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July 26, 1909

FOUR JOY RIDERS ARRESTED.

Dale Gardner Just Strolling Around
When He Found Rig.

"Strolling around" was the reason given by Dale Gardner to the police yesterday for being up at 2 o'clock a. m. At Thirteenth street and Baltimore avenue his eyes fell upon a horse and buggy. The buggy did not belong to him but he got in and drove around the city. Later he invited three companions to drive with him. Eylar Brothers, to whom the horse and buggy belonged, missed it and made a report to the police.

Patrolmen Thomas Eads and Edward Matteson arrested Gardner and his friends at Sixth and May streets just as the sun was rising.

All were charged with disturbing the peace, and their bonds fixed at $26.

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June 5, 1909

ROSE TAKES MURPHY'S RIG.

Officers in Rosedale Put Abrupt End
to Her Brief Ride.

The hankering after horses of Rose Smith, a woman living at Thirtieth street and Southwest boulevard, who "just loves to drive," yesterday afternoon for the second time caused her arrest.

Rose climbed up on Thomas Murphy's hack, which was standing near Summit street on the Southwest boulevard, and whipping up the horses, drove away toward Rosedale. When Murphy came out of a store he discovered that his hack was gone, but he had no trouble in following. Rose was arrested in Rosedale by the city marshal, who delivered her to the Missouri officers.

"I just loves to drive horses," was the woman's explanation. "I wasn't going to steal them at all -- just out for a little drive."

Rose Smith was arrested in Kansas City, Kas., a month ago for undertaking a trip which differed very little from yesterday's feat. On the former occasion she took a horse and buggy.

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May 25, 1909

"MY NECK, NOT YOURS
BEING TRIED" -- SHARP.

PROSECUTOR INTERRUPTED BE-
CAUSE HE OBJECTED.

Fanatic Causes Attorneys Trouble by
Persistent Outbreaks -- State
rests -- Defense's Plea In-
sanity and Self-Defense.

"Self-defense and insanity will be the defense," said A. E. Martin of Martin & Bailey, counsel for James Sharp or Adam God, when court adjourned yesterday. The state finished its case in the afternoon and this morning will be begun the taking of testimony on behalf of the defendant. It is likely that the case will be given to the jury by Wednesday night, if not earlier. Sharp is being tried before Judge Ralph S. Latshaw in the criminal court for the killing of Michael Mullane, a patrolman.

Sharp was much in evidence yesterday. There were times when he boldly took charge of his own case, ignoring his attorneys and accusing them of not following his instructions.

Once, during the afternoon session, when the court refused to admit evidence of the shooting at the river front, Sharp spoke quickly to Virgil Conkling, the prosecutor, who had made the objection:

"MY NECK BEING TRIED."

"This evidence has to do with the dirty work on the other side. They show up all the dirty work on me, and don't show up anything on the other side. Let's have a little justice in the house of God. This is my neck being tried, not yours, Mr. Conkling."

"In that case," said the prosecutor quietly, "I will withdraw my objection.

The answer of the witness, however, showed he did not have the information desired by the defense.

Earlier in the day Sharp had remarked that "things were not going as they should." In the morning he took his attorneys to task for objecting to the testimony of a witness. Sharp insisted that the man was telling the truth.

Throughout its presentation of the case the state has persistently combated the plea of insanity. It has attempted to show that Sharp at all times was possessed of a keen mind; that he dropped all claims of being God, or Adam, or David, or any other Biblical character, and that his mind was reflecting on the consequence of the riot in which five persons lost their lives.

The appearance of Sharp at this time and the acute manner in which he follows the words of every witness would seem to place him out of the insanity class, at least so far as the present is concerned. As to whether he knew right from wrong at the time of the shooting is another matter and one to be determined by the evidence of the defense.

Sharp himself expects to take the stand and when he does an exposition of his religious teachings may be expected. From remarks he has made in the courtroom and from the manner in which he has interrupted witnesses it may be surmised he intends to tell that the police provoked the riot and that he shot to protect himself. Sharp has longed for days to tell his side, in fact, from the first moment of the trial.

SHARP IS TO TESTIFY.

Today will open with the statement of A. E. Martin, his chief counsel. Then there will be witnesses and depositions from persons who knew Sharp and his band. Besides these will be Sharp himself. The state may submit some evidence in rebuttal before the case is argued and given to the jury.

It was while Goerge W. Robinson, owner of the barber shop at 952 Mullberry street, was on the stand that Sharp jumped up and said, addressing Judge Latshaw:

"Your honor, they are swearing my neck away. My lawyers let these witnesses say what they will. They don't object enough."

Then Sharp advanced to near the witness stand. A. E. Martin, one of his attorneys, objected to Sharp's interference, but the latter said sharply:

"Don't cross-examine him . He's telling the truth."

Eugene P. Barrett, a farmer near Olathe, who participated in the capture of sharp, was put on the stand after quiet had been restored. Barrett was watering his team by the roadside the morning Sharp came along. They exchanged greetings, said Barrett, and when there was noise of a horse coming down the road Sharp crawled through a fence.

"We object," said Mr. Martin. "There's no evidence here there was a horse."

"Yes, there was," said Sharp, getting up. "He's telling the truth. I heard a horse and went into a field until the horse was past."

Sharp was told to sit down and Barrett resumed his story. Said he:

"I next saw Sharp about 3:30 o'clock this afternoon, December 10. Mr. Bair and myself were in a searching party made up after word had been received from Kansas City about the riot. We made inquiry and found overshoe tracks leading to a straw stack about fifty yards from the road. This was about a mile from where I had seen Sharp go through the fence that morning. He was in a small stack of oat straw, in a hole the cattle had eaten, and there was straw in front of him. It was impossible for me to see him until I got within fifteen feet.

CLAIMED HE WAS PARALYZED.

"Sharp got up and said: 'I've been taking a snooze.' 'That's a good place to snooze," I answered.

" 'What are you doing? Hunting for rabbits?' he asked, and I said, "Yes, I thought I might kick out a few rabbits.'

"By that time Bair had come up on motion from me and Bair told Sharp to throw up his hands. He refused at first on the plea he was paralyzed, but finally put them up. Bair and myself searched him and found a bloody knife, $105 in bills, about$6 or $8 in silver and some small change tied up in a bloody sack in an overcoat pocket. We took him to the road and there turned him over to Sheriff Steed of Johnson county. Then we went home.

Sharp whispered to his attorneys and the witness was not cross-examined.

Joseph Beaver, a farmer who lives ten miles northwest of Olathe, told of giving Sharp a night's lodging at the request of William Thiry, his brother-in-law. He said Sharp told him and Mr. Beaver's mother he was a peddler, and that his partner had left him because he had become paralyzed. He added his wife had deserted him three years ago and taken the children with her. Sharp said he had been reared in Georgia.

"That night," said Beaver, "Adam slept on the lounge. The next morning I fed him, and told him it was time to move, and he went away. He told me his name was Thomas or Thompson."

Throughout his testimony, Mr. Beaver referred to Sharp as Adam. He was asked no questions in cross-examination.

When Sheriff John S. Steed of Johnson county, Kas., took the stand, Sharp nodded at him and smiled. The sheriff returned the salutation. It was to Sheriff Steed that Bair and Barrett turned over their prisoner as soon as they had reached the public road. Steed took Sharp into his buggy and drove with him to Olathe, where he was put in jail.

BLAMED SALVATION ARMY.

"From that time until the officers took him to Kansas City, Sharp talked almost all the time, and I can remember only part of what he said," related the sheriff. "When I saw the knife that had been taken from him, I remarked that the ferrule on one end was gone.

" 'They shot that off,' said Sharp. 'It looks like it had been through a battle. I cut a policeman in the face with that knife.'

"I asked him if he knew what he had done, and told him the result of the riot. He said:

" 'My God, brother, is that so? It wasn't me that was to blame' it was the Salvation Army. They have been nagging me everywhere I went because I had a different religion from theirs. An officer came out of the police station and shook hands with me. Then came a tall, long-faced fellow, who pulled a revolver and told me to drop my pistol. I commenced shooting then. I suppose I'll be hanged for this. But I want to make a statement first. I want to write a letter to my followers and tell them how I have been misleading them. Then I am ready to die.'

"Sharp told me he deserved hanging or being put to death."

Sharp broke in and asked:

"Told you I deserved hanging? No, no."

The sheriff resumed his story:
"Sharp told me he didn't know whether he hit anybody. He said he shot to hit and meant to fight to the death. He said he had his beard cut off so he could not be recognized. Mr. Leonard, an Olathe newspaper man, talked to Sharp and asked him:

DENIED HE WAS CRAZY.

" 'What defense will you make? Will you plead insanity?'

"Sharp said: 'No, I'm not crazy. I have no defense to make. I am guilty and ready to pay the penalty.' "

Further, Sheriff Steed related what Sharp told him about the meteor that started him to preaching.

"He said a meteor had fallen on his farm, a flaming star, and that he had given up his old life and had been preaching since.

"About the guns, he told me that he had bought them and told his followers to shoot anybody that interfered with his business."

Robert M. Bair, a farmer who lives near Holliday, Kas., corroborated the details of the capture, as previously told by Barrett. The latter was at that time employed by Bair.

" 'That's awful! What have I done? I don't care now for myself, but I am sorry for the women and children I got into this,' " the witness said Sharp told him.

"I asked if his religion taught him to murder, and he said: 'It teaches me to shoot anyone that interferes with my business of preaching.' Then he cried a little. He told me he was mistaken about his belief that bullets couldn't hit him."

James Martin, 10 Delaware street, negro watchman for a boat club on the Missouri river, talked to Sharp on the river front a few days before the shooting. The defendant, said Martin, told him he was Christ and loved everybody, and talked religion to him frequently. Sharp's boat was at anchor near the club house in question for a week prior to the shooting, and its occupants were well-behaved, said the witness.

"Did you see the shooting of the little girl on the river front?" asked Mr. Martin, on cross-examination

Judge Latsaw sustained Mr. Conkling's objection to this question, and it was then Sharp spoke up loudly, saying there had been dirty work on the other side, and that it was his neck being tried.

"No, I didn't see the little girl killed," proceeded the witness and he was excused.

WHEN FAITH LEFT HIM.

Soon after Sharp had been taken to Olathe by Sheriff Steed, John M. Leonard, editor of the Olathe Register, interviewed him. Leonard related verbatim the conversation he had with Sharp, at least that part of it he was able to remember.

"I asked him about his faith," said Leonard, "and he told me I could not understand it. Then I asked him why not.

" 'Ordinary people can't understand it,' said he. 'Only people of God.'

" 'How did the fight start?' "The police tried to drive me off the street.'

" 'Why?' 'The Salvation Army was jealous of my collections.'

" 'Did you see any of the Salvation Army around?' 'No, but they tried this plan on me elsewhere.'

" 'Where was your faith that enabled you to dodge the crowd and get away?' 'I think it was.'

" 'Why did you get your beard clipped?' 'I wanted to get away.'

" 'Where is your partner, Pratt? Didn't he get away?' 'No, he was lying on the walk the last I saw him. I suppose he was shot.'

SAID HE DESERVED HANGING.

"I then picked up his hat, and remarking on the bullet hole, said:

" 'They were getting close to your head.'

" 'Don't talk like that,' said he. 'If the bullet had gone through my head it would have ended a good deal of worry for me.'

" 'Do you know what they will do with you when you get back to Kansas City?'

" 'I suppose they will hang me or take my life. I deserve it.'

" 'Are you going to try the insanity dodge?'

" 'No.' "

The witness did not remember the answer given by Sharp when asked why he had given a wrong name to the farmer who had fed him, but he said he did not deny having done so.

It was at the close of Mr. Leonard's testimony that the state rested and court adjourned for the day.

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May 12, 1909

LIVERYMAN OWN DETECTIVE.

Independence Man Recovers Valu-
able Horse and Buggy.

As Thomas Hughes, an Independence liveryman, was walking on Walnut street near Missouri avenue, yesterday afternoon he was wondering what had become of a fine horse and buggy, which had disappeared from his barn the night before. Hughes was on his way to police headquarters, in fact, to talk it over with the cops, when lo and behold, he espied the missing nag and vehicle. Walter Ayers and W. H. Dunn, young men, were in the buggy.

Hughes grabbed the horse by the bridle and then called Patrolman Henry Harris, who arrested Ayers and Dunn. The former lives about five miles from Independence, while Dunn says his home is in Kansas City. Hughes took his horse and buggy to Independence. The young men are being held for investigation.

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April 14, 1909

559 POUNDS OF GIRL
IN ONE BIG WRAPPER.

With a Waist Line of 88 Inches,
Pearl Rambo Is Still Taking
on Flesh.
Pearl Rambo, 559 Pound Girl.
PEARL RAMBO.
15-Year-Old Girl Who Tips the Scales
at 559 Pounds and Still Growing.

Pearl Rambo, aged 15 years and weighing 559 pounds, was a guest of Mrs. Everingham, matron at Union depot, yesterday afternoon. Pearl arrived in Kansas City from her home in Council Bluffs about 3 o'clock, and for more than three hours was the center of an interested group of spectators and questioners, while she waited for the train which was to take her to Abilene, Kas.

"No, I was not always so large," she said, "but from what physicians tell me, I haven't much hope of ever being any smaller. Since I passed through this city a little more than three years ago, I have gained 109 pounds, and they say that if I continue to gain weight at that rate, when I am thirty I will tip the scales at nearly half a ton. But I don't believe anything like that.

"I have had but very few sick days in my lifetime, and I feel pretty good most of the time. I eat whatever looks good to me, but try to avoid foods that produce fat. Perhaps once a month I eat candy, and then never much. Breakfast foods are struck entirely off my menu, and seldom do I eat those things that are usually served with sugar and cream over them. Sweet things seem to agree with me, but I do not eat them.

"There is only one other person that I know of larger than I, and that is Anna Fredline. She is 35 years old and weighs 670 pounds. When I get to be her age, I fear I shall weigh much more than that."

Pearl walked from the train into the depot unassisted and also walked to the train when she left. It was difficult for her to pass through the gate, and still more difficult to get through the car door. She managed to pull herself up to the first step alone, but, finding it necessary to turn sideways in order to enter, the porter was obliged to assist her.

With a width of forty-five inches across the shoulders, and an eighty-eight inch waist measure, this girl cannot enter an ordinary carriage. She must have either a very wide and very low single buggy or a spring wagon. Her arms at the biceps measure twenty-four inches in circumference. She says she likes to travel and see things and people.

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April 4, 1909

PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT.

Sergeant Halligan Rewarded for
Twenty-Seven Years' Service.

Sergeant Michael Halligan of No. 4 police station, for twenty-seven years a popular officer of the force, has been appointed to fill the vacancy made by the resignation of Lieutenant H. W. Hammil from that station last Wednesday. The latter is now a special detective at the Baltimore hotel. The appointment was made Wednesday by the police board, but Mr. Halligan did not receive the good news until yesterday when two of his friends from the city hall passed him in a buggy and called out:

"Congratulations, lieutenant!"

Later the official notice was received at the station and it was up to the newly-made lieutenant to buy cigars for everyone from Captain Thomas Flahive down to the reporters of the afternoon papers.

Lieutenant Halligan was born in County Wexford, Ireland, fifty years ago. He came to Kansas City in 1881 and became a member of the police force the year following. Since the day he was entered on the roll of patrolmen, walking beats out of Central station, he has not missed a day and there are no charges of inefficiency marked against him. Next to Captain Frank Snow and Chief Daniel Ahern he is the oldest officer in point of years of service in the department.

Patrolman J. M. Bottoms from No. 5 station has been named to fill the sergeantcy left vacant by the promotion of Lieutenant Halligan.

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April 3, 1909

PEDESTRIAN HAS AN INNING.

Eleventh Street Gets a Bath and the
Autos Stampede.

The pedestrian -- that meek and lowly man who ducks and dodges the restless and unruly benzine buggy in Kansas City's crowded thorougfares, and who is smile upon benignly by the carefree chauffeur, had his inning yesterday, or he might have had he been along Eleventh street, between Grand and Walnut, for automobilists who attempt to frisk up and down "Petticoat lane" have their troubles.

Early yesterday afternoon the street springling brigade took special pains to give the aforementioned section of Eleventh street a good bath. They succeeded in mixing a mud that made the surface of the asphalt as slippery as the floor of the oleo room in a packing plant. And when the first autoist to attempt to perform on the slippery surface rounded the corner of Eleventh and Grand the pedestrian's fun began, for the auto refused to make a scheduled stop. In a few minutes the street was full of smoking machines that groaned and chugged to no avail. They were all stuck.

There were cross words from chauffeurs and merry "ha-has" from assembled pedestrians. As the wheels of the autos whirled about like a buzzsaw and the cars did not move an inch, the merry crowds on the sidelines offered numerous suggestions.

"Give 'er the sand, pal," suggested a man who wore the garb of a motorman.

What they did give a majority of the stubborn cars before they got them out of the trouble district was plenty of push.

And the "common people" stood by and smiled broadly.

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April 3, 1909

USED WHIP ON HIGHWAYMAN.

Unsuccessful Attempt to Hold Up
Armourdale Physician.

Dr. Zachariah Nason of 636 Osage avenue, Kansas City, Kas., reported to the police that he was attacked at 10:30 o'clock last night by two masked highwaymen, who attempted to rob him at Seventh street and Tenny avenue. The intersection of the two streets is not well lighted, and while driving along Seventh street two young men, one of whom was in his shirt sleeves, stepped out from the shadows and commanded the doctor to throw up his hands. The smaller of the two men attempted to grasp the reins, while his companion approached the intended victim. Leaning out over the buggy shell the doctor struck the larger of the two men across the face with his whip and a second later struck the horse, causing him to break the hold of the other robber, and effecting his escape.

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December 16, 1908

GOING TO GOTHAM BY GOAT.

Man From San Diego Reaches Rose-
dale in His Slow Journey.
Captain Vivian Edwards Makes His Way Across the Country by Goat
CAPTAIN VIVIAN EDWARDS AND HIS TEAM OF ANGORAS.

From San Diego to New York, in a diminutive buggy drawn by a four-in-hand team of Angora goats, constitutes the unusual transcontinental journey, already more than half accomplished, by Captain Vivian Edwards, who reached Rosedale yesterday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock.

Captain Edwards, or "Santa Claus," as the children have dubbed him along the route on account of his horned team, is a cripple, having completely lost the use of his lower limbs, from paralysis. He is accompanied by J. R. Johnson, a globe trotter with a traveling record, according to himself, that embraces every corner of the known earth except Australia and New Zealand, and Cecil Fleener, a 14-year-old New Mexican, who has ambitions to visit all of the countries seen by his older mate, with the addition of the two antipodal exceptions.

Both companions of the goat driver are on foot and have walked every step of the way from California to Missouri, aside from about fifty feet which they rode through an Arizona mudhole. The camp paraphernalia of the party is borne by three pack burros.

Edwards is a great goat driver. He is making this long journey to further familiarize himself with the fidelity, endurance, magnamity and mental endowments of the creature. Then he's going to write a book on "Some Goats I Have Met," or "From Golden Gate to Gotham by Goat," or some such alluring title. That's the secret. The idea is to come rambling back, like Ezra Meeker did, and like the Alaskan and his dogs are doing, like they all do, in fact.

The goat driver's able bodied companion talks long and uninterestingly about the trip, which, for one of its kind, appears to have been extraordinarily devoid of incident and adventure.

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December 11, 1908

'ADAM' SHARP IS
TAKEN IN KANSAS.

JOHNSON COUNTY SHERIFF CAP-
TURES RELIGIOUS FANATIC.

IS WOUNDED IN BOTH HANDS.

BROUGHT TO KANSAS CITY AND
LOCKED IN HOLDOVER.

Offers No Resistance and Declares
He's Glad That His Fight Is
Over -- Abjures His "Faith."
City Hall Guarded.
James Sharp, Leader of Religious Fanatics
JAMES SHARP,
Religious Fanatic Who Styles Himself "Adam God."

After fifty hours' search by the local police and officers of nearby towns, James Sharp, who styles himself "Adam" and "King David," was captured three miles south of Zarah, Johnson county, Kas., yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. It was James Sharp who started a riot at Fourth and Main streets Tuesday afternoon, resulting in the death of Patrolmen A. O. Dalbow and Michael Mullane; bystander A. J. Selsor; and Louis Pratt, one of the religious band, and his 14-year-old daughter, Lulu.

News of Sharp's arrest reached police yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock and Chief of Police Daniel Ahern sent Captain Walter Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan to Olathe, Kas., after the prisoner.

A farmer named W. C. Brown living eight miles northwest of Olathe telephoned to J. S. Steed, sheriff of Johnson county, about 11 o'clock yesterday morning that a man resembling the description of the fanatic, James Sharp, had been seen in that neighborhood Wednesday night and yesterday morning. He said that the suspect had spent the night at the home of Joseph Beaver, a farmer living about two miles from him. Beaver, he said, was in Olathe and the sheriff could talk to him and get a good description of the man.

Sheriff Steed found Beaver and after having him describe the stranger who had stayed at his home decide that the man was Sharp and drove to the Brown farm, leaving Olathe about 1 o'clock yesterday. When he reached the Brown farm he deputized a young man who worked on a nearby farm, and the two men started a search for the mysterious stranger.

ASLEEP IN STRAW STACK.

A large wood pasture was first gone over, and then the officers separated and searched the ravines for several miles. A straw stack in the middle of an old wheat field was seen by the sheriff's deputy and, going around it, he found a man sleeping under the straw.

When Sheriff Steed reached the straw stack the man was called and told to come out. As he rolled from under the stack the men noticed he kept his hands in his pockets, and when they made him take them out they saw that he was wounded in both hands. After being searched by the sheriff, Sharp was placed in a buggy without being handcuffed and driven to Olathe.

Sharp told his captors that he was praying and contemplating while he was in the haystack as to what he should do. Weary with the long tramp from Kansas City and exhausted for the want of food, Sharp welcomed arrest and surrendered without any show of making a fight.

He was taken into the office of the county jail and his wounds, which had not been treated, were washed and bandaged by Sheriff Steed. He was then given a supper, which he devoured with eagerness.

ANXIOUS TO GO BACK.

While he was eating his meal the police officers from Kansas City arrived. Sharp greeted them and said he was anxious to go back with them. After finishing eating he told of his trip from Kansas City to the place of his capture.

"I shot five times at the police and when I had emptied my revolver I went into the saloon there on the corner and gave my pistol to the bartender. I told him that I was through, that I was not sure of the Lord, and asked him to take me to a policeman.. The man seemed to be frightened and did not move. I then tried to load the gun, but my two hands were wounded, so I could not do it. The cylinder would not turn. I was going to put the barrel in my mouth and blow off the top of my head."

Sharp said he then walked outside and stood in the crowd and watched the police and citizens gathering around Pratt across the street. Continuing Sharp said, "God then directed my steps south on Main street to Fifth street, and west up Fifth street. I went on down Fifth street to the bottoms. When I reached a barber shop I went in and had my hair clipped. I told the barber that my hands were frozen. Leaving the shop the Lord's will seemed to take me farther away from the shooting scene and I walked and walked.

"I WAS LOSING FAITH."

"I was losing faith in my religion because things had not come about as the revelation made it out. I continued walking all that night. In the morning I slept in the woods. That evening I went to a house and asked for something to eat and a place to sleep. The people gave me my supper, but said they did not have any place to put me for the night. They directed me to a house about 300 yards distant, to a cousin's. I stayed there all night and had my breakfast there.

"I could not use my hands and the man fed me. They asked me what was wrong with my hands, and I told them that I was paralyzed. I told them I was a peddler and that my partner had left me. I was afraid they would suspect that I was wanted in Kansas City and left as early in the morning as possible.

"After leaving that house, which was the Beaver farm, I went to that straw stack and hid. At first my only intention was to get away, to escape. Then I began to fear that I had done wrong and was debating whether I should go to some farmer and pay him to take me to a town and give me up. I had money to pay the man for my trouble.

"When the officer arrested me it seemed like I was going to heaven. I was so worried and had lost such a quantity of blood. I told the sheriff that I was glad he had me and the j ail would not be a bad place for me."

HAD PLENTY OF MONEY.

When the officers searched Sharp he had a number of cartridges in his pocket and a large knife, which he carried in his left hand and cut Sergeant Patrick Clark in the eye with. A large roll of bills containing $105 and a purse with $4.92 in it was also found in his pockets.

A large crowd of persons gathered in the jail yard at Olathe, and attempted to get into the room where the prisoner was. Everybody in the city wanted to see the man that caused so much grief by inciting his followers to murder and riot.

Captain Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan left Olathe and Sharp at 9 o'clock last night over the Frisco railroad, and arrived in Kansas City at 10 o'clock. The officers with their prisoner left the train at Rosedale and took a street car to Fourth and Wyandotte streets. They were afraid that friends of the dead and wounded officers who might have heard of Sharp's capture would attempt a demonstration against the prisoner. When the officers and prisoner got off the car he was placed between the two and hurried to police headquarters, where a large force of policemen and detectives were inside the station and also guarded the doors.

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November 8, 1908

BOTH DESERTED THE WOMAN.

Anna Smith Was Left Behind After
Buggy Collided With Automobile.

An automobile ran into a buggy containing a man and woman at Fifteenth street and Paseo last night about 7 o'clock. The motorists hastened away and the man in the buggy did likewise, leaving the woman, Anna Smith, 11 East Fourteenth street, sitting on a bench in a dazed condition. W. M. Pye, 3104 Paseo, who was passing in his automobile, saw the woman and took her to the Walnut street police station, where she was revived. The police are looking for the machine which ran into the buggy.

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September 24, 1908

FAITHFUL ANIMAL
GUARDED HIS BODY

HORSE KEEPS VIGIL WHEN MAS-
TER DIES IN ITS STALL.

WAS THE MAN'S ONLY FRIEND.

ECCENTRIC CONTRACTOR WHO
FITTED UP BARN AS A HOME.

Burt Davis Slept in the Stall With
His Favorite Horse and Death
Found Him There at
the Last.

After having been inseparable companions for several years, eating in the same stable and sleeping in the same stall, Burt Davis, a contractor, aged 55 years, was found dead in a stall with his horse in the barn occupied by both, Forty-third street and Indiana avenue, late yesterday afternoon.

Although heart disease is thought to have been the cause of death, Davis is said to have met with an accident last Tuesday in which he was thrown from his buggy, alighting on his head in the street. This accident may have been indirectly the cause of death, and is so accepted by the coroner as an autopsy developed the presence of a blood clot on the brain.

Davis was well known in Kansas City. He was a widower and noted for his eccentricities. Several years ago he gave up his home and took up his abode with his horse in his stable. For some time it had been known that Davis slept in the same stall with his horse, and, as the body was found there after death, it is altogether probably that he expired while asleep at the side of what he often characterized as his "only friend."

The body was found after Davis's absence had been noticed. It was his custom to be seen working about the barn at different hours of the day. An investigation was made. The interior of the barn was found to be fitted up with almost everything necessary in the ordinary bachelor apartment, such as cooking utensils, ice box, small table, etc., while on the floor was carpet which extended into the horse's stall.

When an effort was made to remove the body from the stall the old horse showed his displeasure by kicking and attempting to bite, and finally it was necessary to quiet the animal with a pitchfork before the body could be taken from the stable.

Other than a bank book, showing a balance of $100 in a local bank, nothing of value was found in the stable. It is not known whether Davis had relatives living.

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August 25, 1908

HE BEGGED TO BE ARRESTED.

Police Kindly Complied With Roy
Schultz's Request.

Roy Schultz, who formerly conducted a saloon at Tenth and Wyandotte streets, rushed into police headquarters last night, folowed by a pretty young woman, and requested to be locked up, saying that he had stabbed her. The woman, who gave the name of Anna Crisp and said she lived at Twenty-sixth street and Park avenue, declared that Schultz had not stabbed her.

When questioned she admitted that she had been stabbed in both hips in a quarrel while out buggy riding. The horse had started to run away and each held a line and it was to settle the question of which should hold both reins in the emergency that the stabbings occurred. Miss Crisp said that they had been quarreling because he had spent $3,000 on her in the last three years, and he had now only $50 to his name. The woman's injuries were trivial.

Both were locked in the holdover for a short time, and then released on $11 bond each, furnished by Schultz.

Schultz and Miss Crisp came into the lime light last New Year's night when she had trouble with H. R. Schultz, Roy's father, in the north lobby of the Midland hotel. Seeing her with Roy the father tried to induce the son to go home. Miss Crisp objeted and there was a regular hand-to-hand tussle for the possession of the youth. Finally the row reached the street and young Schultz tried to get Miss Crisp into a hack, but she was yanked back by the elder Schultz and then Miss Crisp alleged he struck her. At any rate she was arrested and later released on bond put up by J. H. Adams, a big-hearted real estate man from Texas, who had witnessed the affair.

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June 18, 1908

MAN FROM DEADWOOD
WAS AN EASY MARK.

Went for Ride With a Stranger, Who
Borrowed His Money and Also
His Purse to Hold It.

John Martin, a young farmer who arrived here yesterday from Deadwood, S. D., bound for Voland, Kas., is the easiest picking a confidence man ever had. He was not only "trimmed to a finish" by a "con" man yesterday, but was left at Thirty-fifth street and Troost avenue with a broken buggy belonging to E. Landis, 415 Wyandotte street. After "holding the bag" from 4 until 8 o'clock waiting for his new found friend to appear in another rig, John walked clear to police headquarters and led the horse.

Martin is 33 years old. When he arrived here he had $11.70 and a ticket to his Kansas home. While wandering about in the North End, he met a man who told him he was a horse trader, with a valuable string of ponies and he hired Martin to work for him. The man gave martin the lovable name of "Darling Smith," but said that he used the name of Milligan, after his stepfather.

After hiring Martin, "Darling's first move was to take his railroad ticket and leave it. John did not know where -- "but I was to get the money on it next week," he said. Just before noon Smith borrowed $5 of Martin's $11.70. After lunch they met by appointment and Smith had a rig in which he invited Martin for a ride, saying that it was "one of many." They drove to Electric park and on the way Smith informed Martin that he would have to use another $5 bill until tomorrow. That left Martin $1.70. In the park they took in all the concessions and John Martin was introduced to wonders he never believed existed -- the merry-go-round, shoot-the-chutes, the tickler, scenic railway and all.

Before they had proceeded far, in fact, just after they had had their pictures taken with "Darling Smith" on a burro and Martin by his side, Smith touched Martin for $1 more, leaving him with 70 cents.

"After he'd done that," said John Martin at police headquarters last night, "He borrowed my pocketbook with the 70 cents in it, saying he wanted to use it to carry his change. He was afraid he'd lose it, he said."

That last touch left John Martin of Deadwood, bound for Voland, completely strapped.

"And," Martin said, "I had a quart of good whisky, which I bought in Deadwood to take home to Pa -- paid $1.25 for it, too -- and when that feller Smith found I had it he said we'd better drink it. We did, or rather, he did, as he got the most of it."

On the way home from the park Smith was giving Martin an exhibition of fancy driving with one of his "trained" horses. He collided with a large wagon and smashed the right front wheel. Martin was left to watch the rig, while Smith returned to the city to get another vehicle. It was not until he had held the bag or rather the nag four hours that Martin began to wake up and take notice. He put the buggy by the roadside and started to town, asking all whom he met if they knew "Darling Smith."

The police have a good description of Mr. Smith and are looking for him. Mr. Landis, whose rig the "con" man had, took pity on Martin last night, and took him to his barn where he was given a bunk for the night. Landis said he might give Martin a job "until he gets on his feet and becomes a little wiser."

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June 13, 1908

CARRIED HIM HALF A MILE.

Wounded Lad Taken to Place of
Safety by Herculean Comrade.

Sheriff J. S. Steed of Johnson county, Kas., brought to this city last night for treatment O. C. Oberman, 18 years old, who had been shot at Corliss, Kas., yesterday morning. With him is Mike Stanislauski, 23 years old.

The youths left Topeka yesterday, and when they reached Corliss, Kas., it was raining. They were on foot and, as the depot there was unoccupied, they raised a window and entered.

"We had been in there but a few minutes," said Oberman, "when a young man whom I later learned was the son of a local merchant, came to the depot and ordered us out. He drew a revolver and struck me over the forehead. With the blood streaming down my face we made haste to get out. We had not gone ten feet, when he began to shoot at us, and the bullet went through my right knee."

Oberman said that Stanislauski carried him over a half mile through water up to his knees to where the ground was dry. Stanislauski was afraid to leave Oberman in the town. While Stanislauski was seeking aid a work train came along and the crew picked up the wounded boy and took him to Wilder, Kas., a station beyond where he had left Oberman.

While sitting on the station platform there debating what he would do Stanislauski said a constable came in a buggy two hours later and drove him to De Soto.

Sheriff Steed says he received word from the Santa Fe Company at Topeka to take the two men into custody. When he heard the story, however, he arrested the man who did the shooting and lodged him in jail in Olathe, Kas., the county seat. The sheriff said the man gave the name of Paul.

Oberman was taken to emergency hospital last night, where he was treated by Dr. J. Park Neal. Dr. Neal said that the wound was a serious one, as it involved the knee joint. This morning he will be removed to St. Joseph's hospital. He has an uncle in Detroit, Mich., who will be notified.

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June 7, 1908

POLICE REFUSE TO
GIVE INFORMATION.

"NOT TRYING WIX IN THE NEWSPA-
PERS," THEY SAY.

As in All Cases, They Are Seeking
Evidence Against the Accused,
Only, and Not That Which
Would Free Him.

"The police will give no more information concerning the Wix case. I think we have given out too much of our side already. We do not intend to try the case in the newspapers."

So said Captain Walter Whitsett at police headquarters last night when asked if there was anything new in the case. By "Our side" he meant the prosecution. He said further that the publication of too much of "our information gives the other fellows a chance to get busy." In other words the police department, a public institution, is run solely to prosecute men. When a man is arrested, charged with a crime, it is a well known fact that the police set to work to get all they can against the man and seldom take notice of anything in the prisoner's favor.

If Clark Wix is convicted for the murder of John Mason as he now stands charged, it appears that it will have to be solely upon circumstantial evidence as, so far, the police have no positive evidence.

The man's watch found in pawn in Wix's name at Silverman's pawnshop, 1215 Grand avenue, and later identified by Mrs. Lizzie Mason, widow of the murdered man and Maude Wilson, was yesterday proved beyond a doubt to be the property of Wix. In his statement Wix said that the watch was his and the woman's watch was his wife's.

When J. B. Schmeltz, 1231 Grand avenue, was seen he said that Detective Fred Bailey called him up about the watch. His mark in the watch was 10232107. The 102 Schmeltz places in all his watches and the 32107 when separated means 3, 21, 07, or March 21, 1907, when the watch sold. The works number is 14160503 and the case 6219763. It is a Waltham, size 16.


WIX BOUGHT A DIAMOND.

When Silverman's pawnshop was visited it was learned that the watch pawned by Wix February 10 last bears exactly the same numbers. Schmeltz also said that he recalled Wix bringing a diamond stick pin to him to be set in a ring and said that he believed he sold him a small diamond ring within the last year, possibly the one Wix gave to Maud Wilson.

The numbers on the works of the woman's watch in pawn are 10437364 and the case 67074. That watch is claimed by Mrs. Mason, who said that her husband was carrying it when he disappeared. She said that the watch was brought second hand, so it would be hard to trace the numbers in that case. Wix says the watch is his wife's and she confirms him. Her description of the watch is identical with the one in pawn. Her nurse friends used to use it when she was a nurse at the general hospital, and they all describe it as a large-sized woman's wath, engraved case, with a diamond in the back. Captain Whitsett says that the watch is being held as evidence and no one not connected with the police or the prosecution shall be allowed to see it. Harry Way, Mrs. Wix's father, said yesterday:

"That watch was given to Harriet by her uncle, Cyrus Way, fifteen years ago. It was brought from Roscoe Smulk, a jeweler at Shelbina, Mo, who is now dead. An effort will be made to get the numbers there, but I don't think they keep them."

If the watch was ever cleaned or repaired by a jeweler here, the numbers will be found here, and the defense is working along those lines now.


WHEN HE WAS ELEVEN YEARS OLD.

Some of the new information received by the police yesterday that, twelve years ago, while hunting near Ottawa, Kas., with a man named Alvin Keller, the latter was supposed to have been accidentally shot by Wix, and that the belief was that it was not accidental. Wix is now 23 years old, so, if that is true, he was only 1 years old when the informant seems to cast suspicion upon him.

It was learned yesterday that on Sunday, January 26, when Mason disappeared, he was about the barn of W. A. Marshall, 1417 Walnut, during the morning. He took John Nevins out and drove him through Penn Valley park in an effort to sell him a horse. Nevins, who is a horseshoer, did not take the horse. Then Mason called up George Coleman, a liveryman, and tried to sell him the buggy and harness. He was turning all his property into cash, as his wife had sued him for divorce.

While Coleman was looking at the buggy Mason left the barn. That was about noon. About 2 p. m. he called Marshall and said:

"I will be over pretty soon with Clark Wix, and I want you to knock that trade with me."

"I asked him what he meant," said Marshall, yesterday, "In his broken German he had used knock for boost. I don't see how he could have been talking in the presence of Wix, to whom he wanted to sell a team."


DISPLAYED HIS MONEY.

Detectives "Lum" Wilson and J. L. Ghent were assigned on the Mason case yesterday, and they took a new tack. They found out where Mason had often showed his money, that he did not choose his company well, and was often known to have shot craps with negroes. Any of that class may have known that Mason carried a large sum of money, and he might have been killed by them.

The police had several men in the office of Captain Whitsett last night, sweating them and taking their statements. Some of them are believed to have been men who worked for Wix at the time of Mason's disappearance. It is known that an old man named Barslow, a barn foreman, was told to be there at 8 p.m. One of the men who worked about there at the time and who knew Mason and his habits well is now being looked for by police with two different warrants for swindling transfer men and others for whom he worked. That is he collected C. O. D. money and decamped. That man's name is Gale Chaney, and his brother Tom also worked there. Another man now driving a newspaper wagon may be questioned by police.

Every person who ever knew Wix is now rallying to hi support in his hour of trouble. The verdict of many seen yesterday was, "He was the hardest worker I ever saw, and at the same time a man of jolly disposition. I can't conceive his committing such a crime and feel that he will come out all right."

Funeral services of John Mason, the murdered man, will be held at 2 o'clock this afternoon at Freeman & Marshall's undertaking rooms, 3015 Main street.

Burial will be in Mount Washington cemetery.

Prosecutor I. B. Kimbrell and the grand jury were ready at 10:30 yesterday morning to examine Clark Wix and the evidence in the case against him, on which he is held in the county jail for the murder of John Mason, but Inspector M. E. Ryan telephoned that he did not have his evidence in shape to present. The grand jury then adjourned until Monday.

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June 7, 1908

JOSEPH H. RAYBURN IS DEAD.

Assistant Fire Chief Was Injured
While Trying to Spare Another.

Joseph H. Rayburn, assistant fire chief, died last night at 6:30 o'clock from injuries sustained in an accident while going to a fire May 19. Mr. Rayburn was at home for lunch, when an alarm of fire from the home of Dr. B. F. Watson, 2401 Wabash avenue, was turned in. Mr. Rayburn used his buggy in going for his meals, so the alarm was telephoned to his house, and he started to the scene of the fire. Rayburn, in driving on Wabash, collided with the cart of a by delivering papers. In attempting to avert the collision, he swerved sharply, turning his buggy over and throwing him against an iron lamp post.

He was unconscious when picked up and taken to St. Joseph's hospital. The injuries were thought not to be dangerous, but peritonitis developed later.

Mr. Rayburn lived at 3031 Prospect avenue with his wife and two sons. He was 47 years of age.

Mr. Rayburn was one of the best liked men on the fire department. He was appointed to the department and assigned to No. 8 engine company, December 21, 1886. He was promoted to a captain November 4, 1895, and placed in charge of No. 18 engine company. January 7, 1907, he was appointed sixth assistant chief, and placed in command of engine company No. 14, located at Twenty-sixth and Prospect avenue.

The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9:30 o'clock at the residence, 3031 Prospect avenue. Services will be held at the New Annunciation church, corner of Linwood and Benton boulevards, at 10 o'clock. Interment will be in Mount St. Mary's cemetery.

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May 26, 1908

DROWN IN SWOLLEN CREEK.

Kansas City Girl and Little Brother
Are Among Victims.

TRENTON, MO., May 25. -- (Special.) Mrs. Benjamin King of Brimson, Mo., Miss Anna Coakley, aged 18, and her 5 year old brother, the latter two of Kansas City, were drowned while attempting to cross Sugar creek near Brimson, about 6 o'clock last night. In the carriage were three other persons who escaped, Benjamin King, husband of the drowned woman, and his daughter and grand-daughter. They were attempting to cross the stream, which was swollen by heavy rains, on a low wagon bridge, which was covered with water. Mr. King, who was driving, miscalculated the distance and drove off the bridge. The buggy was washed down stream.

The bodies of Miss Coakley and her brother were recovered with the vehicle. Mrs. King's body has not been recovered.

Mr. King, who is about 60 years old, made a heroic rescue of his daughter and grand-daughter while his wife sank before his eyes. Mr. King is an agent at Brimson for the Quincy, Omaha & Kansas City railroad.

Miss Coakley and brother were visiting Mr. and Mrs. King.

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February 26, 1908

THEIR NOISE RUINED
HIS GENTLE HORSE.

SCARED HIS WIFE, HURT HIS
BABY, INJURED HIM.

So Farmer Harnish Sues Members of
the Motorcycle Club for Dam-
ages Done Him Last
Fall.

The Kansas City Motorcycle Club members, nineteen strong, have avoided the road to Greenwood, this county, since November 3. That day eighteen of them were waylaid by a mob of twenty-five farmers armed with stones. Only one escaped. And County Judge George J. Dodd was chief spokesman for the beseiging party.

It all came out yesterday when suit was filed in Justice Young's court by Angie Harnish against the club members for $800 damages.

Harnish, according to the papers filed, was driving in a top buggy with his wife and 2-year-old child to Greenwood, when just at the outskirts of the town the "the defendants in a body known as the Kansas City Motorcycle Club, mounted on motorcycles," bore down on his rear "at high speed," carelessly and negligently running upon and by him, the loud and explosive exhaust noises, frightening until he became unmanagable, the horse, which was "not acquainted with motorcycles."

Harnish attempted to alight to seize the horse's bits, and the lunging of the animal threw him into the rock road. The woman, busy with the lines, dropped the baby between her feet and frantically begged the cyclists to stop for the sake of hersef and the baby. Instead of this it is alleged the cyclists only laughed, and trying to outrun the maddened horses, allowing the whirr of the explosive sounds to continue until the horse and buggy smashed into a fence. The baby and Harnish were seriously bruised, the horse, formerly gentle, was ruined, its owner says, and the harness and buggy broken.

A few hours later, when the cycle club members came back that way, they were helf up with a threat of stoning Only one cyclist had the fear or the nerve to run the gauntlet. The others stopped and took their medicine in the form of threats as to what would happen if they ever came back -- and they haven't been back.

The cyclists say that udge Dodd, though an officer of the law, declared to them that he would take the law into his own hands if they did return. Nineteen of them are named, and the amount asked is $800, half of it for actual damages and half for exemplary damages. The case was set for March 3.

Those named as defendants are: R. D. Martin, president of the club; L. J. Vogel, F. J. Hahn, C. Hanson, J. B. Porter, Ned D. Bahr, O. V. Newby, J. N. Glass, Lloyd C. Shielaberger, Fred Berry, Oscar J. Plummer and Dan Patterson.

Bucknew and Houston are attorneys for the plaintiff, and they furnished the court constable with all the addresses of the defendants.

"I know the eighteen of us should have licked those two dozen farmers if the fight had really got started," said R. D. Martin, president of the club, last night, "but we are always considerate of people we meet, and we told them so then, instead of being ugly."

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February 8, 1908

SUING ON PLUMBERS'S BOND.

City Wants Martin & Keck to Make
Good a Judgment.

Suit for $1,246.50 against Martin & Keck, plumbers, and their bondsmen, the National Security Company, was brought in the circuit court yesterday by Kansas City. The plumbing firm, it is alleged, left an excavation in front of house number 2824 Olive street unguarded on January 8, 1906, so that Maud G. Norris drove a buggy into it, overturning the buggy and breaking her arm. She sued the city and last June got a verdict for $750 damages.

The city wants the plumbing company to pay this judgment and the incidental costs, because the company is under $1,500 bond, through the National Security Company, to the city to put the dirt back in excavations it digs in the streets or to barricade the excavations.

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February 4, 1907

DR. EUBANK'S HORSE STOLEN.

Twice in Two Years He Is the Mark
of a Thief.

Dr. A. E. Eubank, formerly police surgeon, was the victim of a horsethief last night while attending a meeting of the church board of the Olive Street Baptist church, Ninth and Olive streets. He had left the horse and buggy in front of the church, fastened to a weight. When he went to drive home he found only the weight and strap. The thief had unsnapped it.

The horse was a light sorrel, with a white left hind foot and a white star in forehead. The animal was valued at $150, and the buggy, a black stanhope, at $100.

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January 30, 1908

BABY LOST NEAR HOME.

Lela Weldon Enjoyed Her Ride to the
Police Station.

A little girl, almost a baby, pushing an empty go-cart up and down Holmes, Charlotte, and Campbell streets in the vicinity of Fifth street late yesterday afternoon attracted some attention. The little one seemed to be in search of some place, but she kept steadily on, asking no questions.

After two hours of tiresome walking the tot pulled up at a grocery store at Fifth and Holmes streets and announced that she had "lost her mamma and home." She was given a cracker box to rest upon while the police were notified. The tired little one was carried to police headquarters and place in charge of Mrs. Joan Moran, matron.

About 7 o'clock the child's mother, Mrs. J. J. Pearson, 740 Locust street, called for her. She said the baby's name is Lela Neeley Weldon.

"I sent her about a block away for the baby buggy," the mother said, "and when she came out of the house she turned the wrong way. Then she got lost and began to wander about trying to find her home."

It was said by persons who saw little Lela that she was often within a half block of her home. She has lived here but six weeks, coming here with her parents from St. Louis. Most children howl like the Indians when taken in charge by the police, but Lela said she like the ride to the station on the "treet tar."

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January 6, 1908

MANY HORSES
DIE IN FLAMES

FORTY-TWO PERISH WHEN WY-
ANDOTTE LIVERY BURNS.

Two Heroes Carry Crippled Woman
From Blazing Rooming House.
Three Buildings Destroyed.
Loss $40,000.

Forty-two head of horses, most of which were roadsters owned by business and professional men, perished in a fire that destroyed the Jockey Club livery and boarding stables at 446 Minnesota avenue, Kansas City, Kas., last night shortly after 8 o'clock. A number of the animals were family buggy horses and were boarded at the stable by the owners. In addition to the livery stable loss, the hardware establishment of F. & F. Horseman, at 905 and 907 North Fifth street, and the tin shop of Cashman & Beard, at 909 North Fifth street, were burned. These buildings, which were small frame structures, were reduced to ashes and the contents totally destroyed. The aggregate loss caused by the conflagration is estimated at about $40,000, a small percentage of which is covered by insurance.

Not the least thrilling incident during the fire was the daring rescue of Mrs. Eliza Johnson, a crippled woman, from her room on the second floor of E. M. La Veine's rooming house at 901 North Fifth street. Mrs. Johnson, both of whose legs were amputated some years ago, was left helpless in her room when the smoke from the blaze next door filled the house. La Veine's house was ablaze when Patrolman Edward Fraker and Fireman Charles Abram found their way up the back stairs and carried her through the smoke and flames to a rear window and down a ladder. Mrs. Lottie Hartley, who had previously escaped from the same building, fainted when she saw the rescuers enter the building to save Mrs. Johnson.

ONLY NINE HORSES SAVED.

The fire was discovered by James McGuire, a stable hand, who noticed smoke issuing form the basement of the barn where a number of the horses were kept. He gave the alarm to several other employes of the stable who were sitting in the office, and before an investigation could be made flames commenced to shoot through the first floor of the building from the basement. An alarm was turned into fire headquarters, and while the stable is only a block from the city hall the flames had gained considerable headway before the first stream of water was turned on. he firemen did rapid work, but the water pressure was so weak that little could be done to check the fire until the steamers were brought into play.

As near as could be estimated last night by Emmett W. Uhrich, proprietor of the stable, there were fifty-one horses in the barn at the time the fire broke out. Thirty-seven of these were in stalls on the second floor of the barn and the remaining fourteen were in the basement. Immediate attention was given to the imprisoned animals, but the smoke and fire had maddened them and it was almost impossible to get them out of their stalls. Many were released from their halters and started out of the barn, but in their frightened condition they would invariably rush back into their stalls. Of the total number in the barn only nine were rescued.

The fire spread rapidly and when the hay was reached the flames burst forth as if fed by oil. He hardware store and tin shop, which adjoined the barn on Fifth street, were soon in flames and, as the buildings were old frame structures, they burned like kindling. At one time a large number of business houses in the vicinity of Fifth street and Minnesota avenue were endangered.

KEGS OF POWDER EXPLODED.

While the fire was at its height and the firemen fighting desperately to get control of it thousands of cartridges began exploding in the ruins of the hardware store. Two or three kegs of powder also exploded. This made the work of the firemen hazardous, but they stuck to their posts of duty.

It is said the fire started in the northwest corner of the basement among the hay bales there. Probably it was spontaneous combustion, as some of the bales were wet when put into storage a few days ago, and the barn is heated by steam pipes, which also run through the basement.

James McGuire, who turned in the alarm, says of the origin of the fire:

"I was coming up the street from Minnesota avenue, when I saw flames issuing from a window in the basement. I stooped and, looking in, saw horses in great commotion within the barn. One of them, a beautiful animal, had his nosed pressed through the broken pane of a window farther down on the west side of the building, as though pleading for rescue."

G. A. Vaughn, foreman of the stables, who lived on the second floor in the southeast corner of the barn with his wife, was sitting at a piano idly drumming on the keys. Suddenly he thought he smelled smoke, and, turning, saw a thin column arising from a nail hole in the floor near the entrance from the loft.

Vaughn says he had just time to help throw out some of the smaller articles of value in the room and help his wife escape. All his personal effects to the value of $1,200 were destroyed.

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December 11, 1907

SHOT DOWN IN BARROOM ROW

W. H. BARNES KILLS JAMES E.
WHITE, A MOTORMAN.

PISTOL AGAINST HIS HEART

"WHY DID I GET DRUNK? WAILS
DYING MAN.

Murderer Surrenders and Is Now in
Jail -- Holds Weapon Leveled at
His Victim Some Minutes
Before Firing.

In a barroom brawl yesterday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, W. H. Barnes of Argentine shot and killed James E. White, a motorman in the employment of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, living at 816 Bank street. The fight, according to the story told by an eye witness, was begun by White. Barnes, or "Hank," as he was commonly known, was standing by the bar in Peter McDonnell's saloon, Twelfth and Charlotte streets, with a friend. White entered the room and, seeing some of his acquaintances, began to joke and jostle them in a familiar way. He had been drinking heavily.

Going down the line of men at the bar and speaking to each of them, he stepped up to the young man who seemed to be under the protection of Barnes, and spoke to him, lurching heavily against him as he did so.

The young man resented the drunken familiarity and demanded an explanation of White. But White did not choose to explain matters, and went on teasing the boy, who finally started to strike him. At this juncture Barnes interfered and began to make threatening gestures at White. They were standing within two feet of each other when White made a move towards his hip pocket with his right had as if attempting to draw a revolver. Barnes immediately drew a revolver himself and leveled it at White's heart.

Not believing that either man meant his move in any other manner than a joke, White threw off his coat and turned completely around, evidently to show that he was not the possessor of a revolver. Barnes did not lower the revolver, which was pointing at White. This made the drunken man angry, and he called Barnes many vile names.

FISTS AGAINST REVOLVER.

Mere words and threats did not lower the revolver which Barnes, with a steady hand, kept aimed at his heart for fully two minutes, so White started in bare-handed to disarm Barnes. He struck at him twice, neither blow reaching Barnes. Barnes said nothing, but stepped a little nearer White and pulled the trigger of the revolver. The cartridge did not explode, and Barnes waited another instant before pulling the trigger a second time.

This time the revolver did its work, the bullet striking White in the left breast slightly to the left of the heart. White did not stagger or fall, but kept to his feet and walked steadily to the rear of the saloon where several men had been playing cards. One man who had been standing in the inner doorway during the fight hastened forward to help the wounded man, who tried to throw him aside, saying: "I can whip him any time, but he got me like a coward just now."

He finally consented to sit down after considerable urging on the part of his friends. The minute that he sat down in the chair he became deathly sick and lost consciousness for a short time.

"I HAD TO DO IT."

After firing the last shot, Barnes walked out of the door leading into Charlotte street, remarking to a friend whom he passed, "Bob, I had to do it, didn't I?" He then jumped into his buggy, which was standing by the sidewalk, and drove rapidly south on Charlotte.

Hearing the shot, Officer Ed Doran ran into the saloon to investigate. By the time he arrived, Barnes had gone. The officer telephoned to the Walnut street police station for the ambulance. White was treated by Police Surgeon Dagg, who, seeing his critical condition, ordered him taken immediately to the general hospital.

On the way to the hospital White tried to talk and to answer questions, but the effect of the liquor and the mortal wound were too much for him, and he would only cry out hoarsely: "I know him. I know him. What is his name, I forget? He got me, yes, he got me. Oh, why did I get drunk!"

He died within two hours after he arrived at the hospital, from an internal hemorrhage caused by the bullet, it is thought that the bullet was one of the 38 caliber, as it pierced the body through.

THE MURDERER SURRENDERS.

Several hours after the shooting Barnes appeared at the county jail, where he surrendered. He is now in jail.

Barnes had owned the saloon in which the shooting occurred up to a little over a year ago, when he sold it to Rube Snyder, who sold it to its present owner, Peter McDonnell, a month ago.

White had been a motorman on the Metropolitan for about four years. He ran the Troost avenue owl car for some time, when he was transferred to a daylight run on the Broadway line.

White had been granted a divorce from his wife, Pearly White, by Judge Powell at Independence Monday afternoon. The divorce was granted on the grounds of desertion. His wife does not live in this city and her present address is unknown.

White was born in Caldwell county, near Breckenridge, Mo. He was about 35 years of age. He lived on his father's farm up until four years ago when he moved to Kansas City. His fellow workmen say that he was one of the best natured men in the service of the street car company.

SALT WATER IN HIS VEINS.

It was believed from the first that White would die from the effects of the wound, but the doctors and nurses at the hospital did all in their power to save his life. Word was received from Captain Thomas Flahive of the Walnut street police station that he would be out to the hospital in order to take a dying statement, but when he arrived he found White too near dead for the police to gather much information from him.

While lying upon the operating table he called time and again for Gertrude Stevens, moaning desperately, "I want my girl. I want my girl." He gave her name and said that she worked at the Fern laundry. When she arrived it seemed to have a good effect upon him, for he no longer groaned and was willing to lie quietly, a thing he had refused to do before.

She stooped over and kissed him upon the forehead, talking soothingly to him. He asked to be moved over on his right side, that he might better see her and talk with her. "He shot me," was all that he would say, and then closed his eyes as if everything was satisfactory.

Three nurses and Miss Stevens stayed with during the hour he survived. His sweetheart stood over his body for several minutes after his death, and then left the hospital without a word. It is said that his recent divorce was procured so that he and Miss Stevens might be married.

SELF-DEFENSE, SAYS BARNES.

When seen at the jail last night, Barnes made the following statement in regard to the shooting: "There is not much left for me to say. I shot him in self-defense. He was a man about twice my size, and was ready to fight with me. I am much older than he and knew that I would stand now show with him when it came to a test of strength. For that reason, and to protect myself, I drew a revolver."

"If I had to go through it again, I would let him wipe up the earth with me rather than to even threaten him with a revolver. I did not try to evade the offense, but I just wanted to be the first to tell the unfortunate affair to my wife and family. I live on a farm about a mile and half from Argentine. It took me some time to drive out there and back again. As soon as I opened my front door I told my wife of the affair and told her that I had to go back to the city and surrender. I then drove directly to the jail.

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October 3, 1907

WOMEN HURT IN RACE.

Mrs. C. B. Stevens and Mrs. R. S. Fis-
ette Drive Into Rosedale Car.

An impromptu driving race in Roanoke boulevard last night resulted in a collision with a Rosedale car at Southwest boulevard and Genesee street, and two women were severely injured. Mrs. C. B. Stevens, the owner of the horse and buggy, was taken to her home at 1180 Kansas avenue, in an undertaker's ambulance. Her companion, Mrs. R. S. Fisette, residing at 1621 Kansas avenue, was taken to the Eleanor Taylor Bell Memorial hospital in Rosedale. Both suffered severe bruises about the head, shoulders and back.

The street car crew, J. H. Drilling, motorman, and William Jordan, conductor, was arrested by Patrolman Todd, but released on bond by the commanding officer at No. 3 police station. The men will appear today before the county prosecutor.

Mrs. Stevens and Mrs. Fisette, driving on Roanoke boulevard, refused to allow two young men in another buggy to pass them. The two parties raced until the men turned west as they neared the Southwest boulevard. The women kept on their way and attempted to turn east onto the boulevard when the buggy struck the fender of the car. A buggy wheel went off on the fender, left the car and the women were thrown to the pavement.

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September 29, 1907

ROBS A DRUG STORE.

Masked Robber Terrifies Occupants
and Gets $125 From Cash Register.

R. E. Slaughter, a clerk, and Miss Will Mowrey, cashier in the E. H. Dudley drug store, 5200 St. John avenue, were "held up" at the point of a revolver by a masked man last night at 10 o'clock and $125 was taken from the cash register. The robber escaped.

The man was driving a sorrel horse hitched to a buggy. He tied the horse in front of the drug store. He was wearing a white mask when he drove up. When he entered the store the clerk and the cashier were alone. He pointed the revolver at Slaughter and said:

"I want the money in the cash register and quick." He went behind the showcase and to the register, which he opened, while he kept Slaughter "covered" with the revolver. There was just $125 there. He took all of it. Then he backed out of the store pointing the revolver at Slaughter as he retreated. While he was untying the horse, Slaughter secured a revolver and stepped out onto the street, aimed at the robber and snapped the weapon several times. The cartridges failed to explode. The robber rode away unmolested. The police were notified immediately.

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August 21, 1907

D. F. COBB KILLED

MEETS DEATH IN FIDELITY
BUILDING ELEVATOR SHAFT.

FELL FROM FOURTH FLOOR

JANITOR AVERY HAD TRIED TO
OPERATE THE ELEVATOR.


Unfamiliarity With Its Mechanism
May Have Been Responsible for
Accident -- Brother Saw Dead
Body and Asked Who
Was Killed.
Daniel Forest Cobb, Killed in an Elevator Shaft
DANIEL FOREST COBB, TEXAS LANDS
PROMOTER, KILLED LAST NIGHT IN
ELEVATOR SHAFT OF FIDELITY
TRUST BUILDING.

Falling through the elevator shaft from the fourth floor of the Fidelity Trust building, Daniel Forest Cobb, president of the firm of Dan F. Cobb & Co., was instantly killed at 7:30 o'clock last night. The body was found at the bottom of the shaft in a badly bruised condition by Tom Avery, a janitor in the building, whose inexperience at handling elevators, it is alleged, was indirectly responsible for Mr. Cobb's death.

When announcement of the accident was conveyed to the bereaved family at their home, 3411 Troost avenue, little Cecil Cobb, the 10-year-old daughter, became frantic and rushed to an open window. She exclaimed she no longer cared to live. Opportunely Mr. Cobb's brother was present and restrained the girl from harming herself.

Mr. Cobb's offices were on the fourth floor of the Fidelity Trust building. He was one of the most extensive dealers in Northwest Texas lands in the country. Last night he was waiting in his office for a party of tourists he was to take to Texas today. The elevators had stopped running and the only employe remaining in the building was Tom Avery, a janitor. According to Avery, Mr. Cobb requested him to operate the elevator, as the regular operators had gone home and he was expecting some friends there soon from out of town.

HOW THE ACCIDENT HAPPENED.

Avery, who was the only witness, made the following statement to the coroner:

"Mr. Cobb rang the bell several times and finally I took the elevator up to the fourth floor, where his offices were. He said to me, 'Tom, you must be asleep! Why didn't you come up sooner.' "

I told him I was not an elevator man; that they had all gone home and that I was not supposed to operate the cars. He then said he was expecting some friends there and that he wanted me to get them to his office.

"Then I went back down to the first floor to my work. Shortly he began ringing the bell again, and I went up to the fourth floor. Not thoroughly understanding how to run an elevator I did not stop the car just at the landing, but went on up about four feet. When I came down the bottom of the car caught one of Mr. Cobb's feet, crushing it to the floor.

"He cried with pain and throwing up the reverse lever I quickly shot the car upward again, thinking it would release his foot. That was the last I saw of poor Mr. Cobb. He had fallen into the shaft and dropped to the bottom."

Avery is an elderly man, and his frame shook with grief while he related the sad details.

"God help me," he cried. "Mr. Cobb was such a good man and so kind to me. What can I do, what can I do. I thought I was trying to help him, but see what I have done."

The grief stricken janitor was led away by Henry C. Brent, vice-president of the Fidelity Trust Company, who was one of the first persons to reach the body after it had reached the bottom of the shaft. Mr. Brent spoke high words of Avery's services, telling Coroner Thompson that he had been a trusty employe of the company for many years.

SHOCK TO COBB'S BROTHER.

Walking cheerfully into the lobby of the building shortly after the coroner had arrived, enroute to Mr. Cobb's office, were Luther Cobb, a brother, who has offices in the Ridge building, and Jay M. Jackson, president of the Jackson Land Company, in the Gibralter building, a former business associate and close friend of the deceased. When they saw the dead body of a man lying on a stretcher near the elevator entrance Luther Cobb asked a newspaper reporter standing nearby the cause of the excitement and whose body was lying on the stretcher.

Not knowing that the man was a brother he told that Daniel F. Cobb, a real estate man with offices upstairs, had fallen through the elevator shaft and been killed.

The brother became colorless, gasped for breath, rushed to the remains and, throwing aside the covering, looked into the face of the dead man. He gave a shriek and fell into the arms of Mr. Jackson and nearly collapsed. Quickly recovering himself, the brother's first words were in the interest of the surviving members of the family.

"His poor wife and children; they will never be able to stand this awful blow. But I must tell them; no one else can do it but me."

BORE SAD NEWS TO FAMILY

Mr. Jackson's horse and buggy were outside the building and taking it the brother and Mr. Jackson drove quickly to the home of the bereaved family. They were met at the door by Mrs. Cobb and the three daughters, Cecil, 10, Doris, 8, and Louis, 6 years old, respectively. The news of the death of the husband and father was broken by Mr. Cobb. The wife and mother was stricken dumb for a moment and the eyes of the little children opened wide with a mixture of horror and unbelief.

"Yes, he was killed a few minutes ago," replied her uncle. Then he told them the details of the tragedy.

Mrs. Cobb became hysterical, the two smaller children seemed to fail to grasp the true meaning of the word death, but with a heart-rending cry of intense anguish Cecil darted up the stairway crying that she would also kill herself so she "could be in Heaven with her father." Luther Cobb reached the child just as she was about to plunge through the open window.

TOLD OVER THE TELEPHONE.

S. P. Cobb, a brother of the dead man, is a guest at the Midland hotel. With a party of friends he spent the evening at a theater and did not hear of the accident until he went to the desk for his room key. Several times the hotel clerk had sent a bellboy about the hotel calling for Mr. Cobb to answer urgent calls by telephone, but he could not be located.

It was nearly midnight when Mr. Cobb entered the hotel and went to the desk for his key. A yellow slip of paper bearing a telephone number was handed out with the key.

"Who could be calling for me at this time of night?" mused Mr. Cobb as he studied the slip.

"It's your brother's house," volunteered the clerk. "I fear they have some bad news there for you."

Mechanically the man took down the receiver. The telephone girls, the cashier, clerks and bellboys grouped about the desk watching, but none dared break the news to him.

The telephone girl gave Mr. Cobb immediate connection with his number and in an instant his face clouded then turned crimson.

"Which one?" he asked. Someone at the other end of the wire were telling him of his brother's death. There were two brothers at home and in good health when Mr. Cobb had departed for the theater.

Hanging up the receiver, Mr. Cobb beckoned to a friend and the two hastened to a carriage. He had received the message and was going to his brother's family.

LEFT $50,000 INSURANCE.

Daniel Forest Cobb was born 43 years ago in Owen county, Ky. After reaching manhood he went East and engaged in the brokerage business in New York and Philadelphia. Later he was sent to Topeka, where he held the position of state manager for the Equitable Life Assurance society. Six years ago he came to Kansas City and opened offices in the Fidelity Trust building. He dealed exclusively in Northwest Texas lands and was said to be one of the largest individual operators in the West. According to Jay M. Jackson, Mr. Cobb carried fully $50,000 in insurance, $2,500 of which was accident.

Mr. Cobb is survived by a father, who lives in Owen county, Ky., the widow, formerly Miss Ada Thompson of St. Louis; the three daughters, and two brothers, S. P. Cobb, of Wellington, Kas., and Luther Cobb, of Kansas City.

No funeral arrangements have been made at this time.

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