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January 20, 1910

TWO SERGEANTS STEP UP.

Commissions as Lieutenants for
James and Anderson.

The first promotion of any moment to be made by the present police board took place nar the close of the meeting yesterday when Sergeants Robert E. L. James and Frank H. Anderson, who have given the better parts of their lives to the service, were made lieutenants. Anderson is said to be a Republican and James is a Democrat. Neither man got much encouragement from former boards though their records are both clean.

Anderson, now assigned to desk work at No. 3 station on the Southwest boulevard, went on the force November 9, 1889. On account of his intelligence and adaptability for the work he was assigned for m any eyars to duty in the city clerk's office where he served papers in condemnation suits and did clerical work. On January 9, 1907, while H. M. Beardsley was mayor, Anderson was made a sergeant by a Democratic board. His promtion is said to have been due to former Mayor Beardsley's efforts.

Lieutenant James went on the department as a probationary officer July 22, 1889, a few months before Lieutenant Anderson. As a patrolman James has walked every beat in Kansas City. On July 22, 1902, he was promoted to sergeant.

James early showed particular efficiency in handling large crowds. While outside sergeant at No. 2 station in the West Bottoms during the destructive flood of June, 1903, James distinguished himself.

Last July, when still a sergeant, James was assigned by the police board to Convention hall as instructor in the matter of police duty. This pertained to the old men, already on the force as well as new recruits. In all 241 policemen were instructed in groups of from twenty-five to seventy and their instruction lasted from seventy-two to ninety hours per group. Lieutenant James also had charge of the initial opening of Electric park a few years ago. For two weeks he has had charge of the desk at No. 7 station in Sheffield. Lieutenant James was born at Tipton, Cooper county, Mo., October 17, 1867. His father, Dr. P. T. James, was assistant surgeon general to General Sterling Price of the Confederate army. Some time after the war the family moved to Holden, Mo.. Lieutenant James is married and has four children. He is a brother of Dr. Samuel C. James, a member of the general hospital staff of visiting surgeons and physicians.

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December 14, 1910

DR. NEAL'S BROTHER HURT.

Physician, Called to West, Quits
Hospital Place at Once.

Dr. J. Park Neal, house surgeon at the general hospital, left last night for Los Angeles, Cal., in answer to a telegram that his brother-in-law, E. C. Briggs of Great Bend, Kas., had sustained a badly fractured leg. Dr. Neal, who has been house surgeon since the new hospital was built, tendered his resignation Tuesday, to take effect January 25. As most of the time between now and that time will be consumed in this trip, yesterday virtually was his last day at the hospital.

The position of house surgeon may be abolished. Most of the surgical work is done by visiting surgeons. Dr. Neal also held the position of assistant superintendent. It is not likely this office will be discontinued.

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January 8, 1910

SMALL CHANCE FOR BABY.

Privation Getting Better of Infant
Found in Union Depot.

Privation is getting the better of the week-old baby found shut in a shirt waist box in the Union depot three days ago. It was lying among some litter beneath a seat in the men's waiting room for many hours, the maids believing it was a package someone had thrown away. The physicians at the general hospital where the infant was taken declare it must have been so enclosed at least ten hours and that it has small chance of recovery.

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December 25, 1909

MOTHER COULDN'T MEET HIM.

Claud Bullus, 15 Years Old, Learns
She Is Dead.

One year ago Claud Bullus, now 15 years old, was sent by W. G. Leeman, probation officer of Dallas, Tex., to the boys' industrial school at Nashville, Tenn. A few days ago the officials of the school received a letter from Mr. Leeman containing a ticket and a request that Bullus be allowed to go to Kansas City to spend Christmas with his mother. When the boy arrived in Kansas City night before last he found that his mother had died of tuberculosis at the old general hospital a month ago.

Claud tells a pitiful story. Six years ago he lived in Chicago with his father and mother and two other brothers. The father and mother separated and that is the last he has heard of his father. His oldest brother, Thomas, joined the navy while the mother and other two boys went to Fort Worth, Tex., where her sister resided. They lived with her four months and then went to Dallas where the boys worked at different jobs to support the mother.

About a year ago the mother and her son, Robert, now 18 years old, went to Denver, Col. Claud remained in Dallas and was sent with twelve other boys to the industrial school in Nashville, Tenn. He received a letter once a week from his mother while she was in Denver. About four months ago she and Robert came to Kansas City, where the mother worked as a domestic until she became ill and was taken to the hospital.

Instead of spending a happy Christmas with the mother and brother, Claud will spend the day as he did yesterday, looking for his brother Robert, whom he thinks is still in Kansas City. The boy is being cared for at the old general hospital, where he will remain until he finds his brother or secures a position.

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December 18, 1909

DIDN'T DANCE FAST ENOUGH.

So Man With Revolver Shot Robert
Kimme Through Ankle.

According to a statement made by Robert Kimme, of 912 Bellefontaine avenue, as he lay on the operating table of the emergency hospital last night with his right foot shattered from a revolver bullet, there is an armed maniac roaming the down town district of Kansas City.

Kimme was found lying in an alley near Eighth and McGee streets by Patrolman J. Keenan. He declared that he was taking a short cut downtown from his home when a man armed with a revolver walked up to him and commanded him to dance. Kimme attempted to do so, but his efforts failed to please his captor, who shot him through the right ankle.

After receiving emergency treatment Kimme was taken to the general hospital.

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November 26, 1909

WORKHOUSE INMATES
NOT SERVED TURKEY.

ROAST PORK THERE, WITH SIDE
DISHES PLENTY.

Various Institutions Served Thanks-
giving Dinners -- Children Had
Their Fill of Chicken -- Pris-
oners Not Forgotten.

The unfortunate who are in institutions and the unlucky who happened to be in jail yesterday were not overlooked Thanksgiving day. While a regular turkey and cranberry sauce dinner was not served at all places, on account of the high price of the bird, a good, wholesome, fattening meal was served, where turkey was absent.

In the holdover at police headquarters there were forty prisoners, all but five men. when noontime arrived the following was served to a surprised and hungry bunch: Turkey and cranberry sauce, real biscuits and hot cakes, baked potatoes, hot mince pie and coffee with real cream.

Out at the city workhouse there were 107 men and eighteen women prisoners to be served, too many for turkey at prevailing prices. They were all given their fill, however, of the following menu: Roast pork with dressing, baked Irish potatoes, bakes sweet potatoes, vegetable soup, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, coffee.

A real turkey dinner with cranberry, baked potatoes, celery, vegetables, pie, and coffee with genuine cream was served to the 109 prisoners in the county jail. After appetites had been appeased the men and women put in the rest of the day singing old-time hymns. It has been truthfully said that no old-time hymn can be started in the county jail but that enough voiced immediately join in to make it a success. And they always know the words and the chorus.

CHILDREN MADE HAPPY.

There were but seven children in the Detention home yesterday, but they were not overlooked. The matron saw that they were served with turkey, vegetables, mince pie, coffee, etc.

At the Salvation Army Industrial home, 1709 Walnut street, fifty-five men, and employes of the institution, sat down to Thanksgiving dinner.

"We had turkey, cranberries, potatoes, celery and other vegetables, bread and butter, mince pie, cake, coffee, candy, nuts and apples," said one of the men. "And we got all we wanted, too."

The Salvation Army proper served no Thanksgiving dinner to the poor yesterday, as it makes a specialty of its big Christmas dinner. Baskets are also given out at that time. Wednesday and yesterday baskets were sent out to a few homes where it was known food was needed.

Probably the happiest lot of diners in the entire city were the twenty little children at the Institutional church, Admiral boulevard and Holmes street. While they laughed and played, they partook of these good things: Chicken with dressing, cranberry sauce, sweet and Irish potatoes, celery, olives, salad, oysters, tea, apple pie a la mode, mints, stuffed dates and salted almonds.

DINING ROOM DECORATED.

The dining room was prettily decorated with flowers, and Miss Louise Mayers, a nurse, and Miss Mae Shelton, a deaconess, saw to the wants of the little ones. After the feast all of them took an afternoon nap, which is customary. When they awoke a special musical programme was rendered, and the children were allowed to romp and play games. Those who had space left -- and it is reported all had, as they are healthy children -- were given all the nuts candy and popcorn they could eat.

"I wist Tanksgivin' comed ever day for all th' time there is," said one rosy-cheeked but sleepy little boy when being prepared for bed last night.

Over 200 hungry men at the Helping Hand Institute yesterday were served with soup and tomatoes, escalloped oysters, roast beef, celery, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, cream turnips,cabbage stew, bread, butter, pumpkin pie and coffee.

Out at the General hospital, the convalescent patients were allowed to eat a genuine turkey dinner but those on diet had to stick to poached eggs, toast, milk and the like. A regular Thanksgiving dinner was served to the convalescent at all the hospitals yesterday.

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November 23, 1909

MIDNIGHT ROBBER
KILLS SALOON MAN.

M. A. SPANGLER MURDERED BE-
HIND HIS OWN BAR.

Drops Dead With Bullet Through
Heart -- Son Shot in Pistol Duel
With His Father's
Slayer.

While trying to grasp the revolver of one of two robbers who "stuck up" his saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue at 12:45 this morning, M. A. Spangler was shot across the bar and instantly killed.

In a pistol duel with his father's murderer, Sam Spangler was shot through both arms.

He believes he shot the robber. The latter and his companion escaped.

The murder and holdup occurred in Spangler's saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue about 12:45.

The Spanglers were getting ready to close the saloon for the night. Sam Spangler had removed the cash from the register and was reading the totals from the detail adder, while the father was writing them on a card.

There were two men in the saloon, Al Ackerman, a friend of the Spangler family, and an old man whose identity is not known. Both were seated at tables in front of the bar.

SHOT THROUGH THE HEART.

At this juncture two men, one short and heavy set and the other tall and thin, entered the saloon. They were roughly dressed, and sauntered up about the middle of the room. The tall man walked as far as the big cannon stove at the rear of the bar, but the short man walked up to a point in front of Spangler.

Whipping out a revolver, the short man flourished it and commanded Ackerman and the old man, "Hands up and line up alongside the bar every one of you."

Ackerman and the old man and young Spangler lifted their hands in a hurry to obey the order. Not so old man Spangler. He had been in the street lunch stand business for years and he was not to be bluffed by the sight of a gun.

"Throw up your hands quick," was the second command, this time directed to Mr. Spangler. The latter evidently had been gauging the distance across the bar. Instead of throwing up his hands he lunged forward, grasping for the revolver. He missed the gun and that instant the robber pulled the trigger.

"Oh!" Spangler cried, and collapsed.

Another shot was fired at him, but it missed. The first one had passed through his heart.

SON TRIED TO AVENGE HIM.

Sam Spangler at the first shot pulled open a drawer in the back bar and grabbed a huge navy revolver. Turning around he faced the robber, and began firing. Both emptied their revolvers, the robber retreating toward the front door as he fired his last shot. Meanwhile the tall, thin robber, who had gotten half way behind the bar, turned and fled toward the rear, when young Spangler started shooting. He escaped through a rear door.

Ackerman, who had been standing near the front of the saloon, ran out of the door at the first shot. When the shooting inside ceased he started back but was met by the robber with the revolver who pressed it against his abdomen.

"Get out of my way before I kill you," cried the robber.

Ackerman got out of the way, and returning to the saloon asked for the big revolver.

Young Spangler put a shell in it by this time and Ackerman started after the robber. He chased him to McGee street and half way down to Twenty-first street pulling the trigger several times on the shell, which proved defective and failed to explode.

When he returned to the saloon, he found Sam Spangler bending over the body of his father. He had been shot in both arms and his blood was mingling with that of his father's.

WHO GOT THE MONEY?

It could not be positively ascertained this morning whether the robber got the money which Spangler had taken from the cash register and placed in a glass. During the excitement it is believed that the money was replaced in the register. This was locked and the keys were taken in charge by the police. The sum is said to have been in the neighborhood of $50.

A riot call was sent to No. 4 police station and a squad of police under Sergeant H. L. Goode drove to the saloon. Young Spangler was taken to the general hospital, where his injuries were dressed.

The body of Mr. Spangler was taken to the Stewart undertaking establishment.

M. A. Spangler was about 50 years old. He lived with his family at No. 1322 1/2 Wyandotte street. He leaves a widow and two sons, Sam and William, both grown. The widow and some relatives are in Glasgow, Mo. A telegram was sent to them immediately after the shooting.

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November 22, 1909

WOUNDED MAN WON'T
TELL WHO SHOT HIM.

HARRY BONNELL MAY CARRY
HIS SECRET TO DEATH.

Revolver Found in Room of Former
Wild West Show Rider; Wom-
an May Prove an Impor-
tant Witness.
Harvey Bonnell, Rooming House Shooting Victim.
HARVEY BONNELL.

Lying on the floor in a dingy rooming house at 509 East Sixth street, with a bullet wound in his breast, Harvey Bonnell was found yesterday afternoon.

Although he knew that he was in a dangerous condition, Bonnell refused to tell how he received the wound. At the general hospital, where he was rushed in the police ambulance, he refused to talk to Norman Woodson, an assistant prosecuting attorney, who attempted to get a dying statement.

"I'm not going to tell how it happened," he declared. "Perhaps I'll die, but I'm not going to give anyone away."

He then turned over and then refused to utter another word.

When the police arrived at the scene Sadie Gear, proprietress of the rooming house, was seen going upstairs. She was agitated and declared that she was not in the room at the time. At police headquarters she maintained the story.

Sergeant Robert Smith sent several officers to the building, where everyone was questioned closely. Mrs. Gear was brought to the station with several roomers.

Patrolman Gurney Shaw, after a long search, found the pistol in a room on the third floor, which was occupied by Lee Rarick, formerly a rough rider with Miller Bros.' Wild West show.


ADMITS HEARING SHOT.

Though Rarick denied at first that he knew anything about the affair, he admitted that he heard a shot, and a few minutes later, Harry Gordon, one of the roomers, had brought the revolver to his room.

Mrs. Sadie Gear.
SADIE GEAR,
Considered an Important Witness by Police.

"I loaned it to Mrs. Gear a week ago," he said. "because I didn't want to keep it up here in my room. I'm sure I don't know who did it.

Gordon would make no statement to the police. Mrs. Gear was in a defiant mood when she faced Captain Whitsett. She asserted that she had frequently quarreled with Bonnell, who abused her.

"But I don't know a thing about the shooting today," she declared, "I got up for a moment and went out and then I heard the shooting. I went upstairs, and then they told me that Bonnell had been shot. Yes, that's the same revolver that was given me to keep by one of my roomers."

Captain Whitsett asserted last night that he expected the mystery would be cleared up quickly.

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November 19, 1909

WOMAN BALL PLAYER DEAD.

Former Bloomer Girl Will Be Buried
in Potter's Field.

Miss Daisy Hoover, for ten years a professional baseball player, died destitute in the city hospital November 11 and was be buried in the potter's field yesterday.

Miss Hoover was for several years second baseman on the Boston Bloomer Girls, but for the past two seasons had been playing in the East with the Star Bloomers, making her home during the winter in Kansas City. Last winter she had charge of one of the concessions in the Hippodrome. She returned to Kansas City about a month ago and three days later was taken sick and wsent to the hospital. She is survived by a sister, Mrs. George Johnson, Navarre, Ohio.

Claud East, manager of the cafe at 307 East Twelfth street, formerly manager of the Boston Bloomer Girls, says that Miss Hoover was one of the best women ball players that ever threw a ball.

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October 17, 1909

JUDGE PUTS BAN ON BEGGING.

Cripples Will Be Sent to Hospital
and Others to Workhouse.

"Mooching" on the streets is not to be tolerated in the future. Cripples, who are not able to work, will be sent to the General hospital and those who are begging and are able-bodied will be sent to the workhouse.

That is the substance of an ultimatum delivered by the judge of the municipal court yesterday morning, when a crippled man was brought into court for begging at Eighth and Main streets. In the opinion of the court, Kansas City is able to take care of its needy without its streets being infested with beggars.

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Octoberr 4, 1909

GIFTS TO CITY AND OTHERS.

Swope Park But One of His Contributions.

During his lifetime, Colonel Swope did much for the city in which he amassed his fortune. He gave to the city Swope park, 1,354 acres of land valued at $1,000 per acre. This beautiful tract of land has been converted into one of the finest natural recreation grounds in the Middle West, and it gave the donor much pleasure to see it appreciated as it is.

The land for the new city hospital at Twenty-third and Locust was given to the city by Colonel Swope.

He gave the Young Women's Christian Association $50,000 for its building fund. To the Young Men's Christian Association he gave $5,000.

He gave the ground for the Home for the Aged at Thirty-first and Locust. He recently gave the Franklin Institute, a charitable organization at 1901 McGee street, $50,000 to be used in building a new home, on the condition that the organization raise another $50,000 to add to it.

Many other smaller donations were made toward the work of extending charity to the needy and afflicted and it is said that never did he refuse to heed a plea for funds to conduct such work.

Colonel Swope devoted his time and energy almost entirely to his business. He was at his office early and late. He had been absent from his office but a few days in four or five years until he was taken ill September 2. On that day he was at his office the last time, but he directed his affairs from his sick room and took the same keen interest in the transaction of his business.

HELPED HIS OLD SCHOOL.

The first gift known to have made by the philanthropist was for the sum of $1,000 to the Presbyterian church in Danville, Ky., where he had worshiped so long as a student at Center college. Being a graduate of the famous old institution, Colonel Swope never lost interest in his alma mater, and learning that the school needed a library he made it possible for the old college to obtain one. He offered to give $25,000 to the school for the purpose if another $25,000 was raised. On March 15, 1902, the authorities of the school notified him that the required amount had been subscribed, and he sent his draft for $25,000. The name of the donor had not before been given, as he had requested that it only be given out that an alumnus had offered the money.

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September 24, 1909

A BARNUM ALBINO DYING.

Joseph Lucasie Imported by Show-
man Fifty Years Ago.

Joseph Lucasie, who was one of the Albino family which the late showman P. T. Barnum imported from Belgium to his museum in New York city, over fifty years ago, is dying of dropsy at the general hospital. It was thought last night that he could not survive through today. His hair is white as wool and his eyes are pink.

In his show bills, Barnum advertised the Lucasie family, consisting of four members, as being the last of a famous tribe of Albinos of Madagascar. They were Joseph's father, mother and sister. Joseph was 9, and his sister 12 years old. All were musicians.

Joseph was taken suddenly ill Wednesday afternoon at his home, 1117 Norton street.

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September 19, 1909

ANONYMOUS LETTER CAUSES
CHAUFFEUR'S FATAL INJURY.

L. L. Moore, Found Unconscious on
Pavement Friday Night, Dies
at General Hospital.

An anonymous letter was the cause of the fight which resulted in the death of L. L. Moore yesterday afternoon at the General hospital where he had been taken unconscious on the day previous. Moore was a chauffeur and had fought with Benjamin Lamon, another chauffeur at Fifteenth street and Troost avenue. It developed that his injuries were due to his fall on the pavement.

Lamon is employed by Charles S. Keith of the Central Coal and Coke company. He became angry when Mr. Kieth showed him a letter written by an unknown person which accused Lamon of "joy riding" in Keith's motor car. Suspicion pointed to Moore who was desirous of obtaining a position with Mr. Keith and had written an application for position as chauffeur. The handwriting in both cases were similar.

When Lamon accused Moore as the author of the letter at the Missouri Valley Automobile Company, 1112-14 East Fifteenth street, Friday night, Moore refused to make any explanation or denial. A fight followed, and when Moore fell to the sidewalk he struck his head on the curbing, resulting in concussion of the brain, according to surgeons at the General hospital.

Lamon was arrested early morning, and yesterday afternoon was arraigned in Justice Miller's court for second degree murder. He pleaded not guilty. He was released on a $2,000 bond furnished by Mr. Keith. Lamon lives at 1525 Oak street and is married. Moore formerly lived at Maryville, Mo., and had only been in the city a few weeks. He worked for Mrs. Amy Cruise of 1209 Commerce building.

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June 27, 1909

ENGINE HIT BALL PLAYER.

Boy Run Down While Chasing Foul
at Stevens's Park.

While chasing a foul ball across the Belt Line track during a baseball game at Twenty-fourth street and the Southwest boulevard at 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon, Claude Davidson, 12 years old, was run over by a switch engine and mangled by the wheels. He was taken to the general hospital where his right leg and arm were amputated by Dr. J. Park Neal. It was thought at the hospital last night that the boy would recover.

Two boy teams were playing at the Stephens ball park at the time of the accident. Claude Davidson was what is known among school boys as "pig-tailer" and his business was to recover lost balls and catch fouls landing far behind the batter. One of the latter crossed the low fence behind the field and it was in pursuit of it that the boy was hit by the switch engine. His father, William C. Davidson, lives at 1660 Jefferson street.

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May 25, 1909

CRUELTY CHARGES ARE
DENIED BY WITNESSES.

TEN ARE HEARD IN REBUTTAL
AT HOSPITAL INVESTIGATION.

Visitors and Empolyes Testify No
Cruelty Was Shown to Patients.
Records Back Up Their
Statements.

Ten witnesses, most of them in rebuttal, were put on the stand yesterday by the defense, when the hearing before the joint council committee in the matter of the charges preferred against the management of the new general hospital was resumed in the lower house council chamber.

In explaining how she came to tell a Mrs. Dougherty that a woman friend of the latter was "sitting up and doing well," w hen the woman was really dead, Mrs. Myrtle Keene, telephoneoperator at the hospital, said: "When the call came in the woman did not speak plainly, and all I understood was 'Mc.' I looked on the chart and found but one Mc., a Mr. McVey. I asked if McVey was the name and she was that it was. I was informed by McVey's nurse that he was sitting up and doing nicely, and told the woman so.

"Later I learned that the woman was asking about Mrs. McKay, who had died the night before and whose card had been taken out of the chart at my side. It was purely a mistake and when the woman called up later and I tried to apologize she would not let me explain."

A copy of the hospital chart for the date in question was introduced in evidence to show that McVey was the only "Mc" on the list that day.

Peter Doran, referred to quite often as "Dad," said that he had not beaten a patient because the latter asked for a crust of bread, as charged by the promoters. He said he never struck a patient, and had never known of any such treatment. Doran said that F. A. Wolf, who made serious charges, had bade him a fond goodby when he left the hospital, and had volunteered to take along his hat and clean it for nothing, returning it two weeks later in person.

Dr. S. C. James said the hospital compared favorably with any of its kind in the country.

Dr. W. A. Shelton, police surgeon, told of his connection with the Charles Newell case. He said that Newell was taken to the emergency hospital soon after his injury and hurried out to general hospital as soon as it was seen that his case was serious. Although Dr. J. D. Griffith and Dr. J. Park Neal were in the operating room ready to attend Newell, Dr. Shelton said the injured policeman refused all aid and demanded to be removed to the German hospital, where he could be treated by Dr. J. S. Snyder. He died shortly after being moved.

Fred Bowen, an orderly, explained how a patient named Starr came to leave the hospital. Money was sewed up in his undershirt, and when Starr was informed that he would have to leave it in the office for safe keeping, he dressed and left the institution, Bowen said.

Rev. T. B. Marvin, an evangelist who has visited the hospital for the last sixteen years, and the Rev. J. C. Schindel of the English Lutheran church, told of their many visits there, and said they heard no complaints from the patients, although they had made close inquiry. Mr. Schindel told of a Mrs. Merkle, who had made charges. He said she had written him since, and stated that she had been asked to make the charges, which she now regretted. He promised to send her letter to the committee.

To impeach, if possible, the evidence of Arthur Slim, who testified that "a whole quart of raw acid was poured over my ulcerated leg," Fred Freeman, the ward orderly who dressed the leg, was placed on the stand. The treatment blank, showing what dressing and medicines were used, was placed in evidence. Nothing was used to burn.

Slim also swore that he was "thrown out of the hospital at 11 o'clock on a cold night, with no shoes." The records showed that he was discharged at 11:45 a. m., and R. E. Crockett, property clerk at the hospital, testified that Slim had come to him and complained that his shoes were full of holes. Crockett said he gave the man a new pair of hospital slippers, after he had stated that they would suffice until he reached his room. The discharge blank also showed that Slim was sent away from the hospital for violating rules and for being abusive and profane. The record is an old one and was made long before charges were even contemplated.

Ernest A. Baker testified that while he was dangerously ill with pneumonia his wife called up every hour for two whole nights, and each time was given his pulse, temperature and general condition.

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May 5, 1909

WITNESSES DENY STORIES
ATTRIBUTED TO PATIENTS.

Evidence Introduced to Refute
Charges Against Management
of General Hospital.

Six witnesses were heard for the defense in the general hospital investigation yesterday. The hearing was then adjourned until Saturday at 2:30 p. m., wh en the committee will meet at the city hall. The last two sessions, for convenience of nurses and doctors, were held at the new general hospital.

Miss Catherine May, a former nurse in the hospital, was the first witness. John A. Johnson, Mrs. Violet Hutchins, Miss Josie Pomfret and "Sig Frisco" were patients there, and she attended each of them. As to Johnson, whom she nursed at the old hospital, she said he was not allowed to lie on a damp, cold bed, never did lie on the floor all night and was never strapped to a chair while nude and left in the cold as is charged.

Miss May then told of having received Mrs. Hutchins into the hospital and of the patient having assaulted her while refusing to take a bath. She also told of the patient's threats toward her baby and of having heard her say: "I'll get this hospital in trouble. I'm a good talker in court all right." As to the Miss Pomfret charges Miss May said the young woman demanded a private room and refused to give up her personal property as required.

Regarding Frisco, who swore that he lay all night and a day with no attention from a doctor or nurse, Miss May told of giving him an alcohol rub, placing hot water bottles about him and giving medicine to ease him, after which Frisco said he was "very comfortable."

Mrs. Kate E. Pierson, connected with the Associated Charities and a member of the tenement and pardons and paroles boards, told of sending many patients to the hospital, and of visiting them afterwards. She never heard but one complaint, that of a father regarding food given his daughter.

"I happened in the hospital at meal time a few days later," the witness said, "and the food the girl got was well cooked and good enough for anyone."

In the matter of a charge alleged to have been made by Dr. C. B. Irwin, investigator for the tenement commission, against the treatment of tuberculosis patients at the hospital, Mrs. Pierson said the report was a verbal one made to the board, and that Dr. Irwin had no authority to make such investigation, as the commission has no jurisdiction over the hospital.

Dr. B. H. Zwart, coroner, was placed on the stand to tell of an autopsy which he held on the body of Harry Roberts to determine the cause of death. After the post-mortem it was discovered that Roberts had died of Banta's disease, a rare ailment.

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April 18, 1909

OLD SOLDIER SAVES
LIFE OF A WOMAN.

KNOCKED DOWN MAN WHO
STABBED MRS. ETHEL GRAY.

George Ripley, in Mad Fit, Was
Using Knife on Keeper of Room-
ing House When Charles
Hendrickson Interfered.

The strong right arm of Charles Hendrickson, 68 years old and a member of Fighting Joe Hooker's command during the civil war, saved the life of Mrs. Ethel Gray, 25 years old, last night at 9 o'clock. Hendrickson knocked down George Ripley, an admirer of Mrs. Gray's, after he had stabbed her in the back with a dirk.

Mrs. Gray, whose husband is out of town, bought a building at 215 East Fourteenth street last week and opened it as a rooming house for men only. Hendrickson, who is a carpenter, and W. T. Huddleston, a druggist, were among the roomers.

"I have known George Ripley only a week," she said at the general hospital last night. "He made my acquaintance in a restaurant and walked home with me. He called two or three times but never made love to me until last night. When he came into the room I saw that he had been drinking and it was not long before he began making love to me in the presence of Mr. Hendrickson. I am a married woman and, of course, I paid no attention to him. Then he got angry and struck me."

Hendrickson caught the man's arm after he had landed several blows on Mrs. Gray's face. Huddleston heard the noise and came to the old soldier's assistance. Between them they quieted the man and locked him in a rear room, while Mrs. Gray ran to the drug store of Adolph Lahme at Fourteenth street and Grand avenue and telephoned the Walnut street police station for an officer.

While she was away Ripley escaped from the house by opening a window, but Hendrickson and Huddleston almost immediately discovered his absence and went to the front door to prevent him from waylaying their landlady on her return. Ripley sprang out of the alley between Grand avenue and McGee streets and Huddleston attempted to prevent him from reaching Mrs. Gray.

"This isn't your butt-in," said Ripley. Huddleston gave way and Ripley ran after Mrs. Gray. At her own doorstep he caught her and stabbed her once in the back. Then the old soldier, who was standing on the steps, stepped down and struck the would-be assassin in the face. Ripley was knocked down, but arose and rushed at the woman again. Hendrickson struck again and knocked the knife out of his hand. Then Ripley fled.

The ambulance from the Walnut street police station was called and Dr. H. A. Hamilton dressed the cut, which was in the middle of the back. The knife penetrated to the vertebra. While the physician was at work the woman told the story to officers J. S. Scott and E. M. Wallace and furnished them with a description and a picture of her assailant. Later she was removed to the general hospital, where it was said that she would recover. Ripley has not been arrested. He is about 25 years old and rooms at 1322 Wyandotte street.

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April 13, 1909

GREEK HAS AWAKENED
ONLY ONCE IN 35 DAYS.

LONG-DISTANCE SLEEPER PUZ-
ZLES HOSPITAL PHYSICIANS.

With Organs of Body Apparently in
Normal Condition, Every Ef-
fort to Arouse Carolmas
Has Failed.
George Carolmas, Who Has Been Asleep for Most of 35 Days.
GEORGE CAROLMAS, THE SOUND SLEEPER OF
THE GENERAL HOSPITAL.

Lying on a cot in the insane ward at the general hospital, George Carolmas, a subject of the king of Greece, has for thirty-five days been asleep without interruption except for one day last week. Before being removed from his rooming house, 15 West Fifth street, on March 12, he ha slept for four days.

Carolmas came to America from his home in Athens, about eight months ago. He worked on the railroad as a track layer after arriving in Missouri. Like most of the thrifty foreigners, Carolmas saved most of his wages and horded it for the proverbial rainy day. In some way which has not been satisfactorily explained he lost his little savings and brooded over his misfortune.

The Greeks who knew him were aware that Carolmas was brooding over his loss, but little attention was paid until March 8. That morning Carolmas failed to get up and go to work. His landlord knocked on the door of his room several times during the day to awaken him, but failed to receive any response. In the afternoon he entered the room and discovered that his roomer was sound asleep and that speaking to him or shaking him would not waken him. Becoming frightened the Greek landlord summoned Dr. George Ringel of the emergency hospital.

CONSCIOUS BUT ASLEEP.

Four days later Carolmas was sent to the general hospital for treatment. He was examined carefully by the staff at the general hospital and found to be conscious but asleep. As far as the physicians have been able to discover every organ in the patient's body is normal. His breathing is regular and his heart action is apparently good.

Food is given to the patient five or six times each day. Part of the time the nurses furnish him with nourishment by pouring a small quantity of broth or milk in his mouth and allowing him to swollow it naturally. At other times the patient does not swallow and a stomach pump is brought into use. His nourishment consists mainly of milk and eggs. Very little nourishment is necessary.

When taken to the hospital the Greek patient weighted about 170 pounds., but since then he has lost about ten pounds. He is evidently about 35 years old. On last Thursday Carolmas woke up, and from all appearances was over his sleeping spell. He walked around the corridors of his ward and the specialists believed he was recovering. However, he became tired after being awake for thirty hours, and went back to sleep.

While he was awake last week Carolmas gave evidence of being hysterical. He followed "Pete," the man in charge of the ward, around and continually kowtowed to him. He would get down on his knees and kiss the attendant's shoes. Then he spent a great deal of time in prayer, which would be followed by a spell of crying. If the physicians or attendants atteempted to talk to him, he would break down and weep.

EVEN BATH DOESN'T WAKE HIM.

The treatment being given to him is the best afforded by the hospital. Every day he is given a hot water bath, then an attendant gives him a thorough massage. Treatment with electricity is not possible as the hospital is not equipped for it. What the hospital physicians are endeavoring to do is to build up the man's nervous centers, but about all they can do with him is give him food and a tonic.

From examinations by the best specialists in the city it is believed that Carolmas is suffering from a shattering of the nervous centers. His condition is scientifically termed as stuperous melancholia. It could result from narcolepsy, kidney disease, softening of the brain or from the sleeping sickness common in Africa. A tumor on the brain might also cause such a condition.

As a tumor could be diagnosed and the physicians have failed to find any signs of one in the case of the Greek, that cause has been eliminated. They have also decided that he is not suffering from narcolepsy. On account of his hysteria while awake last week, and the meager information or history of his health before arriving at the general hospital, the physicians are positive that his nervous condition is responsible.

People of Carolmas's nationality are high strung and subject to nervous diseases. If crossed or thrown into any excitement the Greek people are said to go off on a tangent and become nervous wrecks.

HAPPENED HERE BEFORE.

More than two years ago a man was picked up on the street who was believed by pedestrians to be unconscious. He was removed to the general hospital, where it was found that he was really asleep. He continued sleeping for 42 days, being sustained that long by forced feeding, and then died.

Dr. St. Elmo Sanders, former city physician, said yesterday that whenever a patient suffering from a continuous sleep had to be nourished by force chances of recovery were not good.

The man found on the streets two years ago finally slept so profoundly that if he was placed in a chair he would not move a muscle. His legs could be bent and the patient would not move them.

Dr. John Puntin, a specialist of nervous diseases, said that he had had a great many patients who slept for long periods. Most of them, however, would have short intervals of wakefulness. The disease is not necessarily fatal, he said. The physicians who have examined Carolmas believe he will recover, but will not say how much longer he might sleep. All of the physicians and specialists in Kansas City are greatly interested in the case.

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April 7, 1909

COME HOME, WROTE PARENTS.

Pathetic Letters Establish Identity
of Girl Suicide.

There is no longer any doubt as to the identity of Miss Effie Sloan, the young woman who committed suicide by jumping from a third-story window of the general hospital April 3. Miss Sloan was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. N. M. Sloan of Jasper, Ark., according to several letters found yesterday in her trunk.

It is apparent from the letters that the parents live on a farm a few miles from town and that the girl had been away from home a year or more.

"Do come home, dear; we are so anxious to see you once more," is a phrase which occurs many times in brief notes from father and mother. "We thought a long time that you had been killed in a railroad accident and we have worried our hearts sore," says one of the letters, signed by the father.

The fact that several women who knew Misss Sloan here professed to believe that she was using an assumed name led to the investigation of her effects by the administrator and the coroner at the Wagner undertaking rooms yesterday.

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April 5, 1909

HOSPITAL PATIENT'S SUICIDE.

Woman Tricks Nurse and Hurls
Herself From Third Story
Window to Death.

Nurses and patients at the general hospital were startled and shocked last night when Effie Sloan, a patient, committed suicide by leaping from a window on the third floor to the ground below. She was dead when assistance reached her side a few seconds after she jumped.

Miss Sloan entered the hospital on March 31. She was assigned to the ward on the third floor in which were other women patients. The woman was very restless on Saturday afternoon and night, but yesterday the physicians noticed that she was very quiet. About 7:00 last night as one of the nurses passed her cot she asked for a glass of milk. the nurse started after the milk, and Miss Sloan arose from her bed.

After getting up the patient walked the length of the ward to a window. She raised it and began climbing up on the sill. Two patients, Misses Cora Smith and Lulu Williams, took in the situation and ran towards her in an effort to prevent her from jumping. As Miss Smith reached the window Miss Sloan threw herself from off the window ledge.

Succeeding in catching only a slight hold of the gown worn by the woman, Miss Smith was not able to hold her long enough to give Miss Williams time to help. Miss Sloan weighed about 160 pounds, and the woman who attempted to hold her against the window sill by her gown weighs 120 pounds.

When Miss Sloan broke from the grasp of Miss Smith, her body shot downward to the turf beneath the window, and the two patients screamed and fainted. The nurse on duty in the ward immediately notified the internes who ran to the woman's aid. It was found that her skull had been fractured and that death was instantaneous.

When Miss Sloan entered the hospital she gave her age as 26 years, and her residence as 1123 Oak street.

The coroner was notified of the suicide by Dr. J. Park Neal and asked to make an investigation.

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April 3, 1909

WOMEN FIGHT TO SEE
BOY CRUSHED BY CAR.

HYSTERICAL MOTHERS THINK
INJURED CHILD THEIR OWN.

Strong Men Weep as Jimmie
Palermo, Whose Father Saw
Him Hurt, Is Taken From
Under the Wheels.

While running across the street car tracks on Eighth street near Forest avenue about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, "Jimmie" Palermo, 5 years old, was run down by Independence avenue car 247, westbound, and injured to such an extent that both of his legs had to be amputated above the knee. The operation was performed at the general hospital immediately after the accident. Dr. J. Park Neal, who amputated the boy's legs, reported last night that he had survived the operation in a marvelous manner for one so young, and that he had a fighting chance for his life.

The boy is a son of Salvatore Palermo, an Italian grocer and butcher at 1103 East Eighth street, who lives on the second floor of 1103. The father, with Mack Carter, his butcher, saw the accident. The father ran to the scene, but became frantic when he saw his child pinned down by the front trucks of the car, and had to be taken away.

CROWD WEEPS AT SIGHT.

Two mothers, who thought that the child might be theirs, fought with tiger like ferocity with the crowd until they got to where they could get a look at the pale face of the little fellow.

The boy lay in such a position that he could not be moved until the car was "jacked up." The wrecking crew arrived in a few minutes, and with the aid of volunteers, the car tracks were elevated sufficiently. The boy's arm slipped to his side, and three marbles fell from his nerveless grasp.

"Take hold gently, men, and lift the boy out," said the foreman of the wrecking crew as the ambulance stretcher arrived.

"I just can't do it. I have seen enough to break my heart," said a big workman with sleeves rolled to the elbows, exposing a pair of muscular brown arms. He leaned against a trolley pole and wept bitterly.

As the ambulance was leaving another mother of the neighborhood arrived and battled with the dense crowd to get a look at the injured boy. Every woman in the crowd was crying, as were some of the men, and little brothers and sisters and playmates of the boy screamed with fright and grief.

FATHER SAW THE ACCIDENT.

"Mr. Palermo and I were standing in the door of his store when the accident happened," said Mack Carter, the butcher at the store. "We saw little Jimmie as he started to cross the street from the north to the south side about half way between the alley and Forest avenue. When he saw the car he made a motion as if to turn back. The motorman had slowed down at first, but put on speed again. It looked as if he calculated for the boy to cross the tracks before the car reached him, but Jimmie became confused and was struck by the fender and knocked across the track. It looked like an accident to me."

The grief in the Palermo home was tragic. Between sobs, prayers were said in Italian, and supplication made to Heaven to preserve the boy's life.

SNITCH LATE, BUT THERE.

While the family was in the midst of its grief a stranger appeared. Taking a card from his pocket he said, giving his name:

"Here is my card. I am a lawyer, but I got here a too late to see the accident. Send someone out into the street and get the boy's cap and those marbles. They are excellent evidence before a jury. Get the exact time of the accident , the number of the car and all the witnesses you can. I would like to handle this case for you."

Later in the evening Patrolmen William L. Cox and W. H. Schickhardt boarded car 247 and after riding to the end of the line arrested the conductor, H. E. Stoutz, 4100 East Ninth street, and the motorman, J. E. Warnike, 4600 Independence avenue. At police headquarters they made no statement and were ordered held for investigation, without bond, by Captain Walter Whitsett.

Representatives of the street car company insisted that a charge be placed against their men. Later in the evening an information was secured charging them with manslaughter in the fourth degree, a rather unusual charge while the boy was still living. They were taken to the home of Justice James H. Richardson, 2117 Prospect avenue, and arraigned on that charge. The men were then released on bond signed by representatives of their company. Their preliminary will be later. If the boy does not die, the charge will have to be changed.

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March 30, 1909

IS AWAKENED TOO QUICKLY.

Somnambulist Plunges Through
a Window, 12 Feet to Ground.

Too suddenly awakened by his roommate calling him, Henry Harris, a plasterer, while walking in his sleep in his room at 901 East Eighteenth street, at an early hour yesterday morning, plunged through a second story window. He landed on the soft soil of the lawn twelve feet below, and but for severe cuts on his head mad by the broken window panes, would have been uninjured. H e was taken to the general hospital.

Harris has been in the city only five weeks. He is a somnambulist, he says, and has had several hard falls from being frightened while touring his rooms in his sleep.

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March 27, 1909

THREATENED TO PUT
LAWYERS IN JAIL.

Persistent Interruptions in Hospital
Hearing Got on the Nerves of
Alderman Clubertson.

Threats of imposing a fine, with the alternative of going to jail, were made yesterday afternoon by W. C. Culbertson, chairman of the council committee hearing the charges against the management of the general hospital. Attorneys W. O. Cardwell and J. A. McLain, who are conducting the investigation for the complainants, were the objects of the alderman's threat. Members of the inquiry committee were compelled to request the attorneys to desist from interrupting cross-examination of witnesses.

One of the witnesses yesterday was Scott Murphy, an ex-policeman and a painter, who was an inmate of the new general hospital in November. He testified that he saw an extract poured on the injured leg of Arthur Slim, who testified that "Curley" Bates did it. But Murphy swore that a nurse did it and that Bates was not in the room.

Murphy testified that he was treated very well except that the doctors refused to give him any medicine for his cough, and that one of the nurses slipped him some cough tablets. He told of being in the "dope" ward, and also in the "crazy" ward. It was the latter place, he said, that he saw one man put in the bath tub, fulled with ice water, several times each day.

The most serious charge this witness made against the hospital was that of washing the dishes, knives and forks in an uncleanly manner.

Mrs. Maggie Struble was called by the complainants and testified that a son of hers died in the hospital March 18, 1909, and that Dr. Neal had charged her $2, which she has not paid, to sign the death certificate. She also said he had performed a postmortem on the body after she had refused to give him her consent for it to take place.

As to the treatment of her son while in the hospital she said that her son told her they treated him "fine." The only thing she complained of regarding the treatment her son received was that they fed him cooked pigs' feet unseasoned.

The committee then asked Dr. Neal to take the stand. He said that he had refused to sign a death certificate because he did not know the cause of the young man's death. The coroner, he testified, signed the death certificate and performed a postmortem on the body. Dr. Neal admitted charging $2 for filling out the certificate for the insurance company.

Two witness placed on the stand by the complainants were Fannie and Greg Grant, negroes, who testified that they were charged $5 by a physician at the hospital who filled out the insurance papers.

The investigation will be resumed next Monday afternoon.

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March 25, 1909

KILLS HIS FRIEND
IN JEALOUS RAGE.

JOSEPH FLANAGAN TOO ATTEN-
TIVE TO MRS. LEON BRADY.

Husband, Returning From Office,
Finds Attentions Being Forced
on His Wife -- Fires
Three Shots.

Opening the door of his room to find his wife struggling to free herself from the grasp of another man, Leon Brady of 1014 East Fifteenth street, a mechanical draftsman in the employ of the board of education, shot and fatally wounded Josehp Flanagan, a land promoter of El Hito, N. M. The shooting occurred at 1:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon in the hallway of the boarding house at 1014 East Fifteenth streeet, where both Flanagan and the Brady family lived.

Upon arriving at his office at 1526 Campbell street shortly after lunch yesterday afternoon, Brady "felt that something was wrong at home." He went immediately to the East Fifteenth street boarding house and found the door of his room locked and his wife inside. His wife responded to his knock.

"After I had been in the room a few moments, my wife went out and down to the second floor. I shut the door and waited for her to return. In about five minutes I heard her cough. I listened and she coughed again. Then I went to the door and waited. I could not hear anything at first, but in a moment I heard someone whispering and it seemed excited. Then I heard my wife say: 'No! No! No!' in a half frightened, half sobbing tone.

RELOADED HIS REVOLVER.

"I cannot explain my action and I cannot tell how I feel about it now. I saw my wife struggle and I knew the man. I was white with rage and I could not control myself. It was that kind of a situation about which little is remembered and nothing is clear."

Brady rushed to the bureau and grabbed his revolver. Throwing the door open he saw Flanagan and his wife. Then he fired.

Flanagan fell at the first shot. Mrs. Brady uttered a cry and her husband fired twice again at his victim. Flanagan then arose and groped his way to his own room, while Brady went back and put two more cartridges in his revolver. Mrs. Brady, at her husband's request, went to the telephone and notified the police.

Flanagan was taken to the general hospital, where he died two hours later. In his statement to Assistant Prosecutor Garrett, he said he realized he was about to die and had given up all hope. He declared that his relations with Mrs. Brady had never been otherwise than friendly.

At the Walnut street police station where Brady surrendered he stated that Flanagan had persistently attempted to force his attention upon Mrs. Brady. "Flanagan was under the influence of liquor a week ago and he came to our room in that condition. He called my wife by her first name, Rose, and this impression of intimacy with my wife angered me," he said.

"Last Sunday I went out to my father's house at 3115 Benton boulevard, and took Billy, my year-old son, with me. While there someone called me on the telephone, and a woman's voice said, 'You had better come home and see what is doing.' I immediately returned to the boarding house.

BRADY CAN'T EXPLAIN.

"My wife told me when I arrived at the house that Flanagan had come to her room after I left and said to her, 'You are expecting someone.' She told me she was offended by his talk and manner, and asked him why he had taken advantage of my absence to come and see her. He told her that I need not know about it, and my wife told him that she would tell me. Flanagan was angry at that, and said to her, 'I'll fix you if you do. I'll do you dirt.' "

According to the statements of both men, they were out walking together the two evenings before the shooting took place. Both say that on no occasion had Mrs. Brady ever been mentioned by them.

Yesterday at noon when Brady came to lunch he found Flanagan already at the table and sat down with him. They talked during the meal and afterward Brady carried a lunch up to his wife, who is ill and confined to her room.

In an ante-mortem statement Flanagan said Mrs. Brady came out of the room in to the passageway, and following her, Brady appeared and shot him without saying a word. "I fell after the first shot," said he, "and then he fired twice more. I said, 'Oh Brady, Brady, Brady! Why have you done this?' His wife said nothing; simply stood there.

"We had always been good friends and he had never spoken to me about her. She told me to look out for him two days ago. I did not know anything was wrong or that he had anything against me until his wife told me. I ate lunch with him today and and boarded at the same house with them. I have known both of them about four months."

THE BRADY ROMANCE.

Brady is a graduate of the engineering department of Columbia university in New York and is the son of J. H. Brady, chief engineer of the board of education of Kansas City. He was yesterday elected president of the National Association of Heating and Sanitary Engineers in New York. Young Brady is said by his classmates to have been exceptionally bright and stood high with his teachers and others.

Leaving school he went to Mexico as a mining engineer. While riding on the cowcatcher of one of the small locomotives employed about the mines, the engine struck a burro standing in the tracks. The animal fell on Brady and the force of the impact broke his leg in two places. The injured man was taken to the house of the mine superintendent and nursed back to health by the daughter of the household. During the days when he lay helpless on his bed, he and the girl formed a friendship that gradually ripened into love and they were married three years ago. Since that time a son has been born. The son is a little more than a year old and at the boarding house on East Fifteenth street was the universal favorite.

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March 20, 1909

GIRL WIFE SHOT BY
HER BOY HUSBAND.

SHORT WEDDED LIFE OF HUNT-
ERS HAD BLOODY END.

Madly Jealous Because She Went
With Another man, Charles
Hunter Wounds Wife at
Parents' Home.

The short wedded life of Charles Hunter, 19 years old, and his wife, Myrtle Hunter, 17 years old, came to a probably tragic end yesterday morning when in a quarrel, the boy-husband shot his wife with a derringer at the home of her parents, 1713 Madison avenue.

Mrs. Hunter lies at the general hospital, where the physicians say she will not live until morning. The husband gave himself up yesterday afternoon to the police, and is in the matron's room at police headquarters where he will not make a statement to the prosecuting attorney.

No one was at the home of the girl's parents except the young couple. They had been married since Christmas, but had not lived together for several months. On several occasions Hunter had visited his wife, but on each occasion the interview generally ended in a quarrel. About 11 o'clock yesterday morning, neighbors heard a shot, and a moment later Mrs. Hunter rushed out of the house and ran to the home of Mrs. Emma Hodder, 1715 Madison avenue. The front of her kimono was covered with blood.

"HE SHOT ME," SHE SAID.

"He shot me," she gasped, and sank to the floor. She carried the derringer in her hands. The Walnut street police ambulance was called, and after giving her emergency treatment, Dr. Ralph A. Shiras took her to the general hospital.

In the meantime Hunter rushed out of the house into the alley, and it was three hours before the police were able to locate him. At last Albert F. Drake, an attorney with offices in the Scarritt building, called police headquarters and said Charles Hunter was ready to give himself up. Charles McVey, desk sergeant, took Hunter from the Scarritt building to police headquarters. In the chief's office he was questioned by an assistant prosecuting attorney, but would sign no statement.

NEVER HAPPY TOGETHER.

"We haven't' been happy since our marriage," Hunter said later as he sat in a cell in the matron's room. His hands were folded across his breast, and he looked the picture of despair. He is small and looks a mere boy. "She has been going with other fellows," he continued, "and last Wednesday I saw her with someone. That made it more than I could bear. Last night I called on her and we quarreled. When we parted I walked the streets until morning, and in a sort of a trance I went back this morning.

"I don't know how I came to shoot her. I do know that I had a derringer, and that I must have aimed it at her. As soon as I shot I clasped her in my arms and then ran out.

I went down the street a short distance and then determined to go back. I backed out and then walked downtown. I went to Mr. Drake's office, who laughed when I told him that I had shot someone."

MOTHER FEARED FOR HER.

At the general hospital the youthful wife laid the blame on her husband.

"I'm going to die," she said faintly about the middle of the afternoon, "but I don't care very much. Charley and I have never been happy. He called this morning and commenced to quarrel. Suddenly he pulled out a pistol and shot me.

" 'Tell them that you did it,' he whispered as he took me in his arms and rushed out doors."

Mrs. Frank Scanlon, the mother of the girl, says that Hunter entered the house after she had left in the morning. She said that he had often threatened Myrtle, and that she was afraid to leave alone.

"I felt like something was going to happen when I left this morning," she said.

Hunter has been employed at the Hippodrome at odd times. He lives with an uncle, Claude Rider, at 1728 Troost avenue.

At the general hospital last night, the youthful wife lay on one of the beds in the surgical ward. She was suffering intense pain but still retained all of her faculties.

"Did they get Charley?" she asked. "Well I'm glad they did for he meant to shoot me."

Mrs. Scanlon, the girl's mother, was at her bedside all night.

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March 12, 1909

HOSPITAL PATIENTS
TELL THEIR STORIES.

COUNCIL COMMITTEE BEGINS ITS
INVESTIGATION.

Statement Is Made That One Munici-
pal Doctor Was Brusque -- Patients
Feared Being Operated
On Needlessly.

The people making charges of alleged cruelty at the general hospital had an inning with the council investigation committees yesterday, and will have another at 2:30 o'clock next Wednesday afternoon in the chambers of the lower house of the council. Later the defense, which is represented by Attorneys Frank Lowe and T. A. J. Mastin, will be heard. W. O. Cardwell, an attorney, appears for some of the complainants and Attorney J. J. McLain is on hand in the interests of the homeopathic medical fraternity which, too, has a grievance against the hospital administration. The complaint of the homeopathists is that they are not on an equality with other medical schools at the hospital.

The proceedings opened with the reading of a letter by Mr. Cardwell from Miss Carrie M. Carroll of Independence, in which she reviewed the treatment received at the hospital by Miss Josie Pomfret of that city. Miss Pomfret was sent there as a ward of the county court, and was to have a private room. Instead of that, the girl, Miss Carroll claims, "was taken to a public ward, was treated in a brusque manner, and was addressed in loud and threatening language by the doctors because she would not remove her jewelry."

CALLS IT A BUTCHER SHOP.

"You are no better than a pauper and will get treatment as such," Miss Carroll alleges was said to Miss Pomfret, who became excited because she feared that an operation would be performed. She declared that Dr. J. Park Neal, the acting superintendent, had been very discourteous. The next day Miss Carroll called at the hospital to get Miss Pomfret.

"Do you consider you have authority to operate upon patients without notifying friends and relatives of the patients?" Miss Carroll says she asked Dr. Neal.

"Yes, I am in full authority here, and if I consider it necessary I can operate on a patient without asking anybody," Miss Carroll says was Dr. Neal's reply.

Miss Carroll claims that she was treated with much inattention when she called to take her friend from the hospital back to Independence, and concluded the letter by making this allegation: "The general hospital is a butcher shop with a madman at its head."

Miss Carroll explained that she was sending the letter as she could not attend the hearing, having been called to New York. Her affidavit, as well as that of Miss Pomfret, will be demanded by the committee.

Dr. Charles E. Allen, family physician to F. A. Wolf, a patient, who was to be operated on for hernia against his protest, testified that he did not consider an operation necessary and he had Wolf removed to Wesley hospital to prevent the threatened operation. Wolf had been sent to the hospital to be treated for a nervous breakdown.

SHE FELT HUMILIATED.

Mrs. F. A. Wolf testified that her husband was sent to the hospital by direction of Dr. R. J. Wolf, who did not tell her what was the matter with him. She said that he was very much excited, a nervous wreck. Three different times she visited the hospital, and was allowed to remain with him five minutes each time. On the third visit her husband was very much excited because he was to be operated on for hernia. She told Dr. Neal she did not want the operation performed. She called up Camp 2002, Modern Woodmen, of which her husband is a member, and they moved him to another hospital.

Mrs. Wolf said she felt humiliated because her husband had been put in a ward with dope fiends, and had been strapped to the bed. She thought the strapping to the bed was unnecessary, although she had not seen him on the occasion he was strapped to the bed.

Asked by Alderman J. G. Lapp: "Did you see him strapped to the bed?"

Mrs Wolf -- "No, sir; I did not. My husband told me about it."

F. A. Wolf, the patient, said that he had been working night and day seven days a week at his trade of hat cleaner, and last fall became a nervous wreck. He was surprised when Dr. Wolf called and ordered him to the hospital. He rode to the hospital on the seat of the ambulance. At the hospital they made him take a bath, and put him in the insane ward. One of the patients in the ward chained him to the bed by one of his legs.

"I was not violent," continued Wolf. "Next morning an attendant came along and told me that if I would fix up an old hat for him, he would take the chains off my legs. I agreed to fix his hat, and the chains were taken off. Then they made me do work that was objectionable. That night they moved me to another ward, and put me in with a noisy fellow. The doctor gave the noisemaker an injection which kept him sick all night. In the morning I told an attendant that the noisy fellow had a sick night, and the doctor replied, 'That's nothing; they get used to that after they are here a while."

PROTESTED AGAINST OPERATION.

"I saw welts on the legs of an other patient who had been whipped because he had asked for something to eat between meal hours. The Saturday following my arrival at the hospital three doctors told me I would have to be operated on for hernia.

"I protested against an operation. They told me that all of my troubles would be over after the operation. Sunday they removed me to another ward, the surgical ward, it is called, and at supper time the nurse informed me that I didn't want much to eat as I was to have an operation performed. Later that day my wife took me to Wesley hospital in an ambulance. I was weak and exhausted. No operation was performed at Wesley.

Wolf claims that his friends were denied admittance to him while he was at the general hospital, and he thought it wrong for the attendants to chain him to the bed. The night before he was sent to the hospital he acknowledged he had been picked up at the depot, and he could not tell how he got there. He didn't want to go to the hospital. The strap with which the patient was flogged, Wolf said, was about three feet long and two inches wide. The patient was chained during the flogging process, according to Wolf.

W. O. Cardwell, an attorney, swore that on December 14, 1908, he went to the hospital to get the record and affidavit of death of a young man who had died there, as he wanted to get a claim in before the Modern Woodmen. Dr. Neal said he could make the affidavit.

THE AFFIDAVIT RULE.

" 'You know our rule out here,' said Dr. Neal.

" 'What is that rule?' I asked

" 'That a fee of $2 accompany the application for the affidavit,' " Cardwell said Neal said to him.

" 'I never had to do that before,' I told Neal, but on advice of the secretary of the Woodman camp I paid the $2."

"Is the rule of the hospital to charge for furnishing affidavits of death?" Alderman J. D. Havens asked Dr. Neal.

"It is not. I always exact it, as I consider it a professional personal service.," replied the doctor.

In answer to Attorney Frank Lowe, Cardwell would not say for certain whether Dr. Neal "had said it is a rule of the hospital or our rule," but he was quite positive that former administrations at the hospitals had not exacted a fee for supplying affidavits of death.

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February 18, 1909

HOMEOPATHS ARE BARRED.

Are Not Allowed Priveleges of Gen-
eral Hospital Clinics.

Denying recent published statements connecting homeopathic physicians and members of the faculty of the Hehnemann School of Medicine at Tenth street and Troost avenue with the general hospital investigation, Dr. William E. Cramer, dean of the college and chairman of the local association of homeopathic physicians, declared yesterday that they had no part in the general hospital controversy. Both the college and the local association deny positively any connection with the specific charges brought by members of the Modern Woodmen.

Dr. Cramer said yesterday: "We have nothing whatever to do with the charges brought from other sources against the general hospital staff or the individual physicians regularly employed there or connected with the institution.

Dr. Cramer declared that to Kansas City the courtesy of holding clinics in the public hospitals had been denied Homeopathists. He said:

"For twenty-one years we had the privileges of surgical clinics at the general hospital. Our students were permitted to witness these clinics, and paid the customary fee into the city treasury.

"However, since the new hospital and health board was appointed we have been denied these surgical clinics at the general hospital, although repeated attempts have been made to get them.
At the same time the courtesy is extended to the medical department of the University of Kansas at Rosedale. The Kansas students are allowed to come into Kansas City when we citizens and taxpayers are denied.

"There is not one Homeopathic interne or Homeopathic physician regularly employed int he institution."

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February 17, 1909

GENERAL HOSPITAL IS
TO BE INVESTIGATED.

EX-PATIENTS MAKE CHARGES
AGAINST MANAGEMENT.

Cruel Treatment Alleged in Affida-
vits Read Before Council -- Com-
mittee Is Appointed to
Sift Complaints.

The lower house on the council last night named Alderman W. P. Woolf, C. J. Gilman and J. G. Lapp to a committee to investigate charges of inhumane treatment towards patients at the new general hospital.

The investigation was made upon the request of Alderman Darious Brown, who read a number of affidavits said to have been signed by patients.

Alderman Miles Bulger openly asserted that the move was a political one to embarrass the administration.

"I do not believe that Alderman Brown is any more sincere in this than he has been with his moves for a gas pressure regulation," declared Bulger.

Alderman brown denied with emphasis the charge of insincerity in wanting the alleged cruelties investigated. He added that it was impossible for him to believe that the prominent men comprising the health and hospital board would want such aspersions cast upon their management of the institution without having to falsity or correctness of them established.

FOUGHT AGAINST OPERATION.

Affidavits outlining complaints of patients who claimed to have been abused were read by Mr. Brown.

F. A. Wolf, 4237 Tracy, was taken to the hospital December 1, he affirmed, suffering from a nervous complaint, but declares the house physicians said he had a hernia and should be operated on. He says he fought being taken to the operating room and succeeded in escaping an operation until his wife could be communicated with. She called Dr. Charles E. Allen, the family physician, and Wolf was removed to Wesley hospital.

Wolf charges cruelty to other patients, declaring he had seen a patient whipped with a leather strap for asking for something to eat after regular meal hours, and had seen a man suffering from pneumonia die after being forced into a tub filled with cold water.

MODERN WOODMEN INTERESTED.

Wolf claims to be a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and a local lodge of the order is supporting him in his charges.

Frank E. Jefferson made affidavit that on October 22 he underwent an operation at the hospital, and the incision was not dressed until the 25th. Later he was moved to Hahneman Medical college.

Arthur Slim, a brick layer, declared that while he was in the hospital with an ulcerated leg and suffering much pain, a doctor ordered him to the kitchen to work. He replied "that if he had to work, he might as well be laying brick."

SLIM ACCUSES PHYSICIAN.

Then the doctor repeated his order that Slim must either work in the kitchen or leave. Slim says he left, and limped to the emergency hospital and asked they physicians there to dress his sore leg. They refused, he avers, because he had left the general hospital.

Then Slim went to the University hospital, where his leg was dressed, and he was ordered back to the general hospital.

"December 23 I went back to the hospital," claims Slim, "and when the doctor saw me, he told others he would 'fix' me. He poured a quart bottle of acid over my sore leg."

EAGLES TOOK HIM AWAY.

Signor Friscoe was a trapeze performer. He swears that on January 16, 1909, he fell from a trapeze at the Hippodrome, breaking five ribs and paralyzing his lower limbs. He complains that he was roughly handled both in the ambulance and at the hospital, and that when he asked to be allowed to communicate with the Benevolent Order of Eagles, of which he is a member, his request was denied. Finally, he got into communication with officials of the Kansas City aerie, and was removed to another hospital.

W. O. Cardwell asserts that Walter Gessley died at the hospital, and that a doctor refused to state the cause of death or furnish a death certificate until he was paid $2.

An attack on the hospital management came up in a different form in the upper house of the council. The board asked for authority to spend $5,000 for surgical instruments, an X-ray machine and fitting up a laboratory.

DR. NEAL WILL NOT DENY.

Dr. J. Park Neal, house surgeon at the general hospital, said last night:

"Neither I nor any member of the hospital staff care to deny the charges made against the hospital. We simply ignore them. They are too absurd to make a denial necessary."

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