Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

January 21, 1910

NO LOVE NOTES IN
THIS GIRL'S SUIT.

Cigar Stand Manager, Young
and Pretty, Sues Rich
Saloon Keeper.

Miss Mabel Reeder, young and pretty, manager of the cigar stand in the lobby of the Savoy hotel, yesterday filed a suit in the circuit court against John E. Johnston, a saloon keeper at 810 Main street, demanding damages in the sum of $25,000 for alleged breach of promise of marriage. Johnston is said to be well-to-do.

It was on December 1, 1905, Miss Reeder asserts in her complaint, that Johnston promised to marry her. Since then, she alleges, he has discontinued his attentions and has informed her that he does not intend to marry her.

According to the complaint, the engagement of Miss Reeder and Johnston became publicly known and, it is set forth, Johnston's failure to perform his part of the agreement embarrassed, humiliated and wounded her "in feelings, affections, womanly pride and sensibility," and, it is added, her "prospects for life and eligible marriage are blasted."

"This isn't one of those love letter cases," said Miss Reeder last night in her rooms at the Tomlinson apartments, Eleventh and Broadway, "because I haven't any love letters to present. I would just love to give you a story, but I can't for several reasons. One is that my lawyer, Frank P. Walsh, tells me not to talk.

KNEW HIM IN WICHITA.

"You see, Mr. Johnston and I are from the same town, Wichita, Kas. We have known each other a long time and it was there that we became engaged. He was the proprietor of a hotel and I was working at the cigar stand in the hotel. We both came to Kansas City a couple of years ago and Mr. Johnston started a saloon here.

"I am unable to tell you why Mr. Johnston broke off his engagement with me. I don't know whether there is another girl in the case. He has known that I contemplated bringing this suit, because he was notified. Really, now, there isn't anything sensational about this case, and I want to escape all the notoriety I can."

Johnston refused last night to discuss the action brought against him by Miss Reeder.

"Let Miss Reeder do the talking now," he said, "and I will have my say later."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

January 4, 1910

BURGLARS LEAVE A NOTE.

Thank Proprietor of Store For Not
Disturbing Them.

The burglars who visited the grocery store of W. B. Mumford at 2901 Main street, Sunday night, left a note addressed to the proprietor, pinned to his rifled cash drawer. It was written on a piece of wrapping paper and read:

"Dear sir, thank you very much for not disturbing us as we robbed your store, yours truly, M. E."

"M. E." and his friend got away with $3 in small change and about $16 worth of cigars.

Labels: , , ,

December 29, 1909

DIES IN GROCERY STORE.

Nebraska Visitor Had Just Pur-
chased Cigars When Stricken.

While handing the clerk a dollar to pay for some cigars he had just purchased, Isaac N. Mothershead, 57 years old, a farmer of Niponee, Neb., died of heart disease in Edward Kendall's grocery store, at Fourteenth and Harrison streets, yesterday morning. Mr. Mothershead and his wife had been spending the Christmas holidays at the home of their daughter, Mrs. O. P. Haslett, 1420 Tracy avenue.

The body was taken to the Stine undertaking rooms in the police ambulance. A widow and five daughters survive him.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

November 26, 1909

WILLING TO BUY CIGARS.

Postal Telegraph Girl Operator Glad
Missouri Won.

"Give me six cigars," said Miss Jessie Wadley, the petite Postal operator at the Hotel Baltimore, yesterday afternoon as she laid a silver dollar on the cigar counter.

"I don't believe in betting," she explained, "but I told some of my friends that if Missouri won this time that I would buy each of them a good cigar. I just felt all the time that Missouri would win."

Labels: , , ,

November 15, 1909

WOOLF TOOK NO CHANCES.

Didn't Even Take Cigars Until
Board Gave Permission.


A box of cigars was handed to the board of police commissioners yesterday with a written request from Patrolman J. L. Woolf that he be permitted to accept it. Counselor Cromer explained that he had recently sent Woolf out to stand guard at a wedding.


"When he left," said Cromer, "the host handed Woolf a cigar. He noticed that a bill was folded beneath the band. Woolf refused the cigar. The man asked Woolf to call at his place and gave him this box of cigars, which he is asking permission to accept."

"Good," shouted Commissioner marks, "I wish there were more men on the force like this one. Let him have the cigars. That's what all the men should do when they receive a present -- but they don't."

Labels: , , , ,

November 5, 1909

LAST OF WALLACE CRUSADE.

Nearly 4,000 Indictments Dismissed
by Prosecutor Conkling.

Nearly 4,000 indictments, returned by the grand jury last year during the Sunday closing crusade of William H. Wallace, then judge of the criminal court, were dismissed yesterday by Prosecuting Attorney Virgil Conkling. These are the last of 7,000 indictments by the Wallace grand jury.

When Judge Ralph S. Latshaw succeeded Judge Wallace on the criminal bench he instructed the prosecuting attorney, I. B. Kimbrell, to examine all the indictments and to file complaints where he thought he could secure a conviction. One dozen cases were tried, but all were acquitted, and about 2,000 dismissed.

When Prosecuting Attorney Virgil Conkling went into office the first of the year 1,500 more cases were dismissed.

The 7,000 true bills returned were against about 1,000 persons. Against some, principally theater managers, there were from 200 to 300 in each instance.

The Blue Law crusade started by Judge Wallace was directed largely against Sunday shows. At odd times his deputies would arrest cigar dealers, druggists and others who kept open on Sunday.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

November 5, 1909

MAY DIVORCE JESSE JAMES.

Mrs. Stella S. James Files Suit --
Friends Think James May Re-
Enter the Tobacco Business.
Jesse James, Jr., Kansas City Attorney.
JESSE JAMES.

Jesse James, lawyer, son of the famous bandit, and one of the best known men in Kansas City, was made defendant in a divorce suit filed yesterday by Stella J. James, who says they were married January 24, 1900.

Jesse and his wife were married while he was running a cigar store in the Junction building at Ninth and Main streets. It was not long after his celebrated trial in which he was acquitted of a charge of complicity in the Blue Cut train robbery. Jesse was one of the most talked of men in all the country in those days, and his cigar business prospered.

That he and his wife led a happy married life was the general opinion of their friends. In her petition, however, Mrs. James says that her husband has been getting homo late at night, and on these occasions has refused to tell his wife where he had been. The wife says that she is ill and under a doctor's care and without means of support. Their home is at 809 Elmwood avenue.

Friends of Jesse James have noted a change in his demeanor within the last few days. That he was troubled was apparent. Long ago he quit the cigar business, and for a time was the proprietor of a pawn shop. Then he began to study law, and after his graduation he began to practice in local courts and gave evidence of doing well. He devoted his attention largely to criminal business.

Only a few days ago Jesse confided to friends that he had decided to quit the law and intended to go on the road for the American Tobacco Company. It was Jesse's first intimation that he was not satisfied with the legal profession.

Jesse James was not at the Elmwood avenue address last night, and persons at the house said that Mrs. James was sick in bed and could not discuss the case.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

September 16, 1909

POLICE FORBIDDEN
TO TAKE PRESENTS.

TWO DETECTIVES SUSPENDED
FOR THIS REASON.

Board Rules in Case Where Woman
Gave $25 to Show Appreciation,
That a Postage Stamp
Is Graft.

The police board ruled at its meeting yesterday afternoon that it would consider any officer as grafting who accepted "even a postage stamp or a cigar as a present."

The ruling was made after Detectives J. F. Lyngar and Charles T. Lewis had been suspended for sixty days for accepting a present of $25 from Mrs. Rose Herman, 909 Lydia avenue. The money was given to Lewis on September 1 for recovery of a $125 locket. He gave his partner, Lyngar, half of it. The board ordered that if the $25 was not returned to Mrs. Herman within twenty-four hours the officers would be dropped.

Mrs. Herman was an unwilling witness and when she took the stand she said, with her eyes suffused with tears: "I would like to make a preliminary statement. I am not making these charges against these officers. A friend of mine virtually trapped me into doing it. If in telling the truth here I am going to cause trouble for either of them I want to say now that I am very, very sorry for it."

GAVE HIS PARTNER HALF.

The witness then went on to tell how previously she had lost $30 and how Detective Lewis had succeeded in recovering it for her. When the locket was stolen she sent for him. On August 30 it was located in a pawnshop at 812 Independence avenue, where sh paid the pawnbroker $10 to get it back.

"Both officers were there," she continued, "and advised me that I could replevin the locket, but lawyer's fees would have been more than $10, so I paid it. The man wanted $18.

"It was then I told Mr. Lewis to come to my house the next day. When he did I voluntarily gave him $25. I meant it as a present, as I felt very grateful to get my locket back. And I still want the men to have the money. I was dragged into this thing unwillingly."

Detective Lewis admitted all that Mrs. Herman said and added that he had worked on both cases alone, simply giving his partner half of the $25.

"It was my idea," he said, "that we were not allowed to accept of a published reward without permission of this board. I did not know it was a violation of the statute to accept a present. I have done it before, and so has every man on the force for that matter. Mrs. Herman will tell you that I told her she owed me nothing, but still she insisted and I took it."

POSTAGE STAMP IS GRAFT.

Commissioners Marks and Middlebrook discussed the case in low tones for a long time before rendering a verdict. Then Judge Middlebrook wheeled swiftly about in his chair and said:

"Were it not for the fact that Mrs. Herman was an unwilling witness, that the money appears to have been thrust upon the officer, both men would be dropped from the department here and now. That is the only mitigating circumstance in this case. You are suspended for sixty days and the money must be paid to the secretary tomorrow. He will return it. Hereafter men found accepting presents will be absolutely dismissed from the force.

"The mere fact that you see no wrong in what you have done is to say the least distressing. You are paid $115 a month and the acceptance of a postage stamp above that is regarded as graft."

"Rear in mind now," added Mr. Marks, "this means that you are to accept nothing form the public, not even a cigar, without the permission of this board."

"If that rule is enforced," said an officer who heard the order, "the board would be kept busy examining new men for the force, as every ma on the department would lose his job every day. I know a copper who has lost his eleven times today, as he has just that many good cigars in his inside pocket."

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

August 13, 1909

JAMES MORAN SHOT
BY JACK O'DONNELL.

POLITICS SAID TO HAVE CAUSED
THE QUARREL.

After Shooting, O'Donnell Disap-
peared, but Later Surrendered
to Police -- Moran Not Dan-
gerously Wounded.

Enmity said to have grown out of a factional fight in the Democratic party in the Second ward last night culminated in a quarrel between Jack O'Donnell, a cigarmaker, who lives at the Century hotel, and James Moran, formerly proprietor of a saloon in the Washington hotel, in which Moran was shot in the neck and painfully injured by O'Donnell. The shooting occurred in the Century hotel about 8:30 o'clock.

Moran with several friends was standing at the bar in the hotel saloon when O'Donnell and Joseph Donnegan, manager of the Century theater, entered the place.

Moran and O'Donnell began quarreling and Harry Friedburg, who was with the Moran party, endeavored to quiet them. He told O'Donnell that there would be trouble if he stayed int he saloon and that it was best that he leave. O'Donnell went into the lobby of the hotel and was followed by Moran, who again started to upbraid O'Donnell. According to witnesses Moran threatened O'Donnell.

BULLET LODGED IN NECK.

"I'll just get you before you have a chance to do anything to me," is the reply credited to O'Donnell, who drew a revolver and fired at Moran, who had turned and was running from the lobby. As Moran dodged into the bargershop from the lobby, O'Donnell, who was following, fired a second and third time. One bullet struck the fleeing man in the back between the shoulders and ranged upwards and to the left, lodgining in the neck. One bullet lodged in the wall and the third went through the door.

Moran ran out of the barger shop and fell on the sidewalk in front. He was carried into the hotel and Dr. J. D. Griffith was summoned. O'Donnell was caught by Friedberg and John Campbell. A police ambulance with Dr. H. T. Morton from the emergency hospital removed the injured man to St. Joseph's hospital. H is wound is not dangerous and he will be out of the hospital in a few days.

COULDN'T LOCATE O'DONNELL.

The police were notified but when they arrived on the scene O'Donnell had disappeared and they were unable to locate him. Inspector of Detectives E. P. Doyle detailed Detectives Kinney and Jennings on the case. After going to the hotel the men went to the hospital to see Moran, who refused to tell anyone who s hot him. The detectives telephoned the inspector that they could not find O'Donnell, but that Joseph Donnegan informed them that O'Donnell would give himself up the first thing int he morning.

Another officer was informed that O'Donnell was in the Century hotel and would give himself up in the morning. His reason for delaying was said to be because Captain Walter Whitsett disliked him and would place him in the holdover without a chance of securing bond. When Captain Whitsett heard that O'Donnell was at the hotel he instructed Lieutenant M. E. Ryan to send Sergeant Robert Greely to arrest him.

FOLLOWED ANOTHER FIGHT.

The quarrel last night followed one in the afternoon during which O'Donnell struck Moran in the mouth and further bruised the ex-saloonkeeper. This fight occurred in Wisman's saloon, Twelfth and Oak streets. Bert Striegel, a deputy constable named Caulfield, Joseph Donnegan and Moran were in the saloon when Jack O'Donnell came in. The men had a drink together and then Moran, it is claimed,, accused O'Donnell of throwing down politically Michael O'Hearn. Other charges were made by Moran and finally, it is said, he called Edward O'Donnell, a policeman and brother of Jack, a name which Jack resented. The men engaged in a fight. Wisman separated them and put the crowd out, as he said he would not allow a fight in his place.

SURRENDERED TO POLICE.

It was midnight before the police could locate O'Donnell and then he voluntarily gave himself up. He rode by himself in a carriage to police headquarters and surrendered to Lieutenant M. E. Ryan. He was not asked about the shooting by the officers in charge and was placed in the matron's room. He did not mention the shooting nor offer any explanation for it.

The trouble between the men, it is alleged, grew out of the fact that O'Donnell and Donnegan were out of the town on the last election day and Moran and his friends accused the two of being faithless to O'Hearn. The breach between the men was widened more by O'Donnell's brother arresting a barber on election day.

The shooting scrape of last night is not the first in which O'Donnell has figured. He was shot in the back by J. D. Cosby, proprietor of the Cosby hotel, following a fight in the hotel. At the same time J. P. Hayes, who was with O'Donnell, was shot twice in the back. The shooting was in February, 1908.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

July 12, 1909

JOE MARKS STOPPED FIGHT.

Ability as Linguist Helped Him to
Put and End to Quarrel.

The versatility of Joe Marks, a cigar salesman, prevented guests at the Coates house last night from witnessing what might have proved a battle royal, when he intervened between two men, neither of whom could speak English, who were about to "mix it up" in the street at Tenth street and Broadway. Joe speaks seven languages and he said last night it helped him a lot. He lives at the Coates house.

The men were quarreling with their wives. The women knew each other, but the men were not acquainted and neither could speak English intelligently. A misunderstanding occurred when they met and were introduced. One of the belligerents was an Italian and the other a Bohemian. In an aside to his wife the Italian said something the Bohemian believed derogatory. They tried to explain in English, but it was useless.

Just as the men were rolling up their sleeves Marks appeared on the scene. He acted as interpreter general and finally succeeded in quieting all parties. His thanks came in three languages.

Marks was returning from the Union depot to the hotel when he overheard the argument.

"If the flood had not tied up the trains I might have been on my way to Iowa," he said, "and in that case someone would surely h ave been hurt. The women were sure to have gotten into it if a fight had occurred."

Labels: , , , ,

June 23, 1909

THIS DOG SMOKES CIGARS.

"Hutch" Has Only Two Legs and
Walks Like a Man.

Visitors at the Union depot last night witnessed a strange sight of a dog born without forelegs, walking about the waiting room on his hindlegs, standing upright like human beings. The dog was the property of George Hicks, a cigar manufacturer of Hutchinson, Kas.

"Hutch," as the dog is called, was brought to Kansas City to "consult" with a specialist about an illness with which he is afflicted. He was still under the doctor's care when he appeared at the depot last night. Hicks dresses his pet in a coat and trousers, so that he presents an odd spectacle as he prances around at the beck and call of his master.

One of the chief accomplishments of "Hutch" is the manner in which he smokes a cigar. Hicks declares the dog will not smoke any but his own brands.

"No amount of money could tempt me to part from old 'Hutch'," said the owner last night, when asked what price he would take for the dog.

Labels: , , ,

June 23, 1909

HERE TO PROMOTE
CUBAN RECIPROCITY.

CUBAN MINISTER IS TOURING
WESTERN STATES.

Only a matter of Freight Rates and
Facilities, He Says, Prevents
Cheaper Fruit and
Tobacco.

In the interest of Cuba, and to promote Cuban reciprocity sentiment in the West, General Carlos Garcia Velez, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to the United States from Cuba, will make an extensive tour of the Western states, visiting all of the larger cities and the various chambers of commerce.

General Garcia said yesterday at the Hotel Baltimore that his principal object was to get in touch with the merchants and manufacturers of the West, and to interest them in Cuba and her possibilities, and by increasing business, to strengthen the already friendly relations between Cuba and this country.

"We want better freight conditions and facilities," said he. "It is our belief that we can reach the Western states with as great facilities as we now enjoy in the East, that it will be for the mutual benefit of both countries. For instance, we raise one of the largest crops of pineapples of any country in the world. Our pineapples are ready for the market at times when other producers cannot get them to ship. If we could get the rates there is no reason in the world why Cuban pineapples could not sell in Western markets for as low a price as 3 cents a piece.

REDUCING COSTS.

"Then there are our tobacco and cigars. I had trouble today in finding some of the best grades of our cigars in Kansas City. In New York it is easy to find them

"Statistics show that in the United States there is used annually 1,600,000 tons of sugar. I do not know that there is a refinery in this section of the country. But there is need of one. Cuba will produce 1,400,000 tons of cane sugar this year. We need but a small portion of this amount for our own consumption. Sugar in the United States could be sold cheaper if we had the transportation facilities necessary in the west. It is the same with other products of our country.

"Most of our products are marketable when the season is over. We could ship new potatoes when there was not a new potato to be found in the United States, unless in the extreme southwest. Bananas are plentiful with us when they are scarce and dear in this country.

General Garcia is the eldest son of General Calixto Garcia, to whom was written the famous "message." He was his father's chief of staff, has been a minister to Mexico and since his graduation from an American college has been attached to the consular and diplomatic service of his country.

His brother is Justo Garcia Velez, is the present secretary of state of Cuba. The general will remain in Kansas City several days.

Labels: , , , ,

August 22, 1908

THEATER PATRONS MAY SMOKE.

Ordinance Permitting 'Smoky House'
Passes Both Houses.

In the lower house of the council last night Alderman Michael O'Hearn introduced an ordinance permitting the smoking of cigars, cigarettes and pipes in theaters or public halls having regularly established smoking rooms and three exits. The ordinance passed both houses.

Labels: , , ,

June 15, 1908

SODA TRADE AFFECTED.

Cigar Men, Too, Say No One is Smok-
ing These Days.

Unless this weather clears up, soda fountain men will go into spasms.

"And the cigar man, too," said a druggist yesterday, in despair. "We are not making enough off the fountains, any of us, to pay for the help and the syrups. We are losing money on the investment. Nobody drinks soda in ordinary weather, at least not so that the druggist notices it. Cigar men tell me nobody is smoking."

A cigar dealer, who was asked regarding this, had an explanation. "It is too wet to get out to get cigars," he said. "Nobody is on the street, so nobody drops in for a cigar. We always feel trade drop off when it is too wet or too cold for men to get around. Hot weather lets them drop in for a smoke -- but not too hot. They quit smoking then. This rainy season is about the worst experience we have had. It is new, and the cigar dealers do not like it. Just put that down."

Labels: , ,

May 27, 1908

WHEN WALLACE IS GOVERNOR.

The "Blue Law" Candidate Will Lift
the Lid on Sunday Smokes.

ST. LOUIS, MO., May 26. -- (Special.) Judge William H. Wallace of Kansas City, a Democrat aspirant for governor, said here today:

"I am neither Sabbatarian nor a political prohibitionist. I am a temperance Democrat. I neither smoke nor partake of intoxicants or coffee. While I am a Presbyterian elder, I do not believe it is a sin to use tobacco, and if I am made governor, I will recommend that the Sunday laws be amended so that there may be no inhibition on tobacco.

"At Kansas City I have enforced the law as I found it, and have put the Sunday closing lid on cigar stores, as well as saloons."

Labels: , , , ,

April 29, 1908

THOU SHALT NOT
SKATE ON SUNDAY.

JUDGE WALLACE HANDS DOWN
ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT.

He Wants the Rinks Closed -- Sends
Deputies Out to Get Names of
Offenders -- The Philoso-
phy of Kimbrell.

"Thou shalt not upon a Sunday move thy feet with a gliding motion when thou hast roller skates attached to thy shoes!"

This commandment has been handed down by Judge W. H. Wallace to his twelve tried and true grand jurors, passed on to the deputy marshals and was read with a thud yesterday afternoon by County Prosecutor I. B. Kimbrell, who was signing indictments against theater folk, in the form of an indictment against S. Waterman, charged with managing "a place of amusement for pay, otherwise known as the Coliseum roller skating rink at Thirty-ninth and Main streets, Kansas City, Mo."

After reading the missive three times, the prosecutor, who some weeks ago swore off smoking, was so excited that he absent-mindedly lighted a cigar presented to him a week or two since by a voter who had called for free legal advice. When Mr. Kimbrell had coughed the rancid smoke out of his lungs he recovered composure, threw the cigar away and remarked:

"Well, it's not a matter of great importance at this time of year, anyhow, as very soon the boys will be going barefoot and can't wear roller skates. Besides, next Sunday they can go to the baseball game."

The prosecutor picked up his pen and started to sign his name to the indictment. He hesitated. He said:

"I believe I'll talk this over with the grand jury first."

"I wouldn't write anything about it," suggested Charles Riehl, deputy prosecutor, to reporters. "We don't know for sure yet whether the jury will return the indictment against the rink."

Joseph Stewart, veteran bailiff of the criminal court, and Henry Miller, custodian of the criminal court building, were the trusted men, who Sunday went forth and searched the city for roller skating rinks. They were told to report to the prosecutor's office the keepers, ticket sellers and employes of all rinks found. After tramping all day they could locate only one rink, the one at Thirty-ninth and Main streets.

"Waterman was exceedingly kind to us," Miller says. "He offered to have a boy strap skates on our feet and let us use the skates all afternoon free. I was tempted. There were about 200 people in the rink, boys and girls, young men and women and all were laughing and happy. I wanted to jump in and skate, but Joe advised me not to and I didn't.

"We saw many kids skating on the sidewalks and streets over town Sunday, but we hadn't any orders to take their names. They weren't indoors and, so far as we knew, didn't buy or rent their skates on Sunday."

The Sunday skating question will come before the grand jury this afternoon. The usual 140 theater indictments will also be returned by the jury today.

Labels: , , , , , ,

April 18, 1908

BOLEY WINS CIGAR CONTEST.

Makes Ten of Them in Eleven Min-
utes at Century.

The cigar making contest at the Century theater last night was of unusual interest to onlookers. Few of them had ever seen cigars made. John Boley won the first prize of $10. He rolled ten cigars in eleven minutes. Boley is 17 years old and has been employed by cigar firms only one year. The second prize was won by Jacob Kern. His time was 12 1/2 minutes.

The contest was under the supervision of the cigar makers' union, of which every contestant was a member. The judges were John T. Smith, business agent of the Industrial Council; Joseph Henkle, business agent of the cigar makers' union, and Frank M. Reynolds, a cigar manufacturer.

In introducing the contestants Mr. Smith said: "The cigar industry is in Kansas City to stay, but we need your patronage. The factory of every wholesale dealer in the city is open to your inspection and we invite you all to visit them."

It is the purpose of the manager of the Century to introduce different trades to the public from his stage. The next will probably be a horseshoe making contest.

Labels: ,

March 21, 1908

POLICE THOUGHT HIM DRUNK.

Injured Man Was Locked Up in a
Cell Without Treatment.

J. K. Mannois, 63 years old, a cigar merchant of Ottawa, Kas., went to the emergency hospital yesterday morning for treatment. His lower lip was cut through, his face badly bruised and swollen and a tooth was missing. Dr. W. L. Gist attended him.

Mannois said that he arrived in the city Thursday night when he was attacked on Union avenue and robbed of $15 and a gold watch valued at $40. He said that while dazed from his injuries he was taken in charge by the police and locked up at No. 2 station, 1316 St. Louis avenue, as a "drunk" who had fallen and come in contact with the pavement. He said he had started for Kansas City, Kas., when attacked by men who had seen him leave a Union avenue restaurant.

Labels: , , , , , ,

March 2, 1908

CIGAR GIRL TALKS
OF MARRIED BLISS.

DOESN'T SEE MUCH EVIDENCE
OF IT AMONG MEN.

Her Opinion Is That the Long Green
Does It, Whiskers or No Whis-
kers, and She Is Not
Dodging the Issue.

"This isn't a cigar store, it's a confidential station," said the lady who spends the day selling clear Havanas for straight 10 and some for a quarter. "No, this is the place where a man comes up and spends one minute in purchasing a rope and then lets go of his secrets for the next ten.

"See that man there, the one who just left the counter? Well, that fellow has been drinking so much that corn juice is beginning to ooze out of his face. He insists on telling me how good he is when sober. Of course, I have to take his word for it.

"A lot of people wonder why I don't nab some of these human prize packages and take up the tranquil life in a four-room flat. Well, if they heard as many of these hard-luck matrimonial narratives as I do, it wouldn't take 'em long to understand why I play single and look satisfied.

"One of my regular customers has been married for five years. He tells me on the strict level that he would rather go to the pen for five years than to take another woman with the same disposition as his wife.

"Another man asked me if I didn't think $50 for a woman's hat was unreasonable. I told him that I could wear a different hat every day in the week for $50 and look like a class A type at that. Just what I thought, said the man with the millinery troubles. Some wives who never had to earn their own living don't know the A B C's of economy.

"I get an earful every day on domestic complications and I have observed that these difficulties generally arise in the case of a pair of doves who couldn't see life with a field glass unless they were both harnessed on the same limb. I don't want to appear pessimistic. I think that matrimonial negotiations is the finish. It's like getting your teeth filled. It may be painful, but you're just up against it.

"As for sentimental orthography, however, that's a brand that finds no place in my diary. Just between you and me (I'll hand out a little cross-your-heart talk myself now) I intend to hook up to a live one some of these days. It will be on a commercial basis with scientific auxiliaries. I want a man about ten years older than I am which means, of course, that his mental faculties will be well developed. He will also be tamed by that time. It doesn't matter whether he has long whisker or whether he eats rice pudding with his knife, just so as he can listen to reason and has a bale of long green to keep the grocer, the dressmaker, the dress maker and the headgear lady from getting peevish between the 1st and 10th of the month. When that specimen comes along at the psychological moment I'm going to put on my affinity manners, and when he springs those divine words you can see our little soul sister batting out the longest home run ever recorded in these parts.

"If you have anything of that description in your form chart," concluded the cigar lady, "just put me in the running as the one best bet."

Labels: , ,

February 28, 1908

JUDGE WALLACE'S BIRTHDAY.

For Further Particulars Ask Anybody
at the City Hall.

A brand new "sell" has been going the rounds of the city hall and police headquarters and if there is a man down there who has not been caught his name has been supressed. It has to do with a new holiday and for that reason those hard woring city employes took the bait quickly. Here is the way Captain Snow worked the new gag on Police Judge Harry G. Kyle yesterday.

"I see we will have no court Saturday," suggested the captian.

"Is that so?" inquired his judgeship, trying to think what for.

"Yes," was the reply. "It's a new holiday."

"You don't say?" said the court, as he went clear under with the bait. "What's the occasion?"

"Judge Wallace's birthday," answered the captian gravely.

Just a dozen persons were present when the judge bit and just a dozen "good" cigars were purchased by his honor. Cigar dealers near the hall have profited on account of the "new holiday."

Labels: , , , , ,

February 18, 1908

TWO MEN SHOT
AT HOTEL COSBY.

J. P. HAYES AND J. F. O'DONNELL
MAY DIE OF WOUNDS.

WERE SHOT BY
J. D. CROSBY.

PROPRIETOR MIXED IN A ROW
AND USED GUN.

Wounded Men Had Gone Back to Ho-
tel to Apologize for a Row Ear-
lier in the Evening -- Shot
From Behind.

As a result of a quarrel in the Cosby hotel, West Ninth street and Baltimore avenue, at 8 o'clock last night, James P. Hayes, agent of the Traders' Dispatch, and John F. O'Donnell, cigar manufacturer, are in a dangerous condition in St. Joseph's hospital from bullet wounds in their bodis, and J. D. Cosby, owner of the hotel, who shot the men, is in the city jail and will probably answer to a charge of murder, in case the men may die. Hayes cannot recover, according to the attending physician, but O'Donnell's chances are even.

While Cosby is making an appeal to the police that he shot O'Donnell and Hayes in self-defense, the evidence shows that both men where shot in the back as they were retreating from the hotel. Cosby was not assaulted in any way or een mixed up in the quarrel until he grabbed a revolver and began shooting. The police arrested Cosby and his brothe, Wiliam Cosby; his clerk, William Murray, and a negro porter, Moses Butcher. They will be held until police make a thorough investigation.

The shooting was the result of a quarrel between Hayes, O'Donnell and William Murray, because the former two asked to see a friend of the name of A. Drake from Salt Lake City, U., who was staying at the hotel. Hayes and O'Donnell went to the hotel about 8 o'clock and inquired for Drake and H. L. Davis, who was registered from Hutchinson, Kas. Murray informed them that their friends had left. Hayes then made a remark which led Murray, the clerk, to believe Hayes was doubting his word and Murray struck him in the face. A fist fight followed in which Hayes, O'Donnell, Murray, and Cosby, brother of the proprietor, were implicated. Hayes used a bell and a bottle to defend himself with and Murray's head was badly cut as a result.
WENT BACK TO THE HOTEL.
Hayes and O'Donnell managed to get out of the hotel and went to the Senate saloon, where they talked with several men about the fight. They stated that the clerk was in the wrong and that they ol defended themselves until they could get out of the place. Hayes then proposed to O'Donnell that they go back to the hotel and apologize for the wrong they had done and try to make the matter right with the proprietor They then went to the hotel and as they reached the top of the stairs J. D. Cosby called upon Clerk Murray, his brother and others to keep Hayes and O'Donnell in the place until he could summon the police and have them arrested.

Hayes and O'Donnell tried to escape from the hotel and Murray and Williaim Cosby again attacked them. While the men were engaged in a fight J. D. Cosby, the proprietor, came from behind the counter with a revolver in his hand and shot Hayes twice through the back as he was running down the stairs. J. D. Cosby was not assaulted and had no hand in the row except to do the shooting, according to statements of Hayes and O'Donnell and others who were there at the time of the shooting.

Hayes and O'Donnell fell when they were shot and the former lay in an unconscious condition at the top of the stairs, while O'Donnell managed to crawl into a nearby saloon and ask for help. Some one at the hotel telephoned for the police and Hayes and O'Donnell were taken immediately to St. Joseph's hospital They were in a critical condition and at midnight last night it was stated that Hayes could not survive. There were two bullet holes in his back near the right shoulder blade. The bullets had not ben located. He was in a semi-conscious condition up to midnight and was unable to recogize relatives and friends who were permitted to see him. There was one bullet in O'Donnell's shoulder which passed through his body, coming out just above the heart. It was found in his clothing and it was stated by physicians at the hospital last night that O'Donnell may recover.
FOUR MEN UNDER ARREST.
Detectives R. E. Truman, J. W. Farrell, Joseph Halvey and James Ratery last night arrested J. D. Cosby, William Cosby, Moses Butcher, colored, and William Murray, together with a few guests at the hotel. The men whose names are mentioned will be held for investigation.

Asistant Prosecuting Attorney Riehl took a statement from J D. Cosby last night regarding the shooting, in which Cosby claimed self-defense. His story of the shooting is as follows:

"These two men, whom I do not now, came to the hotel and started a row with Murray and my brother (meaning William Cosby). They injured Murray and then went down out of the hotel. Later they came back, and I thought that they intended to start another row. I ordered the men in the hotel not to let these two men out of the place, as I wished to call the police and have them arrested. Then they started another row with Murray and my brother. I took a revolver I had in my hand and went to assist my brother. I grabbed hold of one and he struck at me. Then I shot him. I then shot the other man when he tried to strike me with something he had his hand. I did it in self-defense and to help my brother and Murray."

Cosby made another statement in which he said that he did not know that he had shot more than one man, but held to the story of self-defense.

The statements of all the other eye witnesses to the tragedy discredit that of Cosby. Willilam Cosby, his brother, said Cosby shot Hayes in the back when the latter was wrestling with Murray and then leaned over the railing of the stairway and shot O'Donnel as the later was descending the stairway. He also stated that he asked his brother not to shoot, but he would not listen. J. J. Carter of Garden City, Kas., and R. C. Rawlings of Chanute, Kas., made statements to the police which were about the same as that of William Cosby.

DYING MAN'S WIFE OVERCOME.

Mrs. Hayes, wife of the wound man who will probably die, called at the hosptial about 11 o'clock last night to see her husband. She was almost prostrated with grief when told of the affair and was overcome when she saw the condition of her husband. A sister and friends of Hayes also called to see him. Hayes has a baby daughter and lives at 2904 East Thirty-third street. He is about 30 years old. He is the agent for the Traders' Dispatch with offices in the board of trade.

O'Donnell is unmarried and lived at the Century hotel. He is proprietor of the J. F. O'Donnell Cigar Comany at 1801 Grand avenue. He is about 32 years of age.

It is claimed that this is not the first time that Crosby has been in shooting srapes of this kind. He is claimed to have had trouble with Joe Zigler, a saloon keeper near the Cosby hotel, in which he used a revolver but did not do any shooting.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

November 23, 1907

THEY STOLE MANY PENNIES.

Young Men Also Liked Whisky and
Saloon Cigars.

Confessing that they had robbed five places since last Wednesday night, Benjamin Green, Earl Durbin and Emery Luzelle, all young white men, were arrested early yesterday morning at Sixth and Delaware streets.

Green wore two overcoats and Luzelle had in his pockets three quart bottles of whisky and two boxes of saloon cigars.

They admitted having robbed the following places of the things enumerated:

Saloon of Clem Mees, 612 Walnut street, 600 cigars, 2 overcoats and 500 pennies stolen.

Saloon of George Fawkes, 714 Walnut street, $20 in cash, 1 overcoat and 1 jack-knife stolen.

Saloon of Thomas Larson, 114 West Fifth street, 50 cents in postage stamps and 1 gold ring stolen.

Shooting gallery of George Dunn, who was robbed Wednesday night, applied to the police board that afternoon for permission to carry a revolver because he had no safe in his shooting gallery and did not think it safe to carry his day's receipts home with him without the protection of a pistol. His application was refused. He left his money in his place of business and was robbed.

Labels: , , , , , ,

November 15, 1907

DEATH RATHER THAN BLINDNESS.

Probable Cause of the Suicide of
Leo Mainhardt.

"I believe I am going blind. I can't see to read the paper at night at all."

Before Leo Mainhardt, the cigar dealer, left his store at 601 Delaware street Tuesday night that was a remark he made to one of his clerks. It is the belief of his business associates that he may have wandered about the streets until 12:00 when he went to the Centropolis hotel, engaged a room, then committed suicide.

Mr. Mainhardt's eyesight was rapidly failing and he was constantly worrying about his inability to see.

Constant worry over his ailment," Mrs. Mainhardt said this morning, "is the only cause to which I can attribute his act. He has never said anything that would indicate that he intended to commit suicide, however."

The funeral will be held this afternoon at the house, 1322 Euclid avenue.

Labels: , , , , , ,

November 10, 1907

IT MAKES THEM SNEEZE.

This Is the Powder That's Causing All
the Trouble in Theaters.

"Cachou" is the name of the powder that pests have been scattering in the theaters and other public places recently to make people sneeze. One cigar store sold ten gross bottles of the "sneeze powder" in three days last week.

Cachou is put up in one-half ounce bottles. It is advertised as a secret preparation. A druggist siad that it is made form soap bark and a small amount of tobacco.

Labels: , ,

November 6, 1907

FINED $50 FOR GAMBLING.

Man Says He Lost $110 in
Cigar Store Game.

On the testimony of David Wirchner of 705 Tracy avenue in police court yesterday morning, W. E. Jenkins, a cigar dealer at Eighth and Walnut streets, was fined $50 on a charge of gambling.

"I lost $110 in the store owned by Jenkins at 714 Walnut street," Wirchner said. "We were playing 'chuck-a-luck,' but some one else had the luck; I didn't. The way things looked to me I might as well have bet that I could jump off the top of a skyscraper and escape uninjured."

Wirchner has also placed the case before the grand jury. An appeal was taken to the criminal court.

Labels: , , , , ,

November 3, 1907

GIVE BOND OR GO TO JAIL.

SUNDAY LAW VIOLATORS WERE HUR-
RIED TO THE CRIMINAL COURT.

Judge Wallace Wouldn't Allow Them to
Wait Until Tomorrow -- "You're
Next," He Said to Barbers--
A Tight Lid To-day.

No cigars to-day. No shaves. No haircuts. Last Sunday these luxuries were available. But not to-day.

The cigar dealers indicted yesterday for selling on Sunday were counting on one more day of immunity. Then to-morrow they were to flock to the criminal court and give bond. It had all been arranged by their attorney, T. A. Mastin and Albert Heslip, county marshal. Then Judge Wallace heard and--

"What, allow them to keep open another Sunday in defiance of the law?" he exclaimed. "Not at all. These cigar dealers must learn that I mean business. They must be brought in immediately. They'll give bond to-day or go to jail."

THEN FOR THE WARRANTS.

The judge sent for the marshal. The marshal had gone to Independence. The judge then sent for Herman Weisflog, chief deputy. When that officer emerged from the judge's chambers he looked worried and he was mopping perspiration from his face. He seized a bunch of warrants and the first on the pile was one of thirteen indictments for Dan Lucas, a negro proprietor of a barber shop on Main street between Eighth and Ninth streets. He handed it to another deputy telling him to serve it.

"I thought you were going to wait until Monday," the second deputy said. "That was the agreement."

"You are not to think," was the reply. "The judge is doing the thinking."

Then the chief deputy began distributing cigar store indictments among the other deputies for service. He telephoned the news to the attorney for the cigar dealers and asked him to help.

BUT HE THOUGHT WRONG.

"I thought we were to come down Monday," the attorney protested.

"That doesn't go with the court," the deputy replied. "You will have to bring your clients here and give bond to-night. The judge says he will be here until mid-night if necessary.

Then the attorney telephoned the judge. No use. It was only a short time until those who had been indicted began arriving at the courtroom. Judge Wallace accepted bonds until 6:30 o'clock. Then he went to dinner to return at 8:30 o'clock. He took bonds until 9:30 o'clock last night. He required a bond of $600 for the first indictment and $200 bond for each succeeding one. Each bondsman was interrogated closely and none was accepted accept owners of real estate.

The first to appear was J. W. Hearsch, a dealer at 514 Grand avenue.

"I am an Orthodox Jew," he said. I close on Saturday and open Sunday."

"This isn't your trial," the judge said. "If what you say is true you will not suffer. Your bond is $600."

The next were Dan Lucas and his eight barbers. A deputy marshal had arrested them all. This resulted in closing the shop for a while. The deputy allowed the barbers to finish shaving customers in the chairs and then took them to the criminal court.

LUCAS TRIED TO ARGUE.

"There's nothing in this Sunday law against barbers working on Sunday," Lucas said. "I made a test case of it once and beat it in the supreme court."

"That was a special law against barbers alone and unconstitutional because it was class legislation," the judge said. "You were indicted here under the general law against working on Sunday, which applies to all classes of labor and has been upheld by the supreme court. All the other barber shops have closed. My advice to you is to do likewise."

The eight negro barbers sat in a row waiting for their employer to give bond.

"You're next," the judge said, indicating the second after the first had given bond. "You're next here like you are in a barber shop."

As each one gave bond the judge called "next" until all had qualified.

"Now, Lucas, I'll say this to you," Judge Wallace said as the negro barber prepared to to: "I don't wish to be severe with you if you show a disposition to comply with and not defy the law. If you close I will let you off easy, but if you defy the law you will have to take the consequences of a prosecution on all these indictments."

The negro barber said he would close on Sunday. He returned to his shop with his eight barbers and hung a Sunday closing placard in the window.

Miss Agnes Miller, owner of the cigar stands in the Kupper and Densmore hotels, was among those who appeared.

"There's a young woman; have her come up here first," the judge said.

Miss Miller advanced to the clerk's desk and acknowledged her bond; then she left the courtroom.

THEN A CAPITULATION.

Meanwhile the attorneys had learned that the marshal had orders to arrest "on view" any cigar dealers transacting business to-day.

"But," an attorney suggested, "we may not be able to get word to all the dealers of the agreement. Will they be arrested?"

"If the deputy marshals find any cigar dealer transacting business they will notify him to cease at once," the judge replied. "Should he comply he will not be molested. Otherwise he will be taken to jail, where he will be required to supply a bond or be locked up."

Then the judge began to make fine distinctions.

"The cigar stores," he continued, "may remain open to sell candy, news matter, soft drinks, fruits, nuts or any food that is cooked, so that it may be eaten on the spot.

"There's a distinction between food that may be eaten on the spot and food that must be cooked. One sort is a necessity, the other isn't.

THE NECESSITY OF CANDY.

"Now, why is candy a necessity, while cigars are not?" somebody asked.

"I have looked up the law carefully on this subject," the judge replied, "and I have determined that candy is a food necessity. Children must have it. That is my construction of the law.

The dealers who agreed to close to-day include the owners of practically all of the down town stores and of the hotel and drug store stands.

The theaters, however, under the protection of the federal court, will be open to-day as usual.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

October 7, 1907

ALL OF THEM OPEN

THEATERS DO BUSINESS SAME
AS USUAL.
SOME ARE PACKED TO DOORS

POLICE PREPARE TO REPORT TO
GRAND JURY.

Penny Arcades Put on Passion Play
and Sacred Music -- Judah Says
There Are Sermons in His
Bill -- Cigars Sold
as Usual.

Kansas City theaters really give Sunday performances. Bold policemen, acting under orders which came directly from the police board, found this out last night. Such a rumor had reached police headquarters, but Chief of Police Ahern diplomatically sent out policemen to learn the truth after the police board pledged support to the criminal court in putting on the Sunday lid.

Regarding the rumor of Sunday performances -- the policemen found "It is even so." They will report to their superior officer today the evidence they collected in the playhouses. The supreme court decisions, shipped in from Arkansas, do not say it is a crime for an actor or an actorine to act, any day of the week. But with the managers it is different, and the police caught 'em red handed last night. The manager who includes Sunday performances in his contracts with the public "works" during the show.

Down at the Grand a policeman caught A. Judah working -- smoking numerous cigars and nodding "yes" or "no" to the doorman when a friend of the house applied for free admission. Judah is a long-headed manager. He saw the reform cloud on the theatrical horizon and send down East for a fitting show for the first tabooed performance. "Arizona" is the bill, and Mr. Judah's public flocked to the show like girls to a marked-down carnation sale. The house was sold out before 7 o'clock for the night performance, and half an hour before the curtain went up the "admissions" were exhausted, too.

SERMONS IN HIS SHOW.

"Did you ever see such a turn-a-way," said Harry S. Richards, manager of the show.

"No," answered Judah. "But it's the show which brings 'em out this Sunday night. There's a good sermon in 'Arizona' -- the kind that sends the public home with better thoughts to dwell upon through the week. For a show with a sermon coupon, 'Arizona' is a scream."

"But does Judah really own the Grand?" asked a uniformed policeman of the ticket seller early yesterday morning. He was getting the evidences for the police board. It was his first stop. He finally departed with the information that the place is managed by Mr. Judah.

Policemen did not visit many of the theaters until after the matinee hour in the early afternoon. They then called at each of the first class houses and later made the rounds of the penny arcades and moving picture shows, taking names of manager and locations of the places of amusement.

HE HEARD A HYMN.

At many of the arcades the policemen, who are to make a report also on the character of the performances, were astounded to find the "Passion Play" in progress. Down on Main street an officer put a penny in the slot, adjusted the tubes to his ears, and then turned pale when the phonograph struck up a hymn instead of the ballet medley he had expected. He did not want the proprietor to think he did not like the place, so he ground his teeth and heart it "clean" through.

The officer assigned to vaudeville houses got blind staggers before he caught the right tip and performed the duty assigned him. At the Orpheum he found that Martin Beck is a Chicagoan. He went over to the Shubert and found a vaudeville service in progress, but a kindly disposed man outside told the blue coated officer that Mr. Klaw isn't expected here for a fortnight at least. No, Mr. Erlanger wasn't in town, either.

"Well, who is manager of this house?"

"I'm trying to be," answered Walter Sanford, the local representative of the theatrical syndicate of Klaw & Erlanger.

INSIDE INFORMATION

Chief of Police Ahern at first assigned regular theater patrolmen to bring in the evidence wanted. The men had the information already, and did not bother the managers, but they did "peep in" to see that the show really went on. Others, drawn to the theaters by curiosity, questioned employes. A policeman in uniform stood in front of the Willis Wood last night with the negro attendant who looks after the carriages.

"Who does run this house?" asked the policeman.

"The manager is Mr. Buckley, sir," answered the employe.

"Well," said the policeman, I thought Frank Woodward runs the house."

"No, sir, Mister Frank is business manager, and Mr. Buckley is the manager, sir."

"What's the difference between a manager and a business manager," asked the bewildered policeman.

"That's easy. Mr. Buckley, he runs the business. The business manager signs checks."

"Where does O. D. Woodward come in?"

"Why! He's the governor. He runs the whole business."

HIST! SAID HE.

When two officers in plain clothes applied for admission last night at the Century, Manager Joe Donegan stepped to the door of his office. Then he turned and said:

"Hist! We're pinched." He had forgotten he had occupied the office alone and was only talking to an empty room. But the officers merely wanted to see if a show was in progress, and they soon departed to round up the arcades and outlying playhouses.

Cigar stands continued yesterday to sell newspapers, cigars and other stock. It's alright to sell newspapers, but it's considered Sunday labor to sell cigars, and the cigar stands which stay open to sell newspapers are preparing to put the lid on everything else if the grand jury so orders. But the police made no attempt to close either cigar stands or grocery stores.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

October 3, 1907

JUDGE WALLACE UNDETERRED.

Declares Kansas City Will Be Closed
Tight as a Drum.

Because the board of police commissioners has so far failed to order the theaters, grocery and cigar stores and other places of business in Kansas City closed on Sunday, Judge William H. Wallace, of the criminal court, is not going to give up the fight. He said yesterday:

"The theaters will be closed Sunday. It is the law and it must be enforced and obeyed. If the police board does not care to make the order, and if the police do not care to enforce the law, I shall order the county marshal and his deputies to see that the law is enforced."

County Marshal Al Heslip said that he would serve any warrant which was sent to him from the county prosecutor's office. He wasn't quite able, however, to figure out where he would put his prisoners if he should be asked to arrest everybody connected with all of the theaters in Kansas City next Sunday. He suggested the possibility of locating the chorus girls out in Shelley park.

County Prosecutor I. B. Kimbrell said that he would prosecute any offenders against any law, in cases where there was evidence. He did not seem inclined to talk about the theater question.

Labels: , , , , ,

September 4, 1907

HORSE FELL INTO BASEMENT.

Man Arrested Blames the Mishap to
a Woman Driver.

Patrolmen Abbey and Fagan arrested Edward Vaughan late on the evening of Labor day, alleging that he was beating a livery horse which landed in the basement of a saloon at Twenty-fourth street and Southwest boulevard. There is a fire station at that point and the firemen had to cut the harness to extricate the horse from the basement.

"I was lighting a cigar," explained Vaughan, to Judge Kyle yesterday, "and one of the young women took the lines. Just then an engine whistled and away went the horse. I didn't drive it into a basement to get all skinned up as I did and try to hurt others."

Justice Young defended the case. Vaughan was discharged.

Labels: , , , , ,

August 25, 1907

"RED" MULKEY'S AMUSEMENT.

He Peppered North End Loiterers
With Ripe Tomatoes.

After an extended absence of eight long months in which his presence was pleasantly missed, George ("Red") Mulkey appeared in police court yesterday. "Red" is one of the sort of men who can "whip his weight in wild cats" when he is "steeped with wine," but will walk timidly forward and eat out of the court sergeant's hand in police court.

"After being released on bond," said the officer, "I found him out here on the corner of Fourth and Walnut, a tomato in each hand. Citizens, farmers and others were dodging in every direction as Red was bouncing the big red bulbs off of any who came in his path. And he is a dead shot, too."

"Red" told his old time story of "doin' nothing to nobody" and again referred to how nicely he could get along "if these coppers would attend to their own business and let me alone."

"On account of the fact that you haven't been in here for so long a time," began the court.

"He couldn't. He was out of town," said Patrolman Kennedy. "We'd had him if he'd been in town."

The court smiled and continued, "I will fine you only $10. That you can pay, I know."

"Red" didn't have the money but was given a chance to go out and get it. He was back in ten minutes with the money. On account of his alacrity he was given a stay for half the fine. He paid the $5 and asked: "Judge, what brand of cigar do you smoke?" The judge did not reply. "Red" is a union horseshoer so he bled himself forth and soon returned with a hand full of "good" cigars made in "Kansas City, U. S. A."

"Them's all union made, too," said "Red" as he distributed them to the court, court attaches, and newpaper men.

Labels: , , ,

July 20, 1907

FAT IS ROLLING OFF.


ONE OF FASTING MEN LOSES 24
POUNDS AND THE OTHER 14.


Voices Are Getting Weak, but P. H.
Harlan and Cliff Hogan Are
Sticking to Abstinence ---
Cigarettes, Too.

"I've lost twenty-four pounds in just four days," announced P. H. Harlan, the fasting undertaker, as he stepped from the scales last night, and Cliff Hogan, who had a day and a half the start of me, has lost only fourteen pounds."

"It was a mistake to say I wasn't hungry up to yesterday, for I was, but that was my third day and with it my hunger really left me, as it did with Hogan and with Dr. I. J. Eales, the Bellville, Ill., physician, whose fourty day fast inspired us to start."

Dozens of telephone messages, picture postcards and letters are pouring in on the two fasting neighbors at Fifteenth and McGee streets. Tempting invitations to dine on spring chicken and inch-and-a-half sirloins tumble out of the mail along with serious inquiries from other fat men who are anxious to see the experiment kept up and who will themselves try it if found practical.

Clifford Hogan, who manages the Crescent Automobile Company, was not at his place of business until evening, for he had worked all day at moving his household goods from Mount Washington to Twelfth street and Wabash avenue. He found the unusually hard work on a very empty stomach did not exhaust him. But his voice was weak, and so was Harlan's, though the latter says his wind is better than it has been for years.

Harlan, whose hands and one leg have daily become puffed up, says that since the second day of his fast they have not swollen. He did a great deal of walking yesterday and is so delighted with the results that he may not stop short of the month limit set by Dr. Eales.

Harlan, too, has the title of doctor, having been a practicing dentist in Chicago and Wichita until the size of his belt became so great that he could not get near enough to his dental chair to reach the patients. Then he returned to the undertaking employment, where the patients are not so nervous, anyway.

When Harlan banteringly discusses with Hogan the length of their fast, the automobile man recounts that a week's fast was all he promised himself for sure, and after the first two days he really planned that all the money he saved on meals for the week he would spend for Sunday dinner in breaking the fast.

But he thinks he will probably stay with Harlan on a two or three weeks' fast. He is remembering now that while he was soldiering in the Philippines and ill he lived for five weeks on malted milk alone, and possibly he has visions of tapering off from actual fasting on such a diet, but his running mate stands firm for absolutely no nutriment.

"My second and third days," said Hogan, last night, "every time I passed a restaurant or smelled food, I had a sensation in my jaws as of having mumps. But that left when my hunger disappeared.

"I'm using the fast to break the cigarette habit, too, which was fastened on me. I have switched to cigars, which I could not enjoy before. I always inhaled cigarettes, and I know that if I did now it would make me sick. I suppose that proves that I'm getting down from abnormal to normal, and from depravity to healthfulness.

"Having been reared on a farm, I know that fat in a hog's body is merely the storage of nutriment for use in case a period comes in which no food is available. Then a hog can live off of his fat without injury or inconvenience. And so I see no reason why Harlan and I should not live to advantage for a time off our surplus supply."

Labels: , , , , ,

July 7, 1907

BODY OF JOHN KIRK FOUND.

Is Cigar Stand Proprietor Who Was
Drowned a Month Ago.

The body of John Kirk, proprietor of the cigar stand in the New York Life building, who disappeared June 3, was taken from the Missouri river at Buckner, Mo., yesterday, and positively identified. Kirk is not known to have any relatives in America. He came from Scotland a few years ago. At the time of his disappearance there was talk of foul play, but when the body was discovered yesterday no marks of violence could be found and his watch and $30.15 in money were in his pockets. He was about 40 years old.

The body was taken to Duffy's morgue, and the funeral will be held from there.

Labels: , , , , ,

May 2, 1907

CITY HALL CIGAR STAND.

New Outfit Installed and Privilege
Goes to Highest Bidder.

Hereafter the city is going to invite competition in the bidding for the cigar stand privileges in the city hall. A case and counter costing $300 have been placed in the east end of the rotunda, and after July 1 the man who bids the highest for the privilege of presiding over it gets the plum. For years one man as had the privilege, paying but $6.50 a month, which included light, heat, and janitor service. City Comptroller Pearson said yesterday that one bidder had offered $25 a month for the stand, but he expects to get a higher offer.

Labels: ,

May 1, 1907

TORTURED A KITTEN.

Humane Officer Will Prosecute Offender
if He Can Be Found.

W. H. Gibbons, Humane officer, is looking for the person who placed a rubber around a kitten's foot at the cigar store of W. E. Jenkins, Eighth and Walnut streets, and caused the little thing so much suffering that it finally had to be chloroformed. The case was reported to him yesterday.

"There were two kittens there, a maltese and a black," said Mr. Gibbens. "Recently the clerks discovered that the maltese was holding up one of its front feet as if in pain. The kitten grew ill and could not eat and its leg was swollen to an enormous size. When it was chloroformed and a closer examination made it was discovered that a rubber had been placed around its foot just above the paw so tightly that the circulation had been entirely cut off. The man who placed it there probably did it in 'fun' to see the kittne shake its leg, but leaving it there was the inhuman part of it. I will bring the man before Judge Kyle in police court if he can be found."

The little maltese kitten and the black one were great playmates. When the maltese was chloroformed the little black one saw it after it was dead. It left the store within a few minutes and has never returned. Previous to that time, it had never been out of the store door. The clerks are wondering if it went off somewhere and died of grief.

Labels: , , , , , ,

April 28, 1907

BRIDE HOME AGAIN.

TEN DAYS OF MARRIED LIFE
ENOUGH FOR MRS. SMITH.
RAN AWAY FROM SCHOOL.

WEDDED AGAINST THE WISHES OF HER PARENTS
Father Gives Consent and She Returns to Home
Where She Was Marguerite Jackels--
Ready to Get a Divorce,
She Says.

Less than ten days of married life proved to Mr. and Mrs. Walter D. Smith, 20 and 19 years old, respectively, that the path of matrimony may e a thorny one. Mrs. Smith, formerly Miss Marguerite Jackles, the daughter of Charles F. Jackels, 3653 Harrison, left the roof of her mother-in-law, 1809 East Seventh street, last Thursday evening and returned to the home of her parents, where she declares she will remain.

The marriage of the two, which, in reality, was an elopement, a week ago last Wednesday afternoon, created considerable interest on account of aid given them by young Smith's father, in the face of strong objections made by the young woman's parents.

The young woman was a student of Miss Bigelow's private school, and on the date of her elopement attended the morning session. Walter Smith, who is the son of Sigel D. Smith, a cigar salesman, had left Central high school in January. The two had been sweethearts since childhood, but several months before their elopement the Jackels had forbade him coming to their home. On the day of their marriage the couple met and went to the court house, where the elder Smith was waiting. After procuring the license, a drive to the home of Rev. George H. Combs, pastor of the Independence Boulevard Christian church, was made, and in the presence of the father and mother of young Smith the knot was tied. Mr. Jackels, who is a traveling salesman, was away at the time, but when Mrs. Jackels heard of the marriage, three hours after it had taken place, she hurried to police headquarters to enlist the services of the police in helping her to locate the two. She heard that they were at the Kupper hotel, and there she rushed, to find that they had taken dinner there and gone. There was nothing for her to do then but to send a telegram to her husband. This was done, and the father of the girl hurried back to Kansas City. The couple had gone to the home of young Smith's parents to live, and word was sent by the father to his daughter that he would never consent to his son-in-law entering his home, but for her the latchstring would always hang on the outside.

For several days there was not a ruffle to mar the happiness of the two, but about the fourth day the young bride began to show discontent. The Smiths did all in their power to make surroundings pleasant for her, but to no avail. Last Monday she called up her parents by telephone, and asked her father if she might return home and bring her husband.

The reply was firmly in the negative, the father repeating his edict against young Smith ever entering his home. Wednesday she called her father up again and asked if she could return home, this time alone.

"I want to come home so badly, father," she pleaded. "I am sorry I did it. I wish I hadn't got married."

"Marguerite, I am sorry, too," replied the father, "but live with him a year, and then if you want to, come back you may."

Left alone Thursday morning by her husband, the girl brooded over her troubles, and, at last, declaring that she could no longer stand it, for the third time called up her father.

"Please let me come now," she said appealingly. "Let me get a divorce. I cannot stand this any longer."

The father finally gave in to his daughter's pleadings, and, accordingly to arrangements she met her father at the home of a girl friend, and the two returned home together.

"I am so happy to get back to my home," she declared. "It seems so good to have my mamma and papa, and be here right in my own home. I don't see whatever possessed me to do as I did. I will ever leave it again. I will never return to my husband under any circumstances."

Mr. Jackels said last night that so long as his daughter was happy he was satisfied with conditions.

"Of course, the marriage of my daughter was an unfortunate occurrence," he said. "it was a misstep on her part, but we are all ready to forgive her. Nothing has been decided as to what further will be done regarding obtaining a legal separation, but Marguerite will go back to school and complete her education. However, she will not go to school again in Kansas City. We had planned before to send her away to school next year and this former plan will be carried out."

Young Smith was out of the city last night. He went away Friday morning on business, according to his father, but will return within a few days.

"My son's wife received the best kind of treatment at our house," said Mr. Smith. "We treated her as if she were our own daughter and so far as her surroundings being made pleasant, everything possible was done by us to accomplish that end. Everything would have gone along nicely had not the influence of the girl's parents been brought so strongly to bear upon the young woman. Homesickness seized the girl."

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory