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January 7, 1910

SHOUTS MURDER IN YIDDISH.

Smitzle's Drop Into Salt Barrel
Calls Out Police.

Charles Smitzle, who sells kosher meat to his co-religionists under the careful supervision of the rabbi in a store at 1603 East Eighteenth street, is undersized, so he stood on a salt barrel last night when he went to light the gas lamp. If he was just short there would never have been a feature to this simple act in a thousand years. However, he is also fat and just as he stood on tiptoe to apply the match to the jet the barrel collapsed.

It happened that Smitzle was alone in his store at the time of the accident, but two of his patrons were in the act of coming in and heard the crash coupled with an exclamation in Yiddish.

"Something has gone wrong with Smitzel," said one of them.

They pushed the door in and saw Smitzel arise out of the debris with a bloody nose. They took note of the wrecked condition of the store and thought they remembered that the word Smitzle had used was "murder." They then rushed out in search of a telephone.

Report that on top of several holdups and assaults that had occured earlier in the day a lone Hebrew was killed by highwaymen in his place of legitimate business produced a sensation in No. 6 police station. Sergeant Michael Halligan immediately dispatched a patrol wagon loaded with officers. When they arrived at the address on Eighteenth street Smitzel had succeeded in lighting the lamp. He had used the meat block and it had held. The blood on his nose and been washed away and the treacherous barrel converted to kindling.

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August 26, 1908

ASKED BUTCHER TO KILL HIM.

Charles Timberlake Failed to Take
His Own Life With Three Shots.

Accompanied by his 11-year-old brother-in-law, Max Harrington, Charles Timberlake, a traveling salesman out of employment, left the home of his wife at 3501 East Thirty-first street, about six o'clock last evening. They walked to the corner of Thirty-first and Indiana, one block from home. Mr. Timberlake took a few steps around the corner, drew a revolver and fired three shots at himself. Two of the shots took effect and he dropped to the pavement. The boy ran home and told what had happened.

Henry Trott, a butcher at 3329 East Thirty-first street, was a witness to the attempt at self-destruction. He, with the aid of others, took Mr. Timberlake back to his home and the ambulance from the Walnut street station was called. One bullet pierced the left chest just above the heart, the other passed through the right shoulder.

Patrolman Isaac Hull investigated the case. It was found that Timberlake had only arrived here Friday from California. He had been stopping at the home of his mother-in-law, 3501 East Thirty-first street, where his wife had been for the last eight months. Little information could be gained at the house, but it was intimated that Mr. Timberlake and his wife had been separated and that he had come on here to effect a reconciliation. Mrs. Harrington said she believed all had been arranged yesterday. No one would ascribe a cause for the attempted suicide, and though Mr. Timberlake was conscious when removed to the general hospital, he would tell nothing of the affair to Dr. Thornton or to the attendants at the hospital.

More information was gained from the butcher, Trott, than anyone else. He said he was attracted by the sound of the shooting and ran to Mr. Timberlake as soon as he fell to the ground. "When I arrived at his side and asked him what he had done," Trott told the police, "he begged me to take his gun and finish the job, saying he wanted very much to die and had made a botch job of it."

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August 20, 1908

MEAT IS A LITTLE CHEAPER.

Retail Prices Have Declined as Much
as 3 Cents a Pound.

Retail meat prices are being quoted from 1/2 to 3 cents lower per pound than was the case a month ago. the reason for the slight decrease in price as given by the local retail butchers is that the wholesale markets have reduced their prices on meat stuffs, and that it is more profitable for them to reduce their own prices in proportion, inasmuch as more people will buy meat at cheaper prices.

The wholesalers give no particular reason for the decline in prices, saying that general circumstances make it possible to reduce the price of meat to the retailer a few cents a pound. The flood during the early part of the summer had a great deal to do with the large advance in the price of meats, which was maintained up until the last few days.

Steaks which cost the butcher 14 1/2 cents to 18 1/2 cents a pound are being sold by the retailers at 22 1/2 cents a pound. This is a decrease of from 4 1/2 to 7 1/2 cents per pound since last month. Rib roasts are selling from 15 to 17 cents a pound and cost the retailer anywhere from 14 to 17 cents a pound. Sugar-cured ham which costs the retailer 12 1/2 cents a pound is being sold for 17 cents, and pork, which ranges from 8 to 12 cents a pound at wholesale prices can be bought for 15 cents at many of the downtown markets.

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August 14, 1908

POISON ENDS LIFE
OF GIRL OF TWELVE.

FRIEND OF ANNA MAY WIL-
LIAMS A SUICIDE.

BROODED OVER
CHUM'S END.

"ANNA WAS PERSECUTED," SAID
VIVIAN BURDEN.

Then She Went to a Drug Store and
Purchased 10 Cents Worth of
Carbolic Acid as the Wil-
liams Girl Had Done.

Did the fact that Anna May Williams committed suicide prey upon the mind of 12-year-old Vivian Burden until she yesterday took her own young life by the same method -- carbolic acid? No other reason but mental suggestion has been ascribed as a cause for the girl's death by her family and the coroner.

Little Vivian had gone to the Woodland school with Anna May Williams, the 15-year-old girl who killed herself Tuesday afternoon at her home, 816 Euclid avenue. A discussion of the number of suicides, especially with carbolic acid, took place at the breakfast table in the Burden home yesterday. The death of Ana May Williams, Vivian's acquaintance, was, of course, discussed more than the rest.

"The girl was persecuted," she said "That's the way with step-papas, anyhow."

The child seemed much wrought up over the matter, but as she cooled down afterwards, little was tought of it.


NO TROUBLE TO GET ACID.

Yesterday afternoon Vivian left her house at 800 Lydia avenue, and went to the drug store of E. D. Francisco, Eighth street and Tracy avenue.

"I want 10 cents worth of carbolic acid," she said. "My mamma wants it to make roach poison."

The child, for she was nothing more, sallied when she said this, and seemed restless, as children do, to get away. "Before she left, however, she bought an ice cream soda and ate it at the counter. With the deadly poison clenched in her childish hands she went to the Bazaar, a store at the corner of Independence and Tracy avenues. There she took some time in selecting a pretty doll for her 5-year-old sister, Helen.

All of this took up about an hour, so that Vivian arrived back home about 3 p. m. Calling her little sister she gave her the doll, for which she had paid 35 cents and seemed delighted in the little one's pleasure when the doll was placed in her hands and she was told it was all hers.

No one suspected there was anything wrong with Vivian when she went upstairs to her room. Louise, 17, and Myrtle, 19 years old sisters of Vivian, were busy in the kitchen when Vivian ran in and said: "Call a doctor quick; I've taken some of mamma's roach poison." The sisters at first thought she was joking, but when they saw the condition of her lips and smelled the deadly carbolic acid they were thrown into consternation.


DOCTOR'S EFFORTS WERE IN VAIN.

Dr. Oliver F. Faires, who has an office over Francisco's drug store, was then summoned, and though he worked over the child until 5 o'clock, she died, having been long unconscious before the end came. Coroner George B. Thompson was summoned and sent the body to Newcomer's undertaking rooms.

Vivian Burden was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Burden. The father, a butcher, was not at home, being employed in Bartlesville, Ok. He was notified of his child's rash act and left for home last night.

"What cause can you assign for your daughter, Vivian, taking carbolic acid?" was asked of Mrs. Burden last night.

"I cannot believe the girl committed suicide because of any trouble either at home or with her playmates," the mother replied. "She was of a very happy and bright disposition and was never moody." Vivian regularly scanned the newspapers each day and was particularly interested in stories about suicides. The sad girl named Anna May Williams may have inspired her," the mother said, "as she constantly talked about the girl and the poor girl's sad life."

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July 2, 1908

WAR ON IMPURE MILK.

Pure Food Inspector Has a Plan for
Wholesome Supply.

Five milk dealers will be arraigned in police court today on charges of selling milk that had been watered and was insufficient in butter fats. Warrants are also out for the arrest of butchers on a charge of selling meat treated with sulphuric acid. Recent analysis of samples of ice cream picked up at random by the city pure food squad revealed the presence of gelatin and an absence of the ordinance requirements of 12 per cent butter fat. The offenders will be arrested.

Dr. Frank J. Hall, city pure food inspector, is conducting a campaign of education among dairymen and handlers of milk with a view of having it produced in a sanitary and cleanly manner and to put a stop to the use of preservatives and the watering of milk. He is outlining a plan which, when put in operation, it is believed will result in a better milk supply.

"I am going to give my plan a fair test," said the doctor yesterday, "and if I find the milkmen stubborn and not disposed to co-operate I will then invoke the full power of the law. The sale of impure and unwholesome milk must be stopped."

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September 27, 1907

SHE HAS NOT GONE AWAY.

Wife of Missing Michael Donnelly
Still in the City.

Mrs. Michael Donnelly, who, it was reported, had followed in the wake of her husband, Michael Donnlly, national organizer of the Butcher Workmens' union and mysteriously disappeared from the city, is at 1810 Washington street.

She stated last night that she gave up her restaurant and boarding house at 3103 Southwest boulevard because the expense was too great. Most of the boarders that she had there will still be with her at the Washington street cottage.

She has at yet received no word from her husband and refuses to express any opinion as to what has become of him, on the ground that her fears are of too serious a nature to be given publicly.

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April 21, 1907

ARRESTS A PRIVATE DETECTIVE.

Checked Out When No Funds Were
in Bank, the Charge.

When a city detective hunts up a private detective and says he wants some "detecting" done the private detective should not feel proud that a city detective has sought him, of all others, to do the detecting, but in reality should be suspecting that the detecting game is only a ruse and that the city detective may really be suspecting the private detective.

This proved to be the case yesterday when Detective Philip Murphy went to a private detective agency in the Temple block and asked that L. C. Henning be allowed to "do some private work." Murphy was really trying to locate Henning and the ruse brought him to view. He was told of the "private work" Murphy wanted as they walked along toward police heaadquarters, where Henning was booked for investigation.

On April 17 Henning deposited $5 with the Pioneer Trust Company, telling Walton H. Holmes, for whom he used to be a gripman, that he would place $1,500 in the bank in a few days. It is charged that Henning then gave a check for $10 to A. E. Murphy, 820 East Twelfth street, one for $7.50 to Charles Knelle, a Twelfth street butcher, and another for $6 to Charles A. Bond. It was said at the bank that other checks had been durned down. Henning did not deny making he checks, but said it was his intention to deposit money to cover them.

The records at the criminal court show that Henning was convicted on a similar charge January 6, 1906, and sentenced to two years. On March 2 of the same year the sentence was reduced to one year in jaail and January 7 last he was paroled by Judge John W. Wofford.

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February 26, 1907


BY A LAWYER'S AID.

ATTORNEY HELPED MRS. ROBINSON
KIDNAP HER CHILD.
AN OLD MYSTERY CLEARED UP.


CHILD WAS TAKEN FROM CHACE
SCHOOL LAST JUNE.

Mother and Father Had Separated and Courts Had Awarded HimCustody of Gertrude, 7 Years Old--Humane Officer Suspected.

When little Gertrude Robinson, 7 years old, was kidnaped from the basement of the Chace school by her mother on June 1 last year many persons, especially Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Weaver, 1404 Troost avenue, who were keeping the child, believed that Colonel J. C. Greenman, Humane agent, had aided Mrs. Robinson. A woman, well known as a local temperance worker, appeared at Colonel Greenman's office yesterday afternoon, however, and admitted that she and a lawyer had planned the whole thing. Mrs. Robinson, she said, came on here from Chicago and stopped at her home. The lawyer was called in and the three planned the kidnaping, which was successful.

Just after little Gertrude entered the basement steps at the school the morning of Friday, June 1, 1906, a woman was standing in the shadow. "Hello, Gertrude," she said. "Why, hello, mamma," replied the child. The mother threw a black cloak over her child and ran to where a carriage was standing on the Paseo. With mother and child the carriage was driven rapidly south to Fifteenth street and west. Then it was seen no more.

It was believed that Mrs. Robinson had stolen her own child, but this could not be proved. Woman-like, however, she had to tell it. Two days later a Frisco conductor came in from his run and reported that a woman with a little girl, described as the missing one, had boarded his train in Rosedale. He paid no attention to her, but she had told the train butcher her story. She said that after getting possession of Gertrude the hack had driven to the Southwest Boulevard and Wyandotte street. All that had been planned out beforehand. There she left the vehicle and boarded a Rosedale car, getting out there just in time to meet the ongoing Frisco passenger for Springfield, Mo. She left Springfield for St. Louis and went from there to Chicago, getting home the next day.

The child was not missed by the Weavers until noon. Then they instituted a search on their own accord, and the kidnaping was not reported to the police until 2 p.m., five hours after it occurred. All of the outgoing trains were watched by detectives, but the shrewd little mother with her babe was many, many miles from Kansas City railway stations. She knew they would be watched, that is, she, her woman friend and the lawyer.

Little Gertrude was the daughter of Harry G. Robinson. He secured a divorce from his wife by default, the notice of the suit having been printed in an Independence paper, which the wife never saw in her Chicago home. When she heard of it she came here and tried to get the decree set aside, but failed. The court had given the custody of the child to Robinson. Colonel Greenman had advised the woman in both suits and that was how he came to be suspected of advising the kidnaping.

The mother came here once," said the colonel yesterday, "and visited with her child at the Weaver's for a week. I suspected something wrong at the time and went so far as to make Mrs. Robinson leave her return ticket and all her money, but a small amount, with me, and saw her to the train when she left. She had visited at my house then and I knew if she got away with her baby I would have to bear the blame. When she did come here and succeed in kidnaping it I had no idea she was out of Chicago -- but I got the blame nevertheless of advising her to take it in the manner in which she did. I wouldn't use my office for breaking the law and am glad that Mrs. Blank has set me right."

The woman who helped to plan the kidnaping said she was going to tell the Weavers how it was all done -- some day, when she got a chance.

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