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February 4, 1910

BABY'S CRY SAVED FATHER.

"Don't Send My Papa to Jail" Caused
Judge to Reverse Himself.

The kiss of his 4-year-old daughter, Ethel, yesterday saved Clarence Chronic from serving six months in the county jail for stealing chickens, a crime of which he had been found guilty in the criminal court. Judge Ralph S. Latshaw had passed sentence upon him and was putting on his coat and hat to leave the room. The little girl left her mother's side on her own impulse and threw both arms about her father's legs.

"Don't send him away," she pleaded, leveling a pair of innocent blue eyes at the judge. "Papa is my best friend."

The judge hesitated, scowled and was promptly won over. "A man who is loved by his family," he said after announcing his parole, "has his good traits."

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February 4, 1910

PATRONYMICS OF THE GREAT.

Sly Attempt of Wrongdoers to En-
list Official Sympathy.

"Did it ever occur to you," asked Inspector Edward P. Boyle last night, "how many men when arrested will take the name of the chief of police, the police judge or some other official with whom they have to come in contact? They hope to gain sympathy by that ruse. We got a man yesterday for horse stealing, and, by gosh, he gave the name of Edward P. Boyle, my full name. He is in the county jail now under my name, but when we looked him up in the National Bureau of Identification, we find that he has a goodly supply of names."

"Boyle" was arrested by L. C. Barber, a motorcycle policeman, on complaint of of the Kirby Transfer Company, Missouri and Grand avenues. It appears that he rented a horse and wagon from Kirby to do a huckster business and disposed of the rig.

"Boyle's" picture is in the book sent out by the National Bureau of Identification at Washington. He appears there under the name of James J. O'Neil, which, bu the way, is the name of a former chief of police of Chicago. He also bears the names of Edward Riley and Edward Connors, the last being believed by the police to be his. He has done time in the Rochester, N. Y., Industrial school, the Elmira, N. Y., reformatory, and two years in the Auburn, N. Y., penitentiary. He was five years in Elmira. The man of many "police" names also has done short terms elsewhere.

When Hugh C. Brady was police judge there hardly was a week that some bum did not give the name of "Hugh Brady, sir, yer honor."

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January 28, 1910

DRUMMER RECOVERS OUTFIT.

Detectives Looking for "Good Fel-
lows" Who Pawned It.

The detective department is looking for four "good fellows" who appropriated the drummer's outfit of William G. Viquesney, a member of H. O. Wheeler's band, during the automobile show in Convention hall. The date on which the drums, tambourines, whistle, etc., were supposed to have been taken was January 19. It was on that night that four well dressed white men, half intoxicated, took the instruments to a pawn broker on Grand avenue and realized about $25 on them. The more valuable of the collections were recovered by Mr. Viquesney yesterday.

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January 20, 1910

BABY ROUTS AN ARMED MAN.

But Child Could Not Save the
Family Diamonds.

John Church Ingles, 3 years old, son of Edward M. Ingles, 3830 Forest avenue, put to flight an armed burglar who invaded his nursery yesterday afternoon.

The man gained entrance by means of a skeleton key while Mrs. Ingles was visiting a neighbor. He made a search of the dining room and kitchen, taking two diamond bracelets and about $5 in cash, and was going up the stairs when John heard him.

The child called loudly for his mother. Mrs. Ingles came running from an adjoining house just in time to see the man dash out of the front door and across the lawn. He had a long bladed knife in his hand.

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January 12, 1910

ADAMS IDENTIFIED AS
K. C. MURDERER.

LOCAL MAN PICKS YOUTH AT
OMAHA AS SLAYER OF M.
A. SPANGLER.

Victims of Holdups Insist on
Identity -- Lads Will Be
Brought Here.

OMAHA, NEB., -- Jan. 11. -- John Adams and Earl Brown, two youthful alleged desperadoes who were arrested by Detective Mitchell and others on December 10 for alleged connection with a series of holdups and one shooting affair, are wanted at Kansas City on murder and robbery charges.

They were identified this morning by several victims who came here from Kansas City.

This morning three victims of recent holdups in Kansas City arrived. They were S. W. Spanglerr, Al Ackerman and Joe Shannon. With them were Detective Wilson, Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Norman Woodson and Cash Welch, proprietor of a Kansas City messenger service.

Ackerman identified Adams as the youth who killed Spangler's father November 23 while attempting to hold up the latter's saloon. they said Brown resembled the companion of Adams on that occasion.

SHOT OMAHA MAN.

On December 7, E. S. Ashcroft, of 1811 Chicago street, Omaha, was held up at Seventeenth and Chicago streets by two young men, who ordered him to throw up his hands. He refused, and started to run. they fired two shots at him, one taking affect in his right arm. Two nights later Marvin Kohn, a young business man, was held up by the same two youngsters, it is alleged, at Twenty-fifth avenue and Douglas streets, and robbed of $5. Next Day Detective Mitchell located Adams and Brown in a lodging house at Fifteenth and Capitol avenue and arrested them on suspicion. Kohn positively identified them and they were held to the district court on a charge of robbery under $500 bonds. They are now in the county jail.

When arrested the two young men were in bed, although it was then noon. In the sole of one of their shoes was secreted considerable money and a revolver was found wrapped in a shirt and hidden in a dresser drawer.

The murder in Kansas City with which Adams is charged occurred shortly after midnight November 23. M. A. Spangler was killed and his son, Samuel, had both arms broken. Ackerman was present at the time.

TO BE BROUGHT HERE.

Young Spangler and Ackerman were confronted at the city hall this morning by a group of ten prisoners, among whom were Adams and Brown. Ackerman immediately picked out Adams as the man who killed the elder Spangler. They also said that Brown looked like the other holdup.

Joe Shannon, a Kansas City politician, who was held up and robbed of his watch and $48 shortly before the murder, positively identified Brown as one of the desperadoes. He says the second man looked like Adams.

George H. McCray, a Kansas City business man, identified Adams and Brown as the two robbers who held him up and robbed him of $2. He says that Brown's mask dropped from his face and that he therefore got a good look at him.

Cash Welch, the messenger service man, identified the two young men as having worked for him during the robberies.

It is thought that Adams will be sent to Kansas City to answer a murder charge. Brown will probably be also sent there on a robbery charge, since the Missouri cases are even stronger than the Omaha ones.

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January 4, 1910

BURGLARS LEAVE A NOTE.

Thank Proprietor of Store For Not
Disturbing Them.

The burglars who visited the grocery store of W. B. Mumford at 2901 Main street, Sunday night, left a note addressed to the proprietor, pinned to his rifled cash drawer. It was written on a piece of wrapping paper and read:

"Dear sir, thank you very much for not disturbing us as we robbed your store, yours truly, M. E."

"M. E." and his friend got away with $3 in small change and about $16 worth of cigars.

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December 21, 1909

BURGLAR LEAVES HIS PICTURE.

Found in Band of Hat Dropped in
Escaping From Residence.

A picture of a burglar was found in the band of a hat he dropped in escaping when Mrs. Houser, 3820 Central street, met two men coming up stairs, after they had ransacked all the rooms on the ground floor, getting considerable valuable jewelry. The robbers had entered the back door by using a skeleton key.

Seeing Mrs. Houser, they escaped through a window and ran down the street. A grocery wagon driver saw them and took up the chase, being joined by a number of passersby. After a run of several blocks the robbers darted down an alley near Twenty-seventh street and Bellview avenue, and made their escape.

A portion of the jewelry was dropped by the thieves in their run. One of them in escaping dropped his hat which contained a small picture. Mrs. Houser identified it as one of the burglars. The police have been unable to find either man yet.

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Decmeber 14, 1909

FAKE MESSENGER ARRESTED.

Two Boys Get Year in Jail After
Delivering Bogus Telegram.

Early yesterday morning a traveling man at the Sexton hotel was awakened by a rap at the door. Answering the summons he opened the door to have a telegram thrust in his hand by a boy in the uniform of the Postal Telegraph Company.

"Prepare for the worst," it read, "an accident has happened to your two sons. Will wire particulars later. -- Dr. Brown."

The traveling man rushed into his clothes and raced in a cab to the Postal office. There he was told that no message had been received from "Dr. Brown."

Harry Norton, 18 years of age, a messenger boy, was arrested on the charge of embezzlement. Alvin Church, the boy who is said to have delivered the telegram, but who is not an employe of the telegraph company, was taken into custody later on the charge of petty larceny.

When arraigned in the criminal court they admitted their offense, and Judge Latshaw gave each one year in jail, the maximum sentence. The boys say they have worked the fake telegram graft in three cities. Norton obtained work at the Postal in order to get telegraph blanks.

Church, they said, would visit the different hotels and take names from the registers. Fake telegrams would be prepared, usually telling that the man's wife or child was seriously ill or dead. The telegrams would be marked "collect."

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December 8, 1909

BOYS IDENTIFIED AS
SPANGLER'S SLAYERS.

ROBBERS' VICTIMS RECOGNIZE
TRIO, ONE A BRIDEGROOM.

Elevator Operators, Ages 17, 19 and
21, in Downtown Dry Goods
Store, Are Arrested -- Youngest
Weeps, Others Indifferent.
Louis Dye, Ralph Clyne and Harry Shay, Suspects in the Spangler Murder.
LOUIS M. DYE, RALPH A. CLYNE AND HARRY SHAY,
Three Suspects Held by Police for Spangler Murder and Recent Holdups.
(Sketched at Police Headquarters Last Night.)

Working on the "boy bandit" theory, the police yesterday evening arrested three youths, two of whom were identified as having shot and killed M. A. Spangler and wounded Sam Spangler, his son, in their saloon at Twentieth street and Grand avenue on the morning of November 23. Their names are Louis Dye, 21 years old; Ralph Clyne, 19, and Harry Shay, 17. All are employed as elevator operators in a down town dry goods store. Dye is a bridegroom.

The arrest was made at 5:30 o'clock by Captain Walter Whitsett and Plain Clothes Officers E. M. Smith and E. L. Maston.

VICTIMS VISIT STORE.

The officers visited the store in company with several recent victims of holdups and rode in the elevators with the boys as they were at work. They were arrested and taken to police headquarters. Albert Ackerman, 502 1/2 Wyandotte street, the man who was in the Spangler saloon at the time of the shooting, was summoned and in Captain Whitsett's office identified Dye and Clyne as the two who shot up the saloon.

"That's the fellow that had the gun," Ackerman stated, pointing at Dye. "The other fellow was with him. Of course they are dressed differently now, but there is no mistaking their faces."

Four others who have been robbed recently visited police headquarters in the evening and in every case identified the boys.

DRUGGIST IDENTIFIES.

W. S. McCann, a druggist, living at 1405 East Tenth street, identified Dye and Clyne as the two men who attempted to rob his store at Twenty-seventh street and Agnes avenue on the night of November 25. He said they went in the store, and that Clyne pointed a revolver at his head while Dye attempted to rob the cash register. When he showed fight they fired four shots at him and ran. He thinks that Harry Shay is the man that was left outside as a look out.

Miss Stella Sweet, 529 Brooklyn avenue, and Mrs. C. L. Flaugh, 629 Brooklyn avenue, who were held up Thanksgiving night on the steps of the Admiral Boulevard Congregational church, identified all three of the boys as the robbers.

Edward C. Smith of the Smith-McCord-Townsend Dry Goods Company declared that the three boys had robbed him on Thirty-sixth street, between Locust and Cherry streets, on the night of December 3. They took a pocket book containing a Country Club bond for $100. At that time they had handkerchiefs tied over their faces, but Smith was sure that he recognized them.

SPANGLER TO SEE TRIO.

Captain Whitsett made no attempt to cross-examine the boys last night, but ordered them locked up until this morning when they will be confronted by further witnesses, the chief of whom will be Sam Spangler, who was discharged from the general hospital yesterday. The prosecutor's office was notified and representatives will be on hand today to take their statements.

"I am sure that we have got the right men this time," stated Captain Whitsett. "They answer the description of the gang that have been doing all the robbing lately, and I am sure that it was they that held up Joseph B. Shannon last week."

None of the boys would make any statement except that they were strangers in town, only having been working for a week. During the identification process both Dye and Clyne showed indifference, while the younger boy, Shay, broke down and cried.

Dye lives at 1921 Oakland, Shay at 1242 Broadway and Clyne at 1710 East Thirteenth street. Dye was married three weeks ago, shortly before the Spangler murder.

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December 2, 1909

CONFUSING HORSE DEAL.

Animal Twice Stolen, Alleged Thief
Almost Escapes Prosecution.

Charged with stealing the same horse twice, Henry Tobin, who was arrested yesterday on a warrant from Justice Theodore Remley's court, can be prosecuted only on a minor charge of obtaining money under false pretenses.

On November 22, Tobin is charged with having stolen a horse from E. T. McElroy and the following day selling it to W. E. Edwards.

Subsequently McElroy, who had searched the city for his horse, decided to offer a $5 reward for the animal's return. Tobin, it is charged, hearing of this, went to Edwards's stable, stole the horse he had sold only a few days before, returned it to McElroy and was given the $5 reward.

When Tobin was arrested yesterday, McElroy refused to prosecute. But as the stolen horse which had been sold to Edwards did not belong to the latter, Edwards cannot prosecute for horse stealing. The only charge remaining is that of obtaining money under false pretenses.

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November 29, 1909

"JOE" SHANNON IS HELD UP.

Lawyer-Politician, Robbed of $48
and Watch in Home Ward, Saves
$250 by Clever Trick.

Joseph B. Shannon, lawyer and politician, was held up about 2:30 o'clock Sunday morning on Fifteenth street between Holmes and Charlotte streets, in his home ward, by three young men who wore dark clothing and stiff hats, and had handkerchiefs tied over their faces.

Mr. Shannon was relieved of $48 in money and a gold watch and would have suffered a heavier loss had it not been for his presence of mind. When he first realized that he was about to become a victim of hold-up men he took a roll of bills containing $250 out of his pocket and dropped it on the pavement. The $48 and his watch remained in his pocket, and of course became the property of the highwaymen.

Mr. Shannon says that one of the robbers "covered" him with a gun while the other two searched him and after taking what valuables they could find they fled down an adjacent alley. Later Mr. Shannon returned to the scene of the robbery and recovered the $250 he had dropped.

He immediately reported the matter to the police, who are trying to locate the perpetrators.

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November 29, 1909

JAYHAWK YELL EFFECTIVE.

Early Morning Cheer of Visiting
Collegian Scares Thieves Away.

Stripped of his Kansas colors, his voice gone, money gone, Charles Stewart, a rooter for the Jayhawkers last Thursday afternoon, headed himself to his hotel at Eighth and Locust streets. It was 2:30 a. m. Friday, when he entered the lower hallway and he stopped to cogitate. He tried to talk the defeat over with himself and found his voice weak; he felt deep into his pockets and found no consolation.

Thinking it all over, Stewart said to himself, "Well I have just one more yell left in me for Kansas, poor old defeated Kansas, and now that I am safe in the hotel and not liable to be bombarded by the Missouri bunch, I am going to give it right here in the hallway."

Bracing himself against the wall he threw back his head and let go "Rock Chalk, Jay Hawk, K. U. ---Kansas!" Then he repeated it, al a head yeller style, real fast.

Being in an inclosed hallway he was surprised at the racket he made. He liked it for it made him believe he had located his lost voice. So he gave the yell again, louder than ever, and went on to his room and to bed.

"You have come here late many times," said the proprietress, the next morning, when Stewart appeared, "both late and early, and you have made divers and sundry noises on your way to your room, but this is the first time your noise has served a valuable purpose."

"What's the matter, cause some Missouri man to have a fit in his sleep?" asked Stewart.

"No," she replied, "better than that for the house. Mr. Blank and his wife room just off the hall near where you stood. Well, your yelling awoke them. Just as Mr. Blank raised up in bed to locate the noise he saw a man entering his bed room window from the porch. Rather the man was in the act of entering, but when you cut loose the second time he turned about and made frantic efforts to get out. He did get out and there was another burglar on the porch. Mr. Blank says he and his wife sleep soundly and certainly would have been robbed of all valuables in the room if it hadn't been for you waking them and scaring away the thieves.

"That's good," replied Stewart, "glad my voice was worth something. That's all I had left after the game and that was worth anything and I nearly lost that."

"But I think your noise did more," continued the woman. "For some time before you came I had been lying half asleep and imagined I could hear some one moving furniture. You know I have just finished furnishing some rooms in the new part back there. I went back to investigate and found a window out in the bathroom and all the new furniture piled near the door. It appeared to have been the intention to make a clean-up here, but your 'Rock Hawk, Jay Chalk," or whatever it is, came at a most opportune time."

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November 27, 1909

MANY CITIES ASK FOR
KANSAS CITY PRISONER.

Vagrant a Menace at Workhouse,
Board Member Says, Teaching the
Boys How to Work "Safe" Games.

The police of several cities are anxious to get possession of E. Burgess, now serving a year's sentence here on a technical charge of vagrancy, according to L. A. Halbert, secretary of the board of pardons and paroles.

Burgess was accused originally of inducing the matron of the Nettleton home to marry him, it being alleged that he had a wife in another city. He is said to have posed as a wealthy man. While awaiting "a large remittance," his new wife was supporting him, having paid for the marriage license and ceremony.

Mrs. Burgess heard that her husband proposed to other women after the marriage, and previously had proposed to a dozen or more. She caused his arrest. The first wife did not appear so he was arraigned in the municipal court as a vagrant and fined $500.

A letter from the chief of police at Hudson, Wis., told of a man supposed to be Burgess, who had a wife there. She supported him for a long time after marriage while he gambled and was engaged in a general confidence business.

The chief of police of Ottumwa, Ia., said Burgess is wanted there on a charge of passing worthless checks and "beating" hotels. He said the Cedar Rapids, Ia., police want Burgess on the same charge.

The police of Oklahoma City, Ok., and El Paso, Tex., tell of similar accusations there. The Hudson, Wis., chief says Burgess "is an all round crook and confidence man."

"He has been a menace to the younger prisoners here in the workhouse," said Jacob Billikopf, a member of the board, at the weekly meeting yesterday. "He frequently relates his experiences and tells how easy it is to separate people from their spare change and how to work the game so as to keep out of prison."

"I would be willing to turn Burgess over the the authorities of any city where it plainly could be shown that they had a case against him which would send him over the road," said President William Volker. "If any of these places has a direct charge against Burgess, I will be glad to turn him over, but I don't want to take any chances of turning loose a dangerous man on the public again. Let him remain here for the balance of his sentence, nine months, and notify the places where he is wanted when he is to be released."

An effort is to be made, through the Hudson, Wis., police, to induce the alleged original Mrs. Burgess to come here and prosecute the man for bigamy.

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November 25, 1909

TO BE SHOWN WIFE'S DIARY.

Detective Joyce Goes After Earl
Deaton, Arrested in Omaha.

Detective Harry Joyce left yesterday morning for Omaha, with extradition papers for Earl Deaton, alias Earl Elbridge, charged with robbing Mrs. James W. Couch, 1711 1/2 Grand avenue, of $90 some weeks ago. Deaton left a diary in the Couch home that had been kept by his wife, Edna Deaton, in which it is alleged that he has been concerned in crimes all over the country. Deaton is expected to arrive in Kansas City tomorrow.

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November 25, 1909

TO WATCH PICKPOCKETS.

Special Details of Police Will Pro-
tect Football Crowds.

Extra precautions are being taken by the police department for rounding up the many pickpockets and sneak thieves attracted to Kansas City in the hope of reaping a harvest from today's football crowds. An extra detail of plain clothes men will be on duty at the football grounds besides uniformed officers, and after the game will be detailed to downtown work until late at night.

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November 23, 1909

MIDNIGHT ROBBER
KILLS SALOON MAN.

M. A. SPANGLER MURDERED BE-
HIND HIS OWN BAR.

Drops Dead With Bullet Through
Heart -- Son Shot in Pistol Duel
With His Father's
Slayer.

While trying to grasp the revolver of one of two robbers who "stuck up" his saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue at 12:45 this morning, M. A. Spangler was shot across the bar and instantly killed.

In a pistol duel with his father's murderer, Sam Spangler was shot through both arms.

He believes he shot the robber. The latter and his companion escaped.

The murder and holdup occurred in Spangler's saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue about 12:45.

The Spanglers were getting ready to close the saloon for the night. Sam Spangler had removed the cash from the register and was reading the totals from the detail adder, while the father was writing them on a card.

There were two men in the saloon, Al Ackerman, a friend of the Spangler family, and an old man whose identity is not known. Both were seated at tables in front of the bar.

SHOT THROUGH THE HEART.

At this juncture two men, one short and heavy set and the other tall and thin, entered the saloon. They were roughly dressed, and sauntered up about the middle of the room. The tall man walked as far as the big cannon stove at the rear of the bar, but the short man walked up to a point in front of Spangler.

Whipping out a revolver, the short man flourished it and commanded Ackerman and the old man, "Hands up and line up alongside the bar every one of you."

Ackerman and the old man and young Spangler lifted their hands in a hurry to obey the order. Not so old man Spangler. He had been in the street lunch stand business for years and he was not to be bluffed by the sight of a gun.

"Throw up your hands quick," was the second command, this time directed to Mr. Spangler. The latter evidently had been gauging the distance across the bar. Instead of throwing up his hands he lunged forward, grasping for the revolver. He missed the gun and that instant the robber pulled the trigger.

"Oh!" Spangler cried, and collapsed.

Another shot was fired at him, but it missed. The first one had passed through his heart.

SON TRIED TO AVENGE HIM.

Sam Spangler at the first shot pulled open a drawer in the back bar and grabbed a huge navy revolver. Turning around he faced the robber, and began firing. Both emptied their revolvers, the robber retreating toward the front door as he fired his last shot. Meanwhile the tall, thin robber, who had gotten half way behind the bar, turned and fled toward the rear, when young Spangler started shooting. He escaped through a rear door.

Ackerman, who had been standing near the front of the saloon, ran out of the door at the first shot. When the shooting inside ceased he started back but was met by the robber with the revolver who pressed it against his abdomen.

"Get out of my way before I kill you," cried the robber.

Ackerman got out of the way, and returning to the saloon asked for the big revolver.

Young Spangler put a shell in it by this time and Ackerman started after the robber. He chased him to McGee street and half way down to Twenty-first street pulling the trigger several times on the shell, which proved defective and failed to explode.

When he returned to the saloon, he found Sam Spangler bending over the body of his father. He had been shot in both arms and his blood was mingling with that of his father's.

WHO GOT THE MONEY?

It could not be positively ascertained this morning whether the robber got the money which Spangler had taken from the cash register and placed in a glass. During the excitement it is believed that the money was replaced in the register. This was locked and the keys were taken in charge by the police. The sum is said to have been in the neighborhood of $50.

A riot call was sent to No. 4 police station and a squad of police under Sergeant H. L. Goode drove to the saloon. Young Spangler was taken to the general hospital, where his injuries were dressed.

The body of Mr. Spangler was taken to the Stewart undertaking establishment.

M. A. Spangler was about 50 years old. He lived with his family at No. 1322 1/2 Wyandotte street. He leaves a widow and two sons, Sam and William, both grown. The widow and some relatives are in Glasgow, Mo. A telegram was sent to them immediately after the shooting.

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November 16, 1909

NOISE SAVES SILVERWARE.

Burglar One Who Had Been Wait-
ing on Porch With Headache.

The noise of a bureau drawer being opened awakened Dr. Frances Henry about 3 o'clock yesterday morning in her home, 2203 Brooklyn avenue. She hurried down stairs just in time to see a man running down the hall and escape through the open door.

An examination of the bureau showed that nothing had been taken, although $100 worth of silver plate would have been gone had not Dr. Henry been awakened.

She had noticed the man earlier in the evening on the front porch when she returned from the University hospital, where she had attended a patient.

"I want to see a doctor," the man apologized. "My head hurts me."

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November 16, 1909

MARCHED HIM TO STATION.

Employer Surprised Employe Dis-
posing of Ham and Bacon.

George Teck, head of the firm of Teck, Waterman & Co., 411 Delaware street, wholesale dealers in cured meats, acted as his own detective and yesterday morning caused the arrest of an employe of the firm on a charge of larceny.

For some time past Teck has been missing hams and sides of bacon from the stock. Early yesterday morning, according to his statement at police headquarters, he caught the man trying to dispose of a twelve-pound ham and a side of bacon.

Taking him into custody, Teck marched him to headquarters and turned him over to the police.

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November 15, 1909

CRIES OF MURDER FROM
A HACK THAT VANISHED.

Patrolman's Shots Fail to Stop Car-
riage on Main Street - Near Po-
lice Headquarters.

Cries of murder and help, from an owl hack, and a chase by the police, with shots fired at the jehu of the four-wheeler, caused considerable excitement ont he streets of the downtown district early yesterday morning, and has given the police a mystery outrivaling that famous old query as to "Who hit Billy Patterson?"

The trouble started about 3 o'clock when police headquarters was disturbed by cries apparently of a woman for help. The shrieks were punctuated by a bass voice yelling murder. A half dozen police and other attaches dashed from the station to the street and as they reached the sidewalk a cab driven at breakneck speed went south on Main street.

Patrolman Kartman opened fire when no attention was paid to the command to halt, but the officers were soon outdistanced by the carriage. A general alarm was sent out to various stations to watch for the driver, his vehicle and its occupants, but no trace has been found.

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November 9, 1909

While the Police Drill in Convention Hall...
Police Drilling in Convention Hall

Crime Runs Rampant Kansas City

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November 4, 1909

HEADS BOW, PENITENT STEALS.

New "Mourner" Asks for Prayer,
Grabs Offering and Runs.

The Gospel Mission on Fourth street opposite police headquarters had conducted a successful service last night. The offering had been taken and the presiding elder had called all repentant sinners forward to testify. One young man, in particular, was vehement in his protestations of conversion to a better life.

"Brothers, I was a drunkard -- yes, at one time I was a thief, but all that is changed now, and I desire your prayers for my complete redemption."

The congregation bowed their heads in prayer and while they were so occupied the hand of the professed penitent slowly moved across the wooden table until it reached a pocket book which contained the nightly offering of the score of faithful.

In a flash it had gone, and with a laugh the man ran down the aisle and out into the street.

The police department was notified by Mrs. I. Hanson, 1406 Grand avenue, the owner of the pocket book. It contained about $5.

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November 3, 1909

KANSAS CITY TRIO CONVICTED.

Caught in Nashville, Tenn., After
Following Taft From West.

"Fine work," commented Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle yesterday when he read a communication from the police department of Nashville, Tenn., stating that Arthur Goldblatt, Samuel Kemp and Henry Baker had received penitentiary sentences.

Goldblatt, known as "Little Artie," Kemp, alias "Big Sammy," and "Kansas City" Baker, when working together, constituted the most adept gang of pickpockets in the country.

All three were born and raised in Kansas City. They made their home town a base for their operations. Leaving Kansas City, they would separate and meet in an appointed town.

The Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition was their recent field of operation and from there they followed President Taft part way on his tour. They were caught red handed in a crowd in Nashville, Tenn., and a speedy conviction was obtained. Goldblatt received a sentence of three years in the penitentiary and his companions each went to the workhouse for a year.

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November 2, 1909

SUFFERS SO SHE CAN
LIVE WITH A THIEF.

WOMAN'S DIARY TELLS OF
HARDSHIPS AND ROBBERIES.

Pair Disappear From Couch Hotel,
Where They Had Been Befriend-
ed, Taking New Clothes
and $90 in Money.

A diary, which had been written in plaintive words the sufferings of a woman who loved well, but not wisely, is the only memento Mrs. J. W. Couch, proprietress of the Couch hotel, 1711 1/2 Grand avenue, has of Early Elbridge and his wife, Edna, whom she befriended when they needed help, and who repaid her by robbing her.

There are only two dates in the diary, which was discovered after the couple had departed from the hotel, where Mrs. Couch had given them employment, after hearing their pitiful tale of destitution. They took with them a lot of wearing apparel and $90 in money, belonging to Mrs. Couch.

The writing reveals Bill Sykes and Nancy in real life; a life of theft on the part of one, hunger and suffering on the part of the other, and yet the woman evidently is contented with the love which she seems to think the man holds for her.

The first date is April 18, and the last July 1. In one instance only is it possible to tell where the events recorded occur.

The opening paragraph reads:

"I am sorry to leave this town, but Earl thought we had better get out. As the train started I said to Earl: "We had better get off and go back, so that woman won't suspect we stole her $20," but just then the train started and Earl said it was too late."

HAD BEEN IN ST. JOSEPH.

The next was:

"We have been in St. Joseph now three months, the longest we have been anywhere. Earl split a man's head with a meat cleaver today, though, and I suppose we will have to go away for good."

The next showed some of the hardships she endured with the man she loved and was as follows:

"We haven't had any food for twenty-four hours, and we are nearly starved. We slept last night in an orchard, not being able to get bed or shelter."

Evidently there had been a silver lining to the black clouds of the last paragraph for the next one read:

"Earl is better to me every day. I love him so much. He treats me better than I deserve, I know."

Misfortune and despondency were evidently again knocking at her heart when she wrote the next one:

"I wonder what that woman, Mary, will think of us, we left so abruptly last night. I guess we will always be on the move."

The next one evidenced that the hard luck of the couple was continuing:

"Arrived in the big city yesterday, dead broke and awfully hungry. This is another starving period. If we only could get a job."

STILL LOVES THIEF.

The last paragraph was the most important from a police standpoint. It shows that the hardships have in no wise cooled the ardor of her affections for the man who caused it all. It reads:

"Earl is five feet, eight inches in height and weighs about 145 pounds. He has dark hair and eyes. My love for him grows every day. Isn't it funny we are both 21 years old and there is only a few days difference in our ages."

Mrs. Couch informed the police that the couple came to her house a week ago and related a pitiful tale of suffering. She took them in, nad they had since been working around the place in return for their board.

Saturday night when Mrs. Couch left the couple at home to go to market, they informed her they were going right to bed, and she need not awaken them on her return. Sunday morning when Mrs. Couch went to call them she discovered two dummies, made of old clothes, in the bed.

Further investigation showed that $90 had been taken, together with Mr. Couch's best suit of clothes and Mrs. Couch's entire new fall outfit including shoes, hat, lingerie, etc. Mrs. Couch notified her husband, who was in Baldwin, Kas., and he will arrive here this morning.

Mrs. Couch also learned that Elbridge had failed to pay $15, with which she had entrusted him, to a butcher and furniture dealer to whom she owed some money.

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October 30, 1909

WILSON CONFESSES;
TELLS OF ROBBERY.

ENTERED SCALES OFFICE ON
NIGHT OF SEPTEMBER 8.

Prisoner, Who Wrote Threatening
Letters to R. A. Long, Will Be
Turned Over to Federal
Authorities Today.

After "sweating" Thaddeus S. Wilson all day yesterday, E. P. Boyle, inspector of detectives, finally obtained a confession from the young man last night in which Wilson admitted that he had not only sent the two threatening letters to R. A. Long on Thursday but also had broken into the office of the Moneyweight Scale Company, 730 Delaware street, about three months ago.

"I might as well own up," he admitted. "You have the goods on me."

His signed statement offered the confession not only to sending threatening letters to R. A. Long, but also of the burglary of checks and money from the offices of the Moneyweight Scale Company on the night of September 8.

Although state law is drastic in its punishment of blackmailers, and the letter in which $5,000 is demanded is clearly within that class, Inspector of Detectives Edward Boyle announced last night that Wilson would be turned over to the federal authorities today.

The United States punishes with unusual severity persons who attempt to use the mails to defraud, and in Wilson's case there is no avenue of escape. Wilson will be taken in charge by the postoffice inspector.

Close questioning of Wilson yesterday afternoon at police headquarters by Inspector Boyle elicited the information that R. A. Long was not the only Kansas City man from whom he had demanded money.

Lawrence M. Jones was requested to send $1,000 to the young man September 6, but had paid no attention to the matter.

LIGHT ON POLICE METHODS.

When Wilson first came to Kansas City three months ago, he secured employment with the scale company. A few days later the place was robbed. Among the papers taken from the safe was $75 in currency. A couple of days following the robbery, Mr. Shomo of the Moneyweight Scale Company received an anonymous letter signed "C. O. D. 1239." A promissory note was also enclosed in which "C. O. D." intends to pay back the $75. The letter follows:

"KANSAS CITY, MO., September, 1909.
"Dear Sir: You will please find inclosed certain papers that are perhaps of value to you, also note covering the amount with interest computed that looks good to me. Thanks, humbly, C. O. D. 1239.
"P. S. -- Better send to Wichita and tell Mr. Reade to send another money order.
"P. S. 2 -- Say while I was sitting there in that big chair a bluecoat and a graycoat came along, saw an open window and began to talk about it. Yes, they wondered if any one was in there. I began to think it was a hell of a place for me. But I had to sit there and take it. Come very near offering them a ten spot to go on away and leave me alone. Then I heard one of them say to the other one:

" 'Crawl in through that window and see what's wrong inside.'

"Things getting hotter for me.

" 'Me?' says the bluecoat. 'Oh, no.'

"If I had been out in the country I'd laughed out. Come I couldn't. Well, they argued which it should be to go in. Well, they finally said they would send the janitor.

" 'No, no, no! I'm not on the police force yet,' says he. Then there was some more arguing. Well, they came back and looked at the crack in the window with more argument. I was afraid I would have to give up that ten spot. They said they would wait and see. I don't know where they waited. I didn't see them when I made my exit.

"I will close. I would like to tell you some more about those cops. They're true bloods, all right. Say, you will get my check someday. C."

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October 29, 1909

TRIES TO BLACKMAIL
R. A. LONG FOR $5,000.

LETTERS TO MULTIMILLIONAIRE
DEMAND THIS AMOUNT.

Is Arrested Just as He Is Given
Decoy Package.

THADDEUS SEBASTIAN WILSON.
Accused of Writing Letter to R. A. Long Demanding $5,000 Under Thread Against His Home.

A bungling attempt to "black hand" R. A. Long out of $5,000 resulted in the arrest of a man at the general delivery window of the postoffice at 8:30 o'clock last night, just as he had been handed a decoy package, supposed to contain the money demanded.

At police headquarters the prisoner gave the name Thaddeus Sebastian Wilson, who recently came to Kansas City from Garnett, Kas. He denied writing letters to Mr. Long asking for money, and at the same time making a veiled threat. Wilson was placaed in the holdover to be questioned later. Inspector E. P. Boyle said he had reason to believe that he had the right man.

When Mr. Long went to his office in the R. A. Long building yesterday morning, he found this letter on his desk, addressed and written in long hand, on plain stationary:

"Kansas City, Mo., Oct. 27.
"Mr. R. A. Long.
"Dear Sir: -- Say, old man, I am broke, and want some money. I have to help take care of my mother and sister. You know times are pretty hard on poor people and it is pretty stiff.

"I am trying to give my sister an education. If I had some money I would buy a little store for my mother, and I would work. We could make and save money that way.

"Now, I have to have some money, and I am not going to knock some poor devil down to get it. I want you to send me $5,000 at once. I don't want you to give it to me. I will pay it all back with interest.

"You get up $5,000 in bills of different kind and wrap 'em in a package like goods from the store. Wrap them up good so they won't be tore open. Then you mail it like store goods. It will come all right.

MADE NO THREATS.

"Now I must have the money. I want to be honest so I ask you for it. No guess work or foolin, nothin but the dow will do. Send it today. Sure now. Say I've made n o threats. I have not been foolin either. I have lots of friends that will stand by me.

"You send me $5,000.00 as soon as possible today, as I told you konw. I guess you understand. Now get busy if you want us both to prosper. You needent say nothing to anyboydy, either. For the love of your home send that money as soon as you get this. This is more important. Let your work go.

"Waiting for results. O. B. VANDELLER.
"Gen. Delivery."

Mr. Long read the letter over, then tossed it to his secretary to make a copy. He did not give it a second thought.

R. A. LONG.

But a second letter was received at 4 o'clock in the afternoon. This was more insistent. The writer in his first letter had apparently feigned illiteracy, but in the second the language was pointed and written in the best of style. There were none of the misspelled words that had appeared in the first.

SECOND MORE INSISTENT.

It read:

"Kansas City, Mo., October 27, 1909.
"Dear Sir -- Now the best, cheapest and healthiest, and the most satisfacaotry way for you to do is to send along that $5000. No fooling goes much longer. You'll get it all back within three years. Now mind, $5,000 in the postoffice by tonight. Quicker the better; cheaper and healthier way is to send it along. I'll send you a note duly signed for the amount.
"Earnestly, O. B. Vandaller.
"Gen. Del.
"P. S. -- You send a letter also.

Mr. Long notified the police about 4 o'clock and Detectives Jo Keshlear and J. J. McGraw were assigned to watch the postoffce.

NERVOUS IN POSTOFFICE.

When Wilson went into the postoffice he appeared very nervous. He looked around the rotunda before he took courage to step up to the general delivery window. Finally he edged in among a small crowd of peole and in time reached the window. He went into his pocket and from a notebook handed a sheet of paper to the man at the window.

By that time McGraw and Keshlear knew he was the man after the Long decoy package. Before the clerk could hand it to him, however, Keshlear arrested Wilson. He made no resistance, but became more nervous. The slip of paper, which he handed the clerk and the window has been taken from a loose leaf note book in Wilson's pocket. On it was written, in identically the same hand as that of the Long letters:

"Give man my mail. -O. B. Vandeller."

The package which Wilson would have received, had he been given time, was a twelve-ounce bottle in a cigar box. The package was wrapped in newspapers with plain wapping paper on the outside.

To Inspector Boyle Wilson denied that he had written a letter demanding $5,000. Just a brief statement was taken down in shorthand at first, and the prisoner, who gave his name as Thaddeus Sebastian Wilson, was locked up to think the matter over.

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October 27, 1909

HUNT MISSING MAILBAGS.

Carrier's Rig Disappears While His
Back Is Turned in Dark.

Raffles, who was reported dead some years by an English author named Hornung, reappeared in a rather clever role at 11 o'clock last night at Twenty-third street and Woodland avenue. The victim this time was the United States directly and Samuel E. Robinson, mail collector No. 59, indirectly, if a certain horse and wagon does not turn up tied to a water plug somewhere, as is confidently expected by the police.

Robinson had driven considerably past a mail box at the Twenty-third street corner. He did not like the idea of turning his wagon around to go back when it was only a few rods and his limbs were aching for the exercise, so he tied his faithful animal to a pole and did the trick on foot.

Coming back in a few minutes he found the wagon and horse had disappeared, as two bags of first class mail matter, one package of second class and one parcel which might have contained a sable overcoat went with the rig. The robbery was deemed of enough importance to stir up things at the postoffice last night.

Several government detectives and numerous police officers were detailed to hunt for the missing bags.

At an early hour this morning no trace of the resurrected Raffles and his booty had been discovered.

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October 25, 1909

BURGLAR HAS SWEET TOOTH.

Patrolmen Find Several Jars of
Home Made Jam Opened in Alley.

A sweet-toothed burglar visited the home of Mrs. Earl Boyer, 4031 Flora avenue, last night. Mrs. Boyer was alone in the house, when she heard someone moving in the cellar. She notified the police.

When the patrolmen arrived they discovered that a case of home-made jams had been moved out into the alley and several jars opened and sampled.

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October 20, 1909

YELLS SAVE HIS VALUABLES.

Burglar Flees After Commanding
Real Estate Man to Keep Quiet.

A beam of light from an electric torch shining in his eyes awoke E. A. Norris of 3427 Campbell street, real estate dealer and formerly county assessor, from a dreamless sleep early yesterday morning.

Sitting up in bed, Norris looked down the barrel of a big revolver, backed by a rough command to "lay down and keep quiet."

A series of yells on the part of Norris for the police were sucessful in putting the intruder to flight before he had a chance to make away with anything of value.

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October 17, 1909

PICKPOCKET SUSPECTS HELD.

Man and Woman Thought to Be No-
torious Professionals.

A man and a woman, suspected of being professional pickpockets wanted in many other cities of the country, were arrested yesterday afternoon in the corridor of the First National bank on a charge of attempting to rob B. T. Hawkins, a clerk at the Helping Hand institute, who had just drawn $144 from his savings account.

The two, it is said, have been noticed for several days in the bank building, where they generally loitered without any apparent object in view. Persons who drew their money from the bank, it is charged, were "crowded" by the couple who, if opportunity offered, picked the pockets of their victims. In the opinion of Edward Boyle, inspector of detectives, the two are among the best at their trade in the country. They will be tried in the municipal court on Monday.

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October 15, 1909

JACK, THE FOLLOWER,
SCARES THE WOMEN.

PURSUES MISS ESTELLA STORIE
TO HER HOME.

Walks Right in and Turns Around
When She Screams and Walks
Right Out Again -- Has Fol-
lowed Others.

Closely followed by a stranger who did not halt when she reached her home but pursued her into the hall when she opened the door, Miss Estella Storie, daughter of Thomas C. Storie, a contractor, who lives at 2443 Wabash avenue, aroused the family last night with her frightened cries. The man, without showing much alarm, deliberately walked out and disappeared in the darkness as Mr. Storie came bounding down the stairs.

The girl, her nerves unstrung, sank into a chair and was hardly able to talk for several minutes. She had alighted from a Prospect avenue car at Howard avenue and had started to walk west one block to Wabash and then north to her home. She noticed that a man stepped out of the shadows and followed her as she hastened down Howard avenue.

"He didn't hurry," the girl said, "just walked in that same even pace that frightened me more than if he had said something. But I knew that he was gaining on me and by the time I reached the walk that led up to the house he could have grabbed me.

"He didn't turn as I expected, but followed me right up the walk and entered the house behind me. Then I screamed for help. When I screamed, he deliberately walked out without even closing the door."

Mr. Storie called up the Flora avenue police station at once and Sergeant John Duer dispatched Patrolman John C. Riner to the Storie home. He investigated the premises carefully but there was no trace of the stranger.

Other cases of men following women have been reported at the Flora avenue police station. Last week a woman who lives near Twenty-third and Olive street reported to the police that a man followed her but she was unwilling to give her name as she wished to avoid notoriety. The description of the man she gave the police tallied with the stranger who followed Miss Storie last night. It is believed that the one man has been responsible for the scares given to the women of the district.

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October 9, 1909

IS THIS FAINTING BERTHA?

Young Woman Robs a Sympathetic
Kansan at Depot.

A young woman who faints in a crowd, falls in the arms of one of the gallant sex, and then relieves him of his pocketbook for his pains, is operating in Kansas City. The police recall the time when "Fainting Bertha" worked the same ruse, and though it was five or six years ago when she was sent out of the city, they believe she has returned.

William Sheppard, cashier of the National Bank of Olathe, Kas., was the victim Thursday night in the Union depot. He was standing near one of the ticket windows when he noticed that a young woman standing near showed signs of illness. She began to sway and would have fallen to the floor had not the chivalrous cashier caught her in h is strong arms. He carried her to the fresh air out on Union avenue, when she revived, thanked him, and disappeared up the street.

When Sheppard went inside he found that he had lost $50 in currency, a draft for $210, and three railway tickets to Olathe. He reported the matter to police.

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September 30, 1909

HAD DYNAMITE ON STREET CAR.

Four Months in County Jail
for Two Men.

Four months in the county jail was the punishment meted out yesterday afternoon by J. J. Shepard, justice of the peace, to Edward Sanford and Joseph Monroe, charged with carrying dynamite upon a street car.

The two men were arrested the night of August 26 by Patrolman E. C. Kaiser and S. D. Harrison of the Westport police station. A valise carried by one of them when searched was found to contain a quantity of dynamite. Sanford also carried a double barreled derringer. To Lieutenant O. T. Wofford the defendant Sanford said they were to blow up a scab job.

They were defended by Bert Kimbrell. Thomas Higgs, assistant prosecuting attorney, represented the state.

Sanford was tried on a charge of carrying a concealed weapon and held to the criminal court.

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September 27, 1909

PIE THIS BURGLAR'S UNDOING.

Stopped to Eat After Getting Jewel-
ry and Was Detected.

A home made custard pie may be the innocent cause of William Miller spending several years in the Kansas penitentiary. Miller, according to his own story, yesterday afternoon entered the home of Fred Herwig, a farmer living near Barker station about seven miles west of Kansas City, Kas., on the Kansas City Western electric line. After securing three watches, a gold locket and chain and about $7.50 in money, he prepared to leave before any member of the household should return from a neighbor's home where they were visiting.

Had Miller carried out his original intention of leaving the house at once he might have escaped detection, but the sight of a fresh custard pie on the table proved his downfall. He stopped long enough to wash his face and hands and then sat down and ate the pie. On his way to the car after leaving the house, he was seen by Mr. Herwig. Upon discovering his loss, Mr. Herwig telephoned the police in Kansas City, Kas., to be on the outlook for the thief. An officer entered the car at Sixth and State avenue and arrested Miller. Most of the stolen goods were found in his possession.

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September 26, 1909

POLICE TO ISSUE NEWSPAPER.

It Will Contain Only Matters the
Officers Should Know.

Beginning with the first of next month the printing plant will be in operation for the police department. Two bulletins with all the news of police interest will be issued each day. Instead of the policeman being compelled to listen to a description of a crook fugitive, which he is liable to forget in a few minutes, he will have a printed description of the man in his pocket.

The new bulletin will copy the St. Louis and Chicago plan with the added advantage of being printed twice each day. In the morning the record of all arrests, crimes, robberies and miscellaneous matters of interest to the officers will be printed. In the evening all similar events that have happened during the day will be printed.

The big complaint against the police department in the past has been the slowness with which the department acts. The bulletin will expedite matters at least twelve hours. An officer can consult this list for a complete description of all crooks that have been wanted for the past thirty days.

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September 24, 1909

GET DOGS TO CATCH THIEVES.

Police of K. C. K., Hope to Stop
Telephone Wire Stealing.

W. W. Cook, chief of police of Kansas City, Kan., has a new scheme which he will use in an effort to catch the wire thieves who have been making life miserable for persons in the outlying districts whose telephones are rendered useless by their depredations. From reports made to the office of the Missouri & Kansas Telephone company since last March, it is estimated that more than 1,000 pounds of copper ire has been stolen.

The chief recently secured the services of two English bloodhounds which he will use in an effort to trace the thieves who have been cutting the telephone wires and selling the copper. Every attempt to catch the wire cutters who operate in the early morning has been fruitless, but the chief hopes to stop the practice with the aid of the dogs.

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September 13, 1909

CLOTHES HELP HIM IN COURT.

Judge Discharges Man Charged
With Picking Pockets.

Because Joseph Roland, who was arrested on a charge of picking pockets Saturday night on a Twelfth street car, wore old clothes when he faced the judge in the municipal court yesterday morning, he was discharged. The man's story was also convincing.

"I am a paper-hanger in Salt Lake City," said the man. "When work ran out in that town I sent my wife and child to her father's home in Houston, Tex., and started to beat my way East.

"When they accused me of taking that pocket-book Saturday night I ran because I didn't think I would have any chance in the court where I was a stranger."

"Pickpockets generally wear good clothes," said the judge, "and I'm going to let you go."

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September 13, 1909

USED DIAMOND ON
THE STORE WINDOWS.

PLATE GLASS CUT FOR BLOCKS
ON MAIN STREET.

J. E. Stivers Arrested on Charge of
Damaging Property from Fifth
to Thirteenth Street --
Denies He Is Vandal.

All records in plate glass window cutting were broken last night by J. E. Stivers, a candymaker for the Loose-Wiles Cracker and Candy Company. In years past the record in Kansas City has been a few straggling windows, entailing a cost of from $300 to $400, but Stivers's cutting began at Thirteenth street and Grand avenue and he carried the line of march to Main street and down that street to Fifth, where he was arrested. In all, Stivers damaged sixty-three plate glass windows. If the glass has to be replaced, the total cost would not fall short of $5,000, it is estimated. Most of the places which suffered most carry plate glass insurance.

Edward Clark, recently appointed a Gamewell operator at the Walnut street police station, saw Stivers when he made his first cut on a plate glass window at the Ayres Clothing Company, 1309 Grand avenue. He followed him to Main street, along Thirteenth and down Main to Fifth, seeing him use a 1/4 karat diamond ring on all of the most valuable windows along Main street. It did not occur to Clark to make an arrest. The arrest took place while Stivers was making a final slash at a large window of the Hub Clothing Company at Fifth and Main streets. Herman Hartman, a police officer, chanced to be passing and arrested the culprit.




After leaving Thirteenth and Grand, Stivers made his way to Main street, where he wrote his initials on a glazed monument of the M. H. Rice Monument Company at that point. It was shortly after 9 p. m. when he reached Jones' Dry Goods Company's store and many persons were on the street so he succeeded in cutting but seven of the valuable windows. Some of them are cut so deeply that a tap would knock out part of the glass.


Stivers' route from here was made by jumps, he evidently passing some places on account of the night crowds. He missed most of the stores in the block between Eleventh and Twelfth streets on Main. Altogether, he damaged the windows of more than thirty clothiers, milliners, saloons, flower shops, fortune tellers and other retailers and unoccupied buildings.

When Stilvers began by the Jones Dry Goods Company, when his diamond was in good working order, he appears to have done the greatest damage.

When seen in the holdover after his arrest, Stivers was awakened from a stupor. He told who he was and said he had been working for the Loose-Wiles company for twenty years. He is now 22 years old.

"If any of those windows are damaged I did not do it," he said.

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September 2, 1909

BOLD, BAD MEN ARE
SMALL AND WEAKLY.

MODERN DEADWOOD DICKS ARE
DEFICIENT, SAYS LATSHAW.

Flattering Description of Despera-
does in Yellowbacks Belied by
Experience Here, Declares
Criminal Judge.

Fade away, Deadwood Dick and all other bold highwaymen who look so strong and big in the yellowbacks. You're fiction. The real highwayman and criminal is between 18 and 22. he's a puny little fellow who has not much more strength of mind than he has of body.

After having carefully inspected Deadwood Dick and all his kind as they pass in and out of the criminal court of Jackson County, Judge Ralph S. Latshaw says:

"The real criminal is not the fierce-looking man, with long mustaches drooping in a manner to make his face look fiercer than it was made by nature. He is not tall and stately in appearance, nor does he stalk with his head up and the proud glitter of defiance in his eye.

"Criminal courts have the hardest time with the boy, just growing into his manhood. He is the fellow who fills the lists of those convicted of crime. From 17 or 18 to 20 or 22 years old is the worst stage.

"Look over the records of the highwaymen and burglars who have been sent to the penitentiary from this court, not only in recent months, but for years. All of them are young men, undersized and weakly. They put a revolver in their pocket and go out to commit crime. If it were not for the weapon concealed in their pockets they would not dare steal. It is the additional false courage the firearm gives them that is responsible for the crimes they commit.

"When you go walking in the evening and see, in the shadows, the tall form of someone slinking away into further darkness, don't feel for your pocketbook. It is safe. But steer around the two little fellows who never had enough hair on their face to grow one tenth of the mustache which Deadwood Dick and his fellows sport in the lithographs.

"Do you mean to say," the judge was asked, "that stature has a direct bearing on crime?"

"Only to this extent," said he, "that a child born of average sized parents, who is smaller than they, is commonly a weakling. And with this physical weakness comes mental deficiency, to a certain extent. The late Judge Wofford used to say: 'These boys give me more trouble than all the rest of the county.' He spoke from long experience, and from keen observation of conditions which obtain now as well as then."

"But many Kansas City lawyers say they read penny dreadfuls to relax their mind," was suggested. "Do you never read them?"

"No, thank you. I do not care for that kind of literature," said the judge.

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August 31, 1909

BEATEN CHINAMAN MAY DIE.

Lee Wey Brutally Assaulted in Fifth
Street Laundry and
Robbed of $20.

While resisting two robbers who seized him in his laundry at 620 East Fifth street about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon, Lee Wey, a Chinaman, was beaten into insensibility before his assailants secured $20 and escaped. With barely a chance to live Wey was taken to the general hospital.

When a customer arrived two hours later Lee was found on the floor unable to move. The police were notified. A hasty examination by Dr. H. L. Morton at the emergency hospital showed that the top of Lee's scalp was cut to shreds.

Lee regained consciousness and told a meager story of the assault. Two men had come into his laundry before sundown and inquired the way to find the water meter. As he started to go down into the cellar, where it was located, Lee was struck over the head with a piece of gas pipe. Half-stunned he grappled with the smaller of the two. The blows rained on his head until he knew no more. His pockets, inside out, told the story of the robbery.

"All my savings for many months," Lee said in broken English.

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August 27, 1909

DYNAMITE ENOUGH TO
WRECK A SKYSCRAPER.

WHEN ARRESTED MEN HAD
FORTY SIX INCH STICKS.

Joseph Monroe and Edward Sanford
Found in vicinity of New South
Side Apartment House --
Stories Conflict.

In the arrest of two suspicious characters at Thirty-sixth street and Broadway about 10 o'clock last night the police believe they averted what was intended to be by far the biggest, most costly and most destructive job of dynamiting ever pulled off in Kansas City or vicinity.

Shortly after 10 o'clock Patrolman E. C. Krister and D. B. Harrison, plain clothes men working out of the Westport police station, saw two men at the corner of Thirty-sixth street and Broadway. One was lighting a cigarette and the officers noticed a small suit case in the hands of the other. When they began to close up the men began to accelerate their speed and only the command "Halt or we'll shoot," stopped them.

The officers did not know what they had until they got the men to the station house and Lieutenant O. T. Wofford carelessly opened the small, cheap suit case. What he believed to be a wire sticking through a hole in the end of the case attracted his attention. When the package was opened it was found to contain forty six-inch sticks of dynamite. Each was marked 40 per cent nitroglycerin -- Hercules No. 2. The "wire" proved to be a fuse and it was attached to two of the sticks of the explosive, in the center, with a cap imbedded deeply into each stick.

ONE HAD LOADED PISTOL.

The men gave the names of Joseph Monroe and Edward Sanford. The latter had in his possession a 44-caliber Derringer pistol, loaded. Monroe said he was a lineman and Sanford insisted that he was a common laborer.

The stories of the prisoners, who were separated by Lieutenant Wofford and questioned soon after their arrival, differ in many respects as to how they came to be in that neighborhood with such a package. While Lieutenant Wofford was in a room alone with Sanford he turned his head to answer a telephone call. Hearing a noise Wofford looked up and the prisoner had all but reached the club of Sergeant Harry Moulder which hung on an opposite wall. Wofford dropped the telephone and grappled with the man. Sergeant Moulder then entered the room and no further trouble occurred. A door was only a few feet away and had he succeeded in clubbing the lieutenant Sanford could have easily escaped.

When Monroe was questioned he said he, Sanford and a man named Charles Hogan had "bummed" their way from Denver. He claimed they arrived Tuesday morning, while Sanford said Sunday morning. Monroe said that last night he and his partner were walking down Grand avenue when they came upon Hogan at Thirteenth street.

"Do you want to make a piece of money?" Monroe says Hogan asked.

"We told him yes," Monroe went on. "We were both broke, hungry and dry. He then introduced us to a man named Anderson, Charles, I believe he said his first name was. He said he would give us $5 to carry a grip out on the Westport car line. We were to stay on the car until it made the second turn to the left. Then we were to get off and meet Anderson or some man who would be there waiting for us. We got off and had walked down the street a little ways when we were arrested. Anderson said to be careful that there was an explosive in the suitcase . That's all I know and I'm innocent of any wrong."

HOW DYNAMITE WAS TO BE USED.

Sanford, who tried to escape, said they arrived with Hogan two days earlier than Monroe stated.

"We went to the Stag hotel opposite the city hall," he said, "and this morning we met Hogan there. He asked us if we wanted to make a piece of coin and told us to meet him on Grand avenue this evening. He introduced us to Anderson and he was gone a long time after the grip. We met there about 7 o'clock."

"What was the dynamite for?" asked Lieutenant Wofford quickly.

"He said it was to blow up a scab job. No, we were not to do it. That was for the fellow who was to meet us, I guess. Yes, I knew there was an explosive in the grip and I knew I was doing wrong."

Sanford also said, when asked later, that he was to give the derringer to the stranger -- or Anderson -- who was to meet him. Both described the mysterious Anderson after they had been locked up within talking distance as "a man 35 years old, six feet tall, weighing 170 pounds. He wore a black mustache and had black hair and a dark complexion. He was dressed i a dark suite, black derby hat and black shoes."

ENOUGH TO WRECK SKYSCRAPER.

Sergeant Moulder also said he learned from inquiry along Westport avenue, that there had been much talk among the union men about the big apartment being a "scab job," and "a rat job." There appeared to be much discontent on account of the immense job being done by an "open shop," he said he gathered from talks with saloonkeepers.

Experts who were called in to examine the package of dynamite said that, properly placed, there was enough to wreck any skyscraper in the city and damage buildings for blocks around.

After the men were locked up they were in a position to talk to each other. William Hicks, a patrolman, sat near the door and heard Monroe upbraid Sanford for being such a dunce as to get his dates mixed on the time of their arrival here and their final meeting with Hogan and the mysterious Anderson. The men are being held for investigation.

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