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February 5, 1910

BLIND WOMAN WAITED
AT DEPOT IN VAIN.

Hostess Detained by Accident -- Mrs.
Aldrich Writes Literature
for the Blind.

Mrs. Clara Aldrich, totally blind and a stranger in Kansas City, arrived at the Union depot last night from Joliet, Ill. She was expecting friends to meet her at the station, but was disappointed. She told Mrs. Ollie Everingham, matron at the depot, that Mrs. O. P. Blatchley of 220 South Ash street, in Kansas City, Kas., had promised to meet her. The matron called the Blatchley home over the telephone and found that Mrs. Blatchley had fallen on the ice near her home yesterday morning and received injuries which confined her to bed. The matron sent Mrs. Aldrich to the Young Women's Christian Association boarding house for the night.

Dr. O. P. Blatchley said last night that his wife's parents were friends of the parents of Mrs. Aldrich, and that she had arranged to locate her in Kansas City, Kas. Dr. Blatchley said that Mrs. Aldrich for many years has been engaged in writing religious literature for students in the blind schools over the country.

Mrs. Blatchley suffered a dislocated left shoulder and a ruptured artery over her left eye in her fall yesterday.

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October 10, 1909

COLONEL SWOPE LEFT AN
ESTATE OF $3,000,000.

ENTIRE INSTRUMENT WRITTEN
IN HIS OWN HAND JUNE 15, '05.

Full Text of the Paper as Filed in
Independence Shows the Wide
Extent of Kansas City's
Benefactor's Holdings.

An estate of $3,000,000, by the provisions of the will filed yesterday in the Independence division of the probate court was left by Colonel Thomas H. Swope to his near relatives, friends and to charity. The greater part of his property is bequeathed direct to his blood relations. City lots left to the Humane Society is the largest gift to charity.

The will was filed for probate by J. G. Paxton, an attorney of Independence, Mo., who framed it June 17, 1905. Mr. Paxton since has been its custodian. In filing the will, Mr. Paxton was accompanied by Stuart S. Fleming, Mr. Swope's nephew, who lives in Maury county, Tenn.

Colonel Swope named Mr. Paxton, Mr. Fleming and James M. Hunton of Independence his executors, and requested that they be allowed to serve without bond. George B. Harrison, Arthur F. Day and F. T. Childs, all of whom live here, signed as witnesses. The three men were present yesterday morning in court to attest their signatures.

A "HOLOGRAPHIC WILL."

The instrument states that "this is my holographic will." This is to indicate that it was written by Col. Swope. There were no changes in the instrument as written by him.

The bequests to charity are as follows: To Humane Society, two lots in Turner Company's addition; to Park College, two lots in West Kansas addition; to the Women's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to Young Women's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to Young Men's Christian Association, $10,000 cash; to the Provident Association, $25,000 cash.

After providing for charity and making specific bequests to his near relatives and friends, the balance is left to his nephews and nieces, to be divided share alike.

S. W. Spangler, attorney for Mr. Swope, has prepared a conservative estimate of the values of some of the real estate bequests made in the will. The values are as follows:

One-half of the two story building at 1017-1019 Main street, left to Ella J. Plunket, $75,000; the other half of the same property, left to Gertrude Plunket, $75,000; the undivided half of lots Nos. 10 and 12 on East Fourth street, left to Felix Swope, $13,250; the northeast corner of Hickory and Joy streets, now occupied by the John Deere Plow Company's warehouse, left to James Hunton, $40,000; the northeast corner of Twelfth and Walnut streets, 85-115 feet, left to Margaret Swope's five unmarried children, $400,000; 1112-1114 Walnut street, left to the same children, $190,000; 916-918 1/2 Main street, to the same children, $120,000; the northwest corner of Mulberry and Eleventh streets, to the same five children, $50,000; the southeast corner of Twelfth and Campbell streets, left to the five children, $60,000; 915 Walnut street, left to Frances Swope, $87,500; 120 acres, to the south half of the ground occupied by the Evanston Golf Club, to Thomas H. Swope, Jr., $240,000; the eight-story building at the southeast corner of Eleventh street and Grand avenue, to his nine nephews and nieces, $400,000.

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October 7, 1909

SWOPE PROVIDED FOR
AGED, POOR AND NEEDY.

ORPHAN'S HOME AND CHILD-
REN'S OUTINGS REMEMBERED.

Will Gives $25,000 to Provident As-
sociation and Contains Other
Charitable Bequests,

PUBLIC BEQUESTS BY COLONEL SWOPE:

To the Humane Society of Kansas City, Mo., I give, grant, devise and bequeath in trust forever lots 1 and 2 in clock 43 of Turner & Co.'s addition to Kansas City, Mo., the proceeds of the rental thereof to be used by said Humane Society in the entertainment of children in Swope park, near Kansas City, annually, forever.

To Park College, situated in Platte county, Missouri, I give lots 15 and 16 in block 3, West Kansas addition No 2 to Kansas city, Mo.

To the Women's Christian association I give the sum of $10,000.

To the Young Women's Christian Association of Kansas City, Mo., I give the sum of $10,000.

To the Young Men's Christian Association of Kansas City, Mo., I give $10,000.

To the Provident Association of Kansas City, Mo., I give the sum of $25,000 to be known as the "Swope Fund," and to be used for the benefit of the poor and needy of Kansas City, Mo.

Before the body of Colonel Thomas H. Swope was removed from the family home in Independence, Mo., yesterday afternoon to be brought to this city to lie in state in the rotunda of the public library building, J. G. Paxton, an attorney who had possession of the philanthropist's will, gave out the public bequests mentioned therein. They are enumerated above.

"It was thought befitting," he said, "that bequests made to public institutions and to charity should be published before the funeral. The complete will, enumerating private as well as public bequests, will be filed for probate Saturday."

The lots left to the Humane society are situated at the southeast corner of Union avenue and Mulberry street in the West Bottoms. The corner lot is occupied by the Union Avenue Bank of Commerce. Good rentals are secured from the two buildings of the property.

"The bequest of Colonel Swope to the Humane Society is not a surprise to me," said E. R. Weeks, president of the society last night. "Colonel Swope had a life membership in the society and for several years has been its first vice president. He has been identified with the work for more than twenty-five years and was our closest friend.

WROTE PORTION OF WILL.

"Several years ago Colonel Swope sent for me to come to his office. When I arrived he told me that he intended to remember the society in his will which he intended writing himself. At his suggestion I wrote that portion of his will which he later copied. That is why it is no surprise. There is a provision regarding this bequest to the effect that the society may sell this property at any time it deem necessary or advisable."

The property left to Park college, Parkville, Mo., also is situated in the West Bottoms and is said to pay a good annual rental.

The Women's Christian Association, to which Colonel Swope left $10,000, has charge of hte management and maintenance of the Gillis Orphan's Home and the Armour Memorial Home for Aged Couples, Twenty-third street and Tracy avenue. Colonel Swope gave the land on which the orphanage is built. It is a large tract and later Mrs. F. B. Armour built the home for aged couples which bears her name. Sometimes it is known as the Margaret Klock home, named for Mrs. Armour's sister.

"We had hoped that we might be remembered in a small way," said Mrs. P. D. Ridenhour, acting president of the Women's Christian Association, when informed of the $10,000 bequest. "But this comes to us as a most pleasant surprise, and I might say that it comes at a time when we need it most. We had not expected anything so handsome as our benefactor has given us and to express our thanks would be the smallest way in which we can show our gratitude. In honor of his memory we will endeavor to do the greatest good with what he has left us.

Y. W. C. A. GIRLS REJOICE.

"Have you heard of the $10,000 left the Y. W. C. A. by Colonel Swope?" a young woman at the association rooms was asked over the telephone last night.

"Humph," she replied quickly, "he gave us $50,000."

"But this is over and above the $50,000," she was informed. "This is a bequest in his will."

"Oh, goody, gracious, goodness, isn't that just scrumptiously grand," she cried, dropping the telephone to fairly scream the glad news to other young women present. "Won't we have a dandy home, now, God bless him."

At that moment someone began a song of praise in honor of the welcome news. The telephone was forgotten.

"This certainly comes to us as a glad surprise," said Miss Nettie E. Trimble, secretary for the Y. W. C. A.

"Colonel Swope was so good to us when we were struggling for our new building that we had no idea of getting a bequest from his will. Years ago when the building of a home for the Y. W. C. A. was mentioned, he said he wanted to have a part in it. While committees were out working he sent us $25,000 unsolicited. Toward the close, when it looked as if we would not reach the $300,000 mark by the time set, he sent for me and asked how much we lacked. When told that we needed $22,000 to complete the figure he promptly gave us $25,000, making a total of $50,000 which he gave toward our new home.

AN ENDOWMENT FUND.

"As we have plenty of money to complete our home it is possible that Colonel Swope's bequest of $10,000 will be made a nucleus for an endowment fund to carry on industrial and Bible work. The industrial department never has been self sustaining and teachers for both have to be hired and paid. That the name of Colonel Swope will forever remain dear to the members of the Y. W. C. A. goes without saying."

Henry M. Beardsley, president of the Y. M. C. A. was out of the city and James. B. Welsh, a member of the board of directors, was notified of the bequest of $10,000 to that association.

"Good, good," he cried, "that comes to us at a time when we need it most. We have been in pretty hard straits to complete our new building and this most gracious gift will put us on our feet under full sail. The association, no doubt, will take appropriate action when notified officially of the bequest. I will sleep better tonight and so will many others."

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Octoberr 4, 1909

GIFTS TO CITY AND OTHERS.

Swope Park But One of His Contributions.

During his lifetime, Colonel Swope did much for the city in which he amassed his fortune. He gave to the city Swope park, 1,354 acres of land valued at $1,000 per acre. This beautiful tract of land has been converted into one of the finest natural recreation grounds in the Middle West, and it gave the donor much pleasure to see it appreciated as it is.

The land for the new city hospital at Twenty-third and Locust was given to the city by Colonel Swope.

He gave the Young Women's Christian Association $50,000 for its building fund. To the Young Men's Christian Association he gave $5,000.

He gave the ground for the Home for the Aged at Thirty-first and Locust. He recently gave the Franklin Institute, a charitable organization at 1901 McGee street, $50,000 to be used in building a new home, on the condition that the organization raise another $50,000 to add to it.

Many other smaller donations were made toward the work of extending charity to the needy and afflicted and it is said that never did he refuse to heed a plea for funds to conduct such work.

Colonel Swope devoted his time and energy almost entirely to his business. He was at his office early and late. He had been absent from his office but a few days in four or five years until he was taken ill September 2. On that day he was at his office the last time, but he directed his affairs from his sick room and took the same keen interest in the transaction of his business.

HELPED HIS OLD SCHOOL.

The first gift known to have made by the philanthropist was for the sum of $1,000 to the Presbyterian church in Danville, Ky., where he had worshiped so long as a student at Center college. Being a graduate of the famous old institution, Colonel Swope never lost interest in his alma mater, and learning that the school needed a library he made it possible for the old college to obtain one. He offered to give $25,000 to the school for the purpose if another $25,000 was raised. On March 15, 1902, the authorities of the school notified him that the required amount had been subscribed, and he sent his draft for $25,000. The name of the donor had not before been given, as he had requested that it only be given out that an alumnus had offered the money.

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August 19, 1909

Y. W. C. A. GIRLS GUESTS
OF PROMINENT BANKER.

GIVEN A RIDE OVER BOULE-
VARDS IN HIS MOTOR CAR.

Regular Daily Programme Is Being
Carried Out by Devoted Father at
Daughter's Request -- Moth-
ers as Chaperones.

Three pretty young women, members of the Y. W. C. A., with one of their mothers as a chaperone, enjoyed a ride over the boulevards of Kansas City last evening in one of the most luxurious touring cars in the city. Their ride was through the generosity of a prominent banker of Kansas City who is greatly devoted to his daughter. She departed for a several weeks' visit North and when she left she asked that he arrange to take some of the Y. W. C. A. girls out in the machine.

Tonight another set of girls will be taken for a ride. This will continue each evening until the return of the daughter. The names and addresses of the young women to be taken on these rides will be furnished by Miss Ida Wilson, the desk secretary of the society.

That the idea will be a popular one and will be followed to a great extent by wealthy citizens who do not use their machines much while their families are away during the summer, developed last evening. Henry C. Lambert, cashier of the German American bank, said he thought that the idea should be taken up by the automobile club. "My machines can be placed at the disposal of such a cause at least once a week," said Mr. Lambert; " and I think there are probably a dozen other men in town who would loan their machines an evening or two a week."

"Some of our members have enjoyed the pleasure of auto rides while others have not," said Miss Ida Wilson yesterday afternoon. "Of course, to the majority of those who have not ridden in one of the big touring cars, such an invitation would hardly be refused. I believe that if other citizens hear about our banker friend they too will proffer their machines. If they do, I think we will have no trouble in furnishing the girls to ride. Our idea in this is, of course, to give the girl the full pleasure of the ride. The name and address of each girl and the chaperone will be given to the gentleman who drives the machine or his driver and the girls will be called for at their homes and returned there. In this way they will get the full pleasure of the auto ride.

"While we are not in any way soliciting automobiles for this purpose, I believe that as soon as this fact becomes known we will have several proffers of machines."

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August 16, 1909

HUGH C. WARD DIES
IN NEW YORK CITY.

APOPLEXY FOLLOWED HEAT
PROSTRATION A MONTH AGO.

Mrs. Ward and Judge PHilips at His
Bedside -- With Family Was
Spending Summer at Bass
Rooks Point, Mass.
The Late Hugh C. Ward, Prominent Kansas City Attorney.
HUGH C. WARD.

Hugh C. Ward, one of the most prominent attorneys of Kansas City, and a member of a pioneer family of Western Missouri, died from a stroke of apoplexy in New York yesterday morning.

An attack of heat prostration which he suffered in Chicago a month ago was one of the causes which led up to the death of Mr. Ward. He had never fully recovered from this attack, although his condition had improved sufficiently to permit him to continue his journey to New York, accompanied by his wife. With Mr. Ward at his death were Mrs. Ward, Judge John F. Philips and several relatives.


WESTERN TRIP FATAL.

Mr. Ward had taken a cottage for the summer at Bass Rocks Point, near Gloucester, Mass., and he left for that place in June with Mrs. Ward and their four children. Business matters required the presence of Mr. Ward in Kansas City and he came home for a few days in July. He left again for his summer home on July 13, but became ill as a result of becoming overheated in Chicago.

Mrs. Ward was called to his bedside by telegraph, and after a week his physician pronounced him able to travel. Mrs. Ward and her mother, Mrs. J. C. James, started for the East with Mr. Ward, but it was found necessary to make a stop in New York where Mr. Ward was taken to a hospital and given the attention of some of the best specialists of the city.


SUDDEN CHANGE FOR THE WORSE.

His improvement was slow, but a telegram from Mrs. Ward to her father, J. C. James, on Tuesday announced that he was much better. A sudden change occurred, however, and at 4 o'clock Saturday afternoon Mr. James received a message that Mr. Ward had grown much worse. Mr. James left at once for New York.

The announcement of the death of Mr. Ward came in a telegram from L. T. James, Mrs. Ward's uncle, who landed in New York yesterday morning from a European trip.

The funeral services and interment will occur in Kansas City, the details for these to be arranged as soon as Mr. James reaches New york.

In addition to his wife and the children, Hugh Campbell, Jr., James Crawford, Francis and John Harris, Mr. Ward is survived by his mother, the widow of Seth E. Ward, and his brother, John E. Ward.


LEGISLATION AND POLITICS.

Hugh C. Ward was born March 10, 1864 at Westport. His parents were Seth and Mary Frances Ward. Hugh was reared on the farm and received his elementary education at a private school in Westport and his collegiate education at William Jewell Collete, Liberty, Mo., and at Harvard University. He was graduated with honors from Harvard, a bachelor of arts, in 1886. He then entered the St. Louis Law School and in June, 1888, received his diploma. He then was admitted to the bar in Kansas City.

In recognition of his ability as a lawyer came in 1894 his appointment as receiver for the John J. Mastin & Co., banking business, on dissolution of partnership. The property involved consisted mostly of real estate, and amounted to more than $3,000,000.

Aside from his profession Mr. Ward was known in business circles as a director of the National Bank of Commerce, Commerce Trust Company, Kansas City Railway and Light Company, and of the Kansas City Home Telephone Company.

He was long influential in Democratic circles, and in 1892 was elected to the state legislature where he did much work in connection with constructive measures.

In case preparation Mr. Ward was known as thorough and exhaustive, and in presentation before a judge or jury clear and vigorous in expression, and intensely earnest.

As a politician he was equally successful and well known. In the legislature in 1892 besides being made vice chairman of the judiciary committee, he was appointed chairman of the committtee on conditional amendments.

In 1898 he was appoointed police commissioner by Governor Stephens, who also made Mr. Ward a member of his staff, and placed in his hands the organization of the Missouri National Guard. He resigned as police commissionier and retired from politics in 1902.

SOCIAL AND PERSONAL SIDE.

Mr. Ward was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, deriving his eligibility through the lineal descent from Seth Ward, a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. H e was also a member of the Elks lodge, the Country Club, the Commercial Club, the Harvard Club of the Southwest and the American Bar Association.

Mr. Ward was married October 26, 1898, to Miss Vassie James, a graduate of Vassar college and a daughter of J. Crawford James.

One of Mr. Ward's last acts was to give $25,000 to the Young Women's Christian Association of Kansas City.

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June 6, 1909

Y. W. C. A. FUND OF
$300,000 IS RAISED.

THOMAS L. SWOPE DOUBLES
SUBSCRIPTION OF $25,000.

Other Voluntary Donations Make a
Total of $303,000, Which Is
$3,000 in Excess of the
Amount Asked.

Through the donation of $50,000, by Thomas L. Swope, the largest single gift ever made for a similar enterprise in the history of the Y . W. C. A. , a gift of $20,000 by the R. A. Long family and $10,000 from the banks of Kansas City, the hard fought battle of the Young Women's Christian Association for $300,000 to build a new home was yesterday changed from a faded hope to a joyous reality. At the close of the campaign, May 25, the sum subscribed was $37,000 short of the necessary amount.

Since the end of a most strenuous campaign, every day of which was fraught with brilliant prospects which faded, forces have been at work, and yesterday the announcement was made that the money needed had been raised and there was some to spare.

Mr. Swope, feeling the absolute need of an institution such as has been proposed for the women of Kansas City, agreed to double his first subscription, raising it from $25,000 to the magnificent sum of $50,000. The amount was given with the proviso that the donor's name be withheld from the public, but Miss Nettie E. Trimble, general secretary of the association, considered such a proposition unfair to the man through whose charity their hopes are to be realized.

SUBSCRIPTION DOUBLED.

Following the lead made by Mr. Swope, R. A. Long added another $5,000 to his already large donation, making the total $20,000. Then through the Kansas City clearing house, the various banks donated $10,000, making in all a total of $40,000 since the closing of the original campaign. This brings the subscriptions up to $303,000, $3,000 more than was originally asked. This money will be used for equipments for the new building.

A meeting of the members of the board of directors of the association will be held some day next week to decide upon the plans for the new buildings. The "Home," which is to be erected at Eleventh street and Troost avenue, will be started at the earliest moment. Plans for this building have not yet been decided upon, as the national association has agreed to furnish them, provided use can be made of some that have already been used.

"We wish to thank the public spirited people of Kansas City who have helped in this campaign and made our project possible," said Miss Trimble yesterday. "Especially do we feel indebted to the press of Kansas City for the interest it has shown in the work and the good it has done to further the interests of our cause. We feel the responsibility of our position and we will do all within our power to merit the confidence of the people who have put this great sum at our disposal."

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May 19, 1909

Y. W. C. A. HAS YET TO
BRIDGE $125,000 GAP.

MUST RAISE $40,000 A DAY FOR
THREE DAYS.

Hundreds of Women Are Working
in the Campaign, and Still
There Are Not Enough
Canvassers.
Y. W. C. A. Women Work on Fundraising.
Y. W. C. A. HEADQUARTERS IN THE R. A. LONG BUILDING.

With only three days of its ten-day campaign left, the Young Women's Christian Association has obtained pledges amounting in all to $178,3443.45. A gap of nearly $125,000 yawns between the $300,000 required for the contemplated new buildings, and to bridge it successfully an average of about $40,000 a day must be obtained in the short space of time that is left. It seems an impossible task, and yet there is not the slightest indication of discouragement among the scores of women workers who are giving ever moment of their time to the campaign.

"Fail? Why such a contingency has not even been considered," said one of the officers of the ways and means committee last night. "Everyone of us is perfectly confident that the $300,000 mark will be reached before Saturday. Although hundreds of women are working in the campaign, still we haven't enough canvassers to call on all of the persons we have on our lists. If there was some way we could see all of these people in the next few days, we could get more, much more, than the amount needed. There can be no doubt of this. I know that hundreds and hundreds of people we have not seen are only waiting for our solicitors to call before giving their subscription. What a help it would be if they would send in the amounts voluntarily."

The total amount obtained yesterday was nearly $9,000. About $6,000 of this was pledged in the morning, and the remainder in the afternoon. Besides five gifts of $1,000 there was one $500. The names of the $1,000 givers are as follows:

The Kansas City Journal, the Missouri and Kansas Telephone Company, Mrs. J. L. Abernathy, Mrs. C. A. Baker and Mr. and Mrs. Albert Marty.

Hundreds of donations in varying amounts have been received during the subscription campaign, including $25,000 from Thomas H. Swope, $15,000 from Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Long, $10,000 from Frank Hagerman, and $10,000 from Emery, Bird, Thayer Dry Goods.

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February 27, 1909

"FIGHTING BOB" CRIPPLED.

Wheel Chair Ordered for Admiral,
Who Has Rheumatism.

"Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans will arrive on the Burlington from St. Louis Saturday morning at 7:10. Meet him with a wheel chair and see that he is cared for. He has a severe attack of rheumatism."

This was the order received by Union depot officials last night. "Fighting Bob" is coming to Kansas City to lecture next Tuesday evening at Convention hall under the auspices of the local Young Women's Christian Association on "From Hampton Roads to San Francisco," relating interesting incidents in connection with the cruise of the American battleships during the first leg of their globe-encircling journey.

It was not known here that Admiral Evans was ill until the above instructions were received by the depot authorities. Kansas City business men had planned to have a delegation meet the distinguished visitor and entertain him, but it is probable that his condition will prevent him from taking part in any social functions. It is thought, however, that he will be able to fill his engagement.

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December 3, 1908

TOOTHSOME HINDU EATABLES.

Will Be on Sale at the Y. W. C. A.
Bazaar Friday Night.

"An Evening in Calcutta" is the latest entertainment of the Young Women's Christian Association. The association rooms Friday night will represent a Hindu bazaar. There will be relics from India to entertain the visitors and Dr. Caroline Coats and Miss Ella M. Schooley, both of whom have done missionary work in that country, will relate some of their experiences and tell something of the people and their mode of life.

Around the walls of the association room little booths will be erected where Christmas gifts costing from 5 to 50 cents will be sold. It is a bazaar intended for the young woman of moderate means, anxious to buy Christmas gifts for the smallest amount of money. There will be other booths, where real East Indian sweetmeats will be sold. The association is in possession of some of the recipes from India and the cooking department is proud of its achievements with them.

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September 19, 1908

WHAT'D THE MEN GIVE
TO SEE THIS PARADE.

Nothing but Girls, Young Ones, in
the Spectacle to Be Given
by the Y. W. C. A.

Gaudy-colored posters in the quiet lunch room of the Y. W. C. A. will next week announce the first of the series of jolly evening planned by that organization for its members. October 1 has been decided upon as the rally day for both the educational departments and the gymnasium, and in place of the usual routine speeches there will be a parade in the gymnasium. It will combine humor, instruction, and beauty. For a few days prior to that eventful night the youngsters will look in vain for their Irish Mail wagons, their coasters and their tricycle automobiles, for these are to be the foundations of the floats.

The pageant will be headed by a band in uniform. This band will render at least three selections. Old horns, jews harps, fine and course tooth combs and all sorts of wonderful instruments are being collected and the band members have promised to rehearse their repertoire before their engagement. The lights in the gymnasium will all be extinguished that the effect of the floats may not be lost. Ahead of each float will march two dominoed torch bearers and the floats will be ablaze with lanterns and candles.

The subject of the floats is still a mystery. "Jackson" will be on hand and will distribute souvenirs indiscriminately. No one need to subscribe anything to obtain them. Each float will throw out handfuls of circulars advertising the department it represents. The gymnasium is to have two floats and promised something unique. The pottery and metal workers are going to show something beautiful in the way of their handicraft. The lunch room, the cooking department, the sewing, the millinery, the extension and language departments will all be represented, and even the dignified members of the Bible classes have promised to march in cap and gown.

A cordial invitation is being extended to everybody except the men.

Kansas City's Y. W. C. A. now stands sixth in the United States in point of membership, and it is said that a large percentage of this number has been gained through the good times originated by the various committees. A large number was also gained through the membership campaign of last year when the organization divided into two bodies and held a war of roses. A campaign for new members will be held again this year, but it will be along different lines and promises to be even more unique.

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September 14, 1908

JAPANESE YOUNG WOMAN SANG.

Miss Okajima Entertained Members
of the Y. W. C. A. Yesterday.

Many Japanese and English songs were sung by Miss Okajima, a young woman from Japan, at the Y. W. C. A. rooms on Baltimore avenue yesterday afternoon. Miss Okajima sang for almost an hour and then to the group of admiring young women around her she told stories of Japanese life and of the curious customs observed in her country.

That Japan has taken rapid steps forward by enlightenment and Christianity within the last ten years was championed by the young woman most sturdily, and it is her opinion that a great deal of such advancement comes from the United States. She says that her government is apt to look upon ours as a model and that Japan holds this country in high esteem.

Those who heard Miss Okajima sing declared that she had a remarkably sweet voice with a great range of tone. Some of the renditions were from the old music masters and extremely difficult. The young woman received several years of vocal training in her own country and has come to America to pursue her studies.

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September 4, 1908

BASKETBALL MAKES GIRLS QUARREL,
SAYS MISS CAPEN.

New Physical Director of Y. W. C. A.
Will Not Allow Dr. Naismith's
Game to Be Played.

"Basketball cannot be played by girls without making them quarrel," said Miss Julia Capen, who yesterday took charge of the physical education work of the Kansas City Y. W. C. A.

That is the reason that there is to be no competitive basketball in the Kansas City association this year. Miss Capen is following the lead of many other physical directors throughout the country in putting the ban on the most strenuous of girls' sports. Dr. Clark Hetherton, director of athletics at the University of Missouri, aroused much criticism last year when he contended that the game was bad for women and that every girl who played basketball on the university teams suffered from a nervous collapse before she left school or immediately afterwards. Now Miss Capen says it is bad for the girls' tempers and will forbid it for the association girls. A little mild practice might be allowed, but no real scrimmaging.

Miss Capen succeeds Miss Tamson Weatherbee, who goes to Milwaukee. She plans to enlarge the enrollment in the gymnasium classes, especially the classes for little girls. Children ranging from 6 to 12 years of age will be given instructions in all manner of games, such as Boston ball captain ball, indoor baseball, volley ball, long base, and others.

The Swedish system of correctional gymnastics will be introduced by Miss Capen and instruction in dancing and fancy drills will be given the older girls' and married women's classes.

"It is alarming the number of women you see every day with one shoulder higher than the other or with some other defect which the girl scarcely notices herself, but which is remarked at once by all who see her," said Miss Capen. "Careless habits of standing and walking and breathing are to blame for these defects, which could be remedied by proper gymnastic exercises."

Miss Capen graduated from the Boston Normal school of Gymnastics and has taken work in the Yale summer school. For the last five years she has been physical director of the Binghampton, N. Y., Y. W. C. A. and taught in the Lady Grey School for Girls.

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August 12, 1908

HEIRESS ENDS
LIFE WITH ACID.

ONCE WON PRIZE AS MOST BEAU-
TIFUL GIRL IN MISSOURI.

WEDDING WAS SET FOR TODAY.

DOCTOR PRONOUNCED HER DEAD
3 HOURS BEFORE SHE DIED.

Mother of May Williams Had Her
Committed to Reform School.
Girl Took Poison Rath-
er Than Go.

On the night before her wedding, and on the eve of being sent to the girl's reform school, pretty little May Williams committed suicide by drinking carbolic acid in the presence of her mother and Mrs. W. W. Smith, an officer of the juvenile court. Miss Williams was heiress to $15,000 and her life within the last three months had been a checkered one.

Two months ago, a few weeks after her mother had married Sol Mead, a railway conductor, Miss Williams was sent to the juvenile court, charged with being incorrigible. Mrs. Smith, the probation officer of the Detention home, thought the girl should be in a better place than the home. Consequently, according to Mrs. Alice Page, the matron of the Y. W. C. A. home at Eighth and Harrison streets, arrangements were made whereby the girl was taken to the Y. W. C. A. home. Mrs. Page found the girl to be anything but incorrigible.

A short while ago it became rumored that Miss Williams was to be married today. Shortly after the rumor became public, and the girl admitted that she intended to marry this morning, she was taken from the Y. W. C. A. home and hauled back to the Detention home. At her mother's request the reform school authorities decided to take the girl and to keep her for an indefinite length of time.


SOMEONE WAS NEGLIGENT.

The threat of the reform school had been made to the girl time and again by her mother, Mrs. Mead, and each time Miss Williams had replied that she would die before she went to the institution. Mrs. W. W. Smith accompanied her to her home, 816 Euclid avenue, in order that the girl might pack her trunk. On the way home the girl told Mrs. Smith that she was going to commit suicide. After the two had reached the Mead home, Miss Williams sat in the parlor and talked to her mother of the reformatory. Rising, she said:

"I will die first, and it will be before your eyes."

Whether any attention was paid to the girl's remarks has not been learned. At any rate, she was allowed to leave the presence of the court probationary officer and her mother, with the threat of suicide fresh upon her lips, and over fifteen minutes passed before she was missed. The court officer was present all of that time, and it is said she had heard the threat which the girl made.

In the meantime Miss Williams had gone to the Woodland pharmacy, three blocks away, convinced the druggist that her mother wanted three ounces of carbolic acid, and walked back home again. When she reached her home she walked up the back steps and raised the bottle of carbolic acid to her lips. She had heard footsteps approaching and desired to be successful in her attempt to end her life. At that moment Mrs. Smith caught sight of the girl and called to Mrs. Mead, the mother. With both women looking at her, standing as if rooted to the floor, the girl drank the contents of the bottle and then murmured:"Now, I suppose you are satisfied."

Instantly the probation officer ran to he 'phone and called a doctor and neighbors. Someone called the police ambulance and Dr. J. Park Neal.


DOCTOR THOUGHT HER DEAD.

Dr. A. H. Walls, who lived in the immediate neighborhood, was called. He replied that he could not get to the Mead home for twenty-five minutes. Ten of those twenty-five had elapsed when someone called the police ambulance. The ambulance made a rapid run and arrived at the home of the Williams girl shortly after Dr. Walls had arrived. As Dr. J. Park Neal, probably the most successful combater of carbolic acid suicides in Kansas City, jumped from his ambulance he was met by Mrs. Smith and Dr. Walls. They told him that the girl was dead an d that nothing could be done for her. Taking Dr. Walls's word for it, and knowing Mrs. Smith as a court officer, he did not attend the girl, but went back to the emergency hospital.

As the ambulance turned the corner of Eighth street an undertaker's wagon appeared around the corner of Ninth street. No one knows who called it. By that time Dr. E. R. Curry arrived and pronounced the girl alive. She had been alive all of the time and lived for three hours after she had taken the poison.

"Could she have been saved had you attended her when you were at the house?" was asked Dr. Neal.

"I believe she could," he said. "In fact, I know she could have been saved. But I took Mrs. Smith's and Dr. Wall's word for final. I had no reason to believe the girl was still alive."

Dr. Neal could not understand why he was turned away while there was hope that the girl might not be dead.

Long before the girl was really dead, another undertaker's ambulance had driven up to the front door, and the neighbors looked on and wondered. No one could be found who would admit calling the second undertaker's ambulance.

Mrs. Mead, the girl's mother, says she is heart broken and will see no one. A doctor was called to see her.

May Williams was a beautiful young girl of uncertain age. Her mother swore in court that May was but 15 years old, while May swore that she was 17. Had the girl been 15 years old three years would have expired before she attained her majority; 17 years of age meant only one year until she came into the $15,000 which her father had left her.


WON A BEAUTY PRIZE.

Last spring May Williams won the prize in St. Louis as being the most beautiful unmarried woman in Missouri. The prize was given by a local newspaper. Everywhere she went her beauty was remarked upon. In St. Louis, say those who knew her there, she was not considered incorrigible, nor even wayward.

Mrs. Mead was divorced from her first husband and May lived with him until his death. In his will he left May $15,000, and, it is said, cut off his divorced wife without one cent. At the time of the Williams divorce, which occurred in St. Louis, the whole family history was aired.

Mr. Mead, who is a conductor on the Chicago & Alton railroad, has not been notified of his step-daughter's death. He is expected in from his run this morning at 10 o'clock.

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