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January 22, 1910

GETS WHAT HE ASKED
FOR WIFE'S AFFECTIONS.

Jury in Five Minutes Gives A. L.
Sherman $50,000 Verdict
Against J. C. Silverstone.

After less than five minutes' deliberation yesterday morning a jury in Judge Thomas J. Seehorn's division of the circuit court gave A. L. Sherman, a Kansas City lawyer, a verdict of $50,000 as a balm for a wound his feelings sustained when his wife lost her love for him in favor of another man three years ago. The suit, for $25,000 exemplary and $25,000 actual damages, was instituted by Attorneys L. C. Boyle and C. M. Howell.

The defendant was J. C. Silverstone, who for several years owned a drug store at Ninth and Wyandotte streets, but is now in Seattle, Was. Silverstone was not present at the opening of the case yesterday, but his lawyers were, and there was some interesting testimony. Mrs. Sherman obtained a divorce a year ago and is not in the city.

According to the testimony of Sherman he and Mrs. Sherman were married in September, 1898. Their life was happy until about January, 1907, when, he testified, Silverstone rose over the domestic horizon and began to shed compliments and other attentions on Mrs. Sherman.

One time Sherman said he asked his wife how it was she could buy millinery and fine dresses without approaching him for a loan. He had noticed for several months past that she was making purchases with out either consulting him or having the bills charged. She told conflicting stories of how she could perform the miracle, Sherman testified. He was not convinced and went to Silverstone's store to see him about it.

Sherman said he seized Silverstone by the throat and forced him back on a barrel in the rear of the drug store. Under threats of killing him, he said he obtained a partial confession and made the druggist beg for his life.

"After that my wife and I had frequent quarrels, and finally she left me, taking our child. The last I heard of her she was in Seattle."

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January 15, 1910

MORE SHELTER FOR HOMELESS.

Helping Hand Annex, 401 Wyan-
dotte, Will Be Opened Today.

The Helping Hand Institute annex, 401 Wyandotte street, will be opened at 3 o'clock this afternoon. Addresses will be made by Mayor T. T. Crittenden, W. T. Bland, Rev. Charles W. Moore and Gus Pearson.

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January 7, 1910

CURED OF ILLS
OVER THE PHONE?

ABSENT TREATMENT PUT MRS.
MOSTOW UNDER SPELL,
WITNESSES SAY.

Spiritualist Seeks to Prevent
Heirs From Depriving
Him of Bequests.

That by giving her absent treatment over the telephone for rheumatism and in other ways, John H. Lee, said to be a spiritualist, won the confidence of wealthy Mrs. Victoria Mostow, 71 years old, and thus influenced her to bequeath him property worth $35,000, was the substance of testimony given yesterday in Judge J. G. Park's division of the circuit court.

The occasion was the trial of a suit by which Lee seeks to have set aside deeds transferring to James P. Richardson, principal of the Prosso school, and nephew of Mrs. Mostow, the property left to Lee by will. The heirs have a suit pending to set aside the will.

The story told by witnesses in substance follows:

Mrs. Mostow was the wife of the late Randolph Mostow, and a sister of the late Dr. De Estaing Dickerson. From the latter she inherited a large amount of property. Mr. Mostow died in the summer of 1908. During his last illness, he summoned Lee and was given treatment. In this way Mrs. Mostow became acquainted with the spiritualist.

TREATED BY PHONE.

After her husband's death, Mrs. Mostow became a believer in spiritualism. Through the medium of spirits and mesmeric powers Lee claimed that he could cure every known ill. Mrs. Mostow put in a telephone at her home, at Thirty-fourth and Wyandotte streets, and when she became troubled with rheumatism, Lee would give her absent treatment over the phone. At this time he lived near 4800 East Eighth street, several miles across the city from his patient.

In January, 1908, Mrs. Mostow made deeds to property at 817 Main street, and her home on Wyandotte, to her only surviving heir in Kansas City, James P. Richardson, owner of the Prosso Preparatory school. This was done to escape the payment of the collateral inheritance tax, and to prevent the heirs in Chicago from securing any of her property. The deeds were not to be recorded until after her death.

LIVED WITH HER.

In the summer of 1908, it is charged, Lee secured so great an influence over Mrs. Mostow that he secured permission to move himself and family into her home. Here they have lived since. The taxes are said to have been paid by the Mostow estate, and during her lifetime all the household expenses were met by Mrs. Mostow.

After Lee had been living in the Mostow home a few months, it is charged, it was seen that he gained an influence over the aged woman, and she began deeding small pieces of property to him.

Mr. Richardson, seeing the trend of affairs and fearing that he might lose the property that was to be his at the death of his aunt, immediately recorded the two deeds. When Mrs. Mostow died, it was found that she had bequeathed the same two pieces of property to Lee.

Suit was brought in the circuit court by Lee to set aside the deeds, charging undue influence. A similar suit was also brought by Richardson and the Chicago heirs to set aside the will.

The evidence was all submitted yesterday in Judge Park's court. The final arguments will be heard some time next week.

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December 8, 1909

BOYS IDENTIFIED AS
SPANGLER'S SLAYERS.

ROBBERS' VICTIMS RECOGNIZE
TRIO, ONE A BRIDEGROOM.

Elevator Operators, Ages 17, 19 and
21, in Downtown Dry Goods
Store, Are Arrested -- Youngest
Weeps, Others Indifferent.
Louis Dye, Ralph Clyne and Harry Shay, Suspects in the Spangler Murder.
LOUIS M. DYE, RALPH A. CLYNE AND HARRY SHAY,
Three Suspects Held by Police for Spangler Murder and Recent Holdups.
(Sketched at Police Headquarters Last Night.)

Working on the "boy bandit" theory, the police yesterday evening arrested three youths, two of whom were identified as having shot and killed M. A. Spangler and wounded Sam Spangler, his son, in their saloon at Twentieth street and Grand avenue on the morning of November 23. Their names are Louis Dye, 21 years old; Ralph Clyne, 19, and Harry Shay, 17. All are employed as elevator operators in a down town dry goods store. Dye is a bridegroom.

The arrest was made at 5:30 o'clock by Captain Walter Whitsett and Plain Clothes Officers E. M. Smith and E. L. Maston.

VICTIMS VISIT STORE.

The officers visited the store in company with several recent victims of holdups and rode in the elevators with the boys as they were at work. They were arrested and taken to police headquarters. Albert Ackerman, 502 1/2 Wyandotte street, the man who was in the Spangler saloon at the time of the shooting, was summoned and in Captain Whitsett's office identified Dye and Clyne as the two who shot up the saloon.

"That's the fellow that had the gun," Ackerman stated, pointing at Dye. "The other fellow was with him. Of course they are dressed differently now, but there is no mistaking their faces."

Four others who have been robbed recently visited police headquarters in the evening and in every case identified the boys.

DRUGGIST IDENTIFIES.

W. S. McCann, a druggist, living at 1405 East Tenth street, identified Dye and Clyne as the two men who attempted to rob his store at Twenty-seventh street and Agnes avenue on the night of November 25. He said they went in the store, and that Clyne pointed a revolver at his head while Dye attempted to rob the cash register. When he showed fight they fired four shots at him and ran. He thinks that Harry Shay is the man that was left outside as a look out.

Miss Stella Sweet, 529 Brooklyn avenue, and Mrs. C. L. Flaugh, 629 Brooklyn avenue, who were held up Thanksgiving night on the steps of the Admiral Boulevard Congregational church, identified all three of the boys as the robbers.

Edward C. Smith of the Smith-McCord-Townsend Dry Goods Company declared that the three boys had robbed him on Thirty-sixth street, between Locust and Cherry streets, on the night of December 3. They took a pocket book containing a Country Club bond for $100. At that time they had handkerchiefs tied over their faces, but Smith was sure that he recognized them.

SPANGLER TO SEE TRIO.

Captain Whitsett made no attempt to cross-examine the boys last night, but ordered them locked up until this morning when they will be confronted by further witnesses, the chief of whom will be Sam Spangler, who was discharged from the general hospital yesterday. The prosecutor's office was notified and representatives will be on hand today to take their statements.

"I am sure that we have got the right men this time," stated Captain Whitsett. "They answer the description of the gang that have been doing all the robbing lately, and I am sure that it was they that held up Joseph B. Shannon last week."

None of the boys would make any statement except that they were strangers in town, only having been working for a week. During the identification process both Dye and Clyne showed indifference, while the younger boy, Shay, broke down and cried.

Dye lives at 1921 Oakland, Shay at 1242 Broadway and Clyne at 1710 East Thirteenth street. Dye was married three weeks ago, shortly before the Spangler murder.

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December 2, 1909

AFTER TEN YEARS
'GATOR HAS A HOME.

STUFFED SAURIAN'S CAREER
FULL OF VICISSITUDES.

Hoodoo to a Chicago Saloon, Brought
to Kansas City by a Bartender,
and Sold to a Doctor for
a Small Sum.

Homeless, disowned and an outcast, the mounted form of a once giant saurian occupies floor space -- by sufferance only -- in Schaefer's buffet on Wyandotte and Twelfth streets. It changed ownership three times yesterday and is now the property of Dr. James O. Lee, who before he can remove it from the saloon must build an addition to his office.

Ten years ago Dan Flannigan, a saloonkeeper at Twenty-second street and Wabash avenue, Chicago, loaned a curio man $10 on the stuffed "gator," which was twelve feet long, and its age estimated all the way from 1,000 to 2,000 years. A taxidermist said it was worth at least $50 to mount the reptile, so Flannigan thought he was in the clear.

ONCE A SHOW WINDOW PIECE.

Joe O'Brien was a bartender at Flannigan's, and he helped put the gator on a shelf in the saloon. From that time on, it was said Flannigan's business suffered reverses. Whether the look that a man would give the 'gator w hen he stepped in the saloon sobered him or made him think that he "had 'em" or whether the 'gator was just a hoodoo Flannigan never decided.

When O'Brien left for Kansas City five years ago, however, Flannigan gave him the saurian. O'Brien shipped the thing along with his household furniture, and the story is told around the freight house that three pay checks still await the claim of negro laborers who looked in the car.

The 'gator passed into several hands and for a couple of years was a showpiece in an Eighth street saloon. Then it came into possession of Jack Murty of 1031 Wyandotte street, who put it in the window of his cleaning establishment. This show got tiresome after a while and he placed it farther back in his store. All his friends admired it, but none would purchase it.

One day W. C. Schaefer happened in. Yes, he would purchase the stuffed reptile. He would give all of $3 for it. Murty clasped his hand to seal the bargain. Yesterday morning four men carried the 'gator to Schaefer's saloon. Not until it was deposited on the floor did Schaefer realize that an elephant would have taken up less room.

AND THE DOCTOR BUYS HIM.

"Give him to me," said his brother Al.

"All right," responded Schaefer and the deal was closed. A short while later Dr. Lee happened in. He could use the 'gator all right and would give $2.50 for him. Again Mr. 'Gator was sold. Dr. Lee had forgotten to measure him before he purchased him and when he discovered that the reptile was 12 feet long and a yard wide, he discovered that he did not want him as bad as he had a short while before. The Schaefers would not take him back as a gift.

A carpenter gave Dr. Lee an estimate on an addition which will have to be built into his office to accommodate the alligator. Meanwhile "Ivory," the porter, will have to mop around Mr. Gator.

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November 23, 1909

MIDNIGHT ROBBER
KILLS SALOON MAN.

M. A. SPANGLER MURDERED BE-
HIND HIS OWN BAR.

Drops Dead With Bullet Through
Heart -- Son Shot in Pistol Duel
With His Father's
Slayer.

While trying to grasp the revolver of one of two robbers who "stuck up" his saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue at 12:45 this morning, M. A. Spangler was shot across the bar and instantly killed.

In a pistol duel with his father's murderer, Sam Spangler was shot through both arms.

He believes he shot the robber. The latter and his companion escaped.

The murder and holdup occurred in Spangler's saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue about 12:45.

The Spanglers were getting ready to close the saloon for the night. Sam Spangler had removed the cash from the register and was reading the totals from the detail adder, while the father was writing them on a card.

There were two men in the saloon, Al Ackerman, a friend of the Spangler family, and an old man whose identity is not known. Both were seated at tables in front of the bar.

SHOT THROUGH THE HEART.

At this juncture two men, one short and heavy set and the other tall and thin, entered the saloon. They were roughly dressed, and sauntered up about the middle of the room. The tall man walked as far as the big cannon stove at the rear of the bar, but the short man walked up to a point in front of Spangler.

Whipping out a revolver, the short man flourished it and commanded Ackerman and the old man, "Hands up and line up alongside the bar every one of you."

Ackerman and the old man and young Spangler lifted their hands in a hurry to obey the order. Not so old man Spangler. He had been in the street lunch stand business for years and he was not to be bluffed by the sight of a gun.

"Throw up your hands quick," was the second command, this time directed to Mr. Spangler. The latter evidently had been gauging the distance across the bar. Instead of throwing up his hands he lunged forward, grasping for the revolver. He missed the gun and that instant the robber pulled the trigger.

"Oh!" Spangler cried, and collapsed.

Another shot was fired at him, but it missed. The first one had passed through his heart.

SON TRIED TO AVENGE HIM.

Sam Spangler at the first shot pulled open a drawer in the back bar and grabbed a huge navy revolver. Turning around he faced the robber, and began firing. Both emptied their revolvers, the robber retreating toward the front door as he fired his last shot. Meanwhile the tall, thin robber, who had gotten half way behind the bar, turned and fled toward the rear, when young Spangler started shooting. He escaped through a rear door.

Ackerman, who had been standing near the front of the saloon, ran out of the door at the first shot. When the shooting inside ceased he started back but was met by the robber with the revolver who pressed it against his abdomen.

"Get out of my way before I kill you," cried the robber.

Ackerman got out of the way, and returning to the saloon asked for the big revolver.

Young Spangler put a shell in it by this time and Ackerman started after the robber. He chased him to McGee street and half way down to Twenty-first street pulling the trigger several times on the shell, which proved defective and failed to explode.

When he returned to the saloon, he found Sam Spangler bending over the body of his father. He had been shot in both arms and his blood was mingling with that of his father's.

WHO GOT THE MONEY?

It could not be positively ascertained this morning whether the robber got the money which Spangler had taken from the cash register and placed in a glass. During the excitement it is believed that the money was replaced in the register. This was locked and the keys were taken in charge by the police. The sum is said to have been in the neighborhood of $50.

A riot call was sent to No. 4 police station and a squad of police under Sergeant H. L. Goode drove to the saloon. Young Spangler was taken to the general hospital, where his injuries were dressed.

The body of Mr. Spangler was taken to the Stewart undertaking establishment.

M. A. Spangler was about 50 years old. He lived with his family at No. 1322 1/2 Wyandotte street. He leaves a widow and two sons, Sam and William, both grown. The widow and some relatives are in Glasgow, Mo. A telegram was sent to them immediately after the shooting.

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November 21, 1909

BOY JUMPS OFF CAR;
KILLED BY AUTO.

NOT THE HOPPING KIND, JUST
PLAYING, COMPANION SAYS.

Edgar Palin, Aged 12, Dies in Hos-
pital From Injuries Received in
Alighting in Path of Machine
Giving Children Ride.
Edgar Palin, 12-year-old Killed by Automobile.
EDGAR PALIN,
Twelve-Year-Old Boy Who Leaped from Street Car Fender and Was Mortally Injured by Automobile.

As Edgar Palin, 12 years old, 2802 East Sixth street, jumped from the back fender of an eastbound Independence avenue car yesterday afternoon at Prospect avenue, he was run over and fatally injured by a motor car driven by E. T. Curtis, 3338 Wyandotte street. He died at 7 o'clock last night at the German hospital, without recovering consciousness.

With Allen Compton, 400 Wabash avenue, the boy had been playing all afternoon. About 3 o'clock the two lads started northward on Wabash avenue, and at Independence avenue both noticed an approaching street car.

"Let's catch the fender," called Edgar, as he waited along the curbing. The car was moving at moderate speed and the boy ran behind, and caught hold of the fender. His companion, 10 years old, ran behind on the sidewalk. At Prospect avenue Edgar, without looking around, jumped from the fender directly in front of an approaching auto, barely fifteen feet behind him. Curtis attempted to dodge the boy. The left fender of the auto struck the child and he was sent tumbling on the pavement. He was picked up by Curtis. Several children were in the auto. With Curtis was Herman Smith, of 3606 Olive street, whose father owned the car. In a nearby drug store it was found the boy had been injured seriously.

GIVING CHILDREN RIDE.

"I was driving at about fifteen miles an hour," Curtis said. "The auto belonged to young Smith's father and I was running it because I had the most experience. A party of school children were with us. We were taking them for a ride around the block. I noticed the child on the fender and did not have the least idea that he was going to run in my path. I swerved to one side, but the machine skidded and the fender of the auto struck him in the back. I realized at once that he had received a fearful blow."

After the child was given emergency treatment in the drug store by two neighboring physicians, he was taken to his home in the motor car, and after being attended by Dr. Max Goldman, was removed to the German hospital. Dr. Goldman found that the boy's spine was broken and that his skull was probably fractured.

Allen Compton, his playmate, was in a condition bordering on hysterics last night. The two had been gathering old papers during the forenoon and had just been to the paper mill, where they had received a few pennies with which they intended to buy Christmas presents.

"Edgar wasn't no car hopper," Allen said last night, in defense of his friend. "He was just running behind and holding on to the fender. Edgar wasn't that kind."

With Judge J. E. Guinotte, a friend of the family, young Curtis went to police headquarters last night and made a statement to Captain Walter Whitsett. After consulting Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, it was decided not to hold him. He promised to come to the prosecutor's office Monday and make a complete statement. He said that he had been running a car for eight years. He is the son of W. E. Curtis, a live stock commission man.

The injured boy was the son of W. M. Palin, a real estate dealer in the Commerce building. The body will be taken to Gridley, Kas., for burial.

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November 5, 1909

CITY'S UNEMPLOYED
TO HAVE NEW HOME.

HELPING HAND INSTITUTE AC-
QUIRES ADKINS HOTEL.

With Aid of Four Story Building
1,000 Men Can Be Cared For --
Plenty of Light, Baths --
Has Disinfecting Room.
New Helping Hand Institute Building.
NEW QUARTERS AT FOURTH AND WYANDOTTE STREETS.

With the acquisition of the old Adkins hotel at the southeast corner of Fourth and Wyandotte streets, the Helping Hand Institute has solved the problem of taking care of the city's unemployed. Carpenters are now at work overhauling the four-story structure and by the beginning of cold weather it is believed that the building will be ready for occupancy.

With the old building at 408 Main street, where the main offices are located, the Helping Hand institute will be prepared to take care of more than 600 men without the least crowding. In extremely cold weather little difficulty will be experienced in caring for 1,000 men.

Current Helping Hand Location.
PRESENT HOME OF THE INSTITUTE.

But the new building will have many features not possessed by the old quarters on Main street. Plenty of light, the best of ventilation, high ceilings, a laundry, shower baths and disinfecting room will make it very little inferior to the municipal lodging house in New York city. On the north side of the building are forty-one windows which makes the light and ventilation problem easy.
INSTALLING SHOWER BATHS.

But the main feature is the shower baths and disinfecting room. On the lower floor the plumbers are at work installing baths that will accommodate twenty-five men at one time. No one will be allowed to go to bed without first taking a bath and allowing his clothes to be placed in the disinfecting room, where they will remain over night. The laundry in the basement will keep the linen clean and eventually save the institution hundreds of dollars. Particular care will be exercised in guarding against tuberculosis. Before the year is over it is hoped that a physician will examine every man who applies for a bed.

Without doubt Kansas City will have as good a system for taking care of her unemployed as any municipality in the country. It is true that many of the large cities in the East, particularly New York and Philadelphia, have larger municipal lodging houses but they suffer disadvantages. In most cities bread lines are formed and the man without employment does not feel obliged to work for a night's lodging. In Kansas City, however, the city and county have made the Helping Hand an official charity institution.

WORK IS PROVIDED.

Men are not allowed to sleep in saloons or in other public places where the conditions are not sanitary. There is no other avenue for the unemployed man but to go to the Helping Hand institute, where he is given a chance to work for his meals and lodging. The mere fact that he must work keeps the professional "moocher" from making his headquarters in Kansas City.

The credit for the acquisition of the Adkins building belongs mainly to William Volker, one of the directors of the institute. Mr. Volker clearly recognized the need of more room for the institute, and believing that the employment system is the best, he used his influence in getting the building. E. T. Brigham, superintendent of the Helping Hand, is directing the work.

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November 3, 1909

NEW THEATER OPENS SUNDAY.

Musical Comedy, Vaudeville With
Burlesque Tinge at the Gayety.

The new Gayety theater will open Sunday afternoon with a matinee by the "College Girls" Company. The house is to be devoted to musical comedy and vaudeville with a burlesque tinge. It is owned by the Kansas City Theater Company of New York and will be managed by Thomas Hodgeman, the present manager of the Majestic theater.

The new theater is at Twelfth and Wyandotte streets and has several innovations. The dressing rooms are all outside the theater proper. On the Twelfth street and Wyandotte street sides business houses will occupy the fronts with the exception of the main entrance on Wyandotte street. The theater is surrounded on four sides by open spaces, which provide four exits from the ground floor and two each from the other two floors, in addition to two emergency exits from each of the top floors.

The interior is finished in "art noveau," the colors being gold and yellow. With the exception of the chairs the theater is entirely fireproof. It will have a seating capacity of 1,650. There are three floors, with 550 chairs on the orchestra floor, 400 on the balcony floor, 600 on the gallery floor and 100 in the twelve boxes. The stage will be protected by an ornamental asbestos curtain.

The auditorium of the theater is 72 by 108 feet, of which 40 by 70 feet is taken up by the stage. Inclines instead of stairs will be used to gain access to the first two floors.

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October 1, 1909

OUT OF THE OLD BUILDING.

Y. M. C. A. Members Make the Move
Into Their New Building a
Memorable Occasion.

The Y. M. C. A. building at 810 Wyandotte street -- if a building may have a memory -- never will forget last night. It was the noisiest night the building had ever experienced in the thirteen years it has been occupied by the association. The organization deserted it last night and about 1,000 of the younger members celebrated the occasion by a parade to the new building of the association at Tenth and Oak streets.

Before they left, using bar bells, they tapped and rattled the floors and tables in the building and turned on and off the electric lights, romped up and down the stairs and did other stunts that occur to youthful cut-ups. Then they went out on Wyandotte street, fell into eight platoons, each of which represented one of the teams competing for the most new members, and marched thought the business streets giving a yell half-human and half-coyote that left none of the auditors along the streets in doubt as to the identity of the marchers or the fact that they were celebrating.

When the marchers reached the new building, they raced up unlighted stairs and produced noises that made the former sounds excruciatingly jealous, providing again that noises get jealous. Incidentally, the association members advertised the fact that it was looking for new members. Up to last night 610 new members had been secured. The competition to gain 1,500 new members ends tomorrow night. Those in charge say that they will have them.

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August 23, 1909

"COPPER" MADE GOOD NURSE.

Patrick Coon Took Care of Sick
Mother and Babe.

In the manual of questions asked probationary police officers by Thomas R. Marks, police commissioner, there is none which relates to the art of nursing babies. But if there are credentials needed on that score, women in the block on Wyandotte street, between Twelfth and Thirteenth streets, wouldn't mind indorsing Patrick Coon, one of the oldest policemen on the force. In fact, they'd be glad to do so.

To the rowdies and thugs along Twelfth street, which forms part of his beat, Coon is called a "double knuckled copper." The phrase carries with it majesty of person as well as majesty of law. Coon's heart is as big as his body. That's what the women say. And this is why:

Three weeks ago a baby was born to Mrs. Elizabeth Rockey of 1222 Wyandotte street. Mrs. Rockey was sick and alone. Her husband had left her, it is said. The women in the neighborhood told Coon of the circumstances.

The patrolman investigated the case. He found that Mrs. Rockey was worthy of help. So he took up a collection on his beat and with the money bought delicacies such as a mother might relish and saw that the baby was cared for. Word was received yesterday from the missing husband, who has been located, that he wishes to be with his wife. Today a letter is expected telling when he will be at home.

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August 7, 1909

UNEARTHED MYSTERIOUS BOX.

Contained Skeleton of a Dog,
and Not a Bomb.

While excavating in the basement of the old Southern hotel at Tenth and Wyandotte streets yesterday afternoon, a workman unearthed a suspicious looking box. Fearing an infernal machine, police headquarters was notified and Detective Charles Lewis was sent to investigate the matter.

Lewis used a pick. One or two vigorous blows was sufficient to break the hinges, and the skeleton of a dog was disclosed.

Then someone recalled the fact that a woman who once lived at the hotel had owned two white house dogs and that on the death of the favorite, the animal was buried in the cellar with much ceremony.

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July 22, 1909

LOCKWOOD SOLD HIS FIND.

Unidentified Monster Found in North End
to Be a Circus Exhibit.

James Lockwood, who discovered a peculiar reptile near Second and Wyandotte streets Tuesday, was possessed of a spirit of commercialism yesterday morning and placed the long-tailed creature on exhibition near Twelfth and Main streets. After he had been visited by naturalists and curious ones for half a day and had cleared at least $3, he decided to sell his new found possession. A man who claimed that he was a circus advance agent gave him $15 for sole possession. He promptly took down his sign and left his place of business.

No one was able to tell what the creature really is. It was agreed that it belonged to the lizard family.

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June 23, 1909

GIRL STRUCK BY LIGHTNING.

Miss Jenny B. Haug, Knocked to
Ground Unconscious.

Miss Jenny B. Haug, 1615 Wyandotte street, Kansas City, Mo., was rendered unconscious early yesterday morning by a bolt of lightning, which tore away a section of the wall near which she was standing. A light pan which she was holding was torn from her grasp, and her entire right side seemed paralyzed. Although able to talk last night, she was still suffering greatly from the shock. Dr. George F. Berry, who was called, said last night that the right hand and foot was pulled backward in a strained position, and that the patient was in a highly nervous state. Miss Haug's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Haug, live at 2707 North Eighth street, Kansas City, Kas.

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June 17, 1909

FARE LIFE OF CAR
ENDED BY SUICIDE.

RUNS AWAY AND DASHES IT-
SELF AGAINST POLE.

Deliberately Leaves Barn and Makes
Wild Run Down Ninth Street
Until It Jumps Track at
Wyandotte Street.

Roanoke car No. 604 committed suicide last night at 7:30 o'clock by running down Ninth from Washington street and dashing itself against the trolley pole at the southeast corner of Ninth and Wyandotte streets. So carefully was the act committed that no one was hurt and the tracks were left clear, but the car was smashed to kindling.

No. 604 returned from a hard day's work and was put into the car barn at Ninth and Wyandotte streets by Motorman Floyd Dyer, 809 West Twenty-first street. It was raining and there was a despondency in the air, but the car manifested no signs of the deep design it was nursing within its breast.
INTENT ON SUICIDE
Fifteen minutes later, when none of the street car men was looking, it poked its nose out of the barn and started, gathering speed as it progressed. A girl clerking at a laundry agency across the street from the barn saw it start.

"There was no one on or near the car," she said. "It came out deliberately like a living thing, and ran away before anyone had time to stop it."
Two street car men saw the runaway after it had gone half a block and ran after it. Fortunately there were no cars on the track in front and the rain had driven pedestrians from the streets.
Detective Andy O'Hare, who was waiting for a car at Ninth and Wyandotte streets, saw the car bearing down upon him. The trolley was threshing wildly although it had been on the wire when 604 left the barn.
DASHES ITSELF TO PIECES.
Grinding the speed limit beneath its wheels, the suicide leaped the track at Wyandotte steret, instead of making the turn, and precipitated itself sideways against the granitoid walk at the west side of the Boston Drug Company, on the southeast corner.
It was brought to a stop by an iron trolley pole, and the bed of the car left the trucks and fell sideways on the walk, completely blocking passage. Only two windows in the drug store were damaged. Every window in the car ws broken, the front end was ripped open and a few solid planks were left.
The wreck was entirely clear of the tracks and traffic was not delayed. Dyer, the motorman, is positive that he set the brake before leaving the car.
"Clear case of suicide, probably due to despondency brought on by the whether," was the verdict of the wreckers who cleared the debris away.

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June 10, 1909

CLAIM HE HYPNOTIZED
ATHENAEUM WOMEN.

SIX MEMBERS CAUSE ARREST OF
AFFABLE BOOK AGENT.

A. W. Johnson Alleged to Have In-
duced Them to Give Up Money
and I. O. U.'s Totaling $120.
Held by Justice.

Six members of the Athenaeum Club went to the prosecutor's office yesterday and on behalf of themselves and three others declared that A. W. Johnson, a book agent, had hypnotized them into giving up money and I. O. U.'s totaling $120.75.

The women who complained to M. M. Bogie, assistant prosecuting attorney, were the following: Mrs. Anna S. Welch, wife of a physician; Mrs. E. T. Phillips, wife of a physician, residence the Lorraine; Mrs. Paul B. Chaney, 3446 Campbell street; Mrs. George S. Millard, 4331 Harrison street; Mrs. W. W. Anderson, 2705 Linwood avenue; Dr. Eliza Mitchell, 1008 Locust street.

Besides these, the following complained of Johnson, but did not appear yesterday: Mrs. Willard Q. Church, 3325 Wyandotte street; Mrs. Wilbur Bell, 200 Olive street, and Mrs. S. S. Moorehead, 3329 Forest avenue.

The women confronted Johnson in Mr. Bogie's office. It was declared that he had exercised hypnotic power. Said Mrs. M. H. Devault, 3411 Wabash avenue, prominent in the Athenaeum:

"This man sold a set of books called 'The Authors' Digest' to these members of the Athenaeum on representation that I had purchased the volumes and had recommended them. They bought largely on this recommendation."

"Yes, and we were hypnotized," said the women.

In addition to the books, Johnson sold a membership in the "American University Association." This, the women say he told them, would enable them to buy books, and especially medical works, at less than the usual price. After correspondence it was found that the lower prices could not be secured.

From all but one woman named, except Mrs. Devault, Johnson secured $5.75 and an order for $115. From Mrs. Millard he got $20 in money.

Johnson, a well dressed, affable young man, was arraigned before Justice Theodore Remley on a charge of obtaining money under false pretenses. He pleaded not guilty and was released on a bond of $500. He said he had an office in the Century building.

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May 28, 1909

BOUNDARIES FOR TENDERLOIN.

Tenement Commission's Advice Con-
cerning "Red Light" Districts.

In a letter to the board of police commissioners yesterday the tenement commission advised the board that conditions on Twelfth street in the neighborhood of Central high school were not ideal, and that many hotels and rooming houses in that neighborhood were frequented by an undesirable class of inmates.

The commission also advised that the "red light" district be segregated to definite boundaries, south of Twelfth street. The letter advised that the boundaries of the district be fixed at Main street on the west, McGee street on the east, Eighteenth street on the south and Fourteenth street on the north. The district in the North End should be bounded on the north by Second street, on the east by Wyandotte street, on the south by Fifth street and on the west by Broadway.

Commissioner Marks was delegated to make an investigation of the matter, and report at the next meeting.

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May 23, 1909

THE WILL OF GOD IF
I AM HANGED: SHARP

LEADER OF RELIGIOUS FANATICS
DODGES RESPONSIBILITY.

Conflicting Testimony as to Who
Started the City Hall Riot
Brings Protest From
the Defendant.

SHARP TRIAL'S SECOND DAY: Defense still fails to indicate any trace of an insanity plea and continues to question along self-defense lines.
Sharp interrupts and contradicts Captain Whitsett, while latter testifies.
Patrick Clark, captain of police, tells of his fight, barehanded, with Sharp, who had both revolver and knife.
Testimony as to fight on river admitted only sparingly by Judge Latshaw.
Sharp gives out statement to effect that evidence which gets at the cause of the riot is being excluded. Also ridicules introduction of his overcoat as evidence, as not proving anything.

"If they sentence me to hang it will be the will of God."

With these words James Sharp was led back to his cell in the county jail after the second day of his trial on the charge of killing Michael Mullane, a patrolman, in the city hall riot. It was the first time during yesterday that he had mentioned religious matters.

The day closed with the evidence of the state two-thirds finished and with no more traces of an insanity defense than were shown on Friday. A. E. Martin, of counsel for Sharp, stated that he had not announced any defense and that his purpose would be to break down the testimony of the state's witnesses. All of his cross-questioning, however, as told in The Journal yesterday, was directed towards showing that the band of fanatics under Sharp's leadership did not provoke the riot, but that it was started by officers. Self-defense is the logical name for such a theory of the case. The state is expected to finish its testimony by Monday evening.

Police officers gave the greater part of the testimony yesterday. Of them, Captian Walter Whitsett was on the stand the longest time. Whitsett gave his age as 41, his service in the police department as twenty years and his residence as 2631 Gillham road. On the afternoon of the riot he was at his desk in the city hall as captain commanding the headquarters precinct.

CHILDREN WERE SHOOTING.

"I heard the shooting," testified Whitsett, "took my revolver out of my desk and ran to the street. I met Captain Clark, who had been wounded, on the stairs. When I got to the middle of the street I saw Mullane standing with a club in one hand and a revolver in the other. There was a man in front of him with a revolver. The women of the band also were near at the time. There was a man with a long beard standing on the opposite corner firing in the direction of Mullane."

"Who was this man?" asked Prosecutor Conkling.

"That's him right there," said the witness, indicating Sharp.

"What happened then?"

"I fired three or four shots at him and his revolver fell out of his hand. Two or three children came up behind and began to shoot at me. When I got back on the street, after going into the station for another revolver, I saw Mullane staggering toward headquarters and helped him in. Later we searched for Sharp but could not find him. We immediately sent his description to every officer in the city and notified the surrounding towns.

"On the evening of December 10 we got word from Olathe that Sharp was under arrest there. I went there that evening with Inspector Charles Ryan."

Court adjourned at noon with Whitsett still on the stand. In the afternoon he resumed his story of the trip to Olathe. He found Sharp there in the office of Sheriff Steed. Sharp's beard and hair had been cut and he was wounded in both hands. There was a hole through his hat.

"I talked to Sharp in the presence of Mr. Steed, Inspector Ryan and Hugh Moore, a newspaper man Sharp told us--"

Mr. Martin for the defense here objected to Whitsett's telling of Sharp's statement.

"If a written statement was taken that is the best evidence," said Martin.

The statement was shown to Captain Whitsett and identified by him. Weapons used in the city hall riot then were introduced in evidence. First there was Sharp's .45 caliber Colt revolver, the handle scarred by a shot. Sharp told Whitsett the weapon was shot out of his hand. Then there was a .45 caliber colt which Louis Pratt had carried.

"I was told by Sharp that Pratt had bought his weapon in Kansas City," said Whitsett, but Sharp spoke out sharply in court to the witness:

"I didn't say that. Why do you want to tell such stuff as that?"

"I don't know. He might have bought it up the river," responded Whitsett.

EXHIBITED THE WEAPONS.

Then was shown the 38-caliber Colt, which Sharp said his wife brought in her bosom from the houseboat. Lena Pratt's 32-caliber pistol was then exhibited and identified, and the knife, with its four-inch blade.

"What was the purpose of all these weapons, as Sharp told it to you?" asked Mr. Conkling.

"He said it was to resist any officer who might interfere with his preaching. He said he also had two rifles and a shotgun and another revolver, the latter used by Lulu Pratt."

The overcoat worn by Sharp the day of the riot was then shown to the jury, as were the remnants of Sharp's beard.

"Don't see why they want to show the coat," said Sharp to W. S. Gabriel, assistant prosecutor. It doesn't prove anything."

On cross-examination, Captain Whitsett was asked about happenings at the river, following the street fight, but the state objected successfully to most of the questions. Just after an objection had been sustained, Sharp spoke up and said:

"Your honor, can I have a word? This man wants to tell what happened there, and he is cut off. Now ---"

"Make your objection through your attorneys, Mr. Sharp," answered Judge Latshaw.

BARBER TESTIFIES.

Inspector Charles Ryan followed Captain Whitsett on the stand. He recounted substantially the same details of the shooting and the trip to Olathe.

George Robinson, 2905 Wyandotte street, a barber at 952 Mulberry street, was the next witness, and told how Sharp came into his shop sat in the chair of Chester Ramsey and had his hair and whiskers cut off.

"He didn't take his hands out of his pockets. He said: 'My hands were frosted up North, where I've been fishing. I want this job done in a hurry. I want to meet a friend and have to get on a train.'

"When the job was done, Ramsey took a purse out of Sharp's pocket and took 40 cents out of it. Then Sharp went away."

The defense objected to the testimony of Robinson on the plea that the state had given no notification that he would be called as a witness. The objection was overruled. Robinson was not cross-examined, but will be recalled by the defense to give further testimony.

Then came William Thiry, a farmer who lives near Monticello, Kas. "On the evening of December 9 Sharp came to my house," said Thiry. "My son opened the door and then I went out on the porch. Sharp was standing there. He said, 'Brother, I want to tell you my circumstances. Wait till I sit down,' and he sat down on the edge of the porch. 'I'm paralyzed, brother,' he resumed. 'I lay down over there on a strawstack and tried to die, but the laws of nature were against me.'

"He kept his hands in his overcoat pockets and asked for food and a night's lodging. 'I am no ordinary bum,' said he. 'I have money to pay for my keep over night.' I consulted with my wife and we decided we could not keep him, but we took him and fed him. I telephoned Mr. Beaver, my brother-in-law, who lives a quarter of a mile from me and Mr. Beaver said he could keep him. While I was telephoning, Sharp came into the ho use and listened to the conversation.

"At supper he spoke of being a peddler and that his partner had turned him down because he was paralyzed in his hands. He said he wanted to get back to town to a good hospital. It was 8 o'clock when he left my house. I fed him myself. He didn't take his hands from his pockets."

"I am willing to acknowledge anything this man says," remarked Sharp. "He treated me alright while I was there."

The defense fought the introduction of this testimony on the same theory it had advanced in the case of Robinson. It objected further to Thiry's relating some of the conversation. Mr. Conkling insisted it was relevant as combating a defense of insanity, if such was to be the defense.

"We have never announced what our defense would be," said Martin.

"You have done so repeatedly in open court while applying for continuances in this case," said Mr. Conkling.

Court was adjourned after the defense had secured permission to bring a number of witnesses from Lebanon, Mo.

OTHER WITNESSES.

In the course of the morning session Captain Clark, who lost an eye in the riot, gave his testimony. He lives at 538 Tracy avenue, and has been on the police force for twenty-one years. He was sergeant in immediate charge of headquarters station the afternoon of the riot. Testimony was also taken from Howard B. McAfee, business manager of Park college at Parkville, Mo., who was making a purchase on the Fourth street side of the city market when he heard children singing on Main street and went toward the gathering. He saw Dalbow come from the station and shake hands with Sharp. Then someone behind Sharp fired. He saw Mullane trying to get away from the women, who seemed to be pursuing him. then he saw Sharp and Clark in their encounter. He helped Clark into the station and when he looked again Sharp was gone.

Preceding Mr. McAfee, there testified Job H. Lyon, a traveling evangelist. Just before the riot he had a talk in the Workingman's Mission with Pratt. Sharp and Creighton, the last named in charge of the place. Being warned against antagonizing the police, Lyon said Sharp waved his hand and said: "I am God. If any policeman attempts to interfere with me, I'll kill him."

The witness said Sharp made similar statements while brandishing his revolver in the direction of the city hall. Pratt and Sharp, said Lyon, pointed revolvers at Dalbow when he approached. Sharp, said the witness, fired the first shot.

After Sharp had been brought to jail here, Lyon, who often holds Sunday meetings for the prisoners, accused the fanatic of falsehood in regard to the story he told the Mulberry street barber. He asked Sharp to attend the jail services and Sharp said he himself was god, and, of course, would not come. Then Lyon told him that God did not prevaricate and Sharp refused to have anything more to do with the evangelist.

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April 18, 1909

OLD SOLDIER SAVES
LIFE OF A WOMAN.

KNOCKED DOWN MAN WHO
STABBED MRS. ETHEL GRAY.

George Ripley, in Mad Fit, Was
Using Knife on Keeper of Room-
ing House When Charles
Hendrickson Interfered.

The strong right arm of Charles Hendrickson, 68 years old and a member of Fighting Joe Hooker's command during the civil war, saved the life of Mrs. Ethel Gray, 25 years old, last night at 9 o'clock. Hendrickson knocked down George Ripley, an admirer of Mrs. Gray's, after he had stabbed her in the back with a dirk.

Mrs. Gray, whose husband is out of town, bought a building at 215 East Fourteenth street last week and opened it as a rooming house for men only. Hendrickson, who is a carpenter, and W. T. Huddleston, a druggist, were among the roomers.

"I have known George Ripley only a week," she said at the general hospital last night. "He made my acquaintance in a restaurant and walked home with me. He called two or three times but never made love to me until last night. When he came into the room I saw that he had been drinking and it was not long before he began making love to me in the presence of Mr. Hendrickson. I am a married woman and, of course, I paid no attention to him. Then he got angry and struck me."

Hendrickson caught the man's arm after he had landed several blows on Mrs. Gray's face. Huddleston heard the noise and came to the old soldier's assistance. Between them they quieted the man and locked him in a rear room, while Mrs. Gray ran to the drug store of Adolph Lahme at Fourteenth street and Grand avenue and telephoned the Walnut street police station for an officer.

While she was away Ripley escaped from the house by opening a window, but Hendrickson and Huddleston almost immediately discovered his absence and went to the front door to prevent him from waylaying their landlady on her return. Ripley sprang out of the alley between Grand avenue and McGee streets and Huddleston attempted to prevent him from reaching Mrs. Gray.

"This isn't your butt-in," said Ripley. Huddleston gave way and Ripley ran after Mrs. Gray. At her own doorstep he caught her and stabbed her once in the back. Then the old soldier, who was standing on the steps, stepped down and struck the would-be assassin in the face. Ripley was knocked down, but arose and rushed at the woman again. Hendrickson struck again and knocked the knife out of his hand. Then Ripley fled.

The ambulance from the Walnut street police station was called and Dr. H. A. Hamilton dressed the cut, which was in the middle of the back. The knife penetrated to the vertebra. While the physician was at work the woman told the story to officers J. S. Scott and E. M. Wallace and furnished them with a description and a picture of her assailant. Later she was removed to the general hospital, where it was said that she would recover. Ripley has not been arrested. He is about 25 years old and rooms at 1322 Wyandotte street.

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April 17, 1909

ZOO BENEFIT CIRCUS HERE.

Campbell's Elephants Raid an
Italian Fruit Stand.

The Campbell Bros.' big show, on a special train consisting of forty cars, arrived in the city yesterday over the Rock Island from winter quarters in Fairbury, Neb. There will be a parade this at 11:00 and the show opens in Convention hall in the evening, where performances will be given every afternoon and evening until April 25. The greater part of the receipts go to the Kansas City Zoological Society, which intends to establish a menagerie out at Swope park.

The Campbell show has a complete menagerie, has over 200 head of horses and employs over 500 men. After unloading, the animal cages and the horses were located in a vacant lot south of the big hall. The bulls, two herds of elephants and the camels were placed inside the hall.

"The baby camel, which was born three weeks ago and is the only one born in captivity, is doing fine. So is the mother, and the father is also pretty proud of his son."

The big parade will be nearly one mile long. All of the animal cages will be in line along with the trained animals. Performers will ride their trained horses and clowns will cavort for the benefit of the children. Three brass bands and a drum corps will furnish the music.

The elephants, while on the way to the hall, nearly stampeded when they came to a street fruit stand run by an Italian at Twelfth and Wyandotte streets. Alice, who was in the lead, spied the fruit, and, being ravenously hungry, protruded her snout and plucked a large luscious banana from a big bunch hanging on the outside of the stand. The others fell right in line and made a run for the fruit stand. The Italian threw up both hands and deserted his post.

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April 4, 1909

MYSTERIOUS SHOT
WILL END HIS LIFE.

STRANGER FATALLY WOUNDED
IN WEST FIFTH STREET.

Man Supposed to Be T. J. Heffron
Victim of Unknown Assassin.
Police Seeking Clue to
the Tragedy.

Hearing a shot in the vicinity of Fifth and Wyandotte streets just after midnight this morning, Patrolmen F. J. Smitherman and W. S. Woods reached there in time to see a man stagger from behind some bill boards near the northwest corner and fall in the street. When taken to the emergency hospital it was found that he had been shot completely through the body on the right side. In a dying condition the man was taken to the general hospital. It is not thought he will live until morning.

The man, who is unknown to the police, appears to be a workman about 50 years old. His hair is gray. He wore corduroy trousers and a brown coat and vest.

In a little book in his pocket was found the following, written in a legible hand: "Sister, I am down and out. I want you to send me $5 to clean up and I will give it to you as soon as I can make it." To this is signed "T. J. Heffron." That name appears several more times in the book and the police believe he tried to say that name when asked who he was.

Further on in the book he has written a line of thanks to his sister for the loan of the money. Then follows: "Contract at Armour Junction. McVaugh, 2:30, March 25, 1909."

On a card in his pocket was written the name "William Ellington, 1614 Grand avenue." Police were at once detailed on the possible murder mystery and the officers at the Walnut street station were asked to see what was known of "T. J. Heffron" or any man answering the description of the victim at 1614 Grand avenue.

On the way to the hospital the injured man revived sufficiently to say that he had a brother-in-law on the police force. The police at No. 4 say that Patrolman W. J. Graham, 2339 Terrace street, who works out of No. 3 station, has several brothers-in-law by the name of Heffron, the name found in the book. Graham was not on duty that night.

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April 1, 1909

ELEVATOR SCALPS A BOY.

Walter Lillis, 16 Years Old, Injured
at Burd & Fletcher Plant.

While looking down the elevator shaft yesterday afternoon at the Burd & Fletcher Printing Company's plant 717 Wyandotte street, Walter Lillis, 16 years old, an errand boy, was caught between the descending elevator and the gate in front of the shaft. Before the elevator could be stopped the boy was "scalped." He was hurried to the emergency hospital, where he was treated by Dr. W. L. Gist. Though his injuries are dangerous, the physicians were positive that he will recover.

The boy had looked down the elevator shaft and shouted an order to a man on the lower floor just before the accident occurred. He was not looking and did not hear the descending elevator until it struck his head. The scalp was torn loose from the occipital region of the skull and it required a delicate operation to replace it. The boy did not require an anesthetic during the operation. He was taken to his home at 662 Park avenue.

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March 29, 1909

GIFT FOR NETTLETON HOME.

Mrs. Budd's Estate, Valued at $40,-
000, to Institution.

Another $40,000 was added to the endowment fund of the George H . Nettleton Home for Aged Women when the will of Mrs. Sarah A. C. Budd was filed yesterday for probate. That is the value placed on the estate, which consists, except for the home at 3632 Wyandotte street, entirely of personal property. The Nettleton home is the sole beneficiary.

Mrs. Budd, who died at the age of 82, was the wife of Azariah Budd, who, dying in 1891, left what is now known as Budd park to Kansas city. He named as one of the conditions of the gift that the city should pay Mrs. Budd $3,000 a year so long as she lived. The twenty-one acres, for which the city paid in annuities about $54,000, is now estimated to be worth five times that sum. Now, on the death of Mrs. Budd, the city ceases to pay this money and the park becomes its absolute property.

C. O. Tichenor, the attorney who drew the will, is named as executor in the document. He declined to serve, and Porter B. Godard was named in his stead by Judge J. E. Guinotte of the probate court.

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March 26, 1909

CHORUS GIRLS IN NEW STUNT.

Will Break Ground for New Theater
at Noon Today.

Forty-two chorus girls will break ground for the new Gayety theater, which the Columbia Amusement Company of New York is to erect at Twelfth and Wyandotte streets at noon today. They are members of the Knickerbocker company, now playing at the Majestic theater, and the Trocadero company, billed there for next week.

"This is an idea of my own, and with all respect to the mayor, I believe it is much more original than to have him present to do the sodturning act," said Thomas Hodgeman, the manager. "Of course, he's tired of such performances, although he's much too good natured to refuse on such occasions."

"Will the girls be in stage costume?" was asked.

"Uh-huh; that is, I don't know. They may, and they may not. It depends on the weather, as manufactured by P. Connor. If it's a little chilly the girls -- oh, I hate to say it, but really, you know, some of them might catch cold."

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January 30, 1909

MOOCHERS HERE ARE PLENTY.

They Infest Certain Streets and Con-
tinually Annoy People.

Beggars infest certain streets in Kansas City near the business districts and annoy people passing along those thoroughfares, especially at night. Along the streets where they ply their trade a policeman is rarely ever seen. Along Central avenue, between Ninth and Tenth street, and along Eleventh street from Broadway to Wyandotte, there are from six to eight beggars stationed every night.

They are a prosperous looking set of hoboes, too. Some of them are able-bodied, healthy, well-dressed young men, who evidently seek the cover of night to beg for dimes.

"Just a dime, please, to get a cheap bed," is their plea. One fellow has a story to tell about being on the way to his home in Iowa and was robbed of all his money. Now he is forced to ask assistance. He has been working the same street for three weeks. He dresses well, too, so he must be prospering.

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December 11, 1908

'ADAM' SHARP IS
TAKEN IN KANSAS.

JOHNSON COUNTY SHERIFF CAP-
TURES RELIGIOUS FANATIC.

IS WOUNDED IN BOTH HANDS.

BROUGHT TO KANSAS CITY AND
LOCKED IN HOLDOVER.

Offers No Resistance and Declares
He's Glad That His Fight Is
Over -- Abjures His "Faith."
City Hall Guarded.
James Sharp, Leader of Religious Fanatics
JAMES SHARP,
Religious Fanatic Who Styles Himself "Adam God."

After fifty hours' search by the local police and officers of nearby towns, James Sharp, who styles himself "Adam" and "King David," was captured three miles south of Zarah, Johnson county, Kas., yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. It was James Sharp who started a riot at Fourth and Main streets Tuesday afternoon, resulting in the death of Patrolmen A. O. Dalbow and Michael Mullane; bystander A. J. Selsor; and Louis Pratt, one of the religious band, and his 14-year-old daughter, Lulu.

News of Sharp's arrest reached police yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock and Chief of Police Daniel Ahern sent Captain Walter Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan to Olathe, Kas., after the prisoner.

A farmer named W. C. Brown living eight miles northwest of Olathe telephoned to J. S. Steed, sheriff of Johnson county, about 11 o'clock yesterday morning that a man resembling the description of the fanatic, James Sharp, had been seen in that neighborhood Wednesday night and yesterday morning. He said that the suspect had spent the night at the home of Joseph Beaver, a farmer living about two miles from him. Beaver, he said, was in Olathe and the sheriff could talk to him and get a good description of the man.

Sheriff Steed found Beaver and after having him describe the stranger who had stayed at his home decide that the man was Sharp and drove to the Brown farm, leaving Olathe about 1 o'clock yesterday. When he reached the Brown farm he deputized a young man who worked on a nearby farm, and the two men started a search for the mysterious stranger.

ASLEEP IN STRAW STACK.

A large wood pasture was first gone over, and then the officers separated and searched the ravines for several miles. A straw stack in the middle of an old wheat field was seen by the sheriff's deputy and, going around it, he found a man sleeping under the straw.

When Sheriff Steed reached the straw stack the man was called and told to come out. As he rolled from under the stack the men noticed he kept his hands in his pockets, and when they made him take them out they saw that he was wounded in both hands. After being searched by the sheriff, Sharp was placed in a buggy without being handcuffed and driven to Olathe.

Sharp told his captors that he was praying and contemplating while he was in the haystack as to what he should do. Weary with the long tramp from Kansas City and exhausted for the want of food, Sharp welcomed arrest and surrendered without any show of making a fight.

He was taken into the office of the county jail and his wounds, which had not been treated, were washed and bandaged by Sheriff Steed. He was then given a supper, which he devoured with eagerness.

ANXIOUS TO GO BACK.

While he was eating his meal the police officers from Kansas City arrived. Sharp greeted them and said he was anxious to go back with them. After finishing eating he told of his trip from Kansas City to the place of his capture.

"I shot five times at the police and when I had emptied my revolver I went into the saloon there on the corner and gave my pistol to the bartender. I told him that I was through, that I was not sure of the Lord, and asked him to take me to a policeman.. The man seemed to be frightened and did not move. I then tried to load the gun, but my two hands were wounded, so I could not do it. The cylinder would not turn. I was going to put the barrel in my mouth and blow off the top of my head."

Sharp said he then walked outside and stood in the crowd and watched the police and citizens gathering around Pratt across the street. Continuing Sharp said, "God then directed my steps south on Main street to Fifth street, and west up Fifth street. I went on down Fifth street to the bottoms. When I reached a barber shop I went in and had my hair clipped. I told the barber that my hands were frozen. Leaving the shop the Lord's will seemed to take me farther away from the shooting scene and I walked and walked.

"I WAS LOSING FAITH."

"I was losing faith in my religion because things had not come about as the revelation made it out. I continued walking all that night. In the morning I slept in the woods. That evening I went to a house and asked for something to eat and a place to sleep. The people gave me my supper, but said they did not have any place to put me for the night. They directed me to a house about 300 yards distant, to a cousin's. I stayed there all night and had my breakfast there.

"I could not use my hands and the man fed me. They asked me what was wrong with my hands, and I told them that I was paralyzed. I told them I was a peddler and that my partner had left me. I was afraid they would suspect that I was wanted in Kansas City and left as early in the morning as possible.

"After leaving that house, which was the Beaver farm, I went to that straw stack and hid. At first my only intention was to get away, to escape. Then I began to fear that I had done wrong and was debating whether I should go to some farmer and pay him to take me to a town and give me up. I had money to pay the man for my trouble.

"When the officer arrested me it seemed like I was going to heaven. I was so worried and had lost such a quantity of blood. I told the sheriff that I was glad he had me and the j ail would not be a bad place for me."

HAD PLENTY OF MONEY.

When the officers searched Sharp he had a number of cartridges in his pocket and a large knife, which he carried in his left hand and cut Sergeant Patrick Clark in the eye with. A large roll of bills containing $105 and a purse with $4.92 in it was also found in his pockets.

A large crowd of persons gathered in the jail yard at Olathe, and attempted to get into the room where the prisoner was. Everybody in the city wanted to see the man that caused so much grief by inciting his followers to murder and riot.

Captain Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan left Olathe and Sharp at 9 o'clock last night over the Frisco railroad, and arrived in Kansas City at 10 o'clock. The officers with their prisoner left the train at Rosedale and took a street car to Fourth and Wyandotte streets. They were afraid that friends of the dead and wounded officers who might have heard of Sharp's capture would attempt a demonstration against the prisoner. When the officers and prisoner got off the car he was placed between the two and hurried to police headquarters, where a large force of policemen and detectives were inside the station and also guarded the doors.

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December 9, 1908

HORSE KILLED IN THE FIGHT.

Driver of the Unfortunate Beast Had
a Narrow Escape.

One horse was killed in the fray. It was attached to a delivery wagon of the National Paper Box Company and driven by C. D. Woodey.

"I was driving down Fourth street from Wyandotte," said Woodey, "and got into the crowd just as the shooting began. One bullet grazed my cap and I whipped up. The horse was excited and prancing. When I got through the whizzing bullets and was down almost to the market, a shot struck my horse and it fell. Then I made tracks."

The horse was the property of Clark Wix, who has a transfer barn at Fourteenth and Walnut. It was rented to the box company.

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November 3, 1908

RETURNS AT Y. M. C. A.

Special Service by Telegraph and
Telephone Tonight.

Returns from the election will be received at Y. M. C. A. rooms, 810 Wyandotte street, tonight, commencing at 7:30 o'clock. At the same time stereopticon slides of the Yosemite valley will be shown by Alfred Foster of New Zealand, who will give a short explanation of each. Special service will be installed by both the Bell Telephone Company and the Postal Telegraph Company. Lunch will be served in the building.

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August 25, 1908

HE BEGGED TO BE ARRESTED.

Police Kindly Complied With Roy
Schultz's Request.

Roy Schultz, who formerly conducted a saloon at Tenth and Wyandotte streets, rushed into police headquarters last night, folowed by a pretty young woman, and requested to be locked up, saying that he had stabbed her. The woman, who gave the name of Anna Crisp and said she lived at Twenty-sixth street and Park avenue, declared that Schultz had not stabbed her.

When questioned she admitted that she had been stabbed in both hips in a quarrel while out buggy riding. The horse had started to run away and each held a line and it was to settle the question of which should hold both reins in the emergency that the stabbings occurred. Miss Crisp said that they had been quarreling because he had spent $3,000 on her in the last three years, and he had now only $50 to his name. The woman's injuries were trivial.

Both were locked in the holdover for a short time, and then released on $11 bond each, furnished by Schultz.

Schultz and Miss Crisp came into the lime light last New Year's night when she had trouble with H. R. Schultz, Roy's father, in the north lobby of the Midland hotel. Seeing her with Roy the father tried to induce the son to go home. Miss Crisp objeted and there was a regular hand-to-hand tussle for the possession of the youth. Finally the row reached the street and young Schultz tried to get Miss Crisp into a hack, but she was yanked back by the elder Schultz and then Miss Crisp alleged he struck her. At any rate she was arrested and later released on bond put up by J. H. Adams, a big-hearted real estate man from Texas, who had witnessed the affair.

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July 14, 1908

PUBLIC LIKES THE
PAY-AS-YOU-ENTER

FIRST DAY'S TRIAL ON TROOST
LINE IS SATISFACTORY.

Cars Make Better Time and Much
Inconvenience to Passengers Is
Overcome -- Bad Layout
for the Deadbeats.
The New Pay-As-You-Enter Street Cars
HOW YOU PAY IN THE PAY-AS-YOU-ENTER CAR.

Pay-as-you-enter cars began running in Kansas city yesterday, the new system being inaugurated on the Troost avenue division. At the end of the first day every report made to the general offices was approving. The public took to the new system at once. Those conductors who were questioned by the company inspectors all said they had not found anyone objecting to the new rule of requiring fares to be paid when passengers board the cars.

The rush hour test proved that the system delays the cars at the main points about 50 per cent longer than the old custom of collecting fares from the interior of the car, but ten blocks out, meaning as far as Troost avenue on the Troost avenue line, the time lost in taking on passengers was more than made up by the quick way in which conductors could dispatch their trains.

There was not a single accident reported during the day, even of the most trivial sort.

An hour's observation at Tenth and Main streets and at Tenth and Walnut, between 5:20 and 6:30 last evening, when travel is heaviest, showed, what the company had not promised, an even distribution of the load. As cars would fill so that it was necessary to allow passengers to ride on the rear platforms, the conductors would close their gates and go without allowing any more to crowd on their cars. To the man who was left standing on the street this looked discriminating, but a watch showed that in six instances where this occurred cars followed within half a minute, in two instances within a few seconds, as two Troosts were running together. Under the old rule the first of the delayed cars would have been packed to suffocation, to the great discomfort of the passengers, while the car immediately behind would have run either with empty seats or at least with its aisles empty.

IT'S A LITTLE SLOWER.

A watch showed that it took eight seconds to take nine passengers on one of the old style, wide platform cars, but twelve seconds to take nine on the Troost avenue cars. It required eighteen seconds to unload five and take on six passengers from and on a Jackson avenue car. No Troost avenue car unloaded more than three passengers at Tenth and Main during the rush hour, but at no time did it take longer than two seconds to take on and seat a passenger.

There was no confusion in the matter of making change. Not having to watch his rear step from the front of his car, the conductor was able to handle his fares with alacrity. Taking twenty-seven passengers on one car at Tenth and Main in thirty-two seconds, the last to board had paid her fair and entered the car before it crossed Main street.

TWO CONDUCTORS TO A CAR.

Two conductors were on all cars during the rush hours -- one to block the exit door from incoming passengers and to start the car, the other collecting fares. The extra men worked only in the downtown district.

"It will be a week, perhaps," said Assistant General Manager W. A. Satterlee, "before the public is familiar with the new system. Accordingly we are putting extra men on to show them. The main difficulty now is to keep passengers from getting in the wrong door. Nobody complains, as there is another within two inches, which is open to them . The front door is closed, so, of course, the public understands it cannot board at that end of the car. We have had several messages telephoned in complimenting us on the innovation."

Ordinarily there are twenty cars and eight trailers on the Troost avenue line during the morning rush hours, and twenty-seven cars with eight trailers at the evening rush time. Yesterday the evening service was augmented to thirty-three cars, making a difference of half a minute between cars. The extras were put on to guard against any delay which might arise through the delay required in making change, the rule being that the car shall not start till the last waiting passenger is taken on, and yet everybody past the conductor shall have paid fare.

NO MORE DEADBEATS.

One of the old conductors laughed as he pointed out two men whose fares he had got. "I have carried them for a year and do not think I got a nickel out of them in all that time," he said "They used to give me a stare that I dare not question, bluffing me out of their fare If I had asked them where they got on they would have said Eighth and Wyandotte, most likely. I suppose they n ever paid the other conductors. They paid me tonight, though. This is pretty tough on the deadbeat."

An inspector, whose attention was called to the small crowd at Tenth and Grand, had a curious explanation.

"The deadbeats are gone," he said. "We known them by name, almost. they go to points like this, where cars always arrive loaded, and then force themselves on the end which the conductor is not working. This class did two things -- they beat the company out of their fares and they crowded passengers The paying passengers suffered from them in the annoying way of having them clock up the aisles. They never wanted seats, preferring to stand, on the alert, ready to leave the car in a natural way the moment they would see the conductor getting close to them. I am certain we carried a front platform load of these deadbeats from Tenth and Grand every night. Their disappearance makes room for ten people to get out of the aisle into the front platform, which is something the other passengers will approve."

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