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November 1, 1909

ASHES OF FRIEND TO
POOR ARE SCATTERED.

HEAVENS WEEP AS LAST RITES
FOR DR. OSBORNE END.

Eulogy Spoken on Hannibal Bridge
by Dr. Miller, Who Braves Sick-
ness to Carry Out Wish of
Philanthropist.

"Goodby, Dr. Osborne, may God by with you until we meet again."

Standing on the middle span of the Hannibal bridge at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon Dr. Thomas D. Miller, a physician with offices in the Shukert building, spoke these words.

A minute before Louis Goldblatt, a saloon man on West Ninth street, had unscrewed the top of a fruit jar, and when Dr. Miller spoke, scattering to the winds the ashes which the jar contained.

These ashes were the mortal remains of Dr. E. H. Osborne, friend of the poor; Dr. Osborne, the mysterious, the eccentric.

It was the first time in the history of the Hannibal bridge that the ashes of a human being were thrown from it into the muddy, surging river below.

Fifty persons witnessed the odd spectacle.

A few minutes before they had listened to Dr. Miller make a eulogy on the man whose ashes were to be conveyed to the waters.

The night before, hundreds had gathered at Goldblatt's saloon on Ninth street on a strange mission. They came to view the remains of their dead friend. Many of them were surprised to find no evidence of a casket when they entered, and were more surprised when Mr. Goldblatt pointed to a two-quart fruit jar, filled with what appeared to be white gravel, surrounded by bottles of various brands of whiskey. The saloonkeeper told them that the white substance in the jar was all that was left of their friend.

A large crowd thronged the brilliantly lit saloon that Saturday night. Negroes, Croatians, Greeks and Americans brushed shoulders and laughed and talked as they drank. As Mr. Goldblatt pointed to the odd receptacle among the bottles, he told many interesting stories of the man he had known intimately for twenty years, and nearly all in the large crowd held beer mugs and sipped the beverage as they listened.

A COLLEGE GRADUATE.

"The old doctor and I were friends for many years," he began, "but despite our friendship he told me little of his early history or his people. He came here twenty-five years ago from Brooklyn, where he had owned a drug store. The store was destroyed by fire, and he, disheartened, came here for a fresh start. For a year or two he lived at 1624 West Ninth street, but moved over in Kansas to two little rooms in the rear of 3 central avenue, where he died. He always said he was "Welsh and Saxon, mixed," and that his forefathers settled on Long Island in 1640.

"Dr. Osborne graduated from Columbia University in New York city, and was highly educated. His greatest delight was to argue. He would argue on religion, politics, history, in fact anything he could start an argument about. He believed in a Divine Creator, but did not believe in the scriptures, and had little use for preachers. He could describe the important battles of some of the European wars until I actually believed I could see them. To my knowledge, he has only one living relative, a cousin, Arthur A. Sparks, who lives in Los Angeles, Cal. He was never married and seemed to care but little for the society of women.

WORSHIPPED BY THE POOR.

"The old doctor was a daily visitor to my place," Mr. Goldblatt continued. "He always came in in the evening. We would have a little drink, and then a friendly game of cards, and then he would go home to his bachelor quarters. He practiced among the poorer classes in the West bottoms, and his life record is full of many kinds of deeds for the poor unfortunate ones. That was Dr. Osborne's platform; that was the sentiment that won him everlastingly to the hearts of his people. He was a man of superior knowledge. He mingled with persons far inferior to him in intellect, but he gave them the knowledge that he had, as best he could, and they worshipped him."

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October 24, 1909

NO REFERENCE TO TRAGEDY.

Murder Victims' Funeral Held in
Church Where Two of Them Met
and Married and One Confirmed.

The funeral of Alonzo R. Van Royan, Mrs. Van Royen and Rose McMahon, victims of the triple murder on the Reidy road, in Wyandotte county, was held yesterday morning. From the undertaking rooms of Daniels & Comfort, where more than 5,000 persons viewed the three bodies during the 24 hours that they lay in state, the cortege moved to the church of the Blessed Sacrament in Chelsea place. This little church was not one-third large to accommodate the crowd that gathered to attend the services. It was the first triple funeral ever held in Kansas City and nearly every woman in Chelsea place congregated at the church and strived to get in.

There were several odd circumstances in connection with the service. In this church Mr. and Mrs. Van Royen were married. Father Bernard S. Kelly, now chancellor of the Kansas City, Kas., diocese, married them, and they were the last couple he married while pastor there.

It was at a fair, given for the benefit of this church, that Van Royen met his wife, and Father Kelly, who married them, preached the funeral sermon.

In the Church of the Blessed Sacrement, also, Rose McMahon, the third victim of the tragedy, made her first holy communion and was confirmed.

Father L. L. Dekat, formerly of Winchester, Kas., read the mass. He is the new pastor of the church and this was his first official act in connection with his pastorate. Father Patrick McInerney, the retiring pastor, assisted.

A requiem high mass was celebrated. In his sermon Father Kelly made no reference to the tragedy, confining his expression to the moral of death.

After the three coffins had been carried in Mrs. McMahon, James and Patrick McMahon and other members of the family led the procession, sitting in pews near the altar rail. The service was brief.

The bodies were buried in Mount Calvary cemetery, Kansas City, Kas.

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October 9, 1909

DEATH OF MRS. E. CORRIGAN.

WELL KNOWN KANSAS CITY WOMAN
SUCCUMBS TO LONG ILLNESS.
Mrs. E. Corrigan
MRS. E. CORRIGAN.

Mrs. Edward Corrigan, one of the best known women in Kansas City in earlier years, died Monday at the home of a sister in Sandy Hill, N. Y., after an illness of eight months. She was 64 years old. The body will reach Kansas City at 7:16 this evening and will be taken to the home of Mrs. Matt Kinlen, a relative, at 3312 Flora avenue.

Funeral services will be from Mrs. Kinlen's residence at 10:30 Sunday morning, and from St. Vincent's Catholic church, thirty-first street and Flora avenue, at 11 o'clock Burial will be in Mount St. Mary's Cemetery.

Mrs. Corrigan lived in Kansas City for about twenty years, during which time she was at the forefront of almost all Catholic charities and was associated with others in non-sectarian undertakings. She was prominent in church work, one of her munificence being the high alter in St. Patrick's church. Since leaving Kansas City the home of Mrs. Corrigan has been in Chicago, but she has paid frequent visits to her friends here.

Mr. and Mrs. Corrigan had no children. A brother of Mrs. Corrigan, Daniel Quinn, lives in Kansas City. Mr. Corrigan is a brother of Bernard Corrigan, president of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, and Patrick Corrigan, a retired business man.

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October 8, 1909

TO GRAVE THROUGH
LINES OF CHILDREN.

YOUNG FOLK PROMINENT FEA-
TURE OF SWOPE FUNERAL.

More Than 60,000 Take Last
Look at Man "Who Gave
Us the Park."

The head of the cortege which will follow Thomas H. Swope to his last resting place will form at the city hall at 1 o'clock this afternoon. From there the procession will march to the public library, thence to Grace Episcopal church, Thirteenth and Washington.

It has been arranged that all children attending school east of Main street will form from the library west on Ninth street and south on Grand avenue, the intention being of the cortege to pass through a line of school children as far as possible. The west of Main street school children will form on Eleventh street west from Wyandotte street and south on Broadway. The children of the Franklin institute, to whom Colonel Swope, conditionally, gave $50,000 before he died, will form on Grand avenue south of Eighteenth street, on the road to the cemetery.

PAY LAST TRIBUTE.

The library doors were opened at 9 a. m. and the waiting crowd began to file slowly by the casket. Instinctively, men removed their hats. Small boys, some of them barefoot, followed this example, keeping the hat close to the heart until the casket had been passed. When there was no rush the crowds passed the casket at the rate of forty to sixty a minute. Between the hours of noon and 2 p. m., however, there was a great increase, and Charles Anderson, one of the police guard, counted 369 in five minutes. Shortly after 3 o'clock, after the flower parade had passed along Admiral boulevard, the crowd became very dense at the library and two lines had to be formed. During that time they passed at the rate of 120 a minute, which would be 720 an hour.

THE SCHOOL CHILDREN'S TURN.

During the morning the school children were released to give them an opportunity to look upon the face of the man "who gave us the park." Some were bareheaded, some barefooted, some black, some white, but all were given the opportunity to look upon the pale, placid face of Colonel Swope.
Mothers who could not get away from home without the baby brought it along. Many a woman with a baby in arms was seen in line. The police lifted all small children up to the casket.

"Who is it, mamma?" asked one little girl, "Who is it?"

"It is Colonel Swope who gave us the big park," the mother replied.

"Out there where we had the picnic?"

"Yes."

"Did you say he gave us the park, is it ours?"

"He gave it to all the people, dear, to you and me as well as others."

"Then part of the park is mine, isn't i t?"

"Yes, part of it is yours, my child."

One white haired man limped along the line until he came to the casket. With his hat over his heart he stood so long that the policeman on guard had to remind him to pass on.

"Excuse me," he said, and his eyes were suffused with tears, "he helped me once years ago just when I needed it most. He was my friend and I never could repay him. He wouldn't let me."

BITS OF HISTORY.

The aged man passed on out of the Locust street door. Every so often during the day the police say he crept quietly into line and went by the casket again, each time having to be remembered to pause but for a moment and pass on. Who he is the police did not know.

Near the casket Mrs. Carrie W. Whitney, librarian, erected a bulletin board on which she posted a card reading: "Thomas Hunton Swope, born Lincoln county, Kentucky, October 21, 1827; died Independence, Mo., October 3, 1909."

In the center of the board is an excellent engraving of Colonel Swope and on the board are clippings giving bits of his history and enumerating his many public gifts to this city. The board was draped in evergreen and flowers.

On a portion of the board is a leaflet from a book, "History of Kansas City," which reads, referring to Colonel Swope:

SENATOR VEST'S TRIBUTE.

"When Swope park was given to Kansas City, Senator George Graham Vest said of Colonel Swope: 'I am not much of a hero worshiper, but I will take off my hat to such a man, and in this case I am the more gratified because we were classmates in college. We graduated together at Central college, Danville, Ky.

"He was a slender, delicate boy, devoted to study, and exceedingly popular. I remember his fainting in the recitation room when reading an essay and the loving solicitude of professors and students as we gathered about him. He had a great respect for the Christian religion. It has gone with him through his life, although he has never connected himself with any church. I know of many generous acts by him to good people and one of his first donations was $1,000 to repair the old Presbyterian church at Danville, where we listened to orthodox sermons when students."

Later Colonel Swope gave $25,000 to his old school at Danville for a library. Then followed his most magnificent gift, Swope park. Its value when given was more than $150,000. Today it is worth far more.

Speaking of Colonel Swope again, Senator Vest said: "In these days of greed and selfishness, where the whole world is permeated with feverish pursuit of money, it is refreshing to find a millionaire who is thinking of humanity and not of wealth. Tom Swope has made his own fortune and has been compelled to fight many unscrupulous and designing men, but he has risen above the sordid love of gain and has shown himself possessed of the best and highest motives. Intellectually he has few superiors. The public has never known his literary taste, his culture and his love of the good and beautiful. The world assumed that no man can accumulate wealth without being hard and selfish, and it is too often the case, but not so with Tom Swope. In these princely gifts he repays himself with the consciousness of a great, unselfish act."

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October 6, 1909

PEOPLE TO JOIN IN
MOURNING FOR SWOPE.

PUBLIC FUNERAL FROM GRACE
CHURCH FRIDAY.

Body to Rest Temporarily in Vault.
Later Suitable Monument Is
to Be Erected Over
Grave.

The body of the late Thomas H. Swope will be brought from Independence at 5 o'clock tonight and lie in state in the Library building, Ninth and Locust, from 9 a. m. Thursday to noon of Friday.

Funeral at 3:30 o'clock Friday afternoon from Grace Episcopal church. Body will rest temporarily in a vault at Forest Hill cemetery.


The body of Colonel Thomas H. Swope is to rest temporarily in a vault at Forest Hill cemetery to await arrangements to be perfected by Kansas City for a final resting place in Swope park.

A monument appropriate to the man who while in life was the city's greatest benefactor and the poor man's friend is to be erected over the grave, and the design in all probability will be a statue. A mask of Colonel Swope's features will be taken at Independence this morning and kept in reserve.

Colonel Swope is to be given a public funeral at 2:30 Friday afternoon, in which the militia, civic and commercial organizations of the city , the governor of the state of Missouri and other distinguished citizens will take part. The tribute from the city will be as free from ostentation as the occasion will permit. There will be no extravagant floral displays, nor flights of oratory. There are to be but two floral offerings at the bier. One will be a blanket of roses for the casket from the family, and the other a broken shaft of choice exotics from the city. It was the colonel's request that there be no lavish display of flowers.

BISHOP ATWILL CELEBRANT.

The simple and beautiful burial services of the Episcopal church will be read by Bishop E. R. Atwill at Grace Episcopal church, Thirteenth street, between Broadway and Washington, and the choir will render appropriate music. In arranging the official programme yesterday, the committees representing the city did not fully complete the details for having the children of the public and private schools participate in the exercises. John W. Wagner, who, with Alderman Emmett O'Malley, has in charge the completion of added details, said last night that he will endeavor to have several thousand school children lined along the sidewalks on Eleventh street, west of Wyandotte, and south on Broadway to Thirteenth street, as the funeral pageant moves to the church. The children will probably sing "Nearer My God to Thee." The participation in the services of school children was suggested to Mr. Wagner by S. W. Spangler, business manager for Colonel Swope.

"School children used to come to the colonel's office by hundreds to look at the man who had given Swope park to the city," was Mr. Spangler's explanation.

The body of Colonel Swope will be escorted from Independence by Mayor Crittenden, Aldermen O'Malley, Wirthman and Edwards, of the upper house; Aldermen Morris, Gilman and Wofford of the lower house, and a detail of mounted police. From 9 a. m. Thursday to noon of Friday the body will lie in state at the library, guarded by a detachment of police and state militiamen. Entrance to the building will be by Ninth street and egress by Locust street.

FROM PUBLIC LIBRARY.

The funeral cortege will move from the library building at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon in the following order:

Mounted Police.
Third Regiment Band.
Battery B.
Police on Foot.
Fire Department Detail on Foot.
Civic and Commercial Organizations.
City Officials in Carriages.
Honorary Pallbearers.
Active Pallbearers.
Hearse.
Family in Carriages.
Citizens in Carriages.

MEETING OF THE BOARD.

There is to be a special meeting of the board of education this morning to consider the suggestion that the pupils of the public schools participate in the funeral of Colonel Swope, and to plan arrangements for having the body lie in state at the library.

Last night Mayor Crittenden and John W. Wagner conferred with J. Crawford James, chairman of the board, on the propriety of the pupils being stationed at a point along the funeral march. Mr. James took kindly to the suggestion, and will present it to the board.

Contrary to general belief, Thomas H. Swope did not gain the title of "Colonel" in warfare. A newspaper during an exciting campaign of civic improvement used the title, which did not have the entire sanction of Mr. Swope.

"Now I will have to go through life with the unearned title of colonel," he complained one day to Kelly Brent.

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October 5, 1909

300 CHILDREN AT FUNERAL.

And Two Wagon Loads of Flowers
Tribute to Col. Hunton.

Three hundred children attended the funeral of James Moss Hunton yesterday afternoon at Independence. The girls were dressed in white and many of them wore pink carnations, the favorite flower of Colonel Hunton, who had legions of little friends all over the city. The public schools were dismissed for the afternoon. The large lawn in front of the home was filled with men who knew Colonel Hunton. Rev. C. C. McGinley, pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Independence, conducted the service. Such a wealth of floral offerings is seldom seen at a funeral.

Two funeral vans were required to hold the tokens of friendship.

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October 3, 1909

HUNTON FUNERAL TOMORROW.

Services at Home of Mrs. L. O. Swope
in Independence.

The funeral of James Moss Hunton will take place Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home of Mrs. L. O. Swope, South Pleasant street, Independence. The service will be conducted by the Rev. C. C. McGinley of the First Presbyterian church.

The active pallbearers will be T. C. Sawyer, W. S. Flournoy, S. W. Sawyer, A. J. Bundschu and A. M. Ott. Honorary pallbearers, E. P. Gates, I. N. Rogers, Henry Harper, J. G. Paxton, O. P. Bryant, O. H. Gentry, Jr., J. N. Southern, S. H. Woodson and Hugh L. McElroy of Kansas City.

Internment will be in Mt. Washington cemetery.

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July 13, 1909

PIONEER PHYSICIAN
OF MISSOURI DEAD.

DR. WILLIS P. KING SUCCUMBS
AFTER LONG ILLNESS.

As a Practitioner and Author, Dr.
King Was Recognized Among
the Foremost of His
Profession.
Dr. Willis P. King, Dead at 69.
DR. WILLIS P. KING.

Dr. Willis P. King, a pioneer physician of Missouri, died yesterday afternoon at 3:15 o'clock at the family home, 3031 Wabash avenue, after a lingering illness of four months. Dr. King had been unconscious for several days. Funeral services will be held at the home at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning, after which the body will be sent to Sedalia for interment. Dr. Burris A. Jenkins of the Linwood Boulevard Christian church will conduct the funeral services at the house. The services at Sedalia will be conducted by the masons. Dr. King was 69 years old.

Willis Percival King was one of the pioneer physicians of Missouri. He began the practice of medicine in Missouri in a frontier county in 1866 after having mastered the profession of medicine and having graduated from the St. Louis Medical college, which course consisted only of lectures. For two years after his graduation Dr. King was what was known in those days as a country doctor, riding circuits at times, like the lawyer and preacher. Concerning this period of his life he has written a book, called, "Stories of a Country Doctor," which is now in its fourth edition. The stories are reminiscences of his own life in that capacity.

MOVED TO NEVADA.

After his two years of country practice, Dr. King moved to Nevada, where he remained several years. In the latter '80s he moved again and went to Sedalia, Mo., where he remained until he came to Kansas City, over twenty-five years ago.

Dr. King was born in Missouri, his parents, William and Lucy K. King, having been brought to Missouri in their mothers' arms. The family remained on a farm in Vernon county, and Willis King stayed with his parents until he was 14 years of age.

At that time his thirst for knowledge got the better of him, and since there were no schools anywhere near his home he ran away. In order to pay for his education he worked on farms in the summer time and went to school during the winter. When the Hannibal & St. Joseph railroad bridge was being built he worked at that and made enough money to put him through another year of school. In 1862 he began to study medicine by himself, and from that time on he gave his life to that profession.

WROTE "PERJURY FOR PAY."

When Dr. King moved to Kansas City he was made a surgeon at the Missouri Pacific hospital, and in 1884 he became the assisting chief surgeon at the institution. He served in that capacity for fifteen years, at the end of which time he retired to private practice. About ten years ago Dr. King contracted blood poison from a needle wound received while performing an operation. From that time until his death his health had been so precarious that he could not give much time to active practice.

Dr. King was a lecturer at the Universities of Missouri and Kansas in the medical departments of each institution. He is the author of many treatises on medical science which have won considerable honor for him in the medical fraternity. Four years ago he wrote his last book, "Perjury for Pay," which has had wide circulation.

On June13, 1861, Dr. King married Miss Albina H. Hoss of Pettis county. From that union six children have been born. They are: Robert Emmett King, Willis P. King, Jr., Mrs. Almeda K. Humphrey, Albert H. King, Granville King and Albina King, who is now dead.

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