Find Rare Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com - A Celebration of Kansas City Past!

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News from Kansas City - Vintage New Items
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

Like Vintage Kansas City on Facebook

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

June 30, 1909

PALE ALE AT AUCTION.

Customs Officials Also Will Sell Her-
ring and Garlic Saturday.

Loyal Britons may be expected to rally when eight and a half casks of pale ale is put up, and Scotland ought to be heard from when fifteen kegs of Glasgow herring are cried at a government rummage sale scheduled for Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at No. 228 West Fourth street. C. W. Clarke, surveyor of the port, is sending to the hammer imports which were not cleared during the present year.

The customs officers find that the ale arrived without any manifest and, though it is a knock to admit it, the herring were "abandoned," whatever that may mean.

Great Britain is not to have everything her own way. Two hundred and nine pounds of Garlic will tempt the Italians. "Coke" fiends will get a chance at two dozen hypodermic syringes. Six rolls of Japanese matting and 12,000 Japanese postal cards and some jute from India complete the offering for the grown ups.

The surveyor also will put up for sale a case of souvenirs, brought to Kansas City by a globe trotter, who evidently went broke buying the toys, for he could not or would not pay the duty on them. In this lot are four dolls, a cuckoo clock and twenty-five pieces of carved wood representing Santa Claus, bears, dogs, deer, cows and jumping jacks.

Some of the bears, so says the custom house list, are smoking, one is playing a piano, a quartette are gambling and one is painting a picture.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

June 20, 1909

WHEN 'LUCKY NUMBER'
TOM DAVIS WAS BOSS.

WITH "ANDY" FOLEY WAS A
POWER IN POLITICS.

Old-Time Czar of Ninth Ward, Who
Helped Make Political His-
tory in Kansas City,
Is Dead.
The Late Tom Davis, Ninth Ward Political Boss.
THE LATE "TOM" DAVIS.

"Big Tom" Davis, for more than twenty years proprietor of the "Lucky Number" saloon, 1711 Grand avenue, and Democratic boss of the Ninth ward, died of liver complaint at his home, 517 East Seventeenth street, at 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

With the passing of "Andy" Foley of the Second ward, twelve years ago, the number of Kansas City's old-time Democratic ward bosses was limited to two, and now there are none worthy of the name left in the city. Davis's sway in the territory immediately surrounding his place, near Seventeenth and Grand avenue, was, however, just as strong at the time of his death as at any previous time, according to his admirers. Should he have bolted his party at any time in his career, they say, the Ninth ward would have become staunchly Republican.

Thomas Jefferson Davis was born in Alliance, O., fifty-five years ago. At 18 years of age he became a fireman on a locomotive and later an engineer. With Andrew Foley, now dead, former councilman from the Second ward, and Charles A. Millman, former member of the state legislature, he came to Kansas City about May 1, 1883. Millman alone survives.

YELLED COWHERD INTO OFFICE.

"Davis made his debut in ward politics in 1892 in rather a unique manner," said Mr. Millman last night.

"It was the time Henry J. Latshaw was running for nomination against William Cowherd, Thomas Corrigan, now dead, backing the former and Bernard Corrigan, president of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, pulling private wires for the latter.

"The Ninth ward was in the hands of William Abel, a druggist, one time alderman, and had been for years, and it was understood that Abel was going to throw all his influence to Latshaw. On the night before the primaries the Cowherd faction was desperate and a hurried consultation was called among the leaders.

"Finally a deputation, comprised of Frank Rozzelle, after city counselor under Cowherd, and George Hale, chief of the fire department, visited his saloon.

"You are the last hope we have," explained Rozzelle. 'We have come to ask you if you can't help us lick Latshaw in the Ninth.'

" 'I can carry the nomination either way,' replied Davis. 'Only give me a short talk with "Andy" Foley.'

"Nominations were made by 'mob primaries' then, and the crowd that could holler the loudest won viva voce, and there was no appeal provided by the rules after the decision was made.

"At the time for the primaries the next day, a dozen or more moving vans came to the convention loaded with Foley's followers in the North End and Davis's particular crowd from the Ninth ward. The instructions were 'Yell like the devil.' Cowherd owed his nomination as well as his subsequent election to Davis. Likewise the power of William Abel was permanently wrested from him, and Joe Shannon became the czar of the Democrats in the Ninth ward."

Stories of Davis's zeal in advertising his saloon display has character in a different light than those relating to his political moves. It is said that every farmer boy in Jackson county knew of the big saloonkeeper twenty years ago, even though they never tasted his wares.

GANZHORN LOST WHISKERS.

One of his favorite pastimes was to purchase live rabbits, ground hogs, badgers and foxes from the farmer youths, and either put them on exhibition at his place or advertise a hunt and turn them loose in front of a pack of hounds on Grand avenue. For the latter amusement he invariably was arrested, but always paid his fine cheerfully and then seemingly forgot the incident.

Years ago when a former justice, now dead, grew tired of the single life he took his troubles to Tom Davis and was advised by "Tom" to have the vows proclaimed while standing with his bride on a table in the rear of his saloon. His idea in giving the judge this advice is not known, but his best friends say it was another advertising scheme brought to a successful conclusion by the overwhelming eloquence with which the saloonkeeper always presented his ideas.

Later when Davis learned that the bride had taken an aversion to the judge's long beard and mustache he sent for his client and advised him to have them cut and sold at auction at his saloon. This, too, was done, and a vast crowd witnessed the sale and shearing while ten bartenders hired for one day tried to take care of the enlivened trade.

Mr. Davis died after an illness of three months at his residence. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Emma Davis, four brothers and a sister, living in Ohio. He leaves an estate already converted for the most part into cash valued at about $30,000. No arrangements for the funeral have been made.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

May 17, 1909

SOUVENIR PICTURE OF TAFT.

Autographed Photo of President for
Fresh Air Fund.

Mrs. Edith Greene of 6009 East Tenth street, who is interested in raising money for the juvenile fresh air fund, wrote Mrs. William Howard Taft at the White House some time ago, asking for some souvenir to auction off in the good cause. Saturday she received a letter from Mrs. Taft, together with an autographed photograph of the president:

"Mrs Taft acknowledges the receipt of Mrs. Greene's letter, and as it is not possible for her to send a souvenir from the White House, she is sending an autograph picture of the president with best wishes for the fresh air fund. White House, May 11."

Labels: , , , ,

February 28, 1909

SELL UNCLAIMED ARTICLES.

Strange Collection Disposed of at
Auction in Federal Building.

An auction sale of articles left during the past year or two in the federal building took place yesterday forenoon in the offices of W. S. Umphrey, assistant custodian of the building. It was a non-descript collection, and there was everything in it, from a Merry Widow hat, model 1907, to a pair of pink pajamas and a case of patent medicine.

A pair of shoes brought the highest price of the sale, at $2.10 Following them, an pair of new canvas golf shoes went for only 10 cents. The wide-brim woman's hat could not be sold at first, but after the other sales it was bid on by a negro at 25 cents. A coat, which had seen about five years' wear, sold for 5 cents.

Labels: , ,

July 7, 1908

"OLD HOSS" SALE JULY 18.

Police Will Auction Confiscated
Goods at City Hall.

On July 18 there will take place in a shady spot on the north side of police headquarters an event that is very interesting and is always looked forward to by many wise ones who are seeking great profit out of small investments. The event is called the "old hoss" sale. It means that on that day there will be auctioned off to the highest bidder all of the uncalled for and confiscated property on hand, and many thing known to have been stolen but for which owners were never found. As usual, Detective Thomas Hayde, who for years has acted as auctioneer, will do the honors again at the coming sale. The last "old hoss" sale was in October, 1906.

To give an idea of what will be on hand at this sale Captain Frank Snow, property clerk, has given out that he has watches and jewelry, tools of all kinds, many revolvers and knives of every make on the globe. In the clothing line he will have everything from workmen's overalls and jumpers to a swell dress suit which is silk lined.

Any man who has a horse and no harness would do well to visit the "old hoss" sale, as there are several sets of good harness to be sold, both single and double. Then there are separate pairs of lines, tugs, hames, single bridles and the like.

Labels: , ,

April 12, 1908

WEARING HIS NEW STAR.

Independence Marshal Given Wheel-
barrow Ride by Defeated Candidate.

J. J. Hammontree, a defeated candidate for city marshal of Independence, wheeled Robert Combs, the successful candidate, around the square yesterday morning. The new marshal had on his new uniform and a very large star of authority. After the trip around the square, which was enjoyed by a large crowd, the wheelbarrow was placed on auction and purchased by Colonel Moses Hanton for $4.50.

Labels: , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com


Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories



Early Kansas City, Missouri


>>More KC Books<<

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory