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February 5, 1910

"BOYS" FIND HOME FOR
PENDERGAST IN FIRST.

Ward Workers Jubilant Over Prac-
tical Certainty That the Alder-
man Will Run Again.

Alderman James Pendergast, 1100 Summit street, temporary abode only.

There is joy in the first ward. The boys have found a home for their patron and political saint, Alderman James Pendergast. After a long and wearisome chase the house hunters yesterday temporarily leased the unpretentious but comfortable dwelling at 1100 Summit street. It is located right in the heart of the First ward,and in a few days the alderman who for eighteen consecutive years has represented the ward in the lower house and gotten city jobs for thousands of the boys will be formally installed in his new domicile.

"Means you are going to be candidate for alderman again?" was suggested to the nestor of Democratic politics.

"Well, I told the boys that if they would find a home for me in the ward I might consider representing them again. Consider, mind you," replied Mr. Pendergast, "since my wife died, four years ago, I've been sort of a Gypsy, dividing my domicile between my farms in Kansas and Missouri and the home of my sister on Prospect avenue. I'm getting tired of calling home wherever I hang my hat.

"I want a place I can really call home, and the boys are going to install me in one in a few days. The boys would go to the end of the earth for me, and I suppose it us up to me to reciprocate."

"Hurrah! Jim is going to run for alderman again," gleefully shouted one of the boys.

"Qualify that with the word 'consider,' " interrupted the alderman.

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February 4, 1910

NORWEGIANS TO TEXAS
PANHANDLE.

Party of Thirty-Five Who Will Try
Dry Farming There.

Armed with a combination of horns and cowbells, a crowd of thirty-five Norwegians passed through the Union depot last night en route to Hansford, in the Texas Panhandle. They are going to a Norwegian settlement there to farm. The settlers are all of the well-to-do class of farmers. They have purchased from 160 to 640 acres of land and are equipped with machinery and stock. churches and schools have been established and the move will be more in the nature of a transplanting operation.

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January 9, 1910

PENDERGAST TO FLORIDA.

The Alderman Decides to Change
Winter Resorts This Season.

California as his winter retreat has gotten to be such an old story with Alderman James Pendergast that he is going to make a change this season and spend the balance of the inclement season in Jacksonville, Fla.

"I'm going to take my winter's rest amid the fragrant magnolias," poetically observed the alderman yesterday.

The alderman expects to remain in Florida until spring planting begins on his farms in Kansas and Missouri.

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December 7, 1909

BOYS FROM FARM INELIGIBLE.

Tendency to "Flat" Feet Keeps
Them Out of the Navy.

"These snows and chilly winds are elements that make our business rushing at this time of the year," said Recruiting Officer Lieutenant C. S. Vanderbeck, "and the boys from the country who do not care to work out in the weather come here to join the navy, with the hopes that they will be sent to more pleasant climes, but most of them are disappointed because they are unable to meet the physical qualifications required by the government. The great majority have what is termed the 'flatfoot,' and are declared ineligible for the service of Uncle Sam."

Out of eleven applicants yesterday, only two were able to pass the physical examination on account of this affliction. It is caused in time of youth where a boy has bone barefoot most of the time, and the arch of the foot is broken down, due possibly because of the carrying of heavy loads.

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November 3, 1909

PLEADS SIZE FOR HALF FARE.

"Look How Small I Am," Said
Everett Crane, 22.

Age, and not height, is what counts in getting railroad fares halved, as Everett Crane found to his sorrow yesterday afternoon. Everett is 22 years old, thirty-seven inches high, and weighs sixty-two pounds. When he is not posing as Prince Henry, the smallest man in the world, with a carnival company he makes his home with his father, John S. Crane, a farmer near Lenexa, Kas.

Everett is so small that he rides around in a go-cart which would hardly accommodate a good-sized child. He has been out on the farm with his father for some weeks, but yesterday he got a wire from the carnival company to join them at Houston, Tex, and getting in to his go-cart, he was wheeled over to the station, where he arrived about 5 o'clock.

An usher hunted up the Missouri Pacific agent for Everett, who has a small body but a well developed head with the unmistakable face of a man.

"I want to get a half-rate ticket to Houston," piped Everett in his childish treble when the agent came up.

The voice was a puzzler, but the face was not.

"How old are you?" asked the agent.

"Twenty-two last October," said Everett.

"Well, you can't get a half-rate when you are that old," said the agent.

"But look how small I am," said Everett. "I don't take up hardly any room."

The agent, however, was obdurate and Everett had to pay full fare.

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October 27, 1909

TO LANSING FOR SAFE KEEPING.

M'MAHON BROTHERS, PATRICK LAMB
ESCORTED IN AUTOMOBILES.

Bum Tire Delays Journey; Mc-
Mahon "Guesses" He Is
Sorry.

Even before James McMahon's confession that he alone killed his two sisters and brother-in-law, Sheriff Al Becker had concluded that it would be best not to keep the prisoners, McMahon and his brother, Patrick, and Patrick Lamb, an employe at the McMahon farm, in Kansas City , Kas., over night and arrangements were made to take them to the penitentiary in Lansing. Telephone messages were coming into the sheriff's office informing him that there was much bitterness expressed in the vicinity of the McMahon and Van Royen homes and that a lynching was being planned.

Acting upon this advice the sheriff deemed it well to remove the prisoners at once, so that when Patrick McMahon had completed his confession to Taggart, the brothers and Patrick Lamb, together with officers and reporters, started for Lansing.

In an automobile with Patrick and James McMahon were Sheriff Becker, Under Sheriff Brady and Deputy Sheriff Brady. Patrick Lamb rode in another car with Deptuy Sheriffs Charles Lukens, U. S. G. Snyder, Harley Gunning, William McMullen and Clyde Sartin. In two other motor cars were newspaper reporters.

Never in all his life, probably, had James McMahon contemplated such a tour as he was then making. Every officer was well armed, and there was anxiety on the part of the sheriff, who did not know to what extent the movement to lynch the prisoners had progressed. The party drove out State street as far as Ninth street, then wheeled into Minnesota avenue and connected with the Reidy road.

The journey was continued on this road to a point where a cross-road offers an outlet to the Parallel road. If the junction of the Reidy road and the cross-road could be passed safely the officers felt confident that they would not meet violence.

PATRICK QUIET AND SULLEN.

Farmers in wagons and buggies lined the thoroughfare, and while the prisoners were peered at curiously, there was no demonstration. That everybody along the route knew of the apprehension of the McMahons was evident.

Riding with the sheriff and under sheriff, James McMahon appeared nervous during the first stages of the ride, but Patrick McMahon sat at his side, quiet and sullen, and seemingly totally oblivious to his surroundings.

At the junction there was not a person in sight when the motor car party arrived and, turning into the road, the machines were speeded rapidly to the main thoroughfare that led directly to Lansing. Near Bethel, Kas., the machine in which the McMahons were riding punctured a tire and the entire party got out and watched the chauffeur make the repairs.

During this interim, James McMahon, who was now feeling safe from a mob attack, appeared more cheerful and talked willingly to those about him. Again and again he said that he could give no reason for his crime and again and again he described it. He seemed unconcerned regarding his strange situation.

"GUESSES" HE IS SORRY.

"Guess you know this country pretty well, don't you, Jim?"

"I've walked over every foot of it," said the prisoner. "And I guess I won't walk over it any more."

"How do you feel by this time?"

"All right, all right, I'm glad I confessed."

"Sure that no one else was implicated in this affair?"

"No one else; Pat ain't guilty of anything," said Jim. "I did the whole thing."

"Are you sorry?

"I guess I am.

"Did you think they were going to catch you any time last week?"

"No, I didn't get afraid until this morning, then I knew the jig was up."

"How have you been at night? Did you sleep?"

"Yes, I slept all right; sometimes I got nervous."

"Didn't you get kind o' creepy when you walked about the Van Royen house?"

"No, not much."

"How about this man you said you saw talking to Van Royen on that Tuesday morning?"

"O, that was a lie."

"And about seeing Rosie when you were going to the pasture to milk the cows?"

"That was a lie, too," said James.

As he answered these questions the prisoner chewed tobacco at a furious pace. His lips were covered with the stains of the weed.

The repairs on the tire completed, the journey was resumed. At a point about fourteen miles from Leavenworth the same tire broke again, and there was another delay.

NEVER IN AN ASYLUM.

"We're outside Wyandotte county now, ain't we," said Jim, as he stepped to the ground the second time.

"Yes."

"Well, I feel safer now. There won't be any feeling over in this county."

"Were you ever in an insane asylum, Jim?" someone asked.

"No, but I guess I ought to have been."

"Ever have any insane fits or anything like that?"

"Not that I know of."

For a second time the obstreperous tire on Henry Zimmer's automobile was repaired and another start made, but in a few minutes the rim of the wheel rolled off. Then Zimmer tore off all the wheel fixings and the machine carrying the McMahons, rolled into Lansing limping on one side.

At the penitentiary Sheriff Becker and his prisoners were received by Warden J. K. Codding, who said that while the prison officials were willing to keep the men they would have to be willing.

"DON'T KNOW WHY I DID IT."

"We're willing," said Jim. "I'd rather be here than in Wyandotte."

"What do you think about it?" Patrick McMahon was asked.

"I guess this is the better place for tonight, anyhow," said Patrick.

Henry Zimmer offered to take Pat Lamb back with him, but the latter, at first willing, later decided that he would remain at the prison.

"I don't know what they're thinking down there," said Lamb, "so I'll just stay here for a few days."

The party remained in the warden's office fully a half hour, and during all that time Patrick McMahon spoke scarcely a word. When spoken to he answered, but his answers were brief. Jim McMahon, apparently not badly frightened, apparently not greatly concerned, sat in one of the warden's easy chairs and answered all questions put to him. The substance of all his answers were:

"I killed them, and I don't know why I did it."

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October 21, 1909

TRIPLE TRAGEDY IN
WYANDOTTE COUNTY.

POSSE WITH BLOODHOUNDS SEARCH-
ING FOR THE UNKNOWN SLAYER OF
ALONZO VAN ROYEN, HIS WIFE
AND HER SISTER.

MANY BULLET WOUNDS
IN THE WOMEN'S BODIES.

MYSTERIOUS VISITOR SOUGHT
BY OFFICERS.

Coroner's Office Delays Sheriff
Several Hours by Failing
to Promptly Report
Crime.
Mrs. Margaret Van Royen and Miss Rose McMahon, Murder Victims of a Triple Homicide.
MRS. MARGARET VAN ROYEN AND MISS ROSE M'MAHON.
Two of the Victims of a Triple Tragedy That is Mystifying the Kansas City, Kas., Officials.

A triple murder in which Alonzo Van Royen, a farmer; his wife, Margaret Van Royen, and Mrs. Van Royen's sister, Rose McMahon, were the victims was enacted Tuesday night or Wednesday morning on the Reidy road in Wyandotte county, about five miles west of Kansas City, Kas.

A posse with bloodhounds is now searching for the assassin whose identity is not known.

The body of Van Royen was not discovered until ten hours after the bodies of the murdered women had been found, and during the interim the theory of the officials was that Van Royen had murdered his wife and sister-in-law and had fled.

The bodies of the women were discovered by their brother, James McMahon, who went to their ho me and found them lying on the floor of their one room about 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Shortly before midnight Sheriff Al Becker and a party discovered the body of Van Royen lying near a ravine about fifty feet from the house.

MANY BULLETS FOR WOMEN.

Six bullet wounds, made by a 38-caliber revolver, were in the body of Mrs. Van Royen, and three bullets were found in the body of her sister. Both women were pierced through the heart and every bullet was fired into their breasts.

When the news of the murder spread through the country, fifty farmers, carrying lanterns in their hands, organized a posse to search for Van Royen. At 11 o'clock his body, buried under leaves, was found by Geo. Stimpson, a 19-year-old farmer boy living a short distance west of the Van Royen farm on the Reidy road.

The body was found to have two bullet wounds in the back. One of them passed through the heart. His face had three bruises on it. At 1 o'clock this morning the body was taken to Daniel Bros. undertaking rooms in Armourdale.

The police who brought the bloodhounds to the scene were forced to give up the hunt. The trail of the murderer was found to be "cold." A good description has been secured. Telegrams were sent this morning to the police departments in this part of the country to be on the lookout for the man.

There was a visitor at the Van Royen home Tuesday morning and it is for this man that the officials are vigorously searching. James McMahon saw the stranger talking to Van Royen, but did not learn his name. He thought the man was buying potatoes. The diaimond ring which Mrs. Van Royen wore is gone from her finger, also other jewelry and money, possibly as much as $700, which was known to be in the house.

The Van Royens lived on a twelve-acre farm about a half mile distant from the farm of Mrs. Van Royen's mother, who is the widow of Timothy McMahon, one of the first settlers in Wyandotte county. On the mother's farm live three sons, James, Timothy and Patrick McMahon. Rose McMahon lived with her mother, but was a daily visitor at the home of her sister.

James McMahon made this statement to The Journal:

"Van Royen came over to our place Tuesday morning and said he was going to Kansas City, Mo., to sell some potatoes, and asked that Rose go over to his house and stay with Margaret. Rose left here Tuesday afternoon. I went to town Wednesday morning and when I returned my mother told me that Rose had not come home Tuesday night. This was an unusual thing. I also expected to see Van Royen at the market, but I learned that he had not been there.

"I went over to their home and then went to the back door and knocked. I got no response, so I tried the door. It was not locked. As I entered I saw the dead bodies of my sisters. Margaret was lying near the south door, a part of her body resting under the dining table. Rose, wearing her outer cloak, was lying near the west door. Thee bed clothes were rumpled and the dishes were not washed, but the room did not indicate that there had been a struggle. I looked for my brother-in-law, but found him nowhere in sight. I was stunned, of course, that there was no reasoning of the problem. I ran to a neighbor's and notified the coroner.

MAY HAVE SEEN SLAYER.

"I am confident that the man I saw my brother-in-law with the day before had something to do with the killing. I was not introduced to him, but Mr. Van Royen appeared to know him pretty well. We have been selling a good many potatoes and I supposed that it was some fellow after potatoes or possibly a load of wood.

"The man wore overalls and a gray coat. He was of dark complexion, having black hair and a black moustache, and of medium build."

James A. Downs, the uncle of Mrs. Van Royen, said last night that Van Royen, in company with a stranger, whose description answers that of the man seen by McMahon, came to his Union avenue saloon about a week ago. Downs was not there, but his bartender told him that Van Royen had called for him.

"About a week ago," said Mr. Downs, "Mrs. Van Royen visited me and said that she and her husband had decided to sell their farm and move to Colorado. They wanted to farm out there on a larger scale.

"I advised them not to leave. She said that her husband was anxious to move and was insistent upon it. I had not seen her since and don't know whether the sale was consummated. My theory is that Van Royen had talked about the prospective sale and that someone just laid for the money. Even if the sale was not consummated there probably was $600 or $700 in the house."

The great number of shots fired into the women by the assassin mystifies the authorities. According to the coroner, nearly every one of the bullet wounds would have caused the death. The coroner searched the premises and found in a trunk a 38-caliber revolver, unloaded. It did not smell of powder and he doesn't believe it was the weapon used in the tragedy. Three loaded cartridges were found in the trunk.

HER UNTIMELY ARRIVAL.

In the coroner's opinion the victims had been dead at least eight or ten hours before their bodies were discovered. The killing of Rose McMahon, it is conjectured, resulted from her arriving at the house at an unexpected moment, just as the assassin had begun his plan of slaying the husband and the wife and that he killed her to put the only witness out of the way. The fact that the girl's cloak was about her body indicates that she had either just arrived or was just departing.


MET AT CHURCH FAIR.

Alonzo Van Royen was 32 years old and his wife was the same age. They met at a Catholic church fair in Chelsea place, Kansas City, Kas., three years ago and were married soon after, Father Stephen Kelly, the pastor of the Chelsea Place church performing the ceremony. Van Royen was then a driver for a baker, an occupation he had followed for several years. He continued with the bakery until about a year after his marriage when he started a small grocery store in Mount Washington. He ran the grocery store a few months and then he and his wife went to live with Mrs. Van Royen's mother.

Mrs. Van Royen owned twelve acres, which originally was a part of her father's farm. A short time ago her husband erected on this land a one-room frame house and they went there to live. The married life of the Van Royens was said to be ideal and both were extremely popular. Their plan to sell the property and move to Colorado was not approved of by any of their relatives, who did not want to see them leave Kansas City.

Their threatened departure was especially opposed by Rose McMahon, the slain sister, who was always her sister's companion. Rose was 24 years old and an attractive girl of the brunette type. Every day she went over to her sister's house.

Another sister, Nellie, is the wife of Edward E. Blue of 4909 Michigan avenue. A third sister is Cyrilla, wife of Richard O'Brien of St. Joseph, Mo., and a fourth, Catherine, is a nun in a Catholic convent at Butte, Mont. Mrs. John Ellis, an aunt, lives at Seventh street and Oakland avenue, Kansas City, Kas., and it was at her home last night that Mr. and Mrs. Blue, Mr. Downs and a few intimate friends of the family gathered. At this time the body of Van Royen had not been discovered and the theory that he had murdered his wife and sister-in-law was suggested. No member present would be convinced that such was the condition.

MURDERER HAS GOOD START.

The bodies of the murdered women were taken to the undertaking rooms of Daniel Bros., Packard and Kansas avenues, and the body of Van Royen will be taken there as soon as Coroner Davis examines it.

In the meantime, the sheriff and his deputies are searching the surrounding country in the hope of apprehending the murderer. The sheriff believes that the murderer has a start of at least twenty-four hours and he has probably gotten a safe distance away.

The ho use of the tragedy stands amid lonely surroundings. Practically the nearest neighbor is the McMahones, a half mile away. A small stream rns near the house and it was beside this that the body of Van Royen was found. There was a team of horses standing tweenty feet away and a short distance from the horses was a wagon. Van Royen had another team, but this was gone and the slayer probably used the horses in his escape.

An inquest will be held today but the funeral arrangements for the three victims have not been determined.

CORONER DELAYED SHERIFF.

Owing to the fact that Coroner Davis did not notify the sheriff until 7 o'clock last night, the Wyandotte county authorities had little opportunity to run down any tangible clue. Mr. McMahon notified Coroner Davis of the tragedy at 1:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Instead of informing the sheriff of the crime the coroner had brought the bodies of the women to an undertaker's establishment, and then he called up the sheriff's office. According to Sheriff Becker, the coroner gave such an indefinite description of the locality last night that he went eight miles out of the way before arriving at the Van Royen home at 10 o'clock. If the bloodhounds could have been brought to the scene yesterday afternoon, the sheriff thinks the animals might have found the trail.

According to the sheriff, other instances of negligence on the part of the coroner have been noticed during the year.

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October 16, 1909

ENGINE STRIKES WAGON,
FATALLY INJURING MAN.

Harlem Farmer Meets With Acci-
dent at Missouri Pacific Crossing.
Family Narrowly Escapes.

Despite the warning of the flagman at First and Main streets last night, A. D. Buyas, a farmer living a mile northeast of Harlem, drove across the Missouri Pacific tracks at that point and was struck by an eastbound passenger train which was coming at a high rate of speed.

Buyas, who was accompanied by Hobert, his 11-year-old son, was struck on his head on one of the rails when he was thrown from the wagon and received fatal injuries. The boy, aside from slight bruises, was not seriously injured.

Buyas came to the city yesterday morning with Mrs. Buyas, Hobert and Pearl, the 14-year-old daughter. Before starting to the ferry at the foot of Main street to get across the river, Mrs. Buyas and Pearl decided to walk.

"Somehow, I feel that something is going to happen," she told her husband. "I'm going to get out. I feel lots safer, anyway."

As the man started down the steep incline toward the river the team seemed unable to hold back the weight. It was almost dark and the flagman with his red lantern could be seen at the crossing. Suddenly he began to wave the red light frantically, but it was too late. Though Buyas in desperation tugged at the lines he was on the track, with the train only a few feet away. The horses passed to safety but the engine struck the rear part of the wagon.

Both occupants were thrown high in the air and the wagon completely shattered. The boy arose, but the father lay moaning, and was found to be unconscious. the train did not slacken its speed.

The ambulance was called from police headquarters, with Dr. F. C. LaMar hurried to the scene of the accident. The injured man and the frightened family were placed in the ambulance and taken to the Emergency hospital. It was found that Buyas had received a fractured skull, a broken left arm and right leg. The physicians had little hope that the injured man would live until morning.

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October 14, 1909

GREAT CROWD SEES
TWO NEAR ACCIDENTS.

MULES DASH FOR GATE OPENED
BY MISTAKE.

Women Avert Collision in Chariot
Race and Are Applauded --
Horses and Poultry Draw
the Most Attention.
American Royal Livestock Show of 1909.

The rise in the temperature, combined with a cloudless sky during the better portion of the day aided materially in increasing the crowd attending the American Royal Live Stock show and a conservative estimate yesterday placed the paid admissions at about 14,000. There was, by far, more congestion than on either of the previous days, and in some of the exhibitions it was difficult to move around without elbowing someone out of the way. The crowd was made up largely of visitors from the small neighboring towns, though there was a number of country people and a goodly sprinkling of city folk in the throng.

The horses and poultry continued to be the mecca for the crowds and the barns in which they were exhibited were crowded all day. The cattle and swine also came in for a good share of attention, and, in fact, there was nothing on the grounds that was not visited by a fair portion of the visitors.

CHAMPION IS SHOWN.

The usual exhibition and parade was given in the pavilion during the afternoon. In addition to the Morris six, the Anheuser-Busch mules and the Clark ponies, Casino, the undefeated world's champion Percheron, was shown in the parade, together with $3,000 worth of medals which he has won in various parts of the world.

Two accidents were narrowly averted in the arena. The first came when, through a mistake, some one opened the upper gate while the Anheuser-Busch mules were being exhibited. The animals thought it was for them to go through and they swerved toward it. The crowd beyond the gate made a rush to get out of the way but the driver, by a quick manipulation of the reins, managed to turn the leaders back into the arena and no damage was done.

The second came in the chariot race in which Mrs. Georgia Phillips and Miss Fra Clark participated. At the second dash around, while the ponies were going at top speed, Miss Clark failed to make her turn short enough and the pole of her chariot almost crushed into the one occupied by Mrs. Phillips. Quick driving on the part of the women prevented an accident and the race was finished amid a storm of applause.

BARKERS OUT IN FORCE.

The barkers were out in full force yesterday, much to the delight of the rural housewife. There were apple parers that could be utilized in a hundred different ways, can openers, milk skimmers, knife sharpeners, and in fact, all descriptions of household gimeracks which could be purchased from ten cents to a quarter, and nearly every farmer's wife availed herself of one or more of the implements.

The candy paddle wheel man was also in evidence, and he did a rushing business. The feature which appealed largely to the country brethren, though, was a hill-climbing automobile demonstration. A runway sixteen feet long, built on a 50 per cent grade, was erected and the car, in charge of a competent chauffeur, would, like the French general, go up the hill and down again. There was no charge for riding and many a love-lorn swain and his sweetheart from the rural districts enjoyed their first auto ride.

HOT SOUP AND COFFEE.

From a financial standpoint the women of the Jackson Avenue Christian church have the very best proposition on the grounds. They are operating a lunch stand where hot soup and coffee, together with other edibles, can be obtained on short notice at a moderate sum. The place is crowed all the time, as the air chilled one in the barn and the soup and coffee are used to "heat up." Of course there are some who do not heat up on soup and coffee, but they seem to be in the minority, and the church women reap a harvest, between those getting warm and those really hungry.

The Kellerstrass farm of Kansas City, which has a large exhibit in the poultry barn, after the first of the year will add a new industry to its line, that of raising fancy pheasants. The farm has been experimenting along that line for some time and the past year raised 700 pheasants. This decided them that it could be done successfully, and after January pheasants will be listed in the Kellerstrass catalogue. The birds will be sold only to fanciers.

STALLS ARE DECORATED.

Many of the owners in the horse barn have decorated in a most handsome manner, the stalls allotted to them. Among these are the McLaughlin and Robinson exhibits. They have their stalls in white, green and yellow bunting, together with the cups, ribbons and other trophies, won by their animals, over the stall occupied by the horse which won them. The effect adds beauty to the barn and is quite pleasing to the visitors.

The sale of Herefords in the Fine Stock Sale Pavilion yesterday was attended largely. It began at 2 o'clock and continued until 5:30 at which hour fifty head had been disposed of at fairly good figures.

The highest price of the afternoon, $800, was paid by J. P. Cudahy of Kansas City to W. S. Van Natta of Fowler, Ind., for the bull Pine Lad 38th. The animal has one prizes all over the country and is an exceptionally fine specimen. The average price of the day was $166 1/2, which is $15 less that the average prices realized at the sale last year.

There will be a sale of Galloways in the sale pavilion today, while in the show proper the judging of sheep will be started and several classes will be finished up.

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September 25, 1909

BY SOME ONE IN THE
HOUSE, SAYS LATSHAW.

DECLARES MRS. JOHNSON WAS
NOT ATTACKED BY BURGLAR.

Court Overrules Demurrer to Evi-
dence Introduced by State -- Im-
portant Testimony Allowed in
Record -- Defense Begins Today.

"This crime was not committed by a burglar, but by a member of the household. The evidence here is that whoever came down stairs soon after the crime went up the stairs again. Burglars do not return to a place where they have committed a crime. They leave the vicinity.

"As to motive, there is an unexplained forgery of Mrs. Johnson's name to a deed. There are quarrels between the couple to help in establishing motive. For these reasons, the demurrer is overruled."

The ruling here quoted was made by Judge Ralph S. Latshaw of the criminal court yesterday after attorneys for William A. Johnson of Buckner had argued half an hour that the state had not presented sufficient evidence to allow the cause to go to the jury. The court held that there was evidence. The introduction of testimony for the defense will be begun this morning.

Mrs. Mina Johnson told her story on the witness stand yesterday. Tired to the point of exhaustion by the many questions put to her, she answered all of them quickly Facing her, at a distance of twenty feet, sat her former husband, charged with assaulting her. She looked in his direction as she testified, but he did not lift his eyes from the table at which he sat.

TESTIFIES TO ASSAULT.

After she had exhibited to the jury the place on her head where she was struck, Mrs. Johnson related the happenings on the night of the assault. She and Johnson had come home from church, and retired. He went to bed first and she blew out the lamp. In the course of the night she awoke. The light was burning and brown paper had been put about the glass. She fell asleep again, seeming to be helpless.

Her next recollection, she said, was after the blow had been struck. She remembered kneeling by the side of the bed, blood streaming over her clothing. She looked about the room for her husband, but not seeing him, called. Then, she said, he came up and took hold of her arm, asking what was the matter with her. She told him she did not know, and asked him to let her lie on the floor.

Then he took pillows from the bed and put her head on them. Mrs. Johnson said Johnson did not ask her how she was hurt, either then or at any time since, in fact, that he had never asked any questions about the affair.

While Mrs. Johnson did not call it a quarrel, she testified to an argument she had with Johnson a few days prior to the assault. He was then planning a trip to New Mexico, and she insisted that she was going with him.

"I told him only death would keep me from making the trip," said the witness.

WAS ABSENT THREE MONTHS.

Mrs. Johnson testified as to her marriage thirty-two years ago. She was Mina Alderman, a school teacher. She taught Johnson to read and write after they were married. They rented a farm near Buckner and prospered, so that they came to own the place in a few years. Everything seemed to go nicely until seven years ago.

About that time, she testified, he became less cordial. Three years ago Johnson intended to buy a ranch in New Mexico, and on this deal was absent form home for three months. He seemed even less cordial on his return from that trip, said the witness. In one of his pockets she found a receipted bill from the Savoy hotel, Denver. It was for $46.50 on account of "W. A. Johnson and Mrs. M. B. Howard."

"It's a mistake," the witness said Johnson remarked when she questioned him.

Not long afterwards Johnson told her, she said, of buying a house and lot in Kansas City. He did not explain the deal to her satisfactorily, the witness testified.

SAYS HE BOUGHT EXPENSIVE HATS.

After the finding of the hotel bill Mrs. Johnson made search and learned the address of Mrs. Howard. She wrote Mrs. Howard, requesting an interview, but was refused. Mrs. Howard said in the letter, according to the witness, that she had met Johnson in a business way. She accused Johnson of dictating the letter, said the witness. Mrs. Johnson also told of coming to Kansas City once with Johnson, who would not or did not ride on street cars, so that she was soon very tired and unwilling to make another trip.

Lillian Short, a milliner in the employ of B. Adler & Co., said that she had seen Johnson come to the store three times with a woman who on each occasion purchased a high-priced hat. The woman was not Mrs. Johnson, the witness said. Mr. Adler testified to the same effect.

IMPORTANT TESTIMONY IN.

John F. Cox, Prescott, Kas., testified that Johnson told him on one occasion that he was very well acquainted with two women in Kansas City.

Edward H. Hilt, who testified Thursday, was recalled by the defense and further questioned. He was asked whether Keshlear and another detective who investigated the alleged assault did not talk to him. The witness said he could not remember.

Hilt was allowed to testify only after the objection, raised Thursday as to part of his testimony and again yesterday morning, had been overruled by Judge Latshaw. Hilt had testified that he was awakened by a groan and that, soon afterwards, he heard the footsteps coming down the stairs and almost immediately retrace their course. Fifteen minutes later he again heard footsteps and this ti me Johnson came to his door. The defense objected to any statement of the witness that the sound of the footsteps was similar.

It was one of the most important points that could be raised in a case in which, as in the one on trial, the evidence is wholly circumstantial. The testimony of Hilt was allowed to remain in the record.

ESTATE WORTH $15,000.

This concluded the state's case.

The defence then submitted its demurrer, which was overruled.
The assault on Mrs. Johnson was committed in the morning of August 20 at Buckner. The Johnson were at one time wealthy, but in the settlement of their affairs which followed the divorce given Mrs. Johnson last spring, only about $15,000 could be saved from the wreckage. Mrs. Johnson was given half of this. There was property sufficient to carry mortgages aggregating about $50,000.

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September 24, 1909

JOHNSON COMPLAINED
OF WIFE, WOMAN SAYS.

MRS. HILT TESTIFIES IN BUCK-
NER ASSAULT CASE.

Three Times Court Denies Motion of
Defense to Dismiss Jury -- Wit-
nesses Tell Events Night
of the Attack.

While Mrs. Mina Johnson did not go on the witness stand yesterday to testify against her husband, William A. Johnson of Buckner, Mo., now on trial in the criminal court on the charge of having assaulted her the day was replete with incidents even without the wife's story.

Three times counsel for Johnson moved that the jury be discharged, stating that matters prejudicial to a fair trail had occurred, and s harp exchanges between attorneys on both sides were not infrequent.

Mrs. Johnson will testify today. Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, informed the court during the afternoon session that he would not call Mrs. Johnson to the stand until today, as he had excused her because she complained of feeling sick.

Of the witnesses examined yesterday, only Mrs. Cornelia Hilt and Edward H. Hilt, her husband, were at the Johnson home in Buckner the morning of August 20, 1908, when Mrs. Johnson was hurt. For six years prior to her marriage Mrs. Hilt lived at the Johnson home. Mrs. Hilt was married ten years ago. At the time of the assault she and her husband had been two weeks at the Johnson home, Mrs. Hilt working about the house and Hilt doing farm work. They live in Buckner.

HUSBAND GAVE ALARM.

"The night Mrs. Johnson was hurt we had been at a Baptist meeting," she testified. "Early in the morning Mr. Johnson came to the room where my husband and I sleep and roused us. He said: "Jump up, quick, Nella, quick.' He said it several times. I got up and followed him up the stairs part of the way. As we were going upstairs he said: 'Mina's hurt.' Then I passed him on the stairs because I began to run. He said: 'Mina's hurt. I'm afraid she's hurt bad.'

"I found Mrs. Johnson on her back on the floor. I can't describe how bloody she was, for there was blood all over her. I could not see the wound, she was so bloody My thought was that her throat had been cut, there was so much blood."

"Did you notice the bed?"

"Yes, I noticed there was blood on it when we lifted Mrs. Johnson from the floor. The blood looked dry compared to that on Mrs. Johnson's clothes and on a corset cover that was lying on a chair by the bed. Mr. Johnson said his wife had wiped blood from her face with the corset cover.

"There was a light in the room. I stepped over and turned it up, although Mr. Johnson told me not to do so. Mr. Hilt said we must have a doctor and I offered to call one, but Mr. Johnson said he would. Mr. Johnson asked no questions nor did he tell me where the wound was. I stayed in the room only a few minutes, then my husband and I went downstairs to heat some water to wash Mrs. Johnson. When we returned, the doctor was there."

Mrs. Hilt said she had heard no unkind words between the Johnsons during her residence at the house. She said that two days before the assault she had driven to Buckner to meet Mr. Johnson and bring him home from the train. On that occasion, said the witness, Johnson had said to her:

" 'Nella, what am I going to do with Mina?' I said: 'I would not do anything to hurt her feelings, Mr. Johnson.' He said" 'She quarrels with me all the time and I don't say anything back.' "

Edward H. Hilt, husband of the previous witness, was then called to the stand. He said:

"While I was at the Johnson home I was in the habit of getting up at 4 o'clock in the morning and going home to do the chores there, then returning to the Johnsons. The morning of the assault I was awakened at about 3:30 o'clock. I was sleeping in the east room downstairs.

"The first thing I heard was a groan from above and southwest from where I lay. Then I heard footsteps or 'footpads' coming down the stairs toward the north. Then I heard a doorknob turn. I cannot say which knob it was, except that it was not the knob to my door. Almost immediately the footsteps returned the same way.

SAID WIFE HAD FALLEN.

"Fifteen minutes later those footsteps came again, just as the first time. My door opened and Mr. Johnson came by and said: 'Jump up.' My wife went out at once, but I waited to dress. I found Mrs. Johnson on the floor, with pillows under her head. Johnson meet me at the foot of the stairs as I started up and said: 'Mina has fallen and hurt herself.'

"We picked Mrs. Johnson up and laid her on the bed and then my wife and I went downstairs to heat some water. There was a dim light in the room when I came in."

PHYSICIAN ON STAND.

Dr. M. G. Ravencroft of Buckner, who was called to attend Mrs. Johnson after the assault, was the first witness. He identified six pieces of bone taken from Mrs. Johnson's skull in the course of an operation . He was asked whether the wound on Mrs. Johnson's head did not look as if the blow which caused it had been struck from the rear and forwards, but the court would not allow him to answer.

The physician said he asked Johnson how Mrs. Johnson was hurt. The latter replied, "I don't know." Mrs. Johnson also was unable to give an account of the happening, said he.

Dr. J. W. Robertson of Buckner testified that it would take a heavy blow to cause the injury received by Mrs. Johnson.

There was a craning of necks when Samuel H. Chiles, four years a marshal of Jackson county and the most renowned fox hunter in the county, took the witness chair. Mr. Chiles has lived forty years in Buckner and has known the Johnsons for a quarter of a century. Mrs. Johnson lived with his family when she was a little girl.

Two days after the assault Mr. Chiles went to the Johnson home. Johnson met him at the gate and said he wanted to talk to him.

" 'I want you to help me out in this trouble and help me ferret out who did this.' I said I would help all I could and asked him to tell me who was at the house at the time so that I would have something to work on. He told me who was there and I suggested that perhaps these people could tell, but Johnson said:

" 'No, they can't tell anything. I heard my wife say, 'Oh, don't,' and saw her on the floor and saw a light. I know I blew out the light when we went to bed. I saw my wife on the floor groaning and wanted to put her on the bed, but she said no.'

"The Johnson took me into the yard and said: 'Have you heard anybody talk about this?' I said: 'Yes, everybody is talking about it.' 'What is the impression of the people to whom you have talked,' he asked and I said: 'The impression is that you did it.' "

About four days later, said the witness, Johnson came to his house, with Clint A. Winfrey, a banker at Buckner. Johnson took him aside and out of Winfrey's hearing, said the witness, and spoke about getting a lawyer and employing a private detective. Whig Keshlear, a relative of Chiles, was mentioned, and Chiles said Keshlear would do as well as anybody.

In his opening statement for the state I. B. Kimbrell said that quarrels with is wife over a period of years were the cause of the assault and that Johnson struck his wife. The defense said that the blow was struck either by an intruder or that Mrs. Johnson fell and hurt herself.

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September 12, 1909

DESPONDENT, HANGS HIMSELF.

Wm. Mann, 80, Grieved for Wife
Who Died in 1905.

Brooding over the loss of his aged wife who died February 24, 1905, William Mann, 80 years old, a pioneer farmer of Johnson county, Kas., became despondent early yesterday morning and hanged himself with a halter rope in the barn of his son, James Mann, who lives in the suburbs of Bonner Springs. The body was discovered at 10 o'clock by Harley Mann, the ten-year-old grandson. An examination made by the Wyandotte county Coroner J. A. Davis proved that life had been extinct several hours.

Mr. Mann was at one time widely known as a successful farmer of Johnson county, where he lived more than 35 years. In 1903 he moved to Bonner Springs in Wyandotte county accompanied by his only son James. There the two went into the potato raising business. Recently James Mann has been locally known as the potato king from the fact that he yearly cultivated 300 acres of the tubers, considerably more than any other farmer in the vicinity.

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July 2, 1909

WANTS 1,000 HARVEST HANDS.

Mayor of Larned, Kas., Sends Out
An Urgent Call.

Farmhands are so scarce around Larned, Kas., that Mayor E. E. Frizell has mailed out postal cards to Eastern cities advertising for 2,000 harvest hands. One thousand men reported by June 28, but the farmers are still in need of capable help in the harvest fields and the mayor yesterday appealed to The Journal for assistance. A telegram to The Journal said:

Wanted -- 1,000 harvest hands; wages $2.50 to $3 per day; harvest commences July 3.

Following the telegram a letter was received from the mayor, in which he said that it had been reported that Larned was overcrowded with unemployed men. Such a report, the mayor stated, was an injustice to Larned and the surrounding country, as there has not been a time within the last fifteen years when men were needed so badly.

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May 14, 1909

DEATH BY CARBOLIC ACID.

Unidentified Man Commits Suicide
Near Centropolis.

The body of an unidentified man was found in a lot between Drury and Hardesty avenues on Fifteenth street yesterday morning by Mrs. Della Morris, who lives in the vicinity. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, said death was due to carbolic acid poising.

The name Henry Patterson was found on a piece of paper in the man's pocket. The underclothing bore the letters J. E. C. and the initials J. C. were upon a signet ring which he wore. H e was about 50 years old, five feet five inches in height, weighed 140 pounds and wore a dark suit, patent leather shoes and a soft hat. His eyes were gray and his hair brown.

ENDED LIFE WITH SHOTGUN.

Morgan Jones, a farmer who lives near Dallas, Mo., killed himself with a shotgun early yesterday morning. He had been ill for a number of years and it is thought by his friends that it caused despondency. He was 30 years old and unmarried. He had been formerly employed as a bookkeeper in Kansas City.

TRIED TO DIE, BUT FAILED.

In a saloon at 1025 East Nineteenth street F. D. Miskelly of Excelsior Springs attempted to kill himself by drinking chloroform. He was taken to the general hospital. He is in precarious condition.

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April 21, 1909

TREATS BLACK HAND
LETTER AS A JOKE.

J. B. MARKEY HAS NO THOUGHT
OF GIVING UP $10,000.

Note Demanding Money Was Sent
to a Wealthy Farmer From Den-
ver -- Believed to Be the
Work of a Crank.

J. B. Markey, whose children live at 1303 West Thirty-ninth street, but who spends most of the time on his big farm in Harrison county, treats as a joke the "Black Hand" letter sent him from Denver, demanding $10,000 under pain of death.

It was last Friday when Mr. Markey received the letter, postmarked at Denver. At that time he was on his farm near Gilman City, Mo., and the missive had been forwarded to him from Kansas City. Laughingly he handed the letter to his friends and then forgot about it.

Being advised, however, to send the letter to Denver authorities, Mr. Markey did so, and since yesterday morning nothing more had been heard of it. Then it developed that the lives of his children were being weighed against the $10,000.

The letter was poorly written and demanded that the $10,000 be apportioned in designated bills, to be delivered at a certain address on Wellton avenue, in Denver, within thirty days of the date of the letter. No mention was made of the three children. Certain reports, however, have frightened the children, who are ignorant of the exact demands made upon their father.

Yesterday morning W. F. Farren, 3136 Central avenue, a nephew of Mr. Markey, read the letter in a morning paper, and hastened to the Markey home to break the news to the family. Some friends had preceded him and had talked with Miss Markey over the telephone. Though he assured the children that no harm whatever attended them, their fears were not fully dispelled. Last night Miss Markey refused to discuss the matter.

Speaking of the letter, Mr. Farren said:

"It is doubtless the work of some crank who knows that Mr. Markey has some money, and thinks that he can be bluffed into giving it up. Mr. Markey has not the slightest fear of harm resulting form the affair, and treats it only as a joke.

"Mr. Markey has no intention of complying with the demand. He pays less attention to the affair than do his friends."

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March 23, 1909

TOOK A STROLL; IS SHY $30.

Farmer Slept in Rear of Saloon and
Was Touched.

When Farmer Gus Peterson of Topeka, Kas., strayed from the glare of the Union depot last night and started for a little stroll along Union avenue he merrily jingled three golden eagles in his pocket. Two hours later when he awoke from a troubled sleep in the rear of a Union avenue saloon all he could find was a bunch of keys. He remembers going into the saloon to have a drink with two "nice appearin' gents."

Peterson reported his loss to the police at No. 2 station and wired home for money.

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February 2, 1909

WILL GET THE SQUARE NOW.

One North of the City Market Is to
Be Acquired.

Both houses of the council last night authorized the city comptroller to spend $250,000 acquired from the sale of bonds for the purchase of the square bounded by Main, Walnut, Third and Fourth streets. The buildings will be razed and sheds erected for the use of farmers having produce to sell. It was stated that an arrangement had been perfected with the several owners of the property to dismiss court appeals from the verdict of the condemnation jury.

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January 26, 1909

HUMAN BONES ARE UNEARTHED.

Seekers After Buried Treasure Sur-
prised at Their Discovery.

Coroner B. H. Zwart has been notified of the discovery of a grave on the A. J. Bundschu farm near Selsea. While out hunting yesterday, a son of James Lynch, who rents the farm, discovered a depression in the ground in a thicket. Thinking he had found buried treasure, the boy notified his father and, together with several neighbors, an exploring expedition was formed.

Instead of buried treasure, the diggers unearthed the bones of a human being. Now the neighborhood is excited and efforts are being made to recall some murder of days gone by or some mysterious disappearance. The discoverers were unable to distinguish whether the bones were that of a man or a woman. Coroner Zwart is expected to solve this question.

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January 25, 1909

HOW SMITH LOST HIS COOK.

Farm Hand Made Love to Her In-
stead of Doing Chores.

The farm-hand problem is troubling the farmers in the same old way. Charles C. Smith, who owns a large farm and ranch in Greer county, Ok., is in Kansas City, staying at the Sexton hotel. Mr. Smith said yesterday that it is hard to obtain the necessary help on the farms, and that the experienced farm hands are either taking advantage of their knowledge of farming to establish homes in the country for themselves, or are attracted to the city.

"I encountered the hardest luck last year in my farming experience," Mr. Smith said yesterday. "I wrote to an employment agency in Kansas City to send me a man and wife who wanted to work on the farm. The man the agency sent represented himself as a married man, but his wife was not with him. He had been there only a few days until he began making love to my cook, who had been with me several years. At the end of two weeks they went to Vernon and were married. Then he hired him and his wife out to another farmer in the neighborhood. That is only one of the hard luck stories the farmers have to tell about the hired hand problem."

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January 12, 1909

DIED FULL OF HONORS.

Wearing the Blue Ribbon, This
White Wyandotte Passed Away.

An unusual incident attended the judging of chickens in the annual show of the Kansas City Fanciers' Association in Convention hall yesterday afternoon in the death of a White Wyandotte cock owned by the P. B. Wyandotte farm at Mount Washington three minutes after it had received the first prize in its class. According to the judges, the cock would have been given the special award to be presented to the best bird in the show of any of the classes entered.

"The bird marked the perfection of breeding in the White Wyandotte class," said W. C. Pierce of Indianapolis, one of the judges. "I never saw its equal. The other judges say that it was a type apart from any bird exhibited, in any of the shows they have attended. It was easily worth $500."

Owners of the Wyandotte farm said that they still have two birds of the same breeding that show promise of equaling the bird that died. A post mortem will be held this morning to determine the cause of the fowl's death.

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January 9, 1909

CAN GROW TOBACCO HERE.

Jackson and Cass Counties' Farmers
Experiment With Weed.

LEE'S SUMMIT, MO., Jan 8 -- G. W. Simmons, who lives near Raymore, Mo., and who recently returned from Kentucky as representative of the Harrisonville Commercial Club to investigate and procure practical help for the raising of tobacco, is in Lee's Summit today. Mr. Simmons says there is no doubt but what the soil of Jackson and Cass counties is properly tilled for the growing of tobacco, and this year he will endeavor to have several of the farmers in the different localities of Cass county plant as much as three acres each of the product.

Jackson county will also be given a trial at this new culture by George Shawhan of Weston, Mo., on his farm near Lone Jack. Mr. Shawhan will plant fifty acres, while his son-in-law, James Rowland, will have fifteen acres. A tobacco company has recently offered inducements to the farmers in these localities in order to get them started in this new venture.

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January 7, 1909

WILL "CUT UP" THE REWARD.

Each of Three Capturers of "Adam
God" Will Receive $33.33.

The row over who should get the reward for the capture of James Sharp, alias "Adam God," was settled by the police board yesterday, when it was decided to cut the $100 into three parts. The fanatic was caught by R. M. Bair, a farmer near Olathe, Kas., and his hired man, E. P. Barrett. But Sheriff J. S. Stead was in the vicinity looking for the fugitive, so these three men will each get $33.33 each, as near as James E. Vincil, secretary of the board, is able to cut it.

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December 11, 1908

'ADAM' SHARP IS
TAKEN IN KANSAS.

JOHNSON COUNTY SHERIFF CAP-
TURES RELIGIOUS FANATIC.

IS WOUNDED IN BOTH HANDS.

BROUGHT TO KANSAS CITY AND
LOCKED IN HOLDOVER.

Offers No Resistance and Declares
He's Glad That His Fight Is
Over -- Abjures His "Faith."
City Hall Guarded.
James Sharp, Leader of Religious Fanatics
JAMES SHARP,
Religious Fanatic Who Styles Himself "Adam God."

After fifty hours' search by the local police and officers of nearby towns, James Sharp, who styles himself "Adam" and "King David," was captured three miles south of Zarah, Johnson county, Kas., yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. It was James Sharp who started a riot at Fourth and Main streets Tuesday afternoon, resulting in the death of Patrolmen A. O. Dalbow and Michael Mullane; bystander A. J. Selsor; and Louis Pratt, one of the religious band, and his 14-year-old daughter, Lulu.

News of Sharp's arrest reached police yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock and Chief of Police Daniel Ahern sent Captain Walter Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan to Olathe, Kas., after the prisoner.

A farmer named W. C. Brown living eight miles northwest of Olathe telephoned to J. S. Steed, sheriff of Johnson county, about 11 o'clock yesterday morning that a man resembling the description of the fanatic, James Sharp, had been seen in that neighborhood Wednesday night and yesterday morning. He said that the suspect had spent the night at the home of Joseph Beaver, a farmer living about two miles from him. Beaver, he said, was in Olathe and the sheriff could talk to him and get a good description of the man.

Sheriff Steed found Beaver and after having him describe the stranger who had stayed at his home decide that the man was Sharp and drove to the Brown farm, leaving Olathe about 1 o'clock yesterday. When he reached the Brown farm he deputized a young man who worked on a nearby farm, and the two men started a search for the mysterious stranger.

ASLEEP IN STRAW STACK.

A large wood pasture was first gone over, and then the officers separated and searched the ravines for several miles. A straw stack in the middle of an old wheat field was seen by the sheriff's deputy and, going around it, he found a man sleeping under the straw.

When Sheriff Steed reached the straw stack the man was called and told to come out. As he rolled from under the stack the men noticed he kept his hands in his pockets, and when they made him take them out they saw that he was wounded in both hands. After being searched by the sheriff, Sharp was placed in a buggy without being handcuffed and driven to Olathe.

Sharp told his captors that he was praying and contemplating while he was in the haystack as to what he should do. Weary with the long tramp from Kansas City and exhausted for the want of food, Sharp welcomed arrest and surrendered without any show of making a fight.

He was taken into the office of the county jail and his wounds, which had not been treated, were washed and bandaged by Sheriff Steed. He was then given a supper, which he devoured with eagerness.

ANXIOUS TO GO BACK.

While he was eating his meal the police officers from Kansas City arrived. Sharp greeted them and said he was anxious to go back with them. After finishing eating he told of his trip from Kansas City to the place of his capture.

"I shot five times at the police and when I had emptied my revolver I went into the saloon there on the corner and gave my pistol to the bartender. I told him that I was through, that I was not sure of the Lord, and asked him to take me to a policeman.. The man seemed to be frightened and did not move. I then tried to load the gun, but my two hands were wounded, so I could not do it. The cylinder would not turn. I was going to put the barrel in my mouth and blow off the top of my head."

Sharp said he then walked outside and stood in the crowd and watched the police and citizens gathering around Pratt across the street. Continuing Sharp said, "God then directed my steps south on Main street to Fifth street, and west up Fifth street. I went on down Fifth street to the bottoms. When I reached a barber shop I went in and had my hair clipped. I told the barber that my hands were frozen. Leaving the shop the Lord's will seemed to take me farther away from the shooting scene and I walked and walked.

"I WAS LOSING FAITH."

"I was losing faith in my religion because things had not come about as the revelation made it out. I continued walking all that night. In the morning I slept in the woods. That evening I went to a house and asked for something to eat and a place to sleep. The people gave me my supper, but said they did not have any place to put me for the night. They directed me to a house about 300 yards distant, to a cousin's. I stayed there all night and had my breakfast there.

"I could not use my hands and the man fed me. They asked me what was wrong with my hands, and I told them that I was paralyzed. I told them I was a peddler and that my partner had left me. I was afraid they would suspect that I was wanted in Kansas City and left as early in the morning as possible.

"After leaving that house, which was the Beaver farm, I went to that straw stack and hid. At first my only intention was to get away, to escape. Then I began to fear that I had done wrong and was debating whether I should go to some farmer and pay him to take me to a town and give me up. I had money to pay the man for my trouble.

"When the officer arrested me it seemed like I was going to heaven. I was so worried and had lost such a quantity of blood. I told the sheriff that I was glad he had me and the j ail would not be a bad place for me."

HAD PLENTY OF MONEY.

When the officers searched Sharp he had a number of cartridges in his pocket and a large knife, which he carried in his left hand and cut Sergeant Patrick Clark in the eye with. A large roll of bills containing $105 and a purse with $4.92 in it was also found in his pockets.

A large crowd of persons gathered in the jail yard at Olathe, and attempted to get into the room where the prisoner was. Everybody in the city wanted to see the man that caused so much grief by inciting his followers to murder and riot.

Captain Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan left Olathe and Sharp at 9 o'clock last night over the Frisco railroad, and arrived in Kansas City at 10 o'clock. The officers with their prisoner left the train at Rosedale and took a street car to Fourth and Wyandotte streets. They were afraid that friends of the dead and wounded officers who might have heard of Sharp's capture would attempt a demonstration against the prisoner. When the officers and prisoner got off the car he was placed between the two and hurried to police headquarters, where a large force of policemen and detectives were inside the station and also guarded the doors.

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December 10, 1908

OFFICER MULLANE IS SINKING.

At Midnight He Was Not Expected
to Survive Until Morning.
Clark Is Better.

Captain Walter Whitsett went to St. Joseph's hospital last night to see Sergeant Patrick Clark and Patrolman Michael Mullane, wounded in the riot of Tuesday afternoon. Clark is doing nicely, with chances far in his favor for recovery, but Mullane is low, and was not expected to survive the night. At midnight he began to sink.

To Captain Whitsett, Sergeant Clark was grappling with the big fanatic who had the knife and gun. She ran in behind me, but I paid little attention to her until I felt the sting of the bullet.. In the struggle I was cut across the right eye."

If this is the case Sergeant Clark was shot by Lena Pratt for, according to her own statement made last night, she was the only one of the girls who carried a revolver. The ball entered Sergeant Clark's right shoulder blade, ranged upward and lodged in the shoulder. Two X-ray photographs were taken of the shoulder yesterday in an attempt to locate the exact position of the ball, but they were not very successful. He has recovered sufficiently from the shock to be operated upon today, say his physicians, Drs. Eugene King and W. A. Shelton. His right eye will have to be removed and then follows the great danger, as is the case in all such operations, of affecting the other eye. The greatest of care will have to be taken of him after such an operation.

When Captain Whitsett called to see Patrolman Mullane he was admitted by the latter's brother, Jack Mullane, an insurance agent. He was allowed to remain only a few minutes. The brave officer, who had battled against such overwhelming odds from the fact that he had absolutely refused to shoot the woman and girl who were firing at him, turned painfully on his bed and said, "Hello, captain, what's the matter? What have I done?" Then he was quiet for a moment, and, reviving, said: "I have three little children at home. My God, what of them! For my little girl's sake I'm glad I didn't shoot the woman and girl. I could have killed them, and they have killed me."

Then he sank again into a semi-conscious state. The gallant officer is making a braver fight for his life than he made in the thickest of the riot, and in his occasional conscious moments declares that he will live for the sake of his wife and children.

A. J. Selsor of 2412 Benton boulevard, the bystander who was shot in Tuesday's riot, cannot recover.

The bullet entered his body at the right side, passing through the fleshy part of his arm just above the elbow, ranged slightly downward and broke the spinal cord.

Mr. Selsor has been a resident of Kansas City for about ten years. He is 72 years of age. Previous to coming to Kansas City, he lived at Gallatin, Mo., and was engaged in banking and farming.

When his daughter told him that the papers referred to him as a "retired farmer," he said it was a mistake; he is merely a "tired" farmer. Besides his daughter, Mrs. Godman, he has three other children, who are either here or coming. They are: Mark Selsor, connected with a magazine in New York; Mrs. H. F. Cox, dramatic art teacher with the Harvey Dramatic Company of Chicago; Frank Selsor, owner of a drug store in Muskogee, Ok.

At last midnight Louis Pratt, lieutenant of James Sharp, alias "Adam God," was still alive. He is in the general hospital with a bullet in his brain, and his legs pierced with balls. One leg was amputated Tuesday night. He cannot recover.

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December 9, 1908

LOUIS HARTMAN IS A FARMER.

Man That Shot Pratt Is Applicant
for Position of Guard at the
Penitentiary.
Louis Hartman, the Farmer Who Shot Pratt
LOUIS HARTMAN.
He May Have Fired the Bullet That
Ended Fanatic Pratt's Fusillade.

Louis Hartman, who grabbed a revolver from Patrolman Coughlin's hand and possibly fired the shot that settled Pratt, is a farmer at Trimble, Mo. He helped to build the Metropolitan tunnel on West Eighth street, and is prominently identified with Republican politics in the northern counties of Missouri. He is an applicant for one of the positions of guard at the state penitentiary at Jefferson City, and was in the city yesterday on matters pertaining to his appointment.

"I was standing in an adjoining saloon, and heard the shooting. I walked to the northwest corner of Main and Fourth streets, and there encountered Patrolman Coughlin, who was shooting at Pratt," said Hartman. "It was evident to me that from the way Coughlin was holding his gun he could not shoot effectively I stepped in front of him, saying, 'Level your gun on my shoulder.' He did so, but the bullet went wild. I took the gun out of the policeman's hand. Pratt was then on all fours, and his three children were about him. A woman was handing him a gun. I took aim, fired, and Pratt fell helpless to the sidewalk. Then the woman and children dispersed. I could have shot the woman, but I was prevented by the police on the opposite side of the street shooting in my direction."

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November 22, 1908

WHEN GREENWOOD
GREW BIG SQUASHES.

HE DESERTED THE FARM TO
TEACH SCHOOL.

It Was Then That He Bid Farewell
to Fame and Name as
the Great "Squash
King."

The opportunities for a truck gardener to become immensely wealthy are more numerous than in any other line of business. This fact was clearly demonstrated yesterday afternoon at the Coates house, where members of the Missouri Valley Horticultural Society devoted their time to an explanation of nature and her wonderful productions.

"There are men in this city today who would be wealthy had they devoted their time and energy to a cultivation of the soil instead of following business careers," said one of the members.

"Professor J. M. Greenwood, superintendent of the public schools, would have undoubtedly become famous as the "squash king," had he persisted in his experiments with squash.. The professor did not deign to waste his time with the ordinary brand of squash known to the general public. His squashes were full grown."

There was a dreamy, far away expression in the professor's eyes yesterday, as he told of seven squash seeds, planted in earth, which had been dug from a well and which produced a sufficient number of squashes to supply the wants of the entire surrounding country. These squashes, according to Professor Greenwood, ranged in size from sixty pounds to the size of a large washtub.

But it must not be supposed that Professor Greenwood was permitted to carry off the honors of the occasion without a contest. As a matter of fact there was a strong faction among those present, who still insist that the squash story was surpassed by the feat of Major Frank Holsinger, who upon one occasion, neglected to prune his grape vines. Thinking they had been destroyed by the severe cold, they were permitted to remain as they were. Behold his surprise, then, as the grape season approached to observe his grape vines loaded with fruit. The fact that Major Holsinger placed a chair under one vine and picked a bushel of grapes without moving the chair, is ample evidence of his success as a grower of grapes.

Although there was some discussion as to the nature study in the schools and the advisability of teaching the children more of plant and insect life, it could be plainly seen that the minds of the majority of those present were busily engaged in mathematical computation as the money to be made on a ten-acre tract of land if the soil be devoted to grapes and squashes

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October 12, 1908

OPENING DAY OF
AMERICAN ROYAL.

STOCK SHOW OPENS AT YARDS
THIS MORNING.

BIGGER THAN EVER
THIS YEAR.

THERE'LL BE A HORSE SHOW
EACH NIGHT.

Fine Line of Beef Cattle, Draft and
Coach Horses, Sheep and Poul-
try on Exhibition -- Judg-
ing Begins Today.

The last flag has been draped, the last bit of bunting festooned over the walls, and the Royal family of American live stock are ready for inspection. The exhibition which opens today is said to be the biggest and best in the Royal's history. The number of entries in the various classes exceed those of former years, and new features have been added which promise to prove attractive to the lover of purebred stock.

All day yesterday and far into the night a crowd of busy attendants worked preparing the decorations for their respective sections. In the big tent workmen were engaged in constructing seats and lacing chairs for the reserved sections. In the big tent workmen were engaged in constructing seats and placing chairs for the reserved sections. Sixty arc lights have been placed in the tent, the roadway has been put in good condition, and everything is ready for the big show.

In the cattle pavilion yesterday the contestants were being washed and groomed for the grand opening this morning. No lady preparing for a ball could be attended with more care by a faithful maid than these representatives of royalty receive at the hands of the grooms. The hair is curled, the hoofs and horns greased and polished, until they look indeed worthy representatives of their royal family.

SHEEP WANTED CABBAGE.

When the sheep began to arrive late Saturday night there was an insistent call from the owners for cabbage. "We must have cabbage to feed our sheep," was the cry. The stock yards company had agreed to furnish feed for the live stock, but here was a contingency which they were not prepared to meet. Being unable to procure cabbage at that late hour, and yesterday being Sunday, there was consternation among the sheep owners. About 8 o'clock yesterday afternoon an old negro who had evidently heard of the dilemma, drove into the pens with a wagon piled high with cabbage. There was a wild scrambling among the sheep owners to purchase the lot and the enterprising farmer realized a good profit on his load. The show sheep now ready for exhibition will eat about 1,000 heads of cabbage daily.

Many devices, showing the enterprise of the attendants with the different heads, may be seen in the pens. "How am I for a Calf," is the inscription above the head of a 1,300-pound yearling, in the Shorthorn division. On every head the grooms and owners are ready and willing to tell of the virtues of their particular string of horses, or herd of Shorthorns.

GREAT LINE OF HORSES.

"If this 2-year-old Belgian mare fails to land first prize we'll walk her back to Iowa," was the boast of a groom who stood at the head of his favorite mare. Stately Percherons, massive Belgians, Clydes and Shires are seen in one section, while in another are the French and German Coach and the Hackneys.

B. O. Cowan of Chicago, assistant secretary of the American Shorthorn Breeders' Association, was enthusiastic over the prospects for the American Royal.

"We are going to have the best show ever seen in Kansas City," he declared. "We have more entries and the people throughout the country have taken a deeper interest. Another thing, you will observe that we have a chicken show this year, a new feature which will be of interest to many."

The night shows during the week will be practically the same as the horse shows formerly held in Convention hall, with this exception, that in all classes there are more entries than in any previous horse show ever held in Kansas City. The big tent, 150x400 feet, with a seating capacity of 7,000, will be well lighted. All seats will be free during the day.

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