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December 26, 1909

FREE LIQUOR, MANY SCRAPES.

Broken Heads and Knife Wounds
Result of Saloon Celebrations.

The North End saloons last night gave free liquor to their customers. The result is that there were several broken heads, some cutting scrapes, not to speak of the parched throats to come. A few of the Christmas celebrators were given free rides to the emergency hospital.

Edward Evans, 1077 Grand avenue, a dishwasher at Eighth and Main streets, was cut in the chest with a knife. His cheek also was slit, the knife blade entering his neck and barely missing the jugular vein. After being treated at the emergency hospital he was taken to the general hospital.

Only one saloon in Kansas City was known to be closed yesterday. "Wish you all a Merry Christmas. This place will be closed until Monday morning on account of Christmas day."

This is the inscription which greeted the would-be Christmas patrons of Jack Sheehan's saloon, 2340 Grand avenue. So far as is known, this is the only saloon which observed Christmas by closing.

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December 18, 1909

DIDN'T DANCE FAST ENOUGH.

So Man With Revolver Shot Robert
Kimme Through Ankle.

According to a statement made by Robert Kimme, of 912 Bellefontaine avenue, as he lay on the operating table of the emergency hospital last night with his right foot shattered from a revolver bullet, there is an armed maniac roaming the down town district of Kansas City.

Kimme was found lying in an alley near Eighth and McGee streets by Patrolman J. Keenan. He declared that he was taking a short cut downtown from his home when a man armed with a revolver walked up to him and commanded him to dance. Kimme attempted to do so, but his efforts failed to please his captor, who shot him through the right ankle.

After receiving emergency treatment Kimme was taken to the general hospital.

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December 11, 1909

DENIED ENTRANCE, HE SHOOTS.

Man Claiming to Be Policeman
Wanted to Search House, Escapes.

When William Peterson, 9 East Seventh street, answered a knock at his door last night he was confronted by a man announcing himself a policeman and demanding the privilege of searching the house. Peterson asked for credentials and when they were not forthcoming he denied the man entrance.

At that juncture the alleged policeman drew a revolver and fired, two bullets piercing Peterson's right thigh and another shattering the thumb on the right hand. The assailant then fled. While making an effort to run on a slippery pavement he was seen by William Jones, proprietor of a rooming house across the street, to fall down and roll in the slush. He has not been arrested. Peterson was taken to the emergency hospital and treated.

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December 9, 1909

TWO KILLED AND
ONE WOUNDED IN
RUNNING BATTLE.

Charles Lukens, Wyandotte County
Deputy Sheriff, Shot Through
Heart by Charles Galloway, Drink
Crazed Rosedale Electrician, He
Tried to Serve With Injunction.

SLAYER HAD THREATENED
WIFE WHO SOUGHT DIVORCE.

After Killing Lukens, Galloway
Carried on a Retreating Fight
With Other Officers Until
Brought to Bay at 3129
Bell Street.

SHOT BY DETECTIVES, DIES
IN EMERGENCY HOSPITAL.

Double Tragedy Direct Result of
Domestic Difficulties of the Gal-
loways -- Wife, Who Sued for Di-
vorce, Feared for Her Life, Which
Husband Had Threatened -- Re-
straining Order Was to Keep Him
From Further Terrorizing Her.
Murderer of Peace Officer, Who Was Slain as He Fled From Posse.
CHARLES T. GALLOWAY.

Two men are dead and another wounded as the result of an attempt by Charles Quincy Lukens, a deputy sheriff of Wyandotte county, Kas., to serve a restraining order upon Charles T. Galloway, a drink crazed electrician of 428 College avenue, Rosedale, Kas., late yesterday evening.

Lukens was shot above the heart and instantly killed during a running fight with Galloway.

Galloway was later brought to bay in a house at 3129 Bell street, and after a desperate resistance was mortally wounded, dying at 11:30 o'clock last night as he was being placed upon the operating table at Emergency hospital.

JUST BACK FROM OKLAHOMA.

Deputy Sheriff Lukens left the Wyandotte county court house yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock with an order from the district court restraining Galloway from annoying or in any way interfering with his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway. The Galloways had been having trouble for several months, and November 23 Mrs. Galloway, through her attorney, Rush L. Fizette, 1255 Kansas City avenue, Rosedale, filed a suit for divorce, alleging cruelty, drunkenness and ill-treatment.

Since the filing of the divorce petition Galloway had beaten his wife and threatened her life. She then applied for an order restraining him from bothering her. The order was granted several weeks ago, but Galloway had been in Oklahoma during that time. Yesterday word was received at the sheriff's office that he was in town, and Lukens was sent to serve papers on him.

QUARTER-MILE RUNNING FIGHT.

Mrs. Galloway has been staying for the past few days at the home of her sister, Mrs. J. L. Connor, at 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale. The deputy sheriff and Marshal Drew thought perhaps they might find Galloway hanging around there, as he had visited the Connor home earlier in the day and made demands to see his wife and children.

The officers reached Kansas City avenue and Washington street about 5:30 o'clock, and met Galloway shortly after they stepped off the car. Marshal Drew spoke to Galloway and shook hand with him. Lukens then shook hands with Galloway, and told him that he had some papers to serve.

Almost instantly Galloway drew a revolver and opened fire on the officers, who, unprepared for such an emergency, had to unbutton their overcoats before they could get at their weapons. They at last got hold of their revolvers and opened fire on Galloway. A running fight was kept up for more than a quarter of a mile.

The fleeing man turned into alleys, turning back every few steps to fire upon the pursuing officers. He finally reached Rosedale avenue, and turning south ran toward the tracks of the Frisco railroad. When the officers reached the tracks he turned and fired at Lukens, hitting him directly over the heart.

LUKENS FALLS DEAD.

Lukens staggered, and after grasping a telegraph pole with both hands fell to the ground dead. Galloway then ran south, and after a vain attempt to make his escape on a horse, abandoned the horse, and fled to the woods on the hills around Gray's park.

Officer Drew ran to Lukens's assistance, but finding him dead, started to pursue Galloway. He fired the last shell from his gun, and then finding himself without ammunition sent a boy after some. A large crowd of persons had been attracted by the firing, and a number of them assisted in taking the body of Lukens to a barber shop at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues. The coroner was notified, and he ordered the body taken to the Gates undertaking rooms in Rosedale, where he performed a post mortem. It was found that the bullet had pierced the heart and lungs, and had gone entirely through the body, coming out near the middle of the back.

GALLOWAY BROUGHT TO BAY.

The sheriff's office was notified in Kansas City, Kas., and Under Sheriff Joseph Brady, deputies William McMullen, Clyde Sartin and George Westfall jumped into an automobile, driven by George E. Porter, an undertaker at 1007 North Seventh street and rode at break neck speed to Rosedale. The Kansas City, Kas., police were also notified and Chief W. W. Cook led a large force of uniformed men and detectives to the scene of the murder. The citizens of Rosedale also turned out in large numbers and the hills around Rosedale glittered with the lights as these posses scoured the woods in an effort to find the murderer.

At 9 o'clock last night Galloway was cornered in the home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., which he took possession of forcibly.

Barricading himself in a closet upstairs he held his pursuers at bay for over two hours. A posse consisting of nearly 100 men guarded the house on all sides. the air was tense with tragedy, and the bitter cold of the winter night added to the unpleasantness of the whole affair. Every man knew that a desperate fight was inevitable and that Galloway would have to be taken either dead or helplessly wounded.

MISSOURIAN LEADS CHARGE.

A delay was occasioned by the fact that the Kansas officers were outside of their jurisdiction, and did not feel that they had a right to enter the house, which is built on Missouri soil. Missouri officers were summoned and arrived at about 10 o'clock. The plans were laid and great precaution was taken in every step taken, for the officers realized that they were at a great disadvantage in forcing their way into the house, which they knew held a man who had already killed one officer and who would not hesitate to kill others should they press him too hard.

Finally the attack was planned and at 11:30 o'clock a squad of detectives consisting of Joe Downs, Billy McMullin, Harry Anderson and J. W. Wilkens, the latter a Missouri officer, leading, forced their way into the house, and after cautiously searching all the downstairs rooms without finding Galloway, rushed up the narrow stairs to the second floor.

When the officers reached the second floor a volley of shots rang out. Another volley followed. Breaking glass and a great commotion could be heard in the street below.

LAST WORD FOR HIS WIFE.

Then a husky voice was heard to shout:

"We got him."

In entering a dining room the officers were reminded of the presence of Galloway by three shots fired in rapid succession. The officers responded with a dozen shots and bullets went whizzing in every direction, embedding themselves in the walls. One bullet passed through the sleeve of Detective Wilkens's overcoat and lodged in the thumb on the left hand of Harry Anderson, a Kansas City, Kas., detective.

Within a twinkling a bullet entered the abdomen of Galloway and he fell to the floor, rolling into a dark kitchen adjoining the dining room. Writhing in his great pain, the man rolled frantically about the floor.

"Oh my dear wife, my own wife, my darling wife," he moaned time and again. Then he pleaded for ice water, clutching his parched throat madly.

An ambulance was called and Galloway was taken to emergency hospital, where he died just as they were lifting him to the operating table.

ANOTHER WOMAN'S LETTER.

Drs. Harry T. Morton and C. A. Pond, who were in attendance, pronounced death due to a wound from several buckshot that had entered the left side of the abdomen and after penetrating the intestines came out of the right side.

His pockets were searched while on the operating table. The contents consisted of a pocket-book containing $55 in cash, a gold watch and chain, a pack of business cards, several boxes of revolver cartridges, a bank book on the Fort Worth, Tex., State bank, and a letter.

The letter, which was written in lead pencil, was so blood soaked that it was barely legible. As far as it could be deciphered it ran as follows:

"Dear Friend -- I hear that you are getting a divorce from Mrs. G. ----- she is selling all your things and ---- I don't see where Mrs. G. or the boys is at. They act disgraceful, never coming home. --- Good luck, your loving Nan."

Lukens, whom Galloway shot down, was one of his best friends and so was Marshal Billy Drew, whom he fired at time and again in an effort to kill.

ASKS FOR FOOD.

The house where the shooting occurred is a two-story frame structure containing four apartments. The front apartment is occupied by Cecil Patterson and his family, and the rear apartment of four rooms by J. E. Creason, his wife and their little daughter.

"It was about 8 o'clock when Galloway came to the house," said Mr. Creason. "He was greatly excited and told me he had been in a shooting scrape and had shot a man. He said that they, meaning the officers, were after him and he did not know what to do. I told him that the best thing for him to do was surrender. He said: 'No, I'm not ready yet.'


Mr. and Mrs. Creason, Who Fed Galloway and Tried to Persuade Him to Surrender.
MR. AND MRS. J. E. CREASON,
In Whose Home Galloway Took Forcible Possession and Held Out Against a Posse Until Forced to Run for His Life When a Bullet Ended His Career

" 'Give me something to eat first and I will think about it,' he said. I have known Galloway for several years and worked for him at my trade as an electrician. He had always been a good friend and I saw no wrong in giving him something to eat and told my wife to fix him something. She fried some chops and potatoes and made some coffee for him. He tried to eat, but he was nervous and he could hardly swallow.

THE POSSE COMES.

"All this time my wife and I tried to find out just who he had shot and what the shooting was about, but he would put us off with the one answer, 'I will tell you when I am ready.' After supper he sat in a corner and seemed to be in a deep study. He paid no attention to our little girl, who seemed to annoy him by her childish prattle.

"I did not know what to do, so thought I would take a walk in the fresh air. I had hardly gotten 100 feet from the house when I met some people from Rosedale. They told me that Galloway had killed the undersheriff and that they were after him. I told them that he was in my house, but warned them not to go after him, as I feared he might use one of the weapons he had there. I told the crowd that I would endeavor to get him to surrender. I went back to the house. Galloway was still sitting in the corner, but jumped up w hen I came into the room.

" 'They know where you are,' I told him. 'Why don't you surrender?' 'I am not ready yet,' he said. I could get nothing more from him. Half an hour later some of the officers came into the ho use. I went downstairs and told them that Galloway was upstairs, but that he was armed and that it would be dangerous for them to go up there at that time. My family was up there, too, and I did not want my wife or daughter to be shot in case Galloway or the officers started shooting.

REFUSES TO SURRENDER.

This turned the posse back for a while and I made another effort to get Galloway to surrender. He still refused and I called to my wife and daughter and we went to the front of the house in Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Patterson's rooms. We left the gas burning in the dining room and the hall. The bedroom, in the closet in which Galloway took refuge, opened from the dining room by big folding doors as you see. The gas mantle on this lamp was broken and it was not lighted. We all remained in the front room until the posse called to us to come out of the house. As we went out I again told Galloway to surrender; that the house was surrounded and he could not get away, or if he did that he would have to jump to the house next door and climb down the side of the house.

" 'I am not ready yet,' were the last words he said to me. I felt as if the officers would not take Galloway alive and I feared that several might be killed. I was so nervous I did know what I was doing or saying. All I thought of was to prevent any more bloodshed.

"After we left the house we went into Griffin's home next door. We had hardly gotten inside when the shooting began. I put my fingers to my ears so that I would not hear the shots.

SURE HE WAS CRAZY.

"Galloway must have been out of his mind. He could have escaped from the house several times after he knew that the officers had him spotted and he could have held that staircase with his guns against 100 policemen. Why he refused to surrender and then retreated into the clothes closet where he was caught like a rat in a trap can only be explained by my opinion that he was crazy.

"Galloway brought the rifle and the shot gun over to the ho use this afternoon. He also brought a suitcase full of ammunition. This was before he did the shooting. He told us that he was going hunting and he wanted to leave his guns at our house. We had no objections to this as we had always been the best of friends. After we left the house he must have taken his rifle and gone into the closet. He left his shotgun in a corner in the kitchen."

THREATENED TO KILL WIFE FOR YEARS.

Mrs. Anna Galloway, wife of Charles Galloway, has been living with her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Connor, at their home, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale, ever since she instituted divorce proceedings against her husband. For over forty-eight hours she has been a prisoner in that home, fearing even to step out, lest Galloway be near, ready to fire at her, as he had repeatedly threatened to do.

When seen last night after the killing of Deputy Sheriff Lukens, she was nearly in a state of nervous prostration. She had witnessed the start of the tragic escapade from a window in her room . She saw the officer attempt to serve papers on her husband. She heard the ensuing shots and then fell in a swoon.

"Oh, I knew it would come to this terrible end -- I knew it, I knew it," she moaned, as she paced nervously up and down the floor. "Charlie has had murder in his heart for thirteen years and I have always realized that it would only be a matter of time until the impulse would control him. He wasn't sane; he couldn't have been.

"Five times since Priests of Pallas week he has threatened to kill me, and from one day to another I never knew if I would see daylight again. Today some stranger 'phoned from a saloon to be extremely careful, as he had heard Charlie say that this would be the last day I could live. Marshal Drew remained with me to protect me and he has been in our house here all day.

"The first time Mr. Galloway ever threatened me was thirteen years ago. I should have left him then, but I thought he would get over his insane notions and I wanted to make a success of our married life if at all possible. He did reform and was better to me for some time, but when our two children, Harvey and Walter, were old enough to run around a great deal he began abusing me terribly and many times told me he would kill me. He became a harder drinker every year and would get in such a condition that no one could manage him at all.

"Many times as he choked me, and more than once has the end seemed so near that I could not possibly escape, but God has been with me for my children's sake I guess."

VICTIM WELL KNOWN IN WYANDOTTE.

Charles Quincy Lukens was 33 years old. He lived with his widowed mother, Mrs. Sarah Lukens, 336 Harrison street, Argentine. He was unmarried. He was appointed deputy sheriff by Sheriff Al Becker about one year ago. Before his appointment Lukens was constable and later marshal of Argentine for several terms. He had also served on the Argentine fire department. "Charley" Lukens was known by everyone in Argentine, both old and young, and also had a wide acquaintance thorugout the county. He was regarded as a very efficient officer, and had a reputation for fearlessness.

Besidses his mother he is survived by four sisters and four brothers. The sisters are: Mrs. Lydia Jones of Girard, Kas., Mrs. Beulah Robinson of 1108 East Twenty-fourth street, Kansas City, Mo., Mrs. C. A. Hare of Faircastle, O., Mrs. Leonard Eshnaur of Terminal Isle, Cal. The brothers are J. R. Lukens of Oklahoma City, Ok., and L. B, J. E., and F. D. Lukens of Argentine.

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November 7, 1909

HELD IN CHAIR AND SHAVED.

Customer Does Not Want Other Side
Finished, Barber Objects, Has His
Way, Then Stabs Defending Self.

As a result of a fight which took place in the barber shop at 902 East Fifth street, James Morley was stabbed five times in the back with a pair of scissors, and slashed once in the left arm with a razor and was then locked up in the police station, charged with disturbing the peace, while Mike Raffles, the barber who inflicted the wounds, escaped.

Morley, who is 20 years of age, but who wouldn't tell his residence, had been drinking when h e entered the barber shop at which Raffles is employed, wanting a shave. When Raffles had shaved one side of his face, Morley decided that he would let the other side go. Raffles remonstrated with him, and finally thourgh force managed to complete the job. As soon as Morley was released from the chair he attempted to start trouble. In self defense, Raffles grabbed a pair of scissors and in the melee which followed, stabbed Morley five times in the back. Morley still showed fight, and raffles slashed him with a razor.

Morley was taken to the emergency hospital in an ambulance, but fought with the doctor all the way to the hospital. When in the hospital he tried to fight everyone with whom he came in contact. Patrolman Miller was sent to quiet the belligerent patient, and Morley again wanted to fight, but one good healthy slap ended the trouble, and Morley was locked up on a charge of disturbing the peace.

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October 18, 1909

UNCONSCIOUS ON STREET.

Henry Sustzo Picked Up in Front of
Willis Wood Theater.

A man giving his name as Henry Sustzo, proprietor of a restaurant at 920 Paseo, was found unconscious early yesterday morning in front of the Willis Wood theater and sent to the Emergency hospital.

The physicians worked on him until 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon before restoring him to consciousness. He was dazed and could not give a coherent account of what happened to him.

The physicians say he will be able to leave the hospital this morning.

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October 16, 1909

ENGINE STRIKES WAGON,
FATALLY INJURING MAN.

Harlem Farmer Meets With Acci-
dent at Missouri Pacific Crossing.
Family Narrowly Escapes.

Despite the warning of the flagman at First and Main streets last night, A. D. Buyas, a farmer living a mile northeast of Harlem, drove across the Missouri Pacific tracks at that point and was struck by an eastbound passenger train which was coming at a high rate of speed.

Buyas, who was accompanied by Hobert, his 11-year-old son, was struck on his head on one of the rails when he was thrown from the wagon and received fatal injuries. The boy, aside from slight bruises, was not seriously injured.

Buyas came to the city yesterday morning with Mrs. Buyas, Hobert and Pearl, the 14-year-old daughter. Before starting to the ferry at the foot of Main street to get across the river, Mrs. Buyas and Pearl decided to walk.

"Somehow, I feel that something is going to happen," she told her husband. "I'm going to get out. I feel lots safer, anyway."

As the man started down the steep incline toward the river the team seemed unable to hold back the weight. It was almost dark and the flagman with his red lantern could be seen at the crossing. Suddenly he began to wave the red light frantically, but it was too late. Though Buyas in desperation tugged at the lines he was on the track, with the train only a few feet away. The horses passed to safety but the engine struck the rear part of the wagon.

Both occupants were thrown high in the air and the wagon completely shattered. The boy arose, but the father lay moaning, and was found to be unconscious. the train did not slacken its speed.

The ambulance was called from police headquarters, with Dr. F. C. LaMar hurried to the scene of the accident. The injured man and the frightened family were placed in the ambulance and taken to the Emergency hospital. It was found that Buyas had received a fractured skull, a broken left arm and right leg. The physicians had little hope that the injured man would live until morning.

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September 28, 1909

SHOT A NEIGHBOR, THEN
ACTED GOOD SAMARITAN.

German Woman Gardner Attempted
to Frighten Victor Marten With
Gun That Wasn't Loaded.
Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, Who Shot Gardener.
MRS. MARY WILSDORF.

After emptying the contents of a shotgun into the left thigh of Victor Marten, a gardener, Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, 46 years old, wife of a gardener at Seventy-seventh street and Walrond avenue, yesterday afternoon got on a Marlborough street car and came to the city and gave herself up to Chief of Police Frank F. Snow.

Before leaving her home she gave the wounded man a glass of water and left him lying on the ground near her house in charge of her husband, Carl Wilsdorf, who was later arrested by Mounted Patrolman E. B. Chiles.

Mrs. Wildorf and Marten are neighbors, each owning a ten acre tract of land.

From the facts elicited from the woman through Dr. George Ringle, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, who acted as interpreter for the police, the shooting followed a quarrel, about Marten's horses getting into the truck garden of the Wilsdorf's.

She said the horses frequently trampled the vegetables. One of them wandered over from the Marten field yesterday to the Wildorf land and was locked up in the barn.

When Marten went to the Wilsdorf house to get his horse he was asked to pay a small amount of money for alleged damages. A dispute arose and Mrs. Wilsdorf said that Marten held aloft a potato digger and threatened to kill her.

She said she then ran into the house and got her husband's shotgun, and returned to the yard. When within five feet of Marten the gun was discharged and the contents of one barrel entered the left thigh of Marten. He fell to the ground and asked for a drink of water which was given to him by Mrs. Wilsdorf.

Her husband told her she had better go to town and give herself up to the police, which advice she took. when she first entered police headquarters she was a little excited, and, not being able to speak good English, was misunderstood. The patrolman she met believed her to say a man shot her in the leg, so he directed her to the Emergency hospital. At the hospital Dr. Ringle took her in charge, and, learning that she was the person who did the shooting, took her back to the police station. She was turned over to Chief Snow.

Mrs. Wilsdorf informed the police that the man was still lying in the yard at her home and needed medical attention. Dr. George Todd, 4638 Troost avenue, attended to the man's injuries. Dr. Todd called an ambulance from Freeman & Marshall's and had the man taken to the University hospital.

The woman told Captain Whitsett that she had never before handled a shotgun and did not know exactly how to use it. The one she got in the house was broken at the breech and as she was running with it toward Marten she was trying to replace it. Suddenly the gun snapped into place and was discharged. She said she really did not think it was loaded, but was only trying to scare Marten. She was locked up in the matron's room.

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September 23, 1909

ELEVATOR FALLS 8 FLOORS.

Brake Did Not Work and Calvin
Kester, Operator, Was Injured.

Calvin Kester, elevator operator in the New York Life building, was severely injured yesterday morning just before noon when the elevator he was running dropped from the eighth floor to the basement. The elevator left the tenth floor with only the operator in it. When he attempted to stop at the eighth floor the brake failed to work and the car continued its downward flight with increasing velocity.

When the car struck the bottom of the shaft Kester fell unconscious and was carried into the United States Trust Company office. An ambulance was summoned and Dr. Fred B. Kyger had the injured man removed to the emergency hospital. Upon examination Dr. Kyger found the man to be suffering from a strained back, a cut on the left leg and bruises on the body. The surgeon pronounced the injuries to be not serious.

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September 21, 1909

STEEL CELLS FOR BABES;
SOFT BEDS FOR EVILDOERS.

"Oh, Please Don't Put Us in There,"
Pleaded Mother With Infant as
Police Thrust Her Into Dungeon.

A condition never before heard of at police headquarters in all of its history, existed there last night. Four women, keepers of public rooming houses, all had comfortable quarters in the matron's room. Down in the steel cell section of the women's department of the holdover, locked behind bars, were two worn women, each with a babe at her breast.

Both of the babies were ill and crying, but there was no room in the matron's comfortable room for women with babies in arms. Those who had the beds and slept beneath the sheets are women who today will be accused of harboring young girls in disorderly resorts.

Mrs. Nellie Ripetre, with a baby of 6 months old, was sent in about 9 o'clock p. m. for investigation. It has always been the custom in the past never to lock up a woman with a baby. If there was no room in the matron's room for the mother and the babe, room had to be made by putting someone down in the holdover. This negro woman lay on the concrete floor with her crying baby folded tightly to her bosom. The floor got too hard for the mother later on and she chose an iron bunk in one of the cells. There she lay all night. The windows were open and the place cold. Mother-like, however, she huddled her baby close to her, to keep it warm. Part of the time the child lay on top of its mother, covered only by her bare arms.

About 11 p. m. Mrs. Mattie Bell, with a 5-months-old child, was sent in from No. 2 station in the West Bottoms.. Her baby was puny, sickly and crying. The matron's room, however, was still filed with healthy, well-dressed rooming house keepers, so the mother and her sick child had to listen to the harsh turn of the key in a cell door.

"Please don't put me in that place," begged the mother. "It's cold down there and my baby is very sick."

"That's the best we've got," she was informed.

Mrs. Bell was booked for the Humane Society. She had been found wandering about in the streets with her baby. After she was locked up Mrs. Bell tried the concrete floor, and, like the other mother, had to creep to the steel slabbed bed in a cell. She complained to the jailer and the Emergency hospital was notified that there was a sick baby in the holdover.

In a short time a nurse and a doctor went to the cell room and relieved the distressed mother of her sickly burden. The little one was tenderly cared for during the balance of the night but the other mother -- she's colored -- her babe clasped tightly to her breast, spent a chilly night.

The four rooming housekeepers in the matron's room rested easily.

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September 16, 1909

WIFE SAVES HER HUSBAND.

Mrs. Joe Percival Comes to His Aid
With Ax Handle and Routs Bullies.

Owing to the pluckiness and nerve of his wife last night Joe Percival, 7 Park place, is alive today, although beaten and battered by a gang of ruffians and bullies. He needed treatment at the emergency hospital because of the cuts received at the hands of the gang before his wife came to his aid.

Percival is the night man at the Gross & McNeal livery stable, 701 Brooklyn avenue. For some weeks he has had trouble with a gang of men and on several occasions has been compelled to run them away from the stable at night. threats were made to get him. Last night his wife, who is young and pretty, went to the stable to spend the night.

About 1 o'clock this morning Percival went into the stable to put up a horse and was attacked by five or six men who had concealed themselves in the dark stalls. He was down on the floor being pummelled by the bullies when Mrs. Percival came to the rescue. A pickax handle proved to be the weapon which she wielded with effectiveness. The men scattered when she commenced to rain blows upon their heads.

When she attempted to telephone for the police the gang tried to stop her by making threats of getting her, but she waved the pick handle aloft and dared them to start something. When the police arrived from headquarters only Percival and his brave wife were on deck. They were transferred to the emergency hospital where Percival had his injuries attended by Dr. D. C. Twyman. The thugs escaped arrest.

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September 13, 1909

ARM SCALDED; BLAMES COOK.

Boy Helper in Restaurant Causes
Arrest of Kitchen Boss.

Because Marion Bell, 18 years old, upset some water in the kitchen of a lower Walnut street restaurant where he is employed, yesterday, he claims Fred Geddes, the cook, shoved him so violently he fell, his right arm being immersed in a pail of scalding water. He says he was then kicked from the building.

Dr. Fred B. Kyger, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, found that the boy was dangerously burned, and advised him to report the matter to the police. After hearing his story, Sergeant Robert Smith ordered the cook's arrest. He was released on $101 bond for trial in the municipal court tomorrow.

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September 11, 1909

BOY VICTIM OF "JOKERS."

Cruel Prank Played on Mysterious
Lad by Fellow Employes.

A practical joke that wasn't exactly pleasant was played yesterday upon Michael Mile, 15 years old, who works at the Brunner Hardware Company, by other boys who work in the same department. The boy was thirsty and drank a cup of water which was placed in the work room. He was then informed that it contained white lead and that his life was in immediate danger.

At the Emergency hospital, where he hastened as fast as his legs would carry him, he was placed upon the operating table and treated for poisoning, much to his bodily discomfort.

An analysis by Dr. Fred B. Kyger and Dr. E. A. Pond showed that the water contained no white lead. The boy left, declaring vengeance.

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September 10, 1909

HAND CAUGHT IN A ROLLER.

Mrs. A. R. Miles Dangerously Hurt
by Laundry Machinery.

While working in the Swan laundry at 560 Walnut street last night, Mrs. A. R. Miles, 18 years old, of 893 Wayne avenue, Kansas City, Kas., was dangerously injured when her right hand was caught in a hot steam roller. Dr. Fred B. Kyger and Dr. W. L. Gist, surgeons at the Emergency hospital, treated the young woman. She was sent to her home.

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August 31, 1909

BEATEN CHINAMAN MAY DIE.

Lee Wey Brutally Assaulted in Fifth
Street Laundry and
Robbed of $20.

While resisting two robbers who seized him in his laundry at 620 East Fifth street about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon, Lee Wey, a Chinaman, was beaten into insensibility before his assailants secured $20 and escaped. With barely a chance to live Wey was taken to the general hospital.

When a customer arrived two hours later Lee was found on the floor unable to move. The police were notified. A hasty examination by Dr. H. L. Morton at the emergency hospital showed that the top of Lee's scalp was cut to shreds.

Lee regained consciousness and told a meager story of the assault. Two men had come into his laundry before sundown and inquired the way to find the water meter. As he started to go down into the cellar, where it was located, Lee was struck over the head with a piece of gas pipe. Half-stunned he grappled with the smaller of the two. The blows rained on his head until he knew no more. His pockets, inside out, told the story of the robbery.

"All my savings for many months," Lee said in broken English.

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August 14, 1909

HEAT OVERCOMES ICEMAN.

While Carrying Cake of Ice Jake
Schuyler is Overcome.

While transferring a cake of ice to a house at Forty-seventh street and Troost avenue at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon, Jake Schuyler, an employe of the City Ice Company, suddenly fell over unconscious.

The police ambulance of No. 4 station was called and Dr. Shiras gave Schuyler emergency treatment for sunstroke. He was taken to the emergency hospital. Schuyler is 25 years old. He lives at 1321 Walnut street.

James Burgess, 3717 Woodland avenue, was affected last night about 8 o'clock. The police station was notified and the operator called Dr. S. S. Morse, 3801 Woodland avenue. Burgess is a foreman of the packing department of the Globe Storage Company, and has complained of the heat for several days. He had recovered in a few hours.

A. M. Kissell, 65 years old, a stationary fireman at the Central Manufacturing Company, First and Lydia avenue, about 9 o'clock was overcome by heat and last night he was taken to the emergency hospital for medical attention.

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August 13, 1909

HE GREW RICH STAR GAZING.

Counted 17,000,000 Shooting Stars,
and 'Phoned John D.

At least one man saw shooting stars in the heavens last night. He had read a prophecy of the pyrotechnical display and early in the evening he started on his rounds star gazing. Occasional trips were made to the drinking emporiums and at the end of refreshments the man would dash madly out into the middle of the street and gaze longingly at the heavens. Passersby saw his lips move convulsively, and one who was possessed of more temerity and curiosity than his brothers approached near enough to hear him whisper:

"Money, Money, Money."

There was a pause until the deluded man saw another star flying from Venus to Jupiter or from Broadway to McGee streets and once more he would gasp convulsively:

"Money, Money, Money."

After some three hours of such behavior the saloons closed. Just before the doors of the saloon of his last choice were to close this strange man went to the telephone.

"Gi'me John D. Rock'feller," he demanded. The operator connected him with the emergency hospital.

"Hello," replied the surgeon in charge in answer to the telephone ring.

"Is that you J. D. R.? Well I just called you up to tell you that you are backed off the financial map. I saw 17,000,000 shooting starts tonight and said 'Money, Money, Money' after each one of them, three times apiece. Sure sign of money. What'll you sell out for?"

"Guess he really needed emergency treatment," said the amiable emergency surgeon. "Batty, clean batty."

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July 20, 1909

BABY BITTEN BY A RAT.

Infant, 3 Weeks Old, Attacked by
Animal in Cradle.

A 3-week-old baby, whose ear and hand had been torn by a rat, was taken to the emergency hospital yesterday by the child's mother, Mrs. Anna Holland, who has rooms at 914 East Eighth street. While Mrs. Holland was busy about the place yesterday she heard the infant crying and on going to the cradle saw a big rat jump out. The baby was covered with blood and its wounds are considered very serious. Mrs. Holland came to Kansas City two or three weeks ago from Wichita, Kas., and has been looking for employment. She has two other children.

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July 14, 1909

ATE ICE CREAM; MAY DIE.

Andrew Johnson Found in Budd
Park Suffering From Ptomaines.

Writhing with pain from ptomaine poisoning, Andrew Johnson, 45 years old, janitor of the Fountain place apartments at 1448 Independence avenue, was found at midnight last night in front of a park bench in Budd park. At the emergency hospital Johnson told Dr. F. R. Berry, who treateed him, that he had eaten some ice cream at a drug store early in the evening. Soon after he was attacked by acute pains in the stomach. Emergency treatment last night brought no relief, and Dr. Berry thought Johnson would not live until this morning.

Johnson has a wife and child.

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July 9, 1909

HE RODE THE BICYCLE.

But Fred Collins, a Baker, Is Now
Under a Surgeon's Care.

To ride a bicycle was the ambition of Fred Collins, a baker, 1526 1/2 Grand avenue, and yesterday afternoon he secured a wheel and went out on Kensington avenue near Independence avenue to experiment. He started at the top of a hill and when he reached the bottom the machine struck a telegraph post. Dr. E. D. Twyman of the emergency hospital was summoned and set a broken right clavicle.

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July 3, 1909

HEAT CRAZED; RUNS AMUCK.

Right From Harvest Fields, Man
Causes Panic on City Street.

Affected by the sun of the Kansas harvest fields, Lewis Wright of Paris, Ill., ran amuck at Seventh street and Grand avenue at 8:30 yesterday morning with a pocketknife, and began slashing passersby.

Jennie Rolfe, 23 years old, a clerk, was stabbed in the left arm. She lives at 3010 Dunham avenue. Wright knocked another woman down with a brick, and ran several other persons away. Thomas Craig, an engineer, 2325 Chelsea avenue, Kansas City, Kas., was stabbed on the left hand and left shoulder. He retorted by knocking his assailant down and taking the knife away from him. A police ambulance took Wright to the emergency hospital.

When he was revived by Dr. W. L. Gist, Wright said that he could remember nothing of what had occurred, except that he thought someone had stabbed him in the leg. He said that he had been prostrated by the heat in the harvest fields. He thinks he is married.

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June 29, 1909

WOMAN FIRST FOURTH VICTIM.

Mrs. Williams Sharp Injured While
Playing With a Toy Pistol.

Mrs. William Sharp, 26 years old, 1025 Harrison street, was last night distinguished by being the first person in Kansas City to be injured by the premature explosion of Fourth of July noisemakers. She was in her home and picked up a toy pistol loaded with a blank 22-caliber cartridge. In some manner the cartridge was exploded and the index finger on her right hand was badly lacerated. She was treated at the emergency hospital.

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May 25, 1909

CRUELTY CHARGES ARE
DENIED BY WITNESSES.

TEN ARE HEARD IN REBUTTAL
AT HOSPITAL INVESTIGATION.

Visitors and Empolyes Testify No
Cruelty Was Shown to Patients.
Records Back Up Their
Statements.

Ten witnesses, most of them in rebuttal, were put on the stand yesterday by the defense, when the hearing before the joint council committee in the matter of the charges preferred against the management of the new general hospital was resumed in the lower house council chamber.

In explaining how she came to tell a Mrs. Dougherty that a woman friend of the latter was "sitting up and doing well," w hen the woman was really dead, Mrs. Myrtle Keene, telephoneoperator at the hospital, said: "When the call came in the woman did not speak plainly, and all I understood was 'Mc.' I looked on the chart and found but one Mc., a Mr. McVey. I asked if McVey was the name and she was that it was. I was informed by McVey's nurse that he was sitting up and doing nicely, and told the woman so.

"Later I learned that the woman was asking about Mrs. McKay, who had died the night before and whose card had been taken out of the chart at my side. It was purely a mistake and when the woman called up later and I tried to apologize she would not let me explain."

A copy of the hospital chart for the date in question was introduced in evidence to show that McVey was the only "Mc" on the list that day.

Peter Doran, referred to quite often as "Dad," said that he had not beaten a patient because the latter asked for a crust of bread, as charged by the promoters. He said he never struck a patient, and had never known of any such treatment. Doran said that F. A. Wolf, who made serious charges, had bade him a fond goodby when he left the hospital, and had volunteered to take along his hat and clean it for nothing, returning it two weeks later in person.

Dr. S. C. James said the hospital compared favorably with any of its kind in the country.

Dr. W. A. Shelton, police surgeon, told of his connection with the Charles Newell case. He said that Newell was taken to the emergency hospital soon after his injury and hurried out to general hospital as soon as it was seen that his case was serious. Although Dr. J. D. Griffith and Dr. J. Park Neal were in the operating room ready to attend Newell, Dr. Shelton said the injured policeman refused all aid and demanded to be removed to the German hospital, where he could be treated by Dr. J. S. Snyder. He died shortly after being moved.

Fred Bowen, an orderly, explained how a patient named Starr came to leave the hospital. Money was sewed up in his undershirt, and when Starr was informed that he would have to leave it in the office for safe keeping, he dressed and left the institution, Bowen said.

Rev. T. B. Marvin, an evangelist who has visited the hospital for the last sixteen years, and the Rev. J. C. Schindel of the English Lutheran church, told of their many visits there, and said they heard no complaints from the patients, although they had made close inquiry. Mr. Schindel told of a Mrs. Merkle, who had made charges. He said she had written him since, and stated that she had been asked to make the charges, which she now regretted. He promised to send her letter to the committee.

To impeach, if possible, the evidence of Arthur Slim, who testified that "a whole quart of raw acid was poured over my ulcerated leg," Fred Freeman, the ward orderly who dressed the leg, was placed on the stand. The treatment blank, showing what dressing and medicines were used, was placed in evidence. Nothing was used to burn.

Slim also swore that he was "thrown out of the hospital at 11 o'clock on a cold night, with no shoes." The records showed that he was discharged at 11:45 a. m., and R. E. Crockett, property clerk at the hospital, testified that Slim had come to him and complained that his shoes were full of holes. Crockett said he gave the man a new pair of hospital slippers, after he had stated that they would suffice until he reached his room. The discharge blank also showed that Slim was sent away from the hospital for violating rules and for being abusive and profane. The record is an old one and was made long before charges were even contemplated.

Ernest A. Baker testified that while he was dangerously ill with pneumonia his wife called up every hour for two whole nights, and each time was given his pulse, temperature and general condition.

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May 8, 1909

LOVER MADE HER SEE STARS.

But When Bertha Marlowe "Came
To" She Still Was For Him.

Unconscious and bleeding from a deep wound in her face, Bertha Marlowe, 19 years old, was found in a rooming house at 210 1/2 Independence avenue last night. When she was revived at the emergency hospital she told the police that she had been attacked by her lover w ho, she asserted, deserted from the army. The girl, who is a laundry worker, told an amazing story of woman fidelity.

She says she came to Kansas City several weeks ago after her sweet-heart had left the army. Her home is in Courtney, Mo., but she gave her parents no intimation of her plans, save that she intended to go to work here.

Since joining the man she ways she has given him money that she has earned in the laundry; money that she received from home, as well as going to police headquarters and baling him out when he was arrested a week ago.

Last night she says he was drinking. She sought him and found him. As a reward he battered her on the face with a beer bottle and other ways mistreated her.

With her face puffed up almost beyond recognition, the ugly cut marring what is not an unpretty face, and reciting the story of mistreatment and imposition, Lieutenant Al Ryan asked her if she would prosecute her sweetheart in the event of his capture.

"Yes, I'll prosecute," said the girl.

There was a moment's pause. "No, I'll take that back. I guess I won't prosecute! I still love him!"

Whereat Dr. Dr. Fred B. Kyger applied some more arniea to the face wound and told the young woman to lie down.

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April 25, 1909

THIS BEATS THE WATER CURE.

One Hundred and Fifty Gallons in
30 Days for Two Women.

Is it possible for two persons to drink 150 gallons of water in thirty days? That's what Gus Pearson, the city comptroller, is wondering this month after the Ozarks Water Company turned in a bill for $16 for the month of March. It wouldn't have been so bad if it represented the combined thirst of the city hall, but it was for the nurses' department in the emergency hospital alone. As there are only two nurses, the problem requires a scientist to solve it correctly.

Each five-gallon bottle of the water costs 50 cents and there were thirty-two bottles used during the month. Naturally the representative of the water company made no complaint when he was called almost ever day to furnish a fresh supply. The nurses insist there was a defect in the apparatus and that most of the water leaked.

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April 13, 1909

GREEK HAS AWAKENED
ONLY ONCE IN 35 DAYS.

LONG-DISTANCE SLEEPER PUZ-
ZLES HOSPITAL PHYSICIANS.

With Organs of Body Apparently in
Normal Condition, Every Ef-
fort to Arouse Carolmas
Has Failed.
George Carolmas, Who Has Been Asleep for Most of 35 Days.
GEORGE CAROLMAS, THE SOUND SLEEPER OF
THE GENERAL HOSPITAL.

Lying on a cot in the insane ward at the general hospital, George Carolmas, a subject of the king of Greece, has for thirty-five days been asleep without interruption except for one day last week. Before being removed from his rooming house, 15 West Fifth street, on March 12, he ha slept for four days.

Carolmas came to America from his home in Athens, about eight months ago. He worked on the railroad as a track layer after arriving in Missouri. Like most of the thrifty foreigners, Carolmas saved most of his wages and horded it for the proverbial rainy day. In some way which has not been satisfactorily explained he lost his little savings and brooded over his misfortune.

The Greeks who knew him were aware that Carolmas was brooding over his loss, but little attention was paid until March 8. That morning Carolmas failed to get up and go to work. His landlord knocked on the door of his room several times during the day to awaken him, but failed to receive any response. In the afternoon he entered the room and discovered that his roomer was sound asleep and that speaking to him or shaking him would not waken him. Becoming frightened the Greek landlord summoned Dr. George Ringel of the emergency hospital.

CONSCIOUS BUT ASLEEP.

Four days later Carolmas was sent to the general hospital for treatment. He was examined carefully by the staff at the general hospital and found to be conscious but asleep. As far as the physicians have been able to discover every organ in the patient's body is normal. His breathing is regular and his heart action is apparently good.

Food is given to the patient five or six times each day. Part of the time the nurses furnish him with nourishment by pouring a small quantity of broth or milk in his mouth and allowing him to swollow it naturally. At other times the patient does not swallow and a stomach pump is brought into use. His nourishment consists mainly of milk and eggs. Very little nourishment is necessary.

When taken to the hospital the Greek patient weighted about 170 pounds., but since then he has lost about ten pounds. He is evidently about 35 years old. On last Thursday Carolmas woke up, and from all appearances was over his sleeping spell. He walked around the corridors of his ward and the specialists believed he was recovering. However, he became tired after being awake for thirty hours, and went back to sleep.

While he was awake last week Carolmas gave evidence of being hysterical. He followed "Pete," the man in charge of the ward, around and continually kowtowed to him. He would get down on his knees and kiss the attendant's shoes. Then he spent a great deal of time in prayer, which would be followed by a spell of crying. If the physicians or attendants atteempted to talk to him, he would break down and weep.

EVEN BATH DOESN'T WAKE HIM.

The treatment being given to him is the best afforded by the hospital. Every day he is given a hot water bath, then an attendant gives him a thorough massage. Treatment with electricity is not possible as the hospital is not equipped for it. What the hospital physicians are endeavoring to do is to build up the man's nervous centers, but about all they can do with him is give him food and a tonic.

From examinations by the best specialists in the city it is believed that Carolmas is suffering from a shattering of the nervous centers. His condition is scientifically termed as stuperous melancholia. It could result from narcolepsy, kidney disease, softening of the brain or from the sleeping sickness common in Africa. A tumor on the brain might also cause such a condition.

As a tumor could be diagnosed and the physicians have failed to find any signs of one in the case of the Greek, that cause has been eliminated. They have also decided that he is not suffering from narcolepsy. On account of his hysteria while awake last week, and the meager information or history of his health before arriving at the general hospital, the physicians are positive that his nervous condition is responsible.

People of Carolmas's nationality are high strung and subject to nervous diseases. If crossed or thrown into any excitement the Greek people are said to go off on a tangent and become nervous wrecks.

HAPPENED HERE BEFORE.

More than two years ago a man was picked up on the street who was believed by pedestrians to be unconscious. He was removed to the general hospital, where it was found that he was really asleep. He continued sleeping for 42 days, being sustained that long by forced feeding, and then died.

Dr. St. Elmo Sanders, former city physician, said yesterday that whenever a patient suffering from a continuous sleep had to be nourished by force chances of recovery were not good.

The man found on the streets two years ago finally slept so profoundly that if he was placed in a chair he would not move a muscle. His legs could be bent and the patient would not move them.

Dr. John Puntin, a specialist of nervous diseases, said that he had had a great many patients who slept for long periods. Most of them, however, would have short intervals of wakefulness. The disease is not necessarily fatal, he said. The physicians who have examined Carolmas believe he will recover, but will not say how much longer he might sleep. All of the physicians and specialists in Kansas City are greatly interested in the case.

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April 1, 1909

ELEVATOR SCALPS A BOY.

Walter Lillis, 16 Years Old, Injured
at Burd & Fletcher Plant.

While looking down the elevator shaft yesterday afternoon at the Burd & Fletcher Printing Company's plant 717 Wyandotte street, Walter Lillis, 16 years old, an errand boy, was caught between the descending elevator and the gate in front of the shaft. Before the elevator could be stopped the boy was "scalped." He was hurried to the emergency hospital, where he was treated by Dr. W. L. Gist. Though his injuries are dangerous, the physicians were positive that he will recover.

The boy had looked down the elevator shaft and shouted an order to a man on the lower floor just before the accident occurred. He was not looking and did not hear the descending elevator until it struck his head. The scalp was torn loose from the occipital region of the skull and it required a delicate operation to replace it. The boy did not require an anesthetic during the operation. He was taken to his home at 662 Park avenue.

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March 26, 1909

PUZZLED THEM FOR HOURS.

Mary Costello, Mayor Crittenden’s
Stenographer, Could Not Tell
Physicians Her Name.

MARY COSTELLO,
Who Couldn't Remember Her Name.

A stylishly dressed young woman startled the attendants of the University hospital about 1:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon when she walked into the reception room and calmly said:

“Please tell me my name.”

A nurse, upon hearing the odd request, looked closely at the young woman and noticed a peculiar expression in her eyes. The attendants sent her to the emergency hospital, where Dr. H. L. Hess and Dr. F. R. Berry questioned her. To every question the girl returned one monotonous answer:

“I wish I knew my name.”

It was nearly 7 o’clock before the girl’s mind began to become partially clear and she answered several questions in a rational manner. A gold hat pin which Dr. Hess held out for her inspection seemed to revive a chain of thought.

“Why, a Mrs. Crittenden gave that to me,” she said.

The clue was sufficient for the physician, who called up the mayor’s home. Mrs. Crittenden was asked if she had ever given a hat pin to a young woman.

“I remember giving one to Mary Costello, Mr. Crittenden’s stenographer,” she replied.

The girl looked up in amazement when her name was called.

“Why, that’s my name!” she exclaimed. “How did you know?”

When William P. Costello, her uncle, was notified he took Miss Costello home. The girl, who is 19 years old, left Mr. Crittenden’s real estate office in the Sheldley building last Monday, as she had been taken ill with the grippe. While the family was at lunch yesterday noon she slipped out of the home at 1410 Belleview avenue and her relatives supposed that she had felt well enough to visit friends. The physicians say her present mental condition is only temporary.

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January 23, 1909

TWO JOHNS IN TROUBLE.

One Finds Way to Hospital and the Other
to Police Station.

"You are jollying, John, John Jones said to John Birmingham last night as the two sat in a store at 250 West Fourth street. For some reason the insinuation was objected to by Birmingham and he swung one of his crutches against John Jones's head. The crutch broke and so did Jones's head. Jones was taken to the emergency hospital and Birmingham to Central station. Both men were later arrested and charged with disturbing the peace.

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December 9, 1908

BULLETS KILL TWO AND WOUND FIVE IN FIERCE BATTLE BETWEEN POLICE AND BAND OF RELIGIOUS FANATICS

FIGHT BEGAN IN FRONT OF CENTRAL POLICE STATION AND ENDED AT MISSOURI RIVER BANK.

MAN AND GIRL AMONG DEAD

YOUNG GIRL, MEMBER OF THE BAND,
PIERCED BY BULLETS AFTER FLEE-
ING TO THE RIVER.

Three Policemen Wounded.
Houseboat Where Religious Fanatics Sought Refuge
Tent on Missouri River Flat Boat Where the Women and Children Members of the Religious Fanatics Took Refuge.


THE DEAD.

ALBERT O. DALBOW, policeman
-- Shot through the breast, abdomen and thigh.
LULU Pratt, 14 years old, fanatic
-- Shot through back of neck at base of brain. Bullet came out through left cheek


THE INJURED.

-- Shot through the right chest and cut through right eye and upper lip with dagger. Taken to St. Joseph's hospital; dangerous.
Michael Mullane, patrolman
-- Shot in the right chest, right kidney and left hand. Taken to St. Joseph's hospital; dangerous.
Louis Pratt, fanatic
-- Shot in forehead. Right ankle crushed and shot in calf of same leg. Leg amputated at general hospital later.
J. J. Sulzer, retired farmer living at 2414 Benton boulevard
-- Shot in right hip, also in right chest. Latter bullet glanced and severed the spine. Paralyzed from shoulders down. Taken to University hospital; will die.
Lieutenant Harry E. Stege
-- Shot through left arm. Ball passed along his chest from right to left, grazing the skin, taking piece out of arm. Went back into fight.

In a battle between police and religious fanatics which began at Fourth and Main streets at 3:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon and ended at the Missouri river bank, two persons were killed and five were injured. The trouble came about through the police trying to break up a religious street meeting, at which revolvers and knives were carried by the exhorters.

Just a few minutes before the tragedy occurred George M. Holt, a probation officer, found Mrs. Melissa Sharp, Mrs. Della Pratt and the latter's five children singing near Fifth and Main streets. He asked why the children were not in school, and was answered with an insult.

"Do you belong here?" he asked of one of the women.

"No, we have a house boat on the river," she replied.

The fanatics, after a collection amounting to about $3 or $4 had been made, started north on Main street with Mr. Holt following. They went into what is known as the Poor Man's mission, 309 Main street, conducted by J. C. Creighton and wife. Mr. Holt then approached J. A. Sharp, husband of one of the women, and addressed him and Louis Pratt, the other's husband.


ASSAULTED HOLT.

"I am the father of Jesus Christ," said Sharp. "I have been sent to reorganize the world. You are no more than damned sheep. Get out of here. I am going to preach with my children right in front of that police station. You'll see what they'll do to me. Get out!"

With that Sharp drew a big revolver and struck Mr. Holt over the head. He left the "mission" with the fanatics following, all of them but two having revolvers, Sharp with both revolvers and knives. The fanatics consisted then of Mr. and Mrs. Sharp, Mr. and Mrs. Pratt and the latter's children, Lulu, 14, Lena, 12, Mary, 11, Dewey, 8, and Edna, 4 years old.

While Mr. Holt hurried into police headquarters, his head bleeding, the fanatics ranged along the curb in front of John Blanchon's saloon, 400 Main street, and the men began to flourish revolvers and knives and talk in wild tones about what God had commanded them to do. While all this was going on Patrolman Dalbow, who was sent from the station to see what the trouble was, walked up to James Sharp, who styles himself as "Adam God." Witnesses say that Dalbow spoke kindly to the man and told him he must cease, as a crowd was gathering.


"I'LL SHOOT THE SERGEANT."

"Do you come as a friend, brother?" Sharp asked.

"Yes," replied the officer," the sergeant wants to see you.

"I am going over and shoot the sergeant," said Sharp, his wrath rising again.

Just at that juncture Lieutenant Harry E. Stege, who had followed Dalbow out of the station, arrived on the scene and said to Sharp, "Drop that knife," at the same time drawing a revolver and pointing it at Sharp.

Then the trouble began in real earnest. Louis Pratt, who, up to that time had stood mute by the curb, a little in the rear and to one side of Sharp, raised a revolver which he was carrying in his hand and shot at Lieutenant Stege.

Louis Pratt, Religious Fanatic
LOUIS PRATT.
Religious Fanatic, Whose Leg Was Shot
Off in Fight With Police.

The ball tore through Stege's clothing form the right to the left side along the chest, taking a chunk out of the left arm. Stege retreated, shooting, and a general fusillade was opened on the police. Pratt shot Dalbow through the chest, just as he was drawing his revolver, and one of the women, Mrs. Sharp, witnesses say, shot him in the back as he retreated.

DIES IN EMERGENCY.

Dalbow staggered across the street south to the door of the emergency hospital. As he pushed open the door his revolver fell from his hand. "I am shot bad," he said to Dr. R. N. Coffey. The officer caught him and carried him to a cot in the hospital. He died in a few minutes without regaining consciousness.

The shooting by that time had attracted the attention of all the officers in police headquarters. Sergeant Patrick Clark, in his shirt sleeves and unarmed, went out and into the thickest of the fray. The big leader, Sharp, was tackled by the sergeant and, though the latter was armed with both a knife and a revolver, the sergeant went after him with his fists. Clark was stabbed twice in the face and as he turned, was shot through the shoulder.

Captain Walter Whitsett, Inspector Charles Ryan, Detective Edward Boyle and others went into the street, emptied their revolvers and returned for more ammunition.

The gamest fight against the greatest odds was made by Patrolman Mullane, who ran down Fourth street from Delaware street just in time to meet the enraged fanatics fighting their way toward him. Louis Pratt, Mrs. Sharp and Lulu, the oldest Pratt girl, all attacked him, paying little heed to the shots of others. He at that time was the only policeman in uniform in range. Mullane would shoot at Pratt and when the woman and girl would walk right up to him and shoot at him, the big Irishman, realizing that they were only women, only clubbed his gun and struck at them.

The three-cornered fight lasted until Mullane's gun was empty and they had him cornered behind a small wagon on the north side of Fourth street. While he was attempting to get at Pratt the woman and girl pumped shots into him from the rear. He soon followed Sergeant Clark into the station, where both men fell to the floor. Doctors attended them there. They were later removed to the emergency hospital, their wounds dressed, and sent to St. Joseph's.

SPECTATOR IS SHOT.

While there were no fewer than 500 spectators in the crowd when the shooting began, only one was shot. That was J. J. Sulzer, 2414 Benton boulevard, a retired farmer. He was an onlooker and was hit by two bullets, the fanatics evidently taking him for an enemy. He was shot in the right hip first and almost immediately afterwards in the right chest. That ball ranged in such a manner that the spinal cord was severed. Mr. Sulzer dropped on the car tracks in front of city hall. He was treated at the emergency and sent to the University hospital. The doctors think he cannot live, as he is paralyzed from the shoulders down.

SHARP, RINGLEADER, ESCAPED.

There was not a moment while the fight was on that the police could not have killed all of the women and children, but they refrained from doing so. Seeming to realize the fact, the women and older Pratt girls -- Mary, Lena and Lulu -- constantly gathered around the two men who were doing most of the shooting. The women and girls would circle about the men, thereby blanketing the fire of the police, and would then fire point blank at the officers themselves.

Among the fanatics, Pratt and Mrs. Sharp made the gamest fight. Sharp, the leader of the bunch, disappeared during the fight, as if the earth had swallowed him. Pratt was so badly wounded that he had to be left on the street, but even then one of the women, Mrs. Sharp, ran to him and gave him a loaded revolver. Struggling to position, he fired again until his weapon was emptied.

Chief Ahern turned in a riot call, and all the police in the city that were available appeared there as soon as possible, under commands of captains and lieutenants.

When it was found that Sharp, the ringleader, had escaped, the chief scattered his men in all direction over the city. It is believed that he was wounded. The houseboat was guarded last night.
WOUNDED RESTING EASILY.

At midnight Dr. Eugene King of St. Joseph's hospital said that Sergeant Patrick Clark was in a serious condition, but that he was doing nicely, and stood a good chance to recover. Patrolman Michael Mullane had shown some little improvement during the hour preceding 12 o'clock. Dre. King said that his chances of recovery were very slight.

The condition of J. J. Sulzer at the University hospital was reported by Dr. A. W. McArthur at midnight to be very critical. Dr. McArthur said that one of the bullets was lodged just beneath the skin on the left side of his body, but that he would not attempt to remove it until this morning.. Hope for Mr. Sulzer recovering from his wounds was slight, the surgeon said.

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December 5, 1908

ISADORE BIT HIM 43 TIMES.

Frank Armstrong Will Not Fight
West Fifth Street Merchant Again.

If you get into an argument with a West Fifth street merchant about a purchase, don't hit him -- don't even hit at him. You may have to fight a bull dog instead of the merchant.

The latter is what happened to Frank Armstrong, a lineman, 32 years old, in a little shop at 335 West Fifth street yesterday afternoon. Armstrong bought a pair of shoes. He said they did not fit. The merchant said they did. They argued. Armstrong gave the merchant the strongarm for one punch in the solar plexis.

"Oof! Ouch!" said the merchant. Then he recovered his breath sufficiently to call loudly, "Sic 'um Isadore, sick 'um quick!"

Now Isadore proved in this instance to be a fine specimen of the brindle bull dog with pink eyes. Obeying his master's command Isadore made a rapid flank movement and at once opened rapid fire on Armstrong's left pedal extremity.

It is not known whether Armstrong took his shoes, but he was taken to the emergency hospital after the "dogs of war" had been called off. Dr. W. L. Gist cauterized forty-three cuts on the lineman's leg -- all made by Isadore's sharp incisors.

After his wounds had been dressed Armstrong was locked up on a charge of disturbing the peace. He spent the night in the holdover.

"If I make any more purchases in that neighborhood," he said, "I think I'll wear football clothes or armor of some kind. I can fight a man, but bull dogs are not in my line. The dern shoes didn't fit anyway."

Armstrong's home is at 2935 North Fifth street, Kansas City, Kas.

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November 22, 1908

FARMER INTO A MAN HOLE.

Man From Oklahoma Experiences
Perils of a Big City.

F. W. Wright, a farmer of Henryetta, Ok., met with an unusual accident at Twelfth and Main streets at 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. While walking east on Twelfth street Mr. Wright stepped upon the covering of a manhole which turned, letting him into the sewer opening up to his arm pits.

When examined by Dr. R. N. Coffey at the emergency hospital Mr. Wright was found to be suffering from a contusion of the right chest and a severe abrasion below the right knee. Mr. Wright is 69 years old and the accident shocked him. He was able to leave the hospital later.

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October 22, 1908

INSANE MAN HAD A KNIFE.

Sheffield Man Subdued by Police.

Physicians at the emergency hospital were called upon to subdue two demented men yesterday. Wiley Stubblefield, who lives in Sheffield, was found by the police early yesterday morning in possession of a vacant lot in the east end of the city. He had a large knife with which he frightened every one away from him. The police subdued him after a struggle and took him to the hospital. The unfortunate man was strapped to a cot and given treatment.

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October 19, 1908

IGNORED "BEARDSLEY RULES."

Nurse Is Reprimanded for Trying to
Have Police Capture Ruffian.

Time after time the surgeons and nurses at the emergency hospital have been notified by the police that they were to call headquarters whenever any person who had been cut or shot appeared at the hospital for treatment. Several times the surgeons have treated persons injured by a cutting or shooting scrape that the police wanted but did not know where to find them.

Acting under the orders of the police department, which orders were given by Captain Walter Whitsett of police headquarters. Mrs. Frances Kaiser, the night nurse, called up the station Saturday night when B. F. Scott was brought in with his jugular vein cut. The officer who answered the telephone informed her that Captain Walter Whitsett and Lieutenant James Morris were not in the station. She told them that Scott would probably die but was told that there were no officers in the station who could leave.

Mrs. Kaiser, desiring to follow her instructions, then called up Chief Daniel Ahern at his home and informed him of the matter. Chief Ahern immediately summoned Assistant Prosecuting Attorney John Hogan, who took up the man's statement. Last night Captain Whitsett went to the emergency hospital and attempted to reprimand the nurse for calling up the chief of police at his home. Mrs. Kaiser replied that she was only endeavoring to obey his instructions to notify the police when men were brought into the emergency hospital who had been cut or stabbed in a fight. She said when the police at the station refused to act she got hold of an officer who would. Captain Whitsett informed the nurse that the "Beardsley rules" were taken up for her guidance but the nurse said yesterday that she was under the impression that she was employed under the administration of Dr. W. S. Wheeler, the health commissioner.

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