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January 8, 1910

MAKING WIFE OBEY
IS "BUTTING IN."

Parole Board Rules She Is
"Lord and Master" in
Kitchen Affairs.

In an effort to make his wife obey, as she had promised to do when he married her nine months ago, J. M. Hall, stock clerk for the Great Western Manufacturing Company, 1221 Union avenue, landed him self into the workhouse on a $300 fine three days after Christmas -- during the most joyous week of last year. The "you must obey your master" stunt took place at the Hall home at St. Clair station, near Mount Washington.

A. B. Coulton, manager of the Great Western Manufacturing Company, appeared before the board of pardons and paroles at the workhouse yesterday and asked for Hall's parole. William Volker, president of the board, then looked over the testimony which was given in the municipal court when Hall was convicted and given the highest fine in the power of the court. It ran something like this:

WOULD NOT OBEY.

Charged with disturbing the peace. Wife appeared to prosecute him. She said that ever since their marriage last March he has been dictatorial and domineering and insisted that she obey him as she promised. The day of his arrest he went into the kitchen and, seeing the stove door open, told her to close it. She did not want the door closed and told him so. Then he demanded that she stoop and close the door and she flatly refused.

"Then I'll teach you to obey as you promised," he said. With that Mrs. Hall testified, he grabbed her by the wrist and forced her to her knees demanding that she obey him. Still she refused. Then she was thrown back so as to strike a couch with her back. She did not shut the stove door. Couple have been married since March, 1909. She said she started to leave him several times, but was induced to return.

STICKS TO HIS RIGHTS.

Hall still thought he "had a right" in his own house to make his wife obey. He was obdurate until he found out that his parole hinged upon his apparent change of heart. Then he asked the board for terms. As Mrs. Hall soon will have to go to a s hospital the board provided that Hall pay over to L. H. Halbert, secretary to the board, $7.50 every Saturday night. That will be given to Mrs. Hall.

"Besides paying the $7.50 weekly," said Mr. Volker, "you absolutely must keep away from your wife. You also must report to the secretary once each week."

Hall, still defiant on the question of "obey," agreed meekly to the terms of parole. His employer, Mr. Coulton, said that a separate check would be made out to Secretary Halbert each week and Hall would be sent to deliver it. Hall will be released today.

"Before we parole anyone," explained President Volker to Hall, "we generally find out if he has any regrets for his actions; if he is sorry for doing the thing that caused his arrest. Are you?"

"I think I did as any husband should," said Hall calmly. "She refused to obey and I tried to make her. That's all."

"I see you have no regrets," said Mr. Volker, much in earnest. "I want you to know that I do not think there is provocation great enough for any man to strike a woman."

DEMANDED APOLOGY.

"But I did not strike her," insisted Hall. "I just tried to make her apologize and obey as any good wife should. What are you going to do when a woman absolutely refuses to obey?"

"If she refused to shut the stove door and I wanted it shut," said the board president, who is a single man, "I think I would quietly shut it. But if she wanted it left open I would leave it open. A woman knows more about a kitchen in a minute than a man does in a year. That is her domain; she reigns there as an absolute monarchy and a man has got no business going into the kitchen and telling the wife what to do. It's bound to cause trouble. Let her run the whole house. That's her place. You may run the rest of the earth if you choose, but think how puny, how little, how mean it is to force your wife to her knees by twisting her wrist simply because she would not 'obey her lord and master' and shut the stove door in a place where she, and she alone, has full command. I am not a believer in slang but I am forced to say that what you did might well be called 'butting in.' "

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December 10, 1909

HUNDREDS AT SCENE
OF ROSEDALE KILLING.

DEPUTY'S MURDERER HAD BEEN
DRINKING AND DANGEROUS.

Compelled Two Men at Point of Re-
volver to Imbibe, Then Carry
Suit Case of Ammunition --
No Funeral Arrangements.

Hundreds of persons yesterday afternoon in Rosedale went over the route of the running fight of Wednesday night which resulted in the murder of C. Q. Lukens, a Wyandotte county deputy sheriff, and the subsequent killing of Charles T. Galloway, the slayer. The home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., where the besieged man was finally captured after a desperate battle with Missouri and Kansas officers, came in for a good share of attention.

In the investigation yesterday circumstances came to light which, had they been known at the time by Lukens, probably would have prevented the double killing. From many sources it was found that Galloway had been drinking heavily preceding the shooting, and was in a dangerous mood during the day. He had made numerous attempts to find his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway, with the avowed intention of taking her life. At the point of a revolver he forced W. E. Tompkins and James Creason to drink with him and later to assist in carrying a suitcase full of ammunition.

ENTERED THE LAWYER'S HOME.

About 6 o'clock Wednesday morning he entered the home of Rush L. Fisette, the attorney who had brought divorce proceedings on behalf of Mrs. Galloway. the half crazed man insisted on searching every room in the house in the hopes of finding his wife. He left without causing any trouble, but with threats that he would kill his wife. It was Mr. Fisette who notified the sheriff's office in Kansas City, Kas.

Mrs. Galloway was prostrated yesterday by the events of the night before. The story of her fourteen years of married life included threats by her husband, who beat her and drove her from the house. Always following a hard drinking spell the man became half crazed and in this condition seized a gun or any weapon and attacked his wife. At other times he spoke in the most endearing terms to her. Mrs. Galloway remained yesterday at the home of her sister, Mrs. James L. Connor, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale.

LUKENS WELL LIKED.

In Kansas City, Kas., and Argentine, where Lukens had been known for years, the man was respected and liked. At the home of his widowed mother in Argentine the aged woman refused to be comforted.

The body of Lukens had been removed to Simmons's undertaking rooms in Argentine. Funeral arrangements have not been completed. Charles Quincy Lukens was a member of the Brother hood of Railway Trainmen in Argentine and also was a member of Aerie No. 87, Fraternal Order of Eagles, in Kansas City, Kas.

POST-MORTEM EXAMINATION.

A post-mortem examination of the body of Galloway, conducted by Coroner Harry Czarlinsky yesterday morning at the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms, showed that the bullet entered his right side and taking a downward course pierced the liver and passed out the left side. A coroner's inquest will be held at 10 o'clock Monday morning.

In a letter received by Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle yesterday afternoon from Chief of Police Wiley W. Cook of Kansas City, Kas., the chief said:

"Especially do I wish to express my highest commendation of Detectives Ralph Truman and J. W. Wilkens, who at the risk of their lives led the attack that effected Galloway's capture."

WANTED HIM TO DRINK.

W. E. Tompkins, employed at the Gates undertaking establishment in Rosedale and who lives at 505 Southwest boulevard, Rosedale, said he was passing in front of Galloway's home at 428 College avenue shortly after noon on the day of the double tragedy when he was accosted by Galloway and told to hold up his hands. At the same time Galloway pointed two large revolvers in the face of Tompkins and told him to follow him into the house. Tompkins followed.

When they reached the inside of the house James Creason, an electrician who helped Galloway on electrical work, was sitting there. Galloway insisted that Tompkins take a drink from a large quart bottle of whisky.

FEARED FOR HIS LIFE.

"I finally talked him out of that," Tompkins said, "but during the two hours he kept Creason and me imprisoned in the house Galloway drank at least three-fourths of the quart of whisky. He sowed us a Winchester shotgun and a Winchester rifle and a suitcase full of ammunition. He said to us: 'Do you know what I am going to do with these,' and when we answered negatively he said he was going to 'raise hell tonight.'

"We pleaded with him to let us go, as I was afraid every minute that he would get wild and kill both of us. He finally agreed to let us go if we would carry the guns and ammunition down to Creason's home on Bell street. Creason led two bird dogs and carried the guns, and I carried a heavy coil wire belonging to Galloway, and the suit case fu ll of ammunition. My load got heavy, though, and I left all of the stuff at Young's store at College avenue and Oak street. Creason, I suppose, took his stuff on down to his place, and then Galloway came back up and got what I had left."

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December 9, 1909

TWO KILLED AND
ONE WOUNDED IN
RUNNING BATTLE.

Charles Lukens, Wyandotte County
Deputy Sheriff, Shot Through
Heart by Charles Galloway, Drink
Crazed Rosedale Electrician, He
Tried to Serve With Injunction.

SLAYER HAD THREATENED
WIFE WHO SOUGHT DIVORCE.

After Killing Lukens, Galloway
Carried on a Retreating Fight
With Other Officers Until
Brought to Bay at 3129
Bell Street.

SHOT BY DETECTIVES, DIES
IN EMERGENCY HOSPITAL.

Double Tragedy Direct Result of
Domestic Difficulties of the Gal-
loways -- Wife, Who Sued for Di-
vorce, Feared for Her Life, Which
Husband Had Threatened -- Re-
straining Order Was to Keep Him
From Further Terrorizing Her.
Murderer of Peace Officer, Who Was Slain as He Fled From Posse.
CHARLES T. GALLOWAY.

Two men are dead and another wounded as the result of an attempt by Charles Quincy Lukens, a deputy sheriff of Wyandotte county, Kas., to serve a restraining order upon Charles T. Galloway, a drink crazed electrician of 428 College avenue, Rosedale, Kas., late yesterday evening.

Lukens was shot above the heart and instantly killed during a running fight with Galloway.

Galloway was later brought to bay in a house at 3129 Bell street, and after a desperate resistance was mortally wounded, dying at 11:30 o'clock last night as he was being placed upon the operating table at Emergency hospital.

JUST BACK FROM OKLAHOMA.

Deputy Sheriff Lukens left the Wyandotte county court house yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock with an order from the district court restraining Galloway from annoying or in any way interfering with his wife, Mrs. Anna Galloway. The Galloways had been having trouble for several months, and November 23 Mrs. Galloway, through her attorney, Rush L. Fizette, 1255 Kansas City avenue, Rosedale, filed a suit for divorce, alleging cruelty, drunkenness and ill-treatment.

Since the filing of the divorce petition Galloway had beaten his wife and threatened her life. She then applied for an order restraining him from bothering her. The order was granted several weeks ago, but Galloway had been in Oklahoma during that time. Yesterday word was received at the sheriff's office that he was in town, and Lukens was sent to serve papers on him.

QUARTER-MILE RUNNING FIGHT.

Mrs. Galloway has been staying for the past few days at the home of her sister, Mrs. J. L. Connor, at 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale. The deputy sheriff and Marshal Drew thought perhaps they might find Galloway hanging around there, as he had visited the Connor home earlier in the day and made demands to see his wife and children.

The officers reached Kansas City avenue and Washington street about 5:30 o'clock, and met Galloway shortly after they stepped off the car. Marshal Drew spoke to Galloway and shook hand with him. Lukens then shook hands with Galloway, and told him that he had some papers to serve.

Almost instantly Galloway drew a revolver and opened fire on the officers, who, unprepared for such an emergency, had to unbutton their overcoats before they could get at their weapons. They at last got hold of their revolvers and opened fire on Galloway. A running fight was kept up for more than a quarter of a mile.

The fleeing man turned into alleys, turning back every few steps to fire upon the pursuing officers. He finally reached Rosedale avenue, and turning south ran toward the tracks of the Frisco railroad. When the officers reached the tracks he turned and fired at Lukens, hitting him directly over the heart.

LUKENS FALLS DEAD.

Lukens staggered, and after grasping a telegraph pole with both hands fell to the ground dead. Galloway then ran south, and after a vain attempt to make his escape on a horse, abandoned the horse, and fled to the woods on the hills around Gray's park.

Officer Drew ran to Lukens's assistance, but finding him dead, started to pursue Galloway. He fired the last shell from his gun, and then finding himself without ammunition sent a boy after some. A large crowd of persons had been attracted by the firing, and a number of them assisted in taking the body of Lukens to a barber shop at Kansas City and Rosedale avenues. The coroner was notified, and he ordered the body taken to the Gates undertaking rooms in Rosedale, where he performed a post mortem. It was found that the bullet had pierced the heart and lungs, and had gone entirely through the body, coming out near the middle of the back.

GALLOWAY BROUGHT TO BAY.

The sheriff's office was notified in Kansas City, Kas., and Under Sheriff Joseph Brady, deputies William McMullen, Clyde Sartin and George Westfall jumped into an automobile, driven by George E. Porter, an undertaker at 1007 North Seventh street and rode at break neck speed to Rosedale. The Kansas City, Kas., police were also notified and Chief W. W. Cook led a large force of uniformed men and detectives to the scene of the murder. The citizens of Rosedale also turned out in large numbers and the hills around Rosedale glittered with the lights as these posses scoured the woods in an effort to find the murderer.

At 9 o'clock last night Galloway was cornered in the home of M. E. Patterson, 3129 Bell street, Kansas City, Mo., which he took possession of forcibly.

Barricading himself in a closet upstairs he held his pursuers at bay for over two hours. A posse consisting of nearly 100 men guarded the house on all sides. the air was tense with tragedy, and the bitter cold of the winter night added to the unpleasantness of the whole affair. Every man knew that a desperate fight was inevitable and that Galloway would have to be taken either dead or helplessly wounded.

MISSOURIAN LEADS CHARGE.

A delay was occasioned by the fact that the Kansas officers were outside of their jurisdiction, and did not feel that they had a right to enter the house, which is built on Missouri soil. Missouri officers were summoned and arrived at about 10 o'clock. The plans were laid and great precaution was taken in every step taken, for the officers realized that they were at a great disadvantage in forcing their way into the house, which they knew held a man who had already killed one officer and who would not hesitate to kill others should they press him too hard.

Finally the attack was planned and at 11:30 o'clock a squad of detectives consisting of Joe Downs, Billy McMullin, Harry Anderson and J. W. Wilkens, the latter a Missouri officer, leading, forced their way into the house, and after cautiously searching all the downstairs rooms without finding Galloway, rushed up the narrow stairs to the second floor.

When the officers reached the second floor a volley of shots rang out. Another volley followed. Breaking glass and a great commotion could be heard in the street below.

LAST WORD FOR HIS WIFE.

Then a husky voice was heard to shout:

"We got him."

In entering a dining room the officers were reminded of the presence of Galloway by three shots fired in rapid succession. The officers responded with a dozen shots and bullets went whizzing in every direction, embedding themselves in the walls. One bullet passed through the sleeve of Detective Wilkens's overcoat and lodged in the thumb on the left hand of Harry Anderson, a Kansas City, Kas., detective.

Within a twinkling a bullet entered the abdomen of Galloway and he fell to the floor, rolling into a dark kitchen adjoining the dining room. Writhing in his great pain, the man rolled frantically about the floor.

"Oh my dear wife, my own wife, my darling wife," he moaned time and again. Then he pleaded for ice water, clutching his parched throat madly.

An ambulance was called and Galloway was taken to emergency hospital, where he died just as they were lifting him to the operating table.

ANOTHER WOMAN'S LETTER.

Drs. Harry T. Morton and C. A. Pond, who were in attendance, pronounced death due to a wound from several buckshot that had entered the left side of the abdomen and after penetrating the intestines came out of the right side.

His pockets were searched while on the operating table. The contents consisted of a pocket-book containing $55 in cash, a gold watch and chain, a pack of business cards, several boxes of revolver cartridges, a bank book on the Fort Worth, Tex., State bank, and a letter.

The letter, which was written in lead pencil, was so blood soaked that it was barely legible. As far as it could be deciphered it ran as follows:

"Dear Friend -- I hear that you are getting a divorce from Mrs. G. ----- she is selling all your things and ---- I don't see where Mrs. G. or the boys is at. They act disgraceful, never coming home. --- Good luck, your loving Nan."

Lukens, whom Galloway shot down, was one of his best friends and so was Marshal Billy Drew, whom he fired at time and again in an effort to kill.

ASKS FOR FOOD.

The house where the shooting occurred is a two-story frame structure containing four apartments. The front apartment is occupied by Cecil Patterson and his family, and the rear apartment of four rooms by J. E. Creason, his wife and their little daughter.

"It was about 8 o'clock when Galloway came to the house," said Mr. Creason. "He was greatly excited and told me he had been in a shooting scrape and had shot a man. He said that they, meaning the officers, were after him and he did not know what to do. I told him that the best thing for him to do was surrender. He said: 'No, I'm not ready yet.'


Mr. and Mrs. Creason, Who Fed Galloway and Tried to Persuade Him to Surrender.
MR. AND MRS. J. E. CREASON,
In Whose Home Galloway Took Forcible Possession and Held Out Against a Posse Until Forced to Run for His Life When a Bullet Ended His Career

" 'Give me something to eat first and I will think about it,' he said. I have known Galloway for several years and worked for him at my trade as an electrician. He had always been a good friend and I saw no wrong in giving him something to eat and told my wife to fix him something. She fried some chops and potatoes and made some coffee for him. He tried to eat, but he was nervous and he could hardly swallow.

THE POSSE COMES.

"All this time my wife and I tried to find out just who he had shot and what the shooting was about, but he would put us off with the one answer, 'I will tell you when I am ready.' After supper he sat in a corner and seemed to be in a deep study. He paid no attention to our little girl, who seemed to annoy him by her childish prattle.

"I did not know what to do, so thought I would take a walk in the fresh air. I had hardly gotten 100 feet from the house when I met some people from Rosedale. They told me that Galloway had killed the undersheriff and that they were after him. I told them that he was in my house, but warned them not to go after him, as I feared he might use one of the weapons he had there. I told the crowd that I would endeavor to get him to surrender. I went back to the house. Galloway was still sitting in the corner, but jumped up w hen I came into the room.

" 'They know where you are,' I told him. 'Why don't you surrender?' 'I am not ready yet,' he said. I could get nothing more from him. Half an hour later some of the officers came into the ho use. I went downstairs and told them that Galloway was upstairs, but that he was armed and that it would be dangerous for them to go up there at that time. My family was up there, too, and I did not want my wife or daughter to be shot in case Galloway or the officers started shooting.

REFUSES TO SURRENDER.

This turned the posse back for a while and I made another effort to get Galloway to surrender. He still refused and I called to my wife and daughter and we went to the front of the house in Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Patterson's rooms. We left the gas burning in the dining room and the hall. The bedroom, in the closet in which Galloway took refuge, opened from the dining room by big folding doors as you see. The gas mantle on this lamp was broken and it was not lighted. We all remained in the front room until the posse called to us to come out of the house. As we went out I again told Galloway to surrender; that the house was surrounded and he could not get away, or if he did that he would have to jump to the house next door and climb down the side of the house.

" 'I am not ready yet,' were the last words he said to me. I felt as if the officers would not take Galloway alive and I feared that several might be killed. I was so nervous I did know what I was doing or saying. All I thought of was to prevent any more bloodshed.

"After we left the house we went into Griffin's home next door. We had hardly gotten inside when the shooting began. I put my fingers to my ears so that I would not hear the shots.

SURE HE WAS CRAZY.

"Galloway must have been out of his mind. He could have escaped from the house several times after he knew that the officers had him spotted and he could have held that staircase with his guns against 100 policemen. Why he refused to surrender and then retreated into the clothes closet where he was caught like a rat in a trap can only be explained by my opinion that he was crazy.

"Galloway brought the rifle and the shot gun over to the ho use this afternoon. He also brought a suitcase full of ammunition. This was before he did the shooting. He told us that he was going hunting and he wanted to leave his guns at our house. We had no objections to this as we had always been the best of friends. After we left the house he must have taken his rifle and gone into the closet. He left his shotgun in a corner in the kitchen."

THREATENED TO KILL WIFE FOR YEARS.

Mrs. Anna Galloway, wife of Charles Galloway, has been living with her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Connor, at their home, 1700 Dodd street, Rosedale, ever since she instituted divorce proceedings against her husband. For over forty-eight hours she has been a prisoner in that home, fearing even to step out, lest Galloway be near, ready to fire at her, as he had repeatedly threatened to do.

When seen last night after the killing of Deputy Sheriff Lukens, she was nearly in a state of nervous prostration. She had witnessed the start of the tragic escapade from a window in her room . She saw the officer attempt to serve papers on her husband. She heard the ensuing shots and then fell in a swoon.

"Oh, I knew it would come to this terrible end -- I knew it, I knew it," she moaned, as she paced nervously up and down the floor. "Charlie has had murder in his heart for thirteen years and I have always realized that it would only be a matter of time until the impulse would control him. He wasn't sane; he couldn't have been.

"Five times since Priests of Pallas week he has threatened to kill me, and from one day to another I never knew if I would see daylight again. Today some stranger 'phoned from a saloon to be extremely careful, as he had heard Charlie say that this would be the last day I could live. Marshal Drew remained with me to protect me and he has been in our house here all day.

"The first time Mr. Galloway ever threatened me was thirteen years ago. I should have left him then, but I thought he would get over his insane notions and I wanted to make a success of our married life if at all possible. He did reform and was better to me for some time, but when our two children, Harvey and Walter, were old enough to run around a great deal he began abusing me terribly and many times told me he would kill me. He became a harder drinker every year and would get in such a condition that no one could manage him at all.

"Many times as he choked me, and more than once has the end seemed so near that I could not possibly escape, but God has been with me for my children's sake I guess."

VICTIM WELL KNOWN IN WYANDOTTE.

Charles Quincy Lukens was 33 years old. He lived with his widowed mother, Mrs. Sarah Lukens, 336 Harrison street, Argentine. He was unmarried. He was appointed deputy sheriff by Sheriff Al Becker about one year ago. Before his appointment Lukens was constable and later marshal of Argentine for several terms. He had also served on the Argentine fire department. "Charley" Lukens was known by everyone in Argentine, both old and young, and also had a wide acquaintance thorugout the county. He was regarded as a very efficient officer, and had a reputation for fearlessness.

Besidses his mother he is survived by four sisters and four brothers. The sisters are: Mrs. Lydia Jones of Girard, Kas., Mrs. Beulah Robinson of 1108 East Twenty-fourth street, Kansas City, Mo., Mrs. C. A. Hare of Faircastle, O., Mrs. Leonard Eshnaur of Terminal Isle, Cal. The brothers are J. R. Lukens of Oklahoma City, Ok., and L. B, J. E., and F. D. Lukens of Argentine.

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September 26, 1909

JOHNSON NOT GUILTY
VERDICT OF JURY.

REPORT AFTER NEARLY FIVE
HOURS DELIBERATION.

Defendant in Buckner, Mo., Assault
Case Says He Was More Affec-
tionate Toward Wife Than
Ordinary Husband.

After being out from 7:35 until midnight a jury in the criminal court last night returned a verdict finding William A. Johnson, charged with an assault on his wife in Buckner, Mo., August 20 of last year not guilty.

In all likelihood the case would have gone over until Monday, had not the jury made a request of Judge Ralph S. Latshaw to allow them to finish last night. the jurors have been kept locked up the greater part of a week and they were anxious to be at their homes Sunday.

The testimony yesterday, as presented by the defense, was largely that of Johnson himself. Johnson was on the stand the greater part of the afternoon. He said he was 57 years of age, had been born in Ohio and come to the Buckner neighborhood about the time he reached manhood. He said he was married 31 years ago and that he was unable to read and write, except that he could sign his name. This lack of education he attributed to the fact that he had to shift for himself from the time he was 15 and also because school conditions were rather unsettled at the time he was a child, it having been the time of the civil war.

Johnson first rented the farm he later came to own. He built the house in which he and his wife lived 20 years. His farm comprised about 800 acres and was encumbered for about $47,000. He testified that he lost money in two ranch deals, in one of them, $10,000. He said that whenever he had money in the bank, he allowed his wife to draw checks herself.

AFFECTION FOR WIFE.

"What was your feeling toward your wife?" he was asked.

"It was good, as much as that of any man and better than that of any number of men I see around," replied the witness.

This was true both at the time Mrs. Johnson was hurt and now, said he. Recounting the events leading up to and immediately upon the injury of Mrs. Johnson, the witness said:

"When we came home from church that evening (about eight hours before the assault), my wife read the paper to me and then we went to bed. I went to bed first and fell asleep almost immediately after taking some medicine I need for asthma. My recollection is that the light was burning when I went to bed. The next thing I heard was my wife calling, 'O, Dode!' a nickname she used for me.

"I jumped up and saw her on the floor, sitting down. I asked her what she was doing there and at first she didn't answer. Then she said she was sick. I wanted her to get on the bed, but she said she was too sick and asked me to lay her down. I got some pillows from the bed and laid her head on them. I don't remember whether I lit the light or not. I asked her what hurt her and she did not answer. Then I ran downstairs to call the Hilts. When they came upstairs with me, we put my wife on the bed and I called a doctor. I saw no blood until I laid her back on the pillows.

"Did you, that night, get up and go downstairs and up again or anywhere else in the house until you called the Hilts?"

"I did not."

"Did you know until the doctors made an examination how badly your wife was hurt?"

"No."

"Have you knowledge of who hurt your wife?"

"I couldn't look it in the face if I killed an animal, much less my wife. I didn't do it and have no knowledge of who did."

Johnson's testimony was not materially changed by cross-examination.

Mrs. C. F. Harra, who lives near Buckner, testified that she had asked Johnson the day after the assault if he was going to make an investigation. The witness said he replied:

"There is no need to investigate. There are no clues."

Other witnesses put on by the defense were Whig Keshlear, a detective, and his assistant. Thomas F. Callahan, an attorney, who acknowledged a deed made by the Johnsons. Depositions were read from Catherine Elliott, a washwoman, and Martha Shipley, a nurse. Both said the Johnsons seemed fond of each other. Henry Johnson, a nephew, also was called. He slept in a room adjoining the Johnsons the night of the assault.

Late in the afternoon Mrs. Johnson was recalled to the stand by the state. She said that, while she was recovering, she often talked to Johnson, but never about the injury. There was long argument over whether this answer should be admitted, but it was finally allowed to go in.

"I called for Mr. Johnson frequently to talk to him to give him a chance to ask me how it all happened."

The jury was withdrawn for a time while this testimony was being debated by counsel. James A. Reed, for the fifth time during the trial, moved the discharge of the jury while Mrs. Johnson was on the stand, but Judge Latshaw overruled.

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September 25, 1909

BY SOME ONE IN THE
HOUSE, SAYS LATSHAW.

DECLARES MRS. JOHNSON WAS
NOT ATTACKED BY BURGLAR.

Court Overrules Demurrer to Evi-
dence Introduced by State -- Im-
portant Testimony Allowed in
Record -- Defense Begins Today.

"This crime was not committed by a burglar, but by a member of the household. The evidence here is that whoever came down stairs soon after the crime went up the stairs again. Burglars do not return to a place where they have committed a crime. They leave the vicinity.

"As to motive, there is an unexplained forgery of Mrs. Johnson's name to a deed. There are quarrels between the couple to help in establishing motive. For these reasons, the demurrer is overruled."

The ruling here quoted was made by Judge Ralph S. Latshaw of the criminal court yesterday after attorneys for William A. Johnson of Buckner had argued half an hour that the state had not presented sufficient evidence to allow the cause to go to the jury. The court held that there was evidence. The introduction of testimony for the defense will be begun this morning.

Mrs. Mina Johnson told her story on the witness stand yesterday. Tired to the point of exhaustion by the many questions put to her, she answered all of them quickly Facing her, at a distance of twenty feet, sat her former husband, charged with assaulting her. She looked in his direction as she testified, but he did not lift his eyes from the table at which he sat.

TESTIFIES TO ASSAULT.

After she had exhibited to the jury the place on her head where she was struck, Mrs. Johnson related the happenings on the night of the assault. She and Johnson had come home from church, and retired. He went to bed first and she blew out the lamp. In the course of the night she awoke. The light was burning and brown paper had been put about the glass. She fell asleep again, seeming to be helpless.

Her next recollection, she said, was after the blow had been struck. She remembered kneeling by the side of the bed, blood streaming over her clothing. She looked about the room for her husband, but not seeing him, called. Then, she said, he came up and took hold of her arm, asking what was the matter with her. She told him she did not know, and asked him to let her lie on the floor.

Then he took pillows from the bed and put her head on them. Mrs. Johnson said Johnson did not ask her how she was hurt, either then or at any time since, in fact, that he had never asked any questions about the affair.

While Mrs. Johnson did not call it a quarrel, she testified to an argument she had with Johnson a few days prior to the assault. He was then planning a trip to New Mexico, and she insisted that she was going with him.

"I told him only death would keep me from making the trip," said the witness.

WAS ABSENT THREE MONTHS.

Mrs. Johnson testified as to her marriage thirty-two years ago. She was Mina Alderman, a school teacher. She taught Johnson to read and write after they were married. They rented a farm near Buckner and prospered, so that they came to own the place in a few years. Everything seemed to go nicely until seven years ago.

About that time, she testified, he became less cordial. Three years ago Johnson intended to buy a ranch in New Mexico, and on this deal was absent form home for three months. He seemed even less cordial on his return from that trip, said the witness. In one of his pockets she found a receipted bill from the Savoy hotel, Denver. It was for $46.50 on account of "W. A. Johnson and Mrs. M. B. Howard."

"It's a mistake," the witness said Johnson remarked when she questioned him.

Not long afterwards Johnson told her, she said, of buying a house and lot in Kansas City. He did not explain the deal to her satisfactorily, the witness testified.

SAYS HE BOUGHT EXPENSIVE HATS.

After the finding of the hotel bill Mrs. Johnson made search and learned the address of Mrs. Howard. She wrote Mrs. Howard, requesting an interview, but was refused. Mrs. Howard said in the letter, according to the witness, that she had met Johnson in a business way. She accused Johnson of dictating the letter, said the witness. Mrs. Johnson also told of coming to Kansas City once with Johnson, who would not or did not ride on street cars, so that she was soon very tired and unwilling to make another trip.

Lillian Short, a milliner in the employ of B. Adler & Co., said that she had seen Johnson come to the store three times with a woman who on each occasion purchased a high-priced hat. The woman was not Mrs. Johnson, the witness said. Mr. Adler testified to the same effect.

IMPORTANT TESTIMONY IN.

John F. Cox, Prescott, Kas., testified that Johnson told him on one occasion that he was very well acquainted with two women in Kansas City.

Edward H. Hilt, who testified Thursday, was recalled by the defense and further questioned. He was asked whether Keshlear and another detective who investigated the alleged assault did not talk to him. The witness said he could not remember.

Hilt was allowed to testify only after the objection, raised Thursday as to part of his testimony and again yesterday morning, had been overruled by Judge Latshaw. Hilt had testified that he was awakened by a groan and that, soon afterwards, he heard the footsteps coming down the stairs and almost immediately retrace their course. Fifteen minutes later he again heard footsteps and this ti me Johnson came to his door. The defense objected to any statement of the witness that the sound of the footsteps was similar.

It was one of the most important points that could be raised in a case in which, as in the one on trial, the evidence is wholly circumstantial. The testimony of Hilt was allowed to remain in the record.

ESTATE WORTH $15,000.

This concluded the state's case.

The defence then submitted its demurrer, which was overruled.
The assault on Mrs. Johnson was committed in the morning of August 20 at Buckner. The Johnson were at one time wealthy, but in the settlement of their affairs which followed the divorce given Mrs. Johnson last spring, only about $15,000 could be saved from the wreckage. Mrs. Johnson was given half of this. There was property sufficient to carry mortgages aggregating about $50,000.

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September 21, 1909

JOHNSON TRIAL ON TODAY.

Buckner Man Charged With Strik-
ing Wife as She Lay Abed.

The trial of William A. Johnson of Buckner, Mo., charged with attacking Mina Johnson, his wife, the night of August 20, 1908, as she lay in bed, is set for this morning in the criminal court. Mrs. Johnson supposedly was struck with a club. Her husband was supposed to be in the room asleep at the time. Later he told officers that the groans of his wife awakened him.

Mrs. Johnson secured a divorce and a division of the property in the circuit court last spring.

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August 18, 1909

STRUCK WIFE, CHOKED BABY.

On This Charge Judge Remley Fines
Man $500.

For swearing at his mother, striking his wife and choking his baby, J. H. Hamilton, Twenty-second and Chelsea streets, was arrested and yesterday appeared in the municipal court, where Judge Theodore Remley fined him $500, the maximum allowed by the law.

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August 8, 1909

KILLS SISTER-IN-LAW
AND COMMITS SUICIDE.

GRANT SIERS SHOOTS MRS.
MARY SIERS AND HIMSELF.

Jealousy and Continual Quarreling
Alleged Cause -- Negro Witness of
Tragedy Says Woman Also
Used Revolver.

Jealousy and continual quarelling is the alleged cause of the death of Mrs. Mary Siers, 1025 Jefferson street, who was shot and instantly killed yesterday afternoon about 4:45 o'clock by her brother-in-law, Grant Siers, who then turned the pistol upon himself and sent a bullet into his head, dying before anyone reached his side. The only witness to the murder and suicide was Susie Richardson, a negro woman, who lives in a house in the rear of the Siers residence.

Siers had lived at the home of Mrs. Siers for the last two years, after being separated from his wife, who lives in Humeston, Ia. Mrs. Siers' husband is divorced and is an inmate of the Soldiers' home at Leavenworth, Kas. From boarders in the house and Chester Siers, a son of the slayer and suicide, it was learned that the couple quarreled most of the time. Jealousy on the part of both is said to have caused nearly all of the domestic trouble.

ORDERED TO LEAVE HOUSE.

About 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mrs. Siers was busy showing two real estate men over the house when Grant Siers returned home and began to quarrel with his sister-in-law. She told him to leave the ho use and he entered the hall to get his suit case. The woman threw the suit case at his feet with the admonition not to return. Siers requested time to get his clothing from his room, but she again told him to leave. His son, Chester, finally induced him to leave the house, and the two men went to a saloon at Eleventh and Jefferson streets. Later in the afternoon the father left his son at Eleventh and Main streets.

The next heard of Siers he was entering the yard at the Jefferson street residence. Instead of going in the back way, as was his custom, Siers entered from the front and went around the house to the rear door. A latticed porch is just off the kitchen door, and as Siers walked upon the porch Mrs. Siers appeared in the doorway. She ordered him off and according to the theory of the police he drew a revolver and shot three times. Two bullets entered her body, one on each side of the chest. The third bullet lodged in the wall back of her. Then Siers placed the muzzle of the pistol behind the right ear and killed himself.

SAYS WOMAN USED PISTOL.

The version of the double killing as given by the Richardson woman differs greatly from that of the police theory. She said she was standing in the yard and saw Mrs. Siers point a revolver at Siers and fire twice. Siers, she said, turned and fell, and while on the floor of the porch took a pistol from his pocket and fired at Mrs. Siers, afterwards shooting himself. However, when the deputy coroner, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, examined the bodies only one revolver was found and that was under Siers. the body of Mrs. Siers was slaying in the kitchen and Siers's body was on the porch.

Mrs. Richardson said that Siers was asking for his clothes and that Mrs. Siers finally ordered him away and said:

"I'll see you dead before I will give you your clothes."

"My God, please don't kill me," Siers exclaimed, she said.

Immediately after this conversation Mrs. Siers began to shoot, according to the negro woman. She was positive two revolvers were displayed. As the police could only find one pistol, and that underneath Siers's body, the discredit the negro's story.

Dr. Czarlinsky also found five shells, which were for the pistol, in the coat pocket of Siers.

SON TELLS OF QUARRELS.

Chester Siers, who is a restaurant cook, said yesterday evening that his father did not own a pistol so far as he knew, but that his aunt had one. He said his father and aunt were in love with each other, but that he had never heard them discuss the subject of marriage.

W. L. Haynes and Charles Callahan, boarders,were in the parlor during the shooting and counted four reports of shots fired. Mrs. Moyer, housekeeper, was in another part of the house. The son of Siers said that in the past when his father had left home after a quarrel with his aunt she always sent him money to come back. About a month ago she had him arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace. He was sent to the workhouse, but after serving a short sentence, Mrs. Siers paid his fine, it is said.

Siers, who was 54 years old, was a barber and had a shop at the corner of Nicholson and Monroe streets. He leaves a widow and six children. The widow and three children reside in Humeston, Ia.

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July 27, 1909

SHE DIDN'T INTEND TO KILL.

Mary O'Neill Pleads Not Guilty to
Charge of Husband.

Mary O'Neill, who took a shot at her husband, Frank P. O'Neill, in the general office of the Muehleback Brewing Company at Eighteenth and Main streets Monday evening, was arraigned in the justice court of James B. Shoemaker yesterday afternoon.

She pleaded "not guilty" to the charge of assault with intent to kill preferred against her by her husband. Hearing was set for 2 o'clock in the afternoon of August 5.

The defendant was released on $700 bond.

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July 26, 1909

SORRY SHE TOOK A
SHOT AT HUSBAND.

MRS. FRANK O'NEILL'S BULLET
JUST GRAZED HIS NECK.

Wife Says She Was Nervous and
Excited, and That Shooting in
Muehleback Brewery Was
Only to Frighten Him.

A daintily dressed woman talking through the grate of the cashier's window in the general office of the Muehlebach Brewing Company to her husband, a bookkeeper, at 7:30 o'clock last night, attracted little attention from the beer wagon drivers who happened to be about. Sharp words between members of the opposite sexes in the vicinity of Eighteenth and Main streets even at such an early hour in the evening are not unusual.

Suddenly the woman, Mrs. Mary O'Neill of 431 Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas., opened her chatelaine bag and inserted her hand.

"Mary, what are you going to do?" asked her husband, Frank P. O'Neill, of 3719 Woodland avenue. Mr. and Mrs. O'Neill have been separated since January 1.

The woman drew a small revolver from the bag and fired at close range, the bullet grazing Mr. O'Neill's neck beneath his right ear and lodging inside the neck band of his shirt. Mrs. O'Neill then dropped the weapon and gave herself up to John Glenn, night watchman of the brewery.

JUST SHOOT TO SCARE HIM.

At No. 4 police station Mrs. O'Neill occupied a cell but a few feet from the operating table where Dr. J. M. McKamey was dressing her husband's wound. She was highly excited, nervous and penitent.

"I did not mean to kill him at all," she said, "but he has mistreated me every time I have approached him for money for my support, and I could not help but be on my guard all the time. When he told me to get out of the office tonight I got excited and fired when I only wanted to frighten him.

"My husband and I were married in a Catholic church two years ago," Mrs. O'Neill went on. "He married me without letting me know that he had been married twice before, and that both of these former wives are still living. During the last days of December last year I was sick and somewhat of a burden to him. On the evening of the New Year he left me sick in bed and never came back.

"I have since kept house for my brother, John Semen, at my home on Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas. The two trips I have taken to see my husband and ask for money from him to buy clothes for myself have not been successful.

NOT SURE HE'LL PROSECUTE.

Frank O'Neill was not sure last night that he would prosecute his wife. His father, Sergeant F. P. O'Neill of No. 6 police station, however, said he would prosecute.

"I have never mistreated my wife," said the son. "It is true that I have been married before. Mary's shooting at me without warning from her, although my mother called me over the telephone half an hour before, and said Mary was on the way to the brewery to kill me."

Dr. McKamey said that O'Neill's would would easily heal.

Mrs. O'Neill is 28 years old.

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July 15, 1909

SOUGHT RELIEF IN COURTS.

James King's Marital Experiences
Were Too Strenuous, He Says.

James I. King had a strenuous marital experience, according to the petition for divorce he filed in the circuit court at Independence yesterday against Gertrude King, in which he says: "She scolded, she fussed, nagged, threw scalding water on him, struck him in the face, hurled a hatchet at him, cut him with a butcher knife, threatened to poison and 'gas' him, broke the alarm clock, which awakened her, refused to get his breakfast or lunch, took his wages, locked him out of doors, refused to let him attend lodge, cashed in goods he bought at the store if they did not suit her and kept the money, threw grease on his clothing, struck and scratched him and then ran off with his children by a former marriage."

This capped the climax and King sought relief in the courts.

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June 26, 1909

WOULD KILL SELF AT DEPOT.

After Quarreling With Husband,
Woman Tries to Swallow Acid.

Despondent and angry because of domestic troubles, and after several hand-to-hand encounters with her husband in the presence of hundreds of persons, a woman attempted to swallow the contents of a bottle of carbolic acid at the Union depot last night, and only the timely interference of Patrolman John Coughlin prevented her from accomplishing her act.

Attracted by the crowd that had gathered about the couple early in the evening, Coughlin forced his way up to them and ordered the disturbance to cease. For a time they were quiet, but several times again broke out in heated and spirited argument, each time drawing a crowd of curious onlookers.

Finally the woman drew the vial of acid from her handbag, opened it and was about to place it to her lips when the patrolman intercepted it. both the man and woman were taken to No. 2 police station. Neither would give their names, and Captain Ennis, after hearing both sides of the story, on the woman's promise of good behavior, allowed them to leave without being booked.

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June 23, 1909

"I'LL FIX YOU" COST $500.

Angry Father Threatened His Son
in the Municipal Court.

When Raymond Agill was fined $50 in the municipal court yesterday morning for mistreating his wife, he shook his fist at his 12-year-old son, who was a witness for his mother.

"I'll fix you when I get out," he declared.

When Judge Kyle heard the remark, he increased the fine to $500, and in default of payment the man was sent to the workhouse.

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May 8, 1909

ATTEMPTED HOLD UP
MAY END IN MURDER.

VICTIM DOES NOT OBEY ORDERS
AND ROBBER SHOOTS.

Charles Zondler, Saloonkeeper, Seri-
ously Injured by Outlaw, Who
Is Captured by Police-
man After Chase.

"I want your money. Hold up your hands."

Charles Zondler, alone in his saloon at Eighteenth and Cherry streets last night at 10 o'clock, looked up into the muzzle of a 38-calibre revolver. He reached for his own gun beneath the bar and the stick-up man shot him twice in the face. The assassin fled from the saloon and darted south through an alley. Zondler fired twice, but missed.

Jerry O'Connell, patrolman on the beat, heard the shots when he was at Nineteenth and Charlotte streets, and caught a glimpse of the flying figure. He cut across lots and headed the man off in the alley. Putting his left hand over the robber's revolver he jammed his own gun close to the fellow's car and brought him to a stop. Then, with the assistance of Patrolman George Brooks, O'Connell marched his prisoner to the Walnut street station.

Zondler, who is an elderly man and has owned the saloon but a few months, was taken to the general hospital in the ambulance from the station. Examination showed that one of the bullets had entered his mouth and passed out through the right cheek. The other bullet entered the left side of the neck and passed out through the right side. He is in a precarious condition.

Lieutenant Michael Halligan put the prisoner through a searching examination at the station. He gave the name of Henry Horton, but a card case had the name of H. S. Seward upon it, and he acknowledged that he sometimes went by that name. Horton admitted to Lieutenant Halligan that he had been arrested in this city before for petty crimes, but said that this was his first attempt at the stick-up game. He had only recently arrived in town, he said, and needed money. A dime and a stamped postcard were in his pockets. Horton asked permission to send the postcard to his mother. He addressed it, "Mrs. W. H. Strain, 3001 Cisna avenue, Kansas City, Kas." On the card he wrote:

"I guess I am gone for good. Come over and see me, Scott."

Horton said that his mother's name was different from his own because she had married twice. He said that he lived at the Kansas City, Kas., address when at home, but had only recently come from Omaha. He made no attempt to deny the act.

Jerry O'Connell, who made the arrest in sensational fashion, is known as the best sprinter in the precinct, if not on the force. He was complimented by Lieutenant Halligan on his capture.

Zondler lives with his family at 3220 East Twenty-third street.

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May 8, 1909

LOVER MADE HER SEE STARS.

But When Bertha Marlowe "Came
To" She Still Was For Him.

Unconscious and bleeding from a deep wound in her face, Bertha Marlowe, 19 years old, was found in a rooming house at 210 1/2 Independence avenue last night. When she was revived at the emergency hospital she told the police that she had been attacked by her lover w ho, she asserted, deserted from the army. The girl, who is a laundry worker, told an amazing story of woman fidelity.

She says she came to Kansas City several weeks ago after her sweet-heart had left the army. Her home is in Courtney, Mo., but she gave her parents no intimation of her plans, save that she intended to go to work here.

Since joining the man she ways she has given him money that she has earned in the laundry; money that she received from home, as well as going to police headquarters and baling him out when he was arrested a week ago.

Last night she says he was drinking. She sought him and found him. As a reward he battered her on the face with a beer bottle and other ways mistreated her.

With her face puffed up almost beyond recognition, the ugly cut marring what is not an unpretty face, and reciting the story of mistreatment and imposition, Lieutenant Al Ryan asked her if she would prosecute her sweetheart in the event of his capture.

"Yes, I'll prosecute," said the girl.

There was a moment's pause. "No, I'll take that back. I guess I won't prosecute! I still love him!"

Whereat Dr. Dr. Fred B. Kyger applied some more arniea to the face wound and told the young woman to lie down.

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April 15, 1909

PETERSON CASE IS
SENT TO THE JURY.

GIRL WIDOW ON STAND TELLS
STORY OF KILLING.

Mistreatment and Brutality by the
Dead Man Told by His
Slayer and Two of
Her Sisters.

The case of Rose Peterson, charged with murdering her husband, Fred L. Peterson, was given to the jury in the criminal court at 10 o'clock last night.

After having retired for an hour with no symptoms of a verdict, the jury went to the Ashland hotel for the night at 11 o'clock, under the eye of a deputy county marshal, with instructions from the court to return at 8:30 o'clock this morning.

The second day of the girl-wife's trial was almost monopolized by herself. From morning until 3 o'clock in the afternoon she sat in the witness chair. Most of the time she bowed her head and talked brokenly through the folds of a handkerchief, which she kept over her eyes. She seemed to be crying.

But part of the time, especially when she was illustrating how she tried to fire a shot to end her own life, the expression changed. The handkerchief came from her eyes. The blue eyes flashed out with the same determined gaze that must have met Peterson when she said to him, after they had been living together seven weeks and no marriage:

HER STORY FROM CHILDHOOD.

"You will have to marry me, or I will follow you to the end of the world and kill you."

She began at the beginning. It was the days when she was 16 that her story began. She began going with Peterson at that tender age, when few girls stand behind a press and feed sheets of paper into its maw during a whole tiring day. The two went to St. Joseph, because her parents objected to the attentions of Peterson on account of his youth. For a time they lived on the girl's wages. Peterson did not work then.

"At first Fred told me he could not find a preacher to marry us," said the girl. "Then, after seven weeks of living in St. Joseph, his mother came to take him home, saying we were too young to get married. I told him if he went back without marrying me I would follow him to the end of the world and kill him.

THOUGHT HE HAD A KNIFE.

"We were married and lived together in Kansas City for six months. I couldn't stand it to work all the time, and Fred struck me. He left me, and went away for two years.

"On December 22, the night of the shooting, we had gone to a dance together. Returning from the Eagles' clubhouse we got off a car at Eighteenth and Askew. We quarreled. He put his hand into this pocket and started towards me. I thought he had a knife. I took the revolver I carried out of my handbag, and tried to shoot. One hand would not pull the trigger. I put both hands to it and closed my eyes. When I opened them Fred was lying on the street.

TRIED TO SHOOT HERSELF.

And then Mrs. Peterson related how regret overcoming her, she had pointed the pistol at herself and had pulled the trigger. The bullet, she said, went through her hat, both brim and crown. She put on the hat and showed the jury.

Going through every motion of her attempt at self-destruction, the witness showed how she had tried to shoot. Bending her right arm, she placed an imaginary revolver twelve inches from her cheek and pulled an imaginary trigger. This time she used but one hand and was able to handle the firearm.

On cross-examination Mrs. Peterson was asked repeatedly why she had no powder burns on her face, and why the hat showed no scorching. She said her hair was slightly singed, adding that she could not have received any burns on her face. She said also that the hat was too far away to be scorched. The distance was about twelve inches.

BEATEN AND DRAGGED ABOUT.

Dr. H. H. Lane testified that Mrs. Peterson had come to him for medical advice. She was suffering, she said, from an ailment that might have had its beginning in a blow.

Agnes Donahue, a sister of Mrs. Peterson, said that one night she visited the Petersons.

"I saw Fred hit my sister, then put one hand over her mouth, the other under her chin, and drag her out of the room. When he went out of the house, she followed. I saw him strike her there. I ran back into the house. When I got home that night I told my mother what I had seen.

Margaret Parker, another sister of the defendant, said she had seen marks on her sister's body which indicated that she had been beaten.

Arguments for defense and prosecution were closed last night.

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April 15, 1909

MURDER AND SUICIDE
END SIEGE OF MONTHS.

ENRAGED ROSEDALE HUSBAND
KILLS WIFE AND HIMSELF.

Breaking Into Home in the Early
Morning, Frank Williams Slays
Sleeping Wife -- Shoots Him-
self Under Fire.

Although the members of the family of Frank Williams, a laborer, have been living at 65 Clinton street, Rosedale, Kas., in a state of siege of nearly three months, and have never during that time retired for the night without placing loaded revolvers beneath their pillows, Williams smashed in the door of his home at 4:40 o'clock yesterday morning, killed his wife, Addie Williams, as she lay sleeping, and committed suicide by sending a bullet into his own brains, after being fired upon by his stepson.

Because of brutal treatment of his stepchildren and his wife, Williams had often been arrested, and upon the last occasion his stepson, James Goodell, refused to allow him to return home. Mrs. Williams on February 11 brought suit for divorce, and from that time began to hear of threats by Williams to exterminate his family and commit suicide. He lived in a tent only a few rods from his home, and was often seen skulking around the house.

WIFE KILLED WHILE ASLEEP.

Mrs. Williams lived in a cottage of four rooms with her son, James Goodell, her daughter, Mrs. Emma Clute, her son-in-law, Oscar Clute, and a grandson, Johnnie Aldine, who is four years old. The pistols were kept under the pillows of three of the members of the household for use should the husband and stepfather attempt to carry out his threats.

Shortly before 5 o'clock yesterday morning James Goodell was awakened by the crash as Williams broke down the kitchen door with a battering ram. Realizing that it was his stepfather, bent upon a murderous mission, Goodell seized his revolver and rushed into his mother's room, which adjoined the kitchen. Before he was able to reach the room, Williams had fired twice, both bullets striking his wife in the forehead. Williams then ran into the kitchen and Goodell fired three shots at him, none taking effect.

The murderer then placed the pistol to his forehead and fired, the bullet splitting and making it appear as though he had been struck by two bullets. Clute and his wife, who occupied the front room, did not reach Mrs. Williams's side until after Williams had committed suicide. Mrs. Williams was killed instantly and probably was asleep when she was shot. The suicide lived for an hour after he shot himself but was unconscious until the end. The grandson was sleeping with hie grandmother and saw Williams fire the shots.

GRANDSON WITNESSED MURDER.

According to Goodell, not a word was spoken by any of the parties during the shooting. Afterwards the little grandson said he saw his grandfather shoot his grandmother. Last night Goodell said he had expected a killing for two months, but believed that it would be his stepfather who would be killed.

Mrs. Williams was 40 years old and her husband 51. They had been married nineteen years.

Coroner J. A.Davis of Kansas City, Kas., was notified soon after the shooting, and took charge of the bodies. He ordered them removed to the Gates undertaking establishment, where he will hold an autopsy this morning. In the afternoon an in quest will be held for the purpose of ascertaining all of the facts leading up to the tragedy.

"The fact that Williams's stepson, James Goodell, fired three s hots at him while he was retreating from the house," said Coroner Davis, "leaves some little doubt as to whether Williams fired the shot that ended his life or was killed by one of the three shots fired at him by Goodell. This will be easily determined at the post mortem examination, as one of the revolvers was of 38 and the other of 32-caliber."

After the bodies were removed from the Williams home, Dr. Davis locked the doors and took possession of the keys. It is probable the coroner's jury will visit the premises today. The surviving members of the Williams family spent the night at the home of neighbors. They were indignant over the coroner's action in locking up the house. Dr. Davis stated last night that he took possession of the premises because both heads of the household were dead, and he did not want any trouble to arise over the disposition of whatever property was there.

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April 14, 1909

THREATENED WITH A
KNIFE, WIFE'S PLEA.

CLAIMED ILL TREATMENT LED
TO KILLING OF PETERSON.

"I Shot Him Because He Slapped
Me," One Witness Testified Ac-
cused Woman Said -- Mother
Overcome in Court.
Rose Peterson, On Trial for the Murder of Her Husband.
MRS. ROSE PETERSON.

Facing a charge of murder in the second degree, Rose Peterson, 19 years old, was on trial before Judge Ralph Latshaw in the criminal court yesterday afternoon. Throughout the proceedings she did not once look at the twelve men who are to decide her fate. She is accused of killing her husband, Fred Peterson, on the night of December 22, by shooting him three times while the two were returning home from a dance.

The defendant was neatly gowned in a plain dress of black and wore a turban hat trimmed with black lace. A gold bracelet and two small rings were the only display of jewelry. With her left arm thrown over the back of a chair, Mrs. Peterson buried her face on her arm and sat in that position all afternoon. She constantly trembled and every now and then sobbed aloud when Frank M. Lowe, her attorney, mentioned the name of her husband.

CLAIMS LIFE WAS THREATENED.


Following I. B. Kimbrell, who in assisting the state in the prosecution, outlined what the state would attempt to prove. Mr. Lowe made a brief resume of what the defense would how in justification of the shooting. He said the defendant practically would be the only witness and would testify that she was induced to go to St. Joseph with Fred Peterson, who promised to marry her there, but that the ceremony was delayed for two months. The defense will endeavor to show that Rose Peterson, after her marriage, earned a living not only for herself, but supported her husband, and that he mistreated her; that he drew a knife and threatened to cut her on one occasion and continually threatened to inform her mother how they had lived in St. Joseph.


"If you do tell, you will never tell anything else," Attorney Lowe said the defendant would testify she replied.

Mrs. Sophia Peterson, mother of Fred Peterson, was the first witness for the state. Grief overcame her at the beginning of her examination.

GRIEF OVERCOMES MOTHER.

"I can't stay here," she sobbed, attempting to leave the witness stand.

Judge Latshaw allowed her to retire until she could control her feelings. When she again took the stand she testified that Fred was 20 years old when he was killed, and 18 when he was married. She said she followed the couple to St. Joseph and that Rose, her daughter-in-law, begged her to assist them in being married and that she did so. Mrs. Peterson also told the jury of the young wife coming to her home the night she shot her husband.

"I've shot Fred and if you want to see him alive you will have to hurry," Mrs. Peterson said Rose told her.

The state introduced a letter written by Rose Peterson to her husband about a month before the shooting occurred. It read, in part:

"It is a good thing you ran today. I would have got you, anyhow, if so many people had not been standing around. You stay away from me. Don't you go any place I am. I won't call for you or go to your home or shop anymore. If you want me to go on in that case I will. Fred, go away from Kansas City and don't you come back. I am not afraid of you any more. I will get you if it is ten years. I am willing for my freedom as you are."

SAID HE SLAPPED HER.

Frank Page, a motorman on a Jackson avenue car, testified that as his car passed the scene of the shooting he saw the body of Peterson. He stopped his car and with the conductor, R. E. Moore, went back. At first he testified he saw no one near, but later noticed the defendant climbing up to the sidewalk from the ditch at the side. She was not excited or crying, according to the witness. Asked what she said, he answered:

"She said, 'I shot him because he slapped me. There is the pistol.' She said his folks should be notified and told us where they lived."

"Oh Fred, don't die," the witness said Rose Peterson begged.

On cross-examination the witness admitted that in the preliminary hearing he testified that he had not heard her say her husband had slapped her. Other witnesses were Arthur Detalent, a tailor, who identified the clothes worn by Fred Peterson; Patrolman Patrick Coon, who arrested the defendant, and F. Frick, who was assistant prosecuting attorney at the time, and took the defendant's statement.

A witness for the state who failed to appear was Hal Jensen, a baker. He sent word that he had a batch of dough in process and could not leave it. Judge Latshaw refused to issue for him because he said he used that bread himself and did not want it ruined. The trial will be continued at 9 o'clock this morning.

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April 13, 1909

TIPPED HAT TO LYNCH'S WIFE.

For This Did Lynch Return and
Knock McDonald Down.

In the presence of 300 persons at Twelfth street and Grand avenue yesterday afternoon J. J. Lynch smashed John McDonald because the latter tipped his hat to Lynch's wife.

Lynch and his wife started to cross the street. McDonald, standing on the corner, lifted his hat and bowed.

"Do you know that man?" said Lynch.

"I do not," said Mrs. Lynch.

"Let's return and see if he does it again," said Lynch.

They returned and McDonald tipped his hat again and Lynch promptly knocked him down.

The fight waged fast and furious until a bystander separated the combatants.

Lynch and McDonald were arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace.

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April 13, 1909

FOR KILLING HER HUSBAND.

Rose Peterson Faces Charge of Mur-
der in Criminal Court.

Rose Peterson will go to trial this afternoon in the criminal court. She is charged with murder in the second degree for the killing of her husband December 22.

Fred Peterson, the dead man, and his wife, from whom he had been separated, went to a dance the night in question. They quarreled. At Eighteenth street and Agnes avenue, she shot him, then ran to 3810 East Nineteenth street, the home of Peterson's parents, and told them of the killing.

Peterson died almost instantly. As a defense the wife, who is 19 years old, says her husband struck her. A jury was empaneled yesterday.

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March 22, 1909

INJURED WIFE'S MOTHER
DOESN'T BLAME HUNTER.

MRS. SCANLON TELLS SON-IN-
LAW SHE IS HIS FRIEND.

Husband Declares Reform School
Was Suggested as Place for
Girl -- Tells Story of
Marital Troubles.

Charles Hunter, 19 years old, who shot and dangerously injured his wife, Myrtle Hunter, Friday morning, yesterday told visitors of the trouble that led up to his crime, and which is causing his detention at police headquarters. He said he loved his wife, but her waywardness caused the trouble.

When the boy and his child wife were married by Michael Ross, J. P., the mothers went to the court house with them to give consent. The girl's mother called at police headquarters yesterday afternoon to see Hunter. She told him she was still his friend and would do all she could for him.

"Even if Myrtle dies, Charles, we won't blame you," the prisoner was told.

The reform school was suggested by Mrs. Scanlon as the best place for the girl wife. Hunter informed a visitor yesterday. But he said he loved her and wanted to keep her at home if possible.

THREAT OF REFORM SCHOOL.

She left home one day and the mother announced her intention of having the police find the girl and sending her to reform school according to the story Hunter tells. Instead he asked her to wait and allow him to give her another trial. Hunter promised to find her and keep her at home.

After four days' search he declares he found her at a house on East Eighth street in company with another young woman and two men. While Hunter was in the room a rambler placed his arm around his wife and caressed her, which made him frantic with shame and anger. From there he took his wife home and she promised him she would remain away from her former haunts.

Then he says a clerk in a clothing store began to pay her attentions. Hunter said this clerk went to the Scanlon home last Thursday and asked for Myrtle. He made a second trip to the house in the afternoon. Mrs. Hunter opened the door, but refused to allow him to come in. Hunter said he was at the head of the stairs on the second floor and upon asking who the visitor was started down. The man left and his wife and Mrs. Scanlon prevented Hunter from following him.

WAS DRIVEN TO DESPERATION.

From the trials he had with his endeavors to keep his wife at home and the attempts by the clerk to take her away, Hunter claims that he was made desperate and driven mad. The climax was reached Wednesday night when the man is said to have collected a gang and announced his intention of going to the Hippodrome and going home with Mrs. Hunter.

Hunter and his wife were standing near the skating rink when the persistent admirer came up and spoke to the wife. She tried to avoid him and when she was unable to do so Hunter says he objected.

"I'll take her home if you have to go home in the undertaker's wagon," Hunter said he was told.

According to Hunter, his uncle, Claude Rider, 1728 Troost avenue, stepped up and said he was going to take a hand in the affair. As his uncle came up Hunter declares friends grabbed him and took him across the street while the other men fought. The police arrested them and took them to No. 4 police station where they were charged with disturbing the peace.

"I believe my mother-in-law was trying to arrange to send Myrtle to the reform school when I shot her," Hunter remarked.

He said he got the pistol at the Scanlon house and that it belonged to his wife's father. The condition of Mrs. Hunter was worse yesterday, but it was said that she still has a chance to recover.

Of late years Hunter has been following the skating rinks and in the summer has had charge of the rink at Fairmount park. At one time Hunter was an office boy for an afternoon newspaper and later became an advertising solicitor.

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March 20, 1909

GIRL WIFE SHOT BY
HER BOY HUSBAND.

SHORT WEDDED LIFE OF HUNT-
ERS HAD BLOODY END.

Madly Jealous Because She Went
With Another man, Charles
Hunter Wounds Wife at
Parents' Home.

The short wedded life of Charles Hunter, 19 years old, and his wife, Myrtle Hunter, 17 years old, came to a probably tragic end yesterday morning when in a quarrel, the boy-husband shot his wife with a derringer at the home of her parents, 1713 Madison avenue.

Mrs. Hunter lies at the general hospital, where the physicians say she will not live until morning. The husband gave himself up yesterday afternoon to the police, and is in the matron's room at police headquarters where he will not make a statement to the prosecuting attorney.

No one was at the home of the girl's parents except the young couple. They had been married since Christmas, but had not lived together for several months. On several occasions Hunter had visited his wife, but on each occasion the interview generally ended in a quarrel. About 11 o'clock yesterday morning, neighbors heard a shot, and a moment later Mrs. Hunter rushed out of the house and ran to the home of Mrs. Emma Hodder, 1715 Madison avenue. The front of her kimono was covered with blood.

"HE SHOT ME," SHE SAID.

"He shot me," she gasped, and sank to the floor. She carried the derringer in her hands. The Walnut street police ambulance was called, and after giving her emergency treatment, Dr. Ralph A. Shiras took her to the general hospital.

In the meantime Hunter rushed out of the house into the alley, and it was three hours before the police were able to locate him. At last Albert F. Drake, an attorney with offices in the Scarritt building, called police headquarters and said Charles Hunter was ready to give himself up. Charles McVey, desk sergeant, took Hunter from the Scarritt building to police headquarters. In the chief's office he was questioned by an assistant prosecuting attorney, but would sign no statement.

NEVER HAPPY TOGETHER.

"We haven't' been happy since our marriage," Hunter said later as he sat in a cell in the matron's room. His hands were folded across his breast, and he looked the picture of despair. He is small and looks a mere boy. "She has been going with other fellows," he continued, "and last Wednesday I saw her with someone. That made it more than I could bear. Last night I called on her and we quarreled. When we parted I walked the streets until morning, and in a sort of a trance I went back this morning.

"I don't know how I came to shoot her. I do know that I had a derringer, and that I must have aimed it at her. As soon as I shot I clasped her in my arms and then ran out.

I went down the street a short distance and then determined to go back. I backed out and then walked downtown. I went to Mr. Drake's office, who laughed when I told him that I had shot someone."

MOTHER FEARED FOR HER.

At the general hospital the youthful wife laid the blame on her husband.

"I'm going to die," she said faintly about the middle of the afternoon, "but I don't care very much. Charley and I have never been happy. He called this morning and commenced to quarrel. Suddenly he pulled out a pistol and shot me.

" 'Tell them that you did it,' he whispered as he took me in his arms and rushed out doors."

Mrs. Frank Scanlon, the mother of the girl, says that Hunter entered the house after she had left in the morning. She said that he had often threatened Myrtle, and that she was afraid to leave alone.

"I felt like something was going to happen when I left this morning," she said.

Hunter has been employed at the Hippodrome at odd times. He lives with an uncle, Claude Rider, at 1728 Troost avenue.

At the general hospital last night, the youthful wife lay on one of the beds in the surgical ward. She was suffering intense pain but still retained all of her faculties.

"Did they get Charley?" she asked. "Well I'm glad they did for he meant to shoot me."

Mrs. Scanlon, the girl's mother, was at her bedside all night.

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