Christmas trees and their tinsel had a better moral effect than the regulation uniforms or the white committee badges. There were no youngsters in that host who wanted to endanger their good standing with St. Nicholas and his assistants. Not much!

There was just one way in which gifts were classified according to the age of the child receiving them yesterday. The presents were in flour sacks, each bearing the label, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." On the sacks containing gifts calculated for older children the letters were printed in blue, while on the others they were in red. There were eighteen persons at each "gift bench" handing out the sacks.

MOURNER'S BENCHES FOR THE LOST.

A great number of visitors at the mayor's Christmas party wondered why two long benches ere arranged alongside the trees. They were told by ushers that these were the mourners' benches. This was proved to be true later in the day when children who had somehow got lost from their parents or elders lined up from one end to the other. Two little girls, Edith Shoemaker, 2311 Euclid avenue, and Menie Marcus, who said she lived near Eighteenth and McGee streets, were prominent among the mourners.

Edith's tear-stained face and Menie's extraordinary composure seemed to attract the attention of everyone. They had never seen each other before, but they were two lost little girls whose ages were on the tender side of 10 years, and in that circumstance there was union. With arms locked about each other's neck, they sat for an hour until Mayor Crittenden personally took charge of Edith, and Jacob Billikopf of Menie, and sent them home, loaded with presents.

Two wagon loads of toys arrived at the hall after the crowd had been treated and were only partially disposed of. The sum of the donations for the tree amounted to $4,880. It was announced last night by Albert Hutchins, chairman of the finance committee, that $200 of the money has not been used. The presents remaining after yesterday will be distributed at the Grand theater Monday night.

Several instances of highway robbery, in which large boys despoiled smaller ones of their trinkets or tickets were reported to the committee of distribution during the afternoon.

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December 25, 1909

TWO WREATHS OF HOLLY.

Outward Evidence of Christmas at
Union Depot.

Two wreaths of holly -- one over Matron Ollie Everingham's desk and the other in the sick room -- was the only evidence at the dingy Union depot last night of the fact that it was Christmas eve. The crowd, good natured and unusually large, packed bundles and and parcels and exchanged Christmas greetings. The exchange of presents by employes at the depot was accomplished under difficulties, made so by the unusually heavy travel this year. There were two places where the fact that it was Christmas eve was apparent. These were the Bell and Home telephone exchanges. The pretty girl operators were fairly loaded up with boxes of candy.

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December 24, 1909

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS
TREE IS ALL READY.

CANDY AND TOYS FOR THOU-
SANDS OF CHILDREN.

Convention Hall Doors Will Swing
Open at 1 o'clock Today to
Admit the Eager
Youngsters.

Nimble fingers, hastened and made dexterous by kind hearts, effected a transformation in Convention hall yesterday, and today the great auditorium is a Santa Claus land for the poor children of Kansas City. At 1 o'clock this afternoon the doors of the hall will swing open for the mayor's Christmas tree, and at 2:30 they will close, while Santa Claus distributes Christmas presents to at least 7,000 little boys and girls who, by force of circumstances, might otherwise have had no Christmas.

Notwithstanding unceasing efforts, the committees of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association have been unable to locate all the poor children in the city to give them the tickets which are necessary to entitle them to gifts, and these children who have been overlooked are asked to apply at Convention hall this morning from 8 o'clock until noon. Tickets will be supplied these children any time between those hours.

The Fraternal Order of Moose caught the Christmas spirit in earnest yesterday and notified the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association that it would have twenty-five wagon loads of coal at Convention hall at noon today for distribution among poor families. Each wagon will contain two tons of coal.

WORKED ALL DAY.

Poor families who need fuel are requested to notify the mayor's office by 'phone or in person up to 11 o'clock this morning. These cases will be investigated and if the applicants be found worthy the coal will be delivered at their homes at noon. The offer from the Order of Moose was made by W. A. McGowan, secretary of the local lodge.

That the Convention hall association is heart and soul in the Christmas tree project was shown when Manager Louis W. Shouse and the directors placed the whole Convention hall force at the disposal of the Christmas Tree Association. As soon as the railroad ball was over Wednesday night, Manager Shouse put a force of men to work taking up the dance floor and before 6 o'clock yesterday morning the building was ready for the decorating committees of the Christmas tree.

Steve Sedweek was the first of the association workers to appear on the scene. He arrived at 6 o'clock and within a short time a large force was at work, setting up the Christmas trees, decorating them and packing the gifts into sacks ready for distribution. The committees worked all day and this morning they will have the hall ready for the great event.

That the people of Kansas City may inspect the work of the "best fellows" a general invitation is extended to any who care to do so to stop into the hall during the morning hours, up to noon today.

THE GIFTS IN SACKS.

Among the busy people at the hall yesterday were Captain John F. Pelletier, A. E. Hutchings, Steve Sedweek, Captain W. A. O'Leary, Hank C. Mank, the Rev. Thomas Watts, Gus Zorn and a Mr. Bennett of Wichita, who is here to gain ideas for a similar event to be inaugurated in his city next year.

Among the most valued workers were the members of the committee of twenty. Their duties consisted of the packing and arranging of the gifts in sacks. They worked from early morning till late at night and ate luncheon and dinner in the hall. Mayor T. T. Crittenden was present at the luncheon and sat at the head of the table, commending the women for their work.

The workers were assisted by seven men from No. 6 hook and ladder company, Thirty-first and Holmes, detailed for the duty by Fire Chief John C. Egner. Chief Egner had intended detailing twenty men, but the fire in the Rialto building made it impossible for him to do so.

The giant Christmas trees, which will be among the objects of chief interest to the children, were decorated in magnificent fashion by the employes of the Kansas City Electric Light Company and the Webb-Freyschlag Mercantile Company.

The presents for the children will be arranged in sacks bearing the inscription, "Mayor's Christmas Tree, 1909." The sacks for the boys will be placed on the east side of the arena and those of the girls on the west side. The sacks for children up to 8 years of age are printed in blue and those of children from 8 to 12 are printed in red.

Each child will receive two suitable toys and candy, nuts and fruit, all arranged in Christmas style.

A CLOWN BAND, TOO.

The programme for the mayor's Christmas tree will be a simple one. The doors will open at 1 o'clock, when the children can come in to feast their eyes upon the great Christmas trees and enjoy a fine musical entertainment. The doors will close at 2:30, so that it will be necessary for the tots to be in the hall by that time.

Preceding the distribution of the presents, the Eagles' clown band will give a dress concert on the arena and a large electrical organ will also furnish music. Old Santa Claus, who, it is said, resembles very much in appearance Captain John F. Pelletier, will be present and he will have six assistants with him to mingle among the children. At 2:30 o'clock Santa will introduce Mayor T. T. Crittenden, who will make a short talk, and the presents will then be distributed.

"We have plenty of funds and plenty of gifts for all the city's poor children," said A. E. Hutchings, "and if they do not come and get their share it will not be the fault of the committees, which have labored incessantly to get in touch with every child entitled to the pleasures of the tree."

Although it was announced that no more funds were needed, and that no further cash donations would be received, the financial committee of the association was forced to decline donations yesterday to the amount of several hundred dollars.

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December 24, 1909

PUBLIC SCHOOLS CLOSED.

Will Not Reopen Until Monday Fol-
lowing New Year's Day.

The public schools of Kansas City closed yesterday for the Christmas vacation and will not re-open until the Monday following New Year's day. In the kindergarten schools and in some of the other grades of the various schools, Christmas exercises were held yesterday and as a rule the kindergarten pupils were given little remembrances by their teaches and each other and were presented with small sacks of candy.

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December 24, 1909

GAVE THE MAYOR A CAKE.

City Hall Employes Remember His
Forty-Sixth Birthday.

Mayor Crittenden admits that he was 46 years old yesterday. His official family and close personal friends took advantage of the occasion to present him with an ornamented cake weighing twenty-five pounds. It was pyramidal and decorated with cupids, bon bons, and images of flying doves. The pyramid was shaped as a bouquet holder, and this was filled with American Beauty roses, ferns and delicate plants. At the base of the cake forty-six miniature candles were set in the open petals of lillies of the valley.

While the mayor was absent in another part of city hall the cake was smuggled into his private office, and when he returned he was greeted by a host of friends, and Frank Lowe made a facetious speech of presentation, and the mayor responded as well as his embarrassment would permit.

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December 23, 1909

NO BOYS IN DETENTION HOME.

Inmates Released to Allow Them a
Merry Christmas.

There is not a boy in the detention home. The youthful prisoners have all been released on the promise to report Monday in juvenile court.

"This has been our custom every year the week before Christmas," said Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer, yesterday. "We want every boy in town, however bad, to be given a chance to celebrate Christmas day. There will be as few arrests as possible this week."

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December 22, 1909

HIS GOOD CHEER PERENNIAL.

Gray Haired Elevator Operator the
Original "Sunny Jim."

"To You All a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year."

This little inscription, signed "Elevator Man, Merry Building," is the way L. G. Chase, the gray-haired man on the lift expresses his sentiments of good cheer to his friends and patrons. The cards bearing greetings of the season are pinned on the sides of the elevator at the Merry building, 1009-11 Walnut street, embedded in a mass of Christmas greens and holiday emblems.

Every Christmas t his gray-haired elevator man enters into the spirit of the season and decorates his car in a lavish manner. This season he has done better than before. With streamers of tinsel, which are entwined around Christmas bells, fern wreaths, holly bells and little bits of mistletoe here and there, Mr. Chase has transformed his little elevator from a simple black iron cage to one of holiday beauty.

But it is not only at this season of the year that the passengers in the Merry building elevator find a plethora of good cheer, for the man who runs the elevator has the same sunny disposition the year round.

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December 22, 1909

TOYS THAT ATTRACT
GROWN-UPS, BOUGHT.

BIG DEPARTMENT STORES ARE
OPEN EVENINGS THIS WEEK.

Crowds Down Town at Night -- Fire
Department Playthings Most
Popular, Patrol Wagons
and Aeroplanes Next.

The announcement posted early that most of the big department stores would be open evenings this week up to Friday night inclusive brought the usual Christmas crowds to the down town districts last night in all the stores people who had braved the crisp winter air to be present with their shopping bags meant business.

The department stores which did not open last night were Emery, Bird, Thayer's, John Taylor's and Bernheimer's. The music stores did not close and while the crowds in them were only comfortably dense their sales were large from the viewpoint of the money taken in.

Some of the heavy sellers among toys last night were mechanical fire department outfits, patrol wagons and flying machines of different patterns.

Fire engines and hose wagons, toy salesmen say, have always been favorites. This is because a fire is spectacular and exciting and inviting to the imagination of old and young people alike. A child is most apt to get the toy in his stocking Christmas Eve that his elders enjoy and appreciate, they say, and so the manufacturers try to please both. Patrol wagons have always sold next to fire apparatus until this year.

Now they are running a distant third with miniatures of Wright's invention in full working order and capable of making short flights running close to first.

The theory of all toy shopmen interviewed last night was that little boys and girls might appreciate a good many gifts more than a flying machine, but that their parents, brothers, sisters and other relatives are anxious to see how the machine works.

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December 18, 1909

CLOWN BAND AND
ORGAN FOR CHILDREN.

LOTS OF MUSIC AND FUN AT
MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS TREE.

A. Judah, Manager of the Grand,
Has a Surprise in Store and It
May Be City's Poor Good Boys
and Girls Will See Theater.

A mammoth organ is to be installed in Convention hall to furnish music for the thousands of little children who will be given presents from the mayor's Christmas tree. The Clown band of the Eagles also will furnish instrumental cheer. The musicians will be dressed in grotesque costumes. A. Judah, manager of the Grand, also has a surprise in the amusement line in store for the tots, and he might repeat this year his generosity of last year by inviting the children who seldom see the inside of a place of amusement to his theater for a performance and a liberal candy distribution.

"I'm always the happiest when I am doing something for girls and boys that the sun of plenty does not shine upon," said Mr. Judah at yesterday's meeting of the Mayor's Christmas Tree Association. Then he chipped in $25 to the fund, which has now reached the encouraging sum of $3,124.10.

"We'll double that amount when we hear from the people we have asked subscriptions from," declared A. E. Hutchings, who, with other warm-hearted and self-sacrificing men and women, are giving their time and means to provide Christmas cheer and joy for the thousands of poor children in Kansas City. And these faithful workers are going right ahead with their commendable work, regardless of envious and malicious ones who belittle the association by referring to it as the "Public Tree."

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December 17, 1909

CHRISTMAS FEED FOR
CITY'S POOR HORSES.

NEGLECTED COBS AND FALLEN
THOROUGHBREDS INVITED.

Humane Society to Be Host at Con-
vention Hall Where Equine
Event Will Show Sufferings
to Local Philanthropists.

The poor horses of the city will be fed to satiety at least once this year. By arrangement with the directors of Convention hall yesterday, the Humane Society, in conjunction with Mrs. Emma W. Robinson, 3208 East Tenth street, and Mrs. E. D. Hornbrook, 3229 East Eleventh street, will give a feast of oats, bran and ground corn, with trimmings of real hay, to the neglected cobs and fallen thoroughbreds of all sections in the big Auditorium Christmas day.

"It will not be an equine quality event," Mrs. Hornbrook said yesterday, "but it will be on invitations, anyway. This is to prevent spongers from feeding a team at our expense. The money will be raised by subscription. We are asking the wholesale houses to donate enough feed for several hundred animals."

The invitations are being printed today. They read:

"Christmas dinner for the workhorse,
Given by the Humane Society,
Call at Convention hall Christmas day between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m .

The plan of giving one good meal to the horses is original with Mrs. Robinson. She always has been interested in the dumb animals, and is a member of long standing of the Humane Society. She said last night:

"Someone has got to take up the horse's end of this charity proposition. It is not right that people should go on year after year giving alms to the human derelicts and entirely ignoring man's best friend, his horse. The scheme to give old work horses at least one square meal has been carried out to perfection in Norway, and someone should try it here. I suppose it will be scoffed at by some, but that is because it is new. In a few years, when through such humble means the attention of the world is directed toward the old horse and his suffering, it will be looked upon in a different light."

Edwin R. Weeks, president of the Humane Society, is in favor of the "banquet."

"Not for itself," he said yesterday, "but merely as a means to bring the suffering of our four-footed friends before local philanthropists. The Chicago idea of tagging the horses that are misused or underfed is not a poor one, but this one will get emaciated subjects of charity together by the hundred, in one hall, and let people see them."

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December 13, 1909

ORPHANS TO BE AT MATINEE.

Benefactor Ill, Boys Will Depend on
Charity for Christmas.

The boys of the Kansas City Orphans' home will be the guests of Oscar Sachs at the matinee at the Orpheum tomorrow afternoon. The boys will be chaperoned by Mrs. Lee Lyson, Mrs. Ferdinand Heim, Mrs. Oscar Sachs, Mrs. J. W. Wagner, Mrs. S. Harzfeld and Mrs. A. D. Cottingham. Mrs. John C. Tarsney, the benefactor of the home, has been ill for some time and so the boys expect that good people will take an interest in them and remember them on Christmas. About 130 orphans are cared for at the home, which is in the charge of sisters of the order of St. Vincent de Paul.

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December 6, 1909

CHRISTMAS TREAT FOR
POOR CHILDREN PLANNED.

Large Tree Will Be Prepared in
Convention Hall -- Names Should
Be Addressed to the Mayor.

The Mayor's Christmas Tree association, which was suggested and carried out last year for the first time in the history of Kansas City, is preparing to give the deserving poor children of this city a great treat this Christmas. Elaborate plans are being worked out by the committee. Headquarters have been opened in the Reliance building at Tenth and McGee streets, where contributions will be received, and also the names of the poor. The city will be canvassed during the next three weeks for the names of the children to be placed on the list. Several large Christmas trees will be prepared in Convention hall where the big event is to take place on the night of December 24, and under the direction of the distribution committee the presents will be given to all children who are deemed entitled to receive them.

Names, or suggestions as to distribution of presents, should be addressed to the mayor, and all checks and remittances for the mayor's Christmas tree should be plainly marked and mailed to the city comptroller, Gus Pearson, treasurer of the association for this year.

The members of the executive committee are Thomas Watts, Louis W. Shouse, Jacob Billikopf, M. G. Harman, A. E. Hutchings, Dave McDonnell, Henry Manke, Rev. Charles W. Moore, Steve Sedweek, T. T. Crittenden, John F. Pelletier, Franklin D. Hudson, A. Judah, George F. Damon, Justin A. Runyan, Gus Pearson, H. E. Barker and George C. Hale.

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October 30, 1909

FOUR GIRLS HURT IN
A HALLOWE'EN FIRE.

JACK O' LANTERN CANDLE IG-
NITES THEIR COSTUMES.

Fleecy Cotton Used by Esquimaux at
Loretto Academy North Pole
Night Flashes Into
Flame.

Three girls seriously burned and a third slightly is the result of the overturning of a jack o'lantern last night during a Halloween celebration at the academy of the Sisters of Loretto, West Prospect and Thirty-ninth street, which set the costumes of the girls on fire.

The most seriously burned are:

Mimie Tiernan, 3525 Broadway.
Mary Maley, 1200 West Fortieth.
Virginia Owen, 3633 Prospect.

Slightly burned:

Ruth Mahoney, a niece of Alderman C. J. Conin.

It was stated early this morning that three of the girls were possibly fatally burned. There are little hopes of Misses Owen and Tiernan recovering. Miss Maley is reported to be in danger, though not as seriously burned as the other two. All the victims were conscious and suffering greatly. All but Miss Mahoney were burned over their bodies, and on the arms and legs.

The girls were giving a Hallowe'en entertainment in the corridor on the first floor. The stage at the end of the hall was decorated with jack o'lanterns and bunting.



They planned a "North Pole" entertainment, and were dressed as Esquimaux. They wore white trousers, covered with cotton to represent snow. Their waists also were covered with cotton. No boys had been invited.

It was 8:20 o'clock when Maley walked across the stage. She was laughing gaily and chatting with a crowd of girls walking at her side. They were all talking of the beautiful decorations and the novel decorations.

Miss Maley stumbled on a jack o'lantern. From the candle the cotton on her Esquimaux dress was ignited. The flame spread over her entire body. Misses Teirnan, Owen and Mahoney, walking at her side, rushed to their friend's help. There were screams and cries for help. Some of the girls fainted, others grew hysterical.

The flames spread from Miss Maley's costume to the three girls who had rushed to her aid. In a moment the four were a mass of flames. The clothing was burned entirely from Miss Maley's body. The cotton burned as if it were saturated in oil. The three girls, who came to her assistance, were burned from head to foot. The fire spread to the clothing of the four.

It was 8:26 o'clock when the fire department at station No. 19, Westport, received the call. Before the firemen arrived the flames were put out. The fire did not ignite the other decorations nor the building.

INFORMATION DENIED.

Captain Flahive of No. 5 police station, and Officer Wood went to the academy. Considerable persuasion was required to gain an entrance. When the mother superior was asked for the names of the injured this information was denied.

Drs. B. H. Wheeler and Horrigan were summoned. All the cotton bandages in the drug store at Thirty-ninth and Genessee were bought outright. It was necessary later to send to Westport for more medicine and bandages. The physicians remained at the bedsides of the injured girls through the night.

The school authorities refused to make any details of the accident public. To all questions as to names and the extent of the injuries, those in authority replied that there was absolutely nothing to give out.

"We have the story," the reporters told them.

"Well, if you publish anything about this, we will sue your paper for libel."

The girls at the academy had planned for a Hallowe'en dance this evening at Little's hall in Westport but because of the occurrence last night, the party has been cancelled.

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October 13, 1909

BIG PARADE HELD IN
HONOR OF COLUMBUS.

ITALIAN SOCIETIES COMMEM-
ORATE DISCOVERY.

Replica of Santa Maria, With "In-
dians" Aboard, a Feature --
Music and Speeches at
City Garden.

Columbus day, commemorating the discovery of America on October 12, 1492, was celebrated in Kansas City yesterday for the first time. A bill making October 12 a legal holiday passed the last legislature.

As the great "Christopher Colombo" was an Italian, born in Genoa, Italy, the Italians of Kansas City took the lead yesterday in celebrating the day. Ever since July 4 last the representative Italians of the city have been working on a monster parade, and yesterday the people viewed the result of their labors. The parade formed at the Holy Rosary church, Fifth and Campbell streets, and was headed by a line of carriages. In the first were Mayor Crittenden, Justice Michael Ross and Michael E. Casey, the state senator who drew up the bill making October 12 a holiday. Judge Harry G. Kyle, W. H. Baehr, city treasurer, and other city officials were in the other carriages with representative Italian citizens. Following these were members of many Italian lodges and societies.

SANTA MARIA IN PARADE.

The most attractive feature of the parade was a replica of the Santa Maria, the boat on which Columbus sailed to America. On board were sailors and "Indians." Frank Bascone, dressed to represent Columbus, stood in the boat, telescope in hand, apparently searching for land. Four bands were in the line of march.

After forming at Fifth and Campbell the parade went south to Sixth street, east on Sixth to Gillis, north on Gillis to Fifth and west to Walnut street, thus traversing the very heart of the Italian quarter known as "Little Italy." Crowds lined both sides of the street through the entire North End.

The line of march was continued down Walnut street to Sixteenth, on that street to Grand avenue and thence to the City garden, about Nineteenth and Grand, where the real celebration was held. Mayor Crittenden, Senator Casey and Judge Kyle made speeches in English, the best they could do. Speeches in Italian were made by Professor G. G. Langueri, Rev. Father John Marchello and Rev. Maxdano, minister of the Italian Evangelist church.

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September 25, 1909

JEWS OBSERVE YOM KIPPUR.

Period of Fasting and Prayer Began
at 6 O'clock Last Night.

The Jewish citizens of Kansas City have been fasting and praying since 6 o'clock last night. They are observing Yom Kippur, or the day of atonement, and their fast and prayers will continue until 6 o'clock tonight. Services appropriate to the event were held in all the Jewish churches last night.

The services at the church of Dr. Max Lieberman, 1415 Troost, were especially solemn and impressive and they will be resumed at 7 o'clock this morning and continue throughout the day. The male choir of twelve voices sang several selections at last night's services.

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September 17, 1909

MEXICAN INDEPENDENCE DAY.

Reception Commemorating 99th An-
niversary Given by J. E. Gonzalez.

A reception commemorating the ninety-ninth anniversary of independence in Mexico was given to a small party of prominent Mexicans and newspaper men at the office of J. E. Gonzalez, acting consul for the Southern republic yesterday afternoon. Among the guests were L. L. Cantu, J. J. Journee, A. E. Pradillo and L. B. Moreno.

Toasts to the present chief executive of Mexico, and to the memory of Padre Miguel Hidalgo Y Costilla, the great liberator, were drunk by the gathering. All present wore the national colors, red, white and green, signifying the three guarantees of Hidalgo, liberty, religion, equality.

"The big celebration will be in the City of Mexico next year," said Mr. Gonzalez. "It will be the centennial of the first independence day and the whole nation will turn out to do it honor. The result no man can now tell, but it will be surpassingly grand as our countrymen are great celebrators and every state will contribute to an exposition illustrating the progress of Mexico during the interim.

"Every true Mexican who has the time and the money should be there to lend his shout to the applause due the grand old man, who has made Mexico what it is today."

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September 16, 1909

JEWS CELEBRATE NEW YEAR.

It Was the Beginning of Rosh Hash-
anah at Sundown Last Night.

At sundown last night the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah, began. In Jewish chronology it marks the beginning of the year 5670 since the creation.

In orthodox Jewish churches the new year is celebrated two days. Services were held at sundown last night and again later in the synagogues. Services also are scheduled for this morning, at sundown this evening and tonight.

In the orthodox churches the ceremonies will be repeated at sundown this evening, tonight and tomorrow morning. The two days are marked with prayer and fasting.

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September 7, 1909

CAT AND CHICKEN TO A KITE.

Boys Preparing to Send Them Up
When Officers Came.

The ascension of a kite with a chicken and cat attached as a ballast didn't take place yesterday morning in the neighborhood of Fifth street and Wabash avenue, which several of the youngsters of the neighborhood had planned as a sort of Labor Day celebration. But it was all the fault of the Humane society who had heard of the plans.

When two officers arrived yesterday morning the crowd scattered. they found the deserted kite with the chicken and cat attached in the proper fashion. No arrests were made.

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August 10, 1909

NO CIRCUSES ON LABOR DAY.

Council Passes Ordinance Favored
by Mayor in Special Message.

In order to allow members of the trade unions to have the full benefit of "spending money" on Labor Day, Mayor Crittenden last night sent a special message to the council favoring the passage of an ordinance to bar circuses from Kansas City on that day, it transpiring that shows have made it a practice to map out their routes as to be here on general holidays, especially Labor Day. A complaint had been made by the ways and means committee that circuses were taking about $25,000 out of the city each Labor Day.

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July 12, 1909

3 DEAD AS RESULT
OF BOMB EXPLOSION.

FIREWORKS DISPLAY NEAR A
CHURCH ENDS FATALLY.

Italians of Holy Rosary Congrega-
tion Were Celebrating St. John's
Day -- Two Negroes Are
Instantly Killed.

The upright figure is sketched from a duplicate of the iron pipe which was also to have been fired. The upper figure is a sketch of the piece which killed the woman and the lower figure is a sketch of the piece which was hurled through the house at 511 Campbell street.


Amidst a throng of 700 persons who gathered at Fifth and Campbell streets last night to watch the celebration of St. John's day, a bomb exploded, instantly killing Clarance Harrington, a negro of 511 Lydia avenue, and Anna Fields, a negro woman of 568 Harrison street; and so seriously wounding Tony Grassiffe, an Italian living at 311 East Third street, that he died at 10:45 o'clock.

The bomb was one used in the pyrotechnical display being held under the direction of the Holy Order of St. John, an organization of the Holy Rosary Roman Catholic church, Fifth and Campbell streets. Tony Grassiffe, one of the victims, was the master of ceremonies and for almost an hour he had been lighting bombs, rockets and Roman candles, while the crowd gathered denser in the street.

Grassiffe finally planted the huge cast iron pipe, loaded with dynamite and a bomb, in the center of a low corner lot. He had been warned to completely cover the bomb with dirt, and to plant it deep. Ignorance or carelessness caused him to leave the bomb in its two feet of iron pipe standing uncovered in the lot. He lighted the fuse and before he could gain his feet the explosion occurred.

NEGROES INSTANTLY KILLED.

Grassiffe's left leg at the knee was completely severed by the bursting projectile. A huge piece of the iron was hurled westward and struck the negro woman full on the right side of her face, tearing it away, and leaving only a small portion of the skull. Another, and smaller piece, struck Harrington in the center of his forehead, crushing his skull and tearing part of it away. The two negroes dropped in their tracks, dead. The woman lay across the sidewalk grasping a palm leaf fan in her hand. The man fell close by her side.

Sergeant D. J. Whalen was standing within three feet of the woman when she fell. He was struck in the chest by a piece of mortar, but was uninjured. Officer Lee Clarry was standing still closer to the negro, and escaped without a scratch.

PENETRATES HOUSE WALL.

One piece of the iron pipe was hurled northward with a force which caused it to penetrate the wall of a house, seventy-five feet distant, and continue its course within, plunging through a two-inch door and spending its force against the other wall of the building.

Seated at a window, not three feet from the point where the projectile entered the wall, was Tony Gafucci. He was thrown from his chair, and lay on the floor of his room, momentarily stunned. The house number is 511 Campbell street.

Instantly after the sound of the explosion, the great crowd surged forward to where the dead bodies were lying. The police officers held them back, and themselves ascertained the condition of the negroes. Seeing that both were dead, the officers hastened to aid Grassiffe, whom they heard groaning and crying for help. They picked the injured man up from the hollow and carried him into a nearby drug store.

The police ambulance was hastily called, and Dr. E. D. Twyman accompanied it to the scene of the explosion. As he alighted at the spot where the negroes were lying on the sidewalk, and stooped down to make examinations, the uncontrollable crowd of negroes and Italians surged forward closer still, knocking over the surgeon.

COULDN'T SAVE ITALIAN.

When Dr. Twyman reached Grassiffe he found the injured man to be in a dangerous condition. Nothing could be done to stop the terrible flow of blood from the severed limb. The surgeon ordered a record drive to the emergency hospital, where every effort was made to save the life of the injured man. He was kept alive until 10:45 o'clock, by means of artificial respiration and then died.

By some means Grassiffe's wife gained entrance to the hospital and, gazing upon the form of her husband, became hysterical. It was necessary for Dr. H. T. Morton to administer an opiate to quiet the woman, who was shrieking strange Italian chants at the top of her voice, pausing now and then to cross herself and mutter a hurried prayer.

The coroner was notified of the deaths and ordered the negroes bodies taken to Moore's undertaking establishment, 1033 Independence avenue.

The celebration last night was held in spite of the constant warnings given out by Father Charles Delbecchi, in charge of the Holy Rosary church. He had just left his church, where he had warned once more of the dangers of fireworks.

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July 6, 1909

NOISE DIDN'T DISTURB THEM.

Deaf Mutes Enjoyed Their Outing
at Budd Park.

In one corner of Budd park yesterday were gathered about 125 men and women. Probably fifty or more children played about, shooting firecrackers and making the usual amount of noise that children make on the Fourth of July.

Not a mother said, "Be careful now," or "Don't go too close." Firecrackers, large and small, were exploded all about the grownups, but not one so much as turned a head or blinked an eye. The occasion was the Kansas City deaf mutes' picnic. Most of the children of deaf mutes have the power of speech, and those at the picnic yesterday were a happy, rollicking, talkative bunch of youngsters.

The picnic was held to arrange ways and means for building a home for aged and infirm deaf mutes somewhere in Missouri. Cash donations already have been made and subscriptions pledged.

On August 26, 27 and 28 the Missouri State Association for the Deaf will hold a convention here. H. B. Waters, 2830 Michigan avenue, is chairman of a local committee to perfect arrangements for the convention.

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July 6, 1909

TURNS A SOMERSAULT AT 80.

Grandpa Brueckmann's July 4th
Antics Amused the Children.

The German Baptist Sunday school, Seventeenth and Tracy, held its annual basket picnic at Budd park yesterday. A crowd of children, with hands joined, danced in a ring, while a man stood in the center and sang a German holiday song. At the end of each verse he would do something and each one in the circle had to imitate him.

With the children, and apparently enjoying himself as much as they, was Henry Brueckmann, 80 years old. He made faces, clapped his hands, pulled his neighbor's hair and did everything suggested by the leader, until the latter turned a somersault. The children all went over in a hurry, and then besieged "grandpa" to turn one. And Grandpa Breuckmann, 80 years old, did turn a somersault -- a good one, too -- much to the delight of the children. There were 140 at this picnic.

The Swedish Methodist church Sunday school, 1664 Madison street, headed by O. J. Lundberg, pastor, and the Swedish mission at Fortieth and Genessee streets, held a big basket dinner in the east end of Budd park. About 150 enjoyed themselves.

Not far from them the Swedish Baptist church Sunday school, 416 West Fourteenth street, with Rev. P. Schwartz and a delegation from a Swedish church in Kansas City, Kas., headed by Rev. Carl Sugrstrom, was holding forth about 300 strong.

There were many family and neighborhood picnics in the park.

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July 5, 1909

QUIET FOURTH, BUT
MANY ACCIDENTS.

TWO KANSAS CITYS HAVE LONG
LIST OF CASUALTIES.

Big Demand for Tetanus Anti-Toxin
at Emergency Hospital -- Four
Boys Hurt in One Explosion.

It was one of the quietest Fourths of July the two Kansas City's ever experienced. But the real test will come today. Many minor accidents were reported yesterday, and there were a number of applications to Dr. W. L. Gist of the emergency hospital for injections of tetanus anti-toxin to ward off the possibility of lockjaw from injuries.

Victim No. 1 to ask for aid at the dispensary was Willie Parrish, 9 years old, 1230 Drury avenue. Willie was playing with a friend named Clarence Cott, who was handling a pistol. It was accidentally discharged and a piece of the gun wad entered the palm of Willie's left hand.

A blank cartridge which S. Stern, 10 years old, 571 Campbell street, accidentally discharged, injured his right hand. He went to the emergency hospital and Dr. Gist cauterized the wound and gave him an injection of tetanus anti-toxin.

CHILD MAY LOSE EYE.

William Meyer, 14 years old, 2108 West Prospect avenue, was wounded yesterday afternoon while playing with a 22-caliber pistol. A wad struck him on the left hand, which was dressed in the emergency hospital. The surgeon made use of 1,5000 units of the anti-toxin which Dr. W. S. Wheeler secured to prevent tetanus infection.

Powder burns, suffered when his brother, John, snapped a toy pistol containing a blank cartridge, probably will cost Charles Grube, aged 6 years, 838 South Pyle street, Armourdale, the sight of his right eye.

Only a few boys and no grown-ups were arrested yesterday for noisy celebration of the Fourth. One boy was taken in at Central police station during the forenoon for exploding a cannon cracker on West Fifth street. His father appeared in a few minutes. Only $4 was necessary too get this juvenile lawbreaker from behind the bars. Police station Nos. 9, 5, 4 and 6 also made an arrest apiece, all the boys being released on minimum bonds.

Thomas Rogers, a negro 14 years old, applied at the emergency hospital last night for treatment, saying he feared he was suffering from lockjaw. Thomas shot himself in the hand with a toy pistol July 2. A piece of the cap was imbedded in the skin. One thousand five hundred units of anti-toxin was administered, and the boy sent home. He was instructed to keep his hand in hot water during the night.

Probably the most serious accident in Kansas City, Kas., was the injury sustained by S. A. Brophy, a street car conductor, living at 332 North Tenth street. The wadding from a blank cartridge entered his left thigh on the inside of the leg and caused a wound which Dr. W. R. Palmer, the attending physician, said last night might prove serious. Brophy was talking to a fellow street car conductor, L. J. Clark, when the latter pointed a gun at him and pulled the trigger.

BOY MAY LOSE HAND.

Roy Irvine, 5 years old, was injured by a piece of tin which flew from a torpedo and buried itself in the third finger of his left hand. He was treated at the home of his father, R. W. Irvine, 727 Central avenue.

Herman Fielder, 11 years old, was shot through the palm of his left hand by the wadding from a blank cartridge. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis, and removed to his home, 940 Ohio avenue. Charles Orr, 931 Tenney avenue, held a firecracker in his left hand while it exploded and may lose the index finger of his left hand as a result. He was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis. Mrs. M. Westerman, 318 North Tenth street, fell and dislocated her left shoulder while attempting to get away from a bunch of firecrackers which had been thrown near her. Mrs. Westerman is 62 years old, and was suffering great pain last night. She was attended by Dr. J. A. Davis.

Nathan Spicer, a merchant at 40 North James street, shot himself through the palm of the right hand while explaining the mechanism of a revolver to a prospective customer. He was attended by Dr. C. H. Brown, assistant police surgeon. James Whipple, 20 North James street, was struck by a flying particle during an explosion near his home and was burned on the left hand.

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July 4, 1909

WANTS A SANE FOURTH
IF BOYS ARE WILLING.

POLICE HAVE STRINGENT OR-
DERS FROM CHIEF SNOW.

Health Commissioner Wheeler Has
Placed Supply of Tetanus Anti-
Toxin With Hospitals --
Quiet in Most Districts.

This year there is to be an extraordinary effort made to have a same Fourth, and also Fifth of July in Kansas City. Chief of Police Frank F. Snow issued orders yesterday that he wanted as many men on duty during the "busy" parts of both days as possible. If the people do not want to act in a sane manner while celebrating a policeman may be on hand to make them. The chief called for the arrests of all parties caught putting explosives on the street car tracks, and wanted officers to take special care to see that "no fireworks of any kind are exploded near any hospital or near where there are sick people."

Dr. W. S. Wheeler, health commissioner, has taken steps to keep down, as far as possible, mortality resulting from gunshot or firecracker wounds. Tetanus often follows such wounds, especially in the hands, and death is frequently the result. At the general hospital, the emergency hospital and the Walnut street police station, Dr. Wheeler has placed a supply of tetanus anti-toxin with instructions to use it immediately in every case where it is suspected the injury may develop lockjaw.

"It has been shown," said Dr. Wheeler last night, "that where the anti-toxin is used promptly it acts as a preventive. It has also been used with good results in many cases where the disease had already begun to develop."

Dr. Isadore Anderson, in charge of the dispensary at the Post-Graduate hospital on Independence avenue, secured a supply of the anti-toxin from Dr. Wheeler and will use it in all cases where its use may be indicated. This dispensary being a free one, has many injured persons.

Chief of Police Frank F. Snow issued stringent orders recently indicating the class of firecrackers and fireworks which would be permitted. Firearms of any character, whether loaded with blank or bullet cartridges, are prohibited.

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