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December 10, 1909

YOUTHS "SWEATED";
STILL DENY CHARGES.

EXAMINATIONS MADE IN VAIN
BY WOODSON.

Shay Says He Can Prove He Was at
Theater on Night of One Hold
Up, the Victim of Which
Identifies Him.

The three youths, Louis M. Dye, Ralph A. Clyne and Harry Shay, locked up in the county jail charged with highway robbery and suspected of the Spangler murder, were subected to a series of rigorous examinations yesterday by Assistant Prosecutor Norman Woodson. His efforts in "sweating" the prisoners so far have met with no success. The trio deny every charge made against them and with the exception of numerous identifications, the authorities have obtained no evidence that might help toward conviction.

The matter is at present entirely in the hands of the prosecutor's office, the case having been taken from the police department.

SHAY IS WORRIED.

Shay is profuse in assurances that he knew nothing of the robberies with which he is charged.

"Of course I am innocent," he says, "but these people whom I never saw before coming in and identifying me a criminal naturally makes me worried. A man swore yesterday that I had held him up at 10 o'clock on the night of December 2. At that time I was a a theater with a friend who can swear to it."

Mrs. Nora Dye, the bride of Louis Dye, visited him yesterday. She remained only a few minutes. Beyond stating that he is innocent, and that he can account for every evening that he had spent away from home for more than a month, Dye refused to talk.

Ralph Clyne is the most talkative of the three. He is in a cell on the third floor of the building in the woman's department and is far more comfortable than his fellow prisoners. He is cheerful and jokes about his surroundings. "Yes, I'm in the state quarters up here," he stated.

DENIES ACQUAINTANCE.

"I can give an account of myself on the occasion of all these hold ups. Before I was arrested I never even knew the names of Dye and Shay. I sued to see them in the morning when I came to work and that was all. I certainly never went any place in their company."

His mother, Mrs. M. Clyne, paid him a visit. "Cheer up mother. I'll be out of here in a week," he told her after kissing her affectionately. "It's no disgrace to be locked up when you are innocent."

Mrs. Clyne had brought him a big package of fruit. "This is like money from home," he said as the jailer pushed the oranges and apples through an aperture in the cell. "I missed your hot cakes this morning at breakfast."

Three more complaints of highway robbery were filed against the prisoners yesterday, and a further examination will be made and more statements taken this morning.

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December 6, 1909

LONG AND SHORT MEN BUSY.

Victims of Highwaymen Report to
Police the Loss of More Than
$300 on Sunday.

J. S. Hubert, a member of the United Brewery Workers of America, living at 2518 Charlotte, was felled by a blow from behind and robbed of five $20 bills, ten $10 bills and five $5 bills at Twenty-first and Locust at 9:30 o'clock last night by two men, one of whom, he says was very tall and the other extremely short. He says he saw the same men in a saloon at Nineteenth street and Grand avenue Saturday night. Hubert immediately reported the case to police and he was taken to his home by Officer Sherry. Upon examination of his head no signs of where he had been slugged could be found.

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November 29, 1909

"JOE" SHANNON IS HELD UP.

Lawyer-Politician, Robbed of $48
and Watch in Home Ward, Saves
$250 by Clever Trick.

Joseph B. Shannon, lawyer and politician, was held up about 2:30 o'clock Sunday morning on Fifteenth street between Holmes and Charlotte streets, in his home ward, by three young men who wore dark clothing and stiff hats, and had handkerchiefs tied over their faces.

Mr. Shannon was relieved of $48 in money and a gold watch and would have suffered a heavier loss had it not been for his presence of mind. When he first realized that he was about to become a victim of hold-up men he took a roll of bills containing $250 out of his pocket and dropped it on the pavement. The $48 and his watch remained in his pocket, and of course became the property of the highwaymen.

Mr. Shannon says that one of the robbers "covered" him with a gun while the other two searched him and after taking what valuables they could find they fled down an adjacent alley. Later Mr. Shannon returned to the scene of the robbery and recovered the $250 he had dropped.

He immediately reported the matter to the police, who are trying to locate the perpetrators.

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September 2, 1909

BOLD, BAD MEN ARE
SMALL AND WEAKLY.

MODERN DEADWOOD DICKS ARE
DEFICIENT, SAYS LATSHAW.

Flattering Description of Despera-
does in Yellowbacks Belied by
Experience Here, Declares
Criminal Judge.

Fade away, Deadwood Dick and all other bold highwaymen who look so strong and big in the yellowbacks. You're fiction. The real highwayman and criminal is between 18 and 22. he's a puny little fellow who has not much more strength of mind than he has of body.

After having carefully inspected Deadwood Dick and all his kind as they pass in and out of the criminal court of Jackson County, Judge Ralph S. Latshaw says:

"The real criminal is not the fierce-looking man, with long mustaches drooping in a manner to make his face look fiercer than it was made by nature. He is not tall and stately in appearance, nor does he stalk with his head up and the proud glitter of defiance in his eye.

"Criminal courts have the hardest time with the boy, just growing into his manhood. He is the fellow who fills the lists of those convicted of crime. From 17 or 18 to 20 or 22 years old is the worst stage.

"Look over the records of the highwaymen and burglars who have been sent to the penitentiary from this court, not only in recent months, but for years. All of them are young men, undersized and weakly. They put a revolver in their pocket and go out to commit crime. If it were not for the weapon concealed in their pockets they would not dare steal. It is the additional false courage the firearm gives them that is responsible for the crimes they commit.

"When you go walking in the evening and see, in the shadows, the tall form of someone slinking away into further darkness, don't feel for your pocketbook. It is safe. But steer around the two little fellows who never had enough hair on their face to grow one tenth of the mustache which Deadwood Dick and his fellows sport in the lithographs.

"Do you mean to say," the judge was asked, "that stature has a direct bearing on crime?"

"Only to this extent," said he, "that a child born of average sized parents, who is smaller than they, is commonly a weakling. And with this physical weakness comes mental deficiency, to a certain extent. The late Judge Wofford used to say: 'These boys give me more trouble than all the rest of the county.' He spoke from long experience, and from keen observation of conditions which obtain now as well as then."

"But many Kansas City lawyers say they read penny dreadfuls to relax their mind," was suggested. "Do you never read them?"

"No, thank you. I do not care for that kind of literature," said the judge.

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July 19, 1909

SIX MEN HELD UP
IN A SINGLE NIGHT.

IN EVERY INSTANCE ROBBERS
SECURE MONEY AND ESCAPE.

Five Highwaymen With Revolvers
Get Dollar Apiece From One Vic-
tim -- Diamonds and Watches
Among the Loot.

Six holdups occurred in Kansas City Saturday night and Sunday morning. In every case the robbers succeeded in getting money, and some of the victims gave up their watches.

Frank Serrett, 829 South Valley street, Kansas City, Kas., the first victim to complain to the police, reported that two men held him up in the alley between Main and Walnut on Ninth street. While one of the highwaymen searched his pockets, the other man kept him covered with a pistol A watch and $10 comprised the booty.

At 10 o'clock Saturday night George Mangoe, 115 1/2 Central street, Kansas City, Kas., reported that he had been robbed by two men, and his watch stolen. The robbery occurred at Ninth and Wyoming streets.

It took five men to stop and rob James Bone, 4413 Bell avenue, at about 11 p. m., at Forty-first and Bell avenue, at about 11 p. m., at Forty-first and Bell avenue. According to Bone, all of the robbers were armed with revolvers and held them in sight. He gave up $5 to the brigands.

A watch at $7 were taken from J. W. Brown, 1326 Grand avenue, at Thirteenth and Franklin streets by two men.

H. A. Lucius, 215 West Fourteenth street, reported to the police that he had been robbed or $50 near 2854 Southwest boulevard.

G. W. Shaw, Strong City, Kas., entered police headquarters early Sunday morning and informed the police that he had been robbed in front of a saloon near McGee and Third streets. He reported the loss of an Elk's tooth and two unset diamonds.

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May 21, 1909

ROBBED AT STATION DOOR.

Bold Holdup Pulled Off in Front
of Police Headquarters by
Two Highwaymen.

Two highwaymen with a sense of humor searched a man in front of police headquarters last night, took all his belongings and then told him to run. The victim, who thought the two strangers were plain clothes officers, got away and didn't even report the matter to the police. Had not several witnesses told Lieutenant M. E. Ryan, the commanding officer at headquarters, no one would have been the wiser.

J. J. Blake, proprietor of the market restaurant, as well as several of his customers, saw the incident. James Baker, proprietor of an ice cream stand, followed the men as they dragged the victim toward the station.

"See what he's got on him," said the larger of the two, as he searched the victims pocket.

"Guess we had better take him in," suggested the other.

In front of the door the two men stopped.

"Might as well let him go," said the large one. The man needed no bidding and ran around the corner. The two crooks leisurely walked up Fifth street.

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April 21, 1909

BOY PRISONERS TELL
OF SEVEN HOLD-UPS.

IMPLICATE OTHERS IN STATE-
MENT TO INSPECTOR BOYLE.

Arrests May Lead to Breaking Up
Band of Highwaymen Which
Has Been Operating Al-
most Nightly.

FRANK M'DANIELS.

In the arrest of Joseph Tent, 20 years old, and Frank McDaniels, 18 years old, the police think that they have solved the identity of the mysterious highwaymen who have bee holding up persons almost nightly in Kansas City. The two, who are mere boys, admit that they have taken part in at least seven holdups in the last six weeks and Inspector Boyle thinks that they can be connected with several others.

For several hours yesterday afternoon, the boys were "sweated" in the inspector's office and at last were willing to make statements to the prosecuting attorney. Two or three others are implicated by the boys' confession and within the next few hours other arrests likely will follow. It is believed the boys are members of a gang of highwaymen, who prowl nightly in Kansas City.

The capture of the youthful bandits came about in a singular manner. In the reports of pawned jewelry that came into the hands of the detectives Monday afternoon was the description of a watch which had been taken from F. R. Hedges of 1004 Forest avenue on the night of April 15. It had been pawned Saturday, the pawn broker said, and a boy had left the watch at his office. Detective John Farrell stationed himself near the store and about 1 o'clock two young men entered the pawn shop and offered to redeem the watch.

PAWNBROKER GIVES TIP.

"Just wait a moment," said the pawnbroker, and he hurried outside. Farrell entered the shop and arrested both men. The younger proved to be Tent, who had secured a prospective purchase for the watch.

"I don't want to go unless you take the fellow that helped me," said Tent. "I don't want to go alone.

The chance to land another highwayman was satisfactory to the officer, and the two went to a photograph gallery at 310 East Twelfth street, where Tent admitted that Frank McDaniels, his partner, was working. The two climbed the narrow stairway and passed into the dark room of the gallery. Farrell was holding the young man to keep from losing his way. Suddenly he felt something pressing against his side, which instinctively he knew was a revolver. He jerked the revolver from the boy's hands. Tent denied that he had intended to fire.

"I was trying to get rid of it," he said to the officer, "and it was so dark that I couldn't see where I was placing it."

McDaniels was caught in the gallery and both were taken to headquarters. Both admitted that they had taken part in several robberies, but only two in each other's company. Experienced highwaymen had been their companions, the boys said, and the police are inclined to believe their story.


JOSEPH TENT.

In the inspector's office, the boys did not appear to realize the gravity of their deeds. Both admitted that older crooks had started them in the business. Both denied that they had started in the holdup business together, and claimed that they had known each other but a few days.

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April 3, 1909

USED WHIP ON HIGHWAYMAN.

Unsuccessful Attempt to Hold Up
Armourdale Physician.

Dr. Zachariah Nason of 636 Osage avenue, Kansas City, Kas., reported to the police that he was attacked at 10:30 o'clock last night by two masked highwaymen, who attempted to rob him at Seventh street and Tenny avenue. The intersection of the two streets is not well lighted, and while driving along Seventh street two young men, one of whom was in his shirt sleeves, stepped out from the shadows and commanded the doctor to throw up his hands. The smaller of the two men attempted to grasp the reins, while his companion approached the intended victim. Leaning out over the buggy shell the doctor struck the larger of the two men across the face with his whip and a second later struck the horse, causing him to break the hold of the other robber, and effecting his escape.

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March 31, 1909

ONE-ARMED HIGHWAYMEN.

New Feature to Street Car
Holdup on Kansas Side.

Another holdup of a street car conductor occurred last night on an eastbound Quindaro boulevard car betweeen Tenth and Eleventh streets, Kansas City, Kas. Two men, one of whom had only one arm, boarded the car, which carried no passengers, and the one-armed one "stuck up" the conductor with a revolver, while the other cut his change pouch from his belt with a knife and went through his pockets. They secured $12 and jumped off the car. The conductor was J. P. Farrell. Motorman J. J. Bunting did not know that the conductor was being robbed.

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March 15, 1909

DEAD SISTER'S HAIR IN CHAIN.

Highwaymen Gave It Back, but They
Kept the Watch.

Two unmasked white men held up and robbed Edward S. Frances of 2317 West Prospect avenue at 8 o'clock last night near Broadway and Southwest boulevard. Both highwaymen had revolvers. After relieving Frances of $1.70 in small change one of them was about to slip his gold watch into his pocket when the victim interposed.

"Look at that chain," he said. "It isn't worth much to you, is it? Well, it's made out of my dead sister's hair. Will you give it back?"

The robber obligingly detached the chain and it was the only article about Frances's person he was allowed to keep. Both then hurried away.

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May 28, 1908

HAS NITROGLYCERIN
BURIED IN A ROAD.

SAFEBLOWER WILL LEAD
THE POLICE TO IT.

That Is, if Some Wagon Wheel
Don't Set It Off Before This
Morning -- One Sends Money
to His Mother.

Safe blowing is not a lucrative business, according to G. W. Hart and William Riley, the two yeggmen who were arrested Tuesday night after having blown a safe in the Metzner Stove Supply and Repair house, 304 West Sixth street. The two burglars made a complete confession before Captain Walter Whitsett and other police officers last night, telling somewhat of their past and present record, also giving an interesting account of how they pulled off their jobs.

The two men met each other on the streets several days ago and their acquaintance grew steadily. Both lived in a low rooming house at 507 Grand avenue and it was there that they perfected their plans for the safe robbery which they perpetrated Tuesday night.

For several days past Hart has made a hiding place of the Hannibal bridge. In that locality he kept his tools and prepared the nitroglycerin which he used to blow the safes. He said that had he been successful in his robberies here he intended taking his loot to that place and burying it at the roadside, where he has now over a pint of nitroglycerin stored away.

The only other safe blowing job which Hart has tried in Kansas City was Sunday night when he attempted to blow open the safe in the Ernst Coal and Feed barns at Twentieth and Grand avenue. At that time, however, he was interrupted by police officers and barely escaped arrest. He was not successful in this attempt. Two or there days previous to this Hart entered and robbed a wholesale house located near Fifth and Delaware streets. He got only a few dollars in currency.

WHERE HE HAS WORKED.

In tell of his work at the safe-blowing, Hart said: "I have been at this business for the past year or two, and in that time I have robbed safes in Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Ohio, Nebraska and Missouri. The biggest haul I ever made was from a bank in some town in Oklahoma. I had to get through four large front doors which were loaded with concrete, but was successful, and sent the money I made in that deal to my mother. I often sent her the biggest part of my makings. She thought I got it honestly. No, I won't tell you her name or where she lives," he replied to a question from the police captain.

"Sometimes I would bank the money I got from the safes," he continued, "but it never got me anything. I am worse broke now than I was when I was living honestly. The job we pulled off last night was to get me money to pay my board.

"When I got the safe all soaped and ready to blow," he said in reply to a question of where he went when the explosion took place, "I usually stand just on top of the safe. There is no danger of any hurt up there, for the explosion always blows out, not up. If it has made too much noise, I most always have time to jump down and pull out the money boxes before anyone gets there, and then make my getaway."

Hart is a man of thirty or more names. He refused to tell his right name to police officers, saying that G. W. Hart was just as good as any. Among the names given were Maycliffe, Miller, Pope, Brown and Simpson. Hart has served a term of years in the Ohio state penitentiary, having been sent there on the charge of assault with intent to kill. He shot a brakeman who tried to eject him from a freight train on which he was stealing a ride. The brakeman was not seriously injured. With this exception he has had no other prison record, being only 26 years of age.

HE'S GREEN AT IT.

William Riley, the other yeggman, was more reticent about his part in the affair of Tuesday night. He claimed that it was his first attempt at safe blowing and admitted that he was rather amateurish about the business. Though he has not done much along the yegging line, he has a much longer prison record than his partner. Most of his matured life has been spent behind prison bars. He is now 47 years old. He was first convicted of highway robbery in Jackson county and sentenced to five years in the state prison. He had not been released from that term many months before he received a sentence at Springfield, Mo., for a term of two years, charged with grand larceny. Besides this he served four years more in the Missouri penitentiary for grand larceny, having been convicted at Sedalia.

When the two men were arrested Tuesday night the woman who keeps the rooming house in which they lived, and Ernest Vega, a Mexican roomer, were also arrested. Hart and Riley have both testified that these two were entirely innocent of the affair, and have asked for their release. It is probable t hat they will be released this morning, as the time limit for investigation of prisoners is over.

Hart will accompany a squad of police officers to his hiding ground at the runway of the Hannibal bridge this morning, when the nitroglycerin, which he has buried there, will be removed. It is lying on the roadside, just under the surface, and it is feared that the wheels of some farm wagon might accidental cause an explosion if it is not removed at once.

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March 11, 1908

TOY SQUIRT GUN HIS WEAPON.

But Jones Wouldn't Be Bluffed and
Landed With Stiff Uppercut.

Roy Jones was walking slowly along Troost avenue near Fifteenth street around 2 o'clock yesterday morning. He was humming a love tune and paid little attention to a man who came up behind him, until he was jabbed in the ribs with something hard, held in the man's right hand.

"Hold up your hands! Give me your money!" the man commanded.

Jones was in for arguing the question, but the man was insistent. As the argued they passed beneath an electric arc light, and James saw the man had a toy squirt gun pistol as a weapon. With one stiff punch, Jones landed an uppercut on the man's jaw.

Just as the man ran away, Patrolman Michael Meany appeared and took a shot at him At Fifteenth and Holmes streets, almost exhausted, the bluff criminal ran into Patrolman James Mulloy and was arrested.

At the Walnut street station he gave the name of Howard A. Watson, an upholsterer. He told Captain Whitsett late in the day that he was "just kiddin'" an' wouldn't harm a fly." Captain Whitsett didn't like that sort of fun between entire strangers, and Watson was charged with highway robbery. He was arraigned before Justice Shoemaker, pleaded guilty and was bound over to the criminal court for trial.

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March 22, 1907

HIS SPEECH BETRAYED HIM.

Jury Gives Highwayman Six Years
-- Pal Pleads Guilty, Gets Five.

Mike Savage says he is an Irishman, but he doesn't make a noise like one. He was in the criminal court yesterday and was given a sentence by a jury of six years for highway robbery. It was charged that he, with the assistance of a man named Sam Hight, held up E. E. Ellis, a brother of the congressman, near Twenty-fifth and Troost on the evening of January 5 and got $3.50 from him.

A part of the testimony for the prosecution was to the effect that the man who held up Mr. Ellishad an unusual impediment in his speech. Mr. Ellis testified that the man who had the revolver exclaimed: "Det up you han's' det 'em up, det 'em up."

During the trial Savage was not permitted by his lawyer to go on the witness stand. Throughout the trial he was mute. But he gave himself away as he left the court room after the verdict was in.

"I dant a new drial," he exclaimed, shaking his fist at Judge Slover. "I dain't doing to be done dis way in dis court."

It was to laugh, and all of the court officials, even Judge Slover, laughed.

Savages wife had made a scene in the court room only an hour or so before and was forcibly put out by the deputies. Hight, Savage's accomplice, pleaded guilty and took a sentence of five years -- one year less than Savage got by standing trial.

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February 23, 1907

ADOPTED A NINTH CHILD.

Mrs. Fanny Savage, Highwayman's
Wife, Accused of Neglect.

When Mike Savage, alias O'Brien, was arrested by Detectives Kenny and Ghent on a charge of highway robbery, at his home, 417 East Eighteenth street, the night of February 14, those officers reported to Colonel J. C. Greenman, Humane agent, that a little 5-month old baby was being kept there in squalor, wretchedness and misery.

Yesterday morning Dr. E. L. Matthias, of the juvenile court and Mrs. Kate Pearson, of the Associated Charities, went to the Eighteenth street house, while Mrs. Fanny Savage, the baby's foster mother, was away and took the little one to Mercy hospital, Fifth street and Highland avenue, where it is said to be in precarious condition.

When Mrs. Savage returned home she was taken before Colonel Greenman for investigation and asked why she had adopted a child of such a tender age and then had neglected it. She said her husband saw it at St. Anthony's home and "took pity on it" and for that reason she adopted it -- "just because my husband wanted me to," she said. "I have eight of my own now and five of them are at home."

Savage, James Severwright, Samuel Hite and Herman, alias "Dutch" Gall, are all confessed highwaymen now in the county jail awaiting trial.

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February 16, 1907

AUTO HIGHWAYMEN FOILED.

Chester L. Jones Tried to Run Over
Them and They Fled.

As Chester L Jones, son of Lawrence M. Jones, merchant, 2613 Troost avenue, was speeding south on Prospect avenue at 11:30 o'clock last night in his automobile two men ran out from the alley just north of Eleventh. One carried a club. They stood in front of the automobile and called "Halt." Mr. Jones kept on and the men jumped for safety.

When he reached the arc light at Eleventh street Mr. Jones stopped and ostentatiously removed his revolver from his hip to an overcoat pocket. He waited for the men to pursue, but they did not come. A man who was standing on the corner stepped over to the machine and asked what the trouble was, but Mr. Jones was suspicious of him and kept his revolver in easy reach.

Seeing that the men did not follow, Mr. Jones continued homeward. He says it was so dark that he could not distinguish the men, further than to say that one was tall and one short and that one had a club.

It was a lucky thing for the men that they jumped aside, for Mr. Jones, who was alone, drove his 50 horse power red juggernaut which could make highwaymen look like pancakes.

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