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November 14, 1909

ARCHBISHOP GLENNON LAYS
ST. TERESA CORNER STONE.

St. Louis Prelate Puts in Two Busy
Days in Kansas City -- Enjoyed
Every Moment.

Several hundred Knights of Columbus were present at the reception given in honor of Archbishop Glennon at their new hall at Thirty-first and Main streets Friday. After renewing many old friendships the archbishop left for St. Louis at 11 o'clock that night.

"It has been a busy two days," he said last night, "but I have enjoyed every moment of my visit. I only wish that I could remain longer. I thank the Lord for the good that He has enabled me to do in Kansas City."

As the result of the prelate's appeal to the public to aid the work that is being carried on by the House of the Good Shepherd, in his lecture at Convention hall last Thursday night, over $5,000 has been collected, and more has been pledged.

Yesterday morning Archbishop Glennon went to the old St. Teresa's academy at Twelfth and Washington streets and celebrated mass. After visiting Loretto academy he returned to St. Teresa's, where a musicale was given in his honor. In the afternoon he laid the corner stone of the new St. Teresa's academy building at Fifth street and Broadway. It rained hard throughout the whole service but over 300 people stood bare headed in the mud while the archbishop put the stone in place and blessed the building.

In the evening Archbishop Glennon was the guest of honor at a dinner given at the home of Hugh Mathews, 1014 West Thirty-ninth street, and attended by Bishop Hogan, Bishop Lillis, Brother Charles and Father Walsh. The party then attended the Knights of Columbus reception.

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September 14, 1909

'CAP' PHELAN, SOLDIER
OF FORTUNE, IS DEAD.

NAME GRAVEN IN WAR HIS-
TORY AS BLOCKADE RUNNER.

Staunch Irish-American Patriot
Mixed in Many Attempts to Free
Ireland -- Stabbed for Expos-
ing Clan ne Gael Plot.
Captain Thomas Phelan, Soldiler of Fortune.
CAPTAIN THOMAS PHELAN.

The death of Captain Thomas Phelan, Irish-American patriot and soldier of fortune, which occurred at 2:30 o'clock last Saturday afternoon, in Bremerton, Wash., ended a life full of romance and a checkered career in war and politics. Early in life he was bitten with the wanderlust, and during the early 60s and 70s helped to make history, not only in America, but in Canada and Ireland. Captain Phelan was 76 years old and leaves a widow and four children.

Being a native of Ireland, Captain Phelan throughout his life and did all in his power to bring freedom to Erin. He was born near the town of Tipperary and came to America about 1857, locating at Independence, Mo. He married Miss Alice Cox of that city.

During the early part of Captain Phelan's life he was embroiled in many attempts to free his native country from the yoke of England. Shortly after his marriage in Independence he enlisted as a volunteer in the Seventh Missouri regiment of the Union army and fought with that regiment throughout the war. He rose from the ranks to a captain. He was in many of the important battles.

NAME IN WAR HISTORY.

One of his daring acts committed during the progress of the war was at the siege of Vicksburg. It was necessary to take a steamboat loaded with cotton and other products, and munitions of war, down the river and Captain Phelan was delegated to run the blockade.

Transferring bales of hay for cotton around the edge of the boat he succeeded in getting safely through the lines. His name appears in Civil war history as that of the man responsible for breaking the blockade.

In the late 60's he gained fame and notoriety by engaging in the Fenian raid from the United States into Canada in a futile attempt to occupy Canada and make it a base of supplies from which to carry on warfare with England for the freedom of Ireland.

The Irish in America congregated about Ridgeway, Canada, for the purpose of an uprising and gaining a stronghold in the Canadian country. Some 1,400 Irish left the United States for this purpose, but boats on the waterways cut off a portion, and they failed to land in Canada. A battle in which many persons were killed on both sides was fought by the Irishmen against the Queen's Own regiment.

While making a visit to his home country, Captain Phelan learned that the Clan na Gael was planning to blow up an English ship named the Queen. Although against England, Captain Phelan did not believe in destroying innocent passengers, and therefore notified the English ship people. In some manner his part became public, and O'Donovan Rossa, editor of the Irishman of New York, attacked his loyalty in the paper.

STABBED THIRTEEN TIMES.

The incident occurred during the term as mayor here of Lee Talbot. Captain Phelan was called to New York to be given an opportunity to explain matters relative to his informing the British of the intended blowing up of the Queen.

Close friendship had before existed between Rossa and Phelan, and the latter did not realize that he was to be the victim of a trap. He went to New York and entered Rossa's office. While there an endeavor to assassinate him was made by an Irishman living in the East. Captain Phelan was stabbed thirteen times and received a broken arm in the attack. He was confined in a hospital in New York for many months on account of his injuries. The news that he gave the information to the English leaked out through a story of the plot printed in Kansas City and written by Frank P. Clarke, a former newspaper man, now living here.

Between the years of 1882 and 1888 Captain Phelan was superintendent of the Kansas City workhouse. He was greatly interested in politics and was a staunch Republican all of his life. When the criminal court was instituted in Jackson county he was appointed clerk of the court and was the first to fill this position. Under Mayor John Moore he served as superintendent of public works. While Colonel R. T. Van Horn was a member of Congress Captain Phelan received the appointment of captain of police of Washington, D. C.

CHALLENGED COUNT ESTERHAZY.

After the civil war he organized Company D of the Third Regiment and was a captain in the regiment for many years. Later he organized Battery B. For the last seven years he had been in charge of a navy yard at Bremerton, Wash., where ships of the United States are repaired. He was holding this position when he died. Captain Phelan belonged to the G. A. R., but was not a member of any other organization.

Captain Phelen also figured very prominently in a duel which was never pulled off. The participants were to have been a Captain McCafferty and Captain Phelan. Rifles were the weapons chosen, and seconds and grounds had been picked when friends interfered.

At one time a number of Irish left America to aid Ireland, whose sons were to rise against England upon a certain day. Chester, England, was the place of the rendezvous for the Irish-Americans. Arms had been secured for their use.

The English troops, however, got wind of the threatened uprising and were sent out in such large forces that the Irish were overawed. The difficulty between Captains McCafferty and Phelan arose out of the means to be used at this time in trying to free Ireland.

Captain Phelan's family resides at 3205 Washington street. Dr. Y. J. Acton of Bremerton notified the family of the death. The body was buried yesterday afternoon in the Soldiers and Sailors' cemetery at Bremerton, Wash., by Captain Phelan's special request.

For many years Captain Phelan traveled over the country giving exhibitions of shooting and fencing. He was a crack shot with pistols and rifles, and was a famous swordsman.

Captain Phelan, while the Dreyfus affair in France was at its height, challenged Count Esterhazy, accuser of Dreyfus, to a duel with swords, to be fought anywhere in the world.

Besides his widow, Mrs. John Young and Miss Annie Phelan, daughters, and two sons, Robert Phelan, a police detective, and Thomas Phelan, survive.

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August 2, 1909

STARGAZING ON ST. TERESA'S.

That's What Peeper, Caught on Fire
Escape of Girls' School, Told
The Police.

Perched at the top of the fire escape on St. Teresa's academy, Eleventh and Washington streets, five floors from the ground, a peeper who told the police he was "star-gazing" was discovered at an early hour yesterday morning.

The noise he made in climbing awakened some of the pupils, all of whom are girls, and police headquarters was notified. Sergeant Robert Greeley and patrolmen Tim Kennedy and Ed Smith were sent.

"A man is trying to get in," said an excited voice. "Please hurry."

A hurried consultation was held under the shelter of the stone wall, which surrounds the place; and it was decided that the building should be surrounded. Flitting lights indicated agitation among the occupants.

"He's on this side," said an excited woman at an upstairs window, as Sergeant Robert Greeley approached the west side. "Do be careful, for I think he is desperate."

The other officers arrived and another council of war was held. The scampering of bare feet in the hallways alone disturbed the stillness. A passing night owl's car light showed a man perched on the topmost round of the fire escape five stories from the ground. Instantly three revolvers were pointed at him.

"Come down at once," commanded Greeley.

"I was just taking a peep at the stars," explained the man when he reached the ground.

The star-gazer was taken to police headquarters. He will explain in municipal court this morning.

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July 28, 1909

NEAR TO DEATH IN POOL.

With Twenty Swimmers Close at
Hand, Bather Goes Down
Third Time at Y. M. C. A.

With more than a score of persons swimming within ten feet of him yesterday afternoon in the swimming pool in the Y. M. C. A. building, P. H. Hanner, a deaf mute 23 years old, living at 517 Washington, was almost drowned before he could attract the attention of anyone. Hanner struggled several minutes and had sunk for the third time before it was realized that he was drowning. It took two hours to resuscitate him.

When Hanner's limbs began to tire and he realized that he couldn't reach safety, he tried to motion for help. No one saw him. He could not cry out, and the water with its splashing bathers , made invisible his signals for help.

He sank for the first time and rose to the surface; a moment later his lungs filled with water. In desperation he waved his hands. The second time he sank he began to think that the end was near.

"That's a pretty good diver," said someone. "See how he stays under water."

Just as he was sinking for the third time, one of his companions noticed the agonized expression on his face. The attention of several others was called, and he was pulled to safety. The ambulance from police headquarters was called and Dr. F. R. Berry induced artificial respiration until he recovered consciousness.

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June 17, 1909

FARE LIFE OF CAR
ENDED BY SUICIDE.

RUNS AWAY AND DASHES IT-
SELF AGAINST POLE.

Deliberately Leaves Barn and Makes
Wild Run Down Ninth Street
Until It Jumps Track at
Wyandotte Street.

Roanoke car No. 604 committed suicide last night at 7:30 o'clock by running down Ninth from Washington street and dashing itself against the trolley pole at the southeast corner of Ninth and Wyandotte streets. So carefully was the act committed that no one was hurt and the tracks were left clear, but the car was smashed to kindling.

No. 604 returned from a hard day's work and was put into the car barn at Ninth and Wyandotte streets by Motorman Floyd Dyer, 809 West Twenty-first street. It was raining and there was a despondency in the air, but the car manifested no signs of the deep design it was nursing within its breast.
INTENT ON SUICIDE
Fifteen minutes later, when none of the street car men was looking, it poked its nose out of the barn and started, gathering speed as it progressed. A girl clerking at a laundry agency across the street from the barn saw it start.

"There was no one on or near the car," she said. "It came out deliberately like a living thing, and ran away before anyone had time to stop it."
Two street car men saw the runaway after it had gone half a block and ran after it. Fortunately there were no cars on the track in front and the rain had driven pedestrians from the streets.
Detective Andy O'Hare, who was waiting for a car at Ninth and Wyandotte streets, saw the car bearing down upon him. The trolley was threshing wildly although it had been on the wire when 604 left the barn.
DASHES ITSELF TO PIECES.
Grinding the speed limit beneath its wheels, the suicide leaped the track at Wyandotte steret, instead of making the turn, and precipitated itself sideways against the granitoid walk at the west side of the Boston Drug Company, on the southeast corner.
It was brought to a stop by an iron trolley pole, and the bed of the car left the trucks and fell sideways on the walk, completely blocking passage. Only two windows in the drug store were damaged. Every window in the car ws broken, the front end was ripped open and a few solid planks were left.
The wreck was entirely clear of the tracks and traffic was not delayed. Dyer, the motorman, is positive that he set the brake before leaving the car.
"Clear case of suicide, probably due to despondency brought on by the whether," was the verdict of the wreckers who cleared the debris away.

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May 29, 1909

PIONEER CONDUCTOR DIES.

A. B. Shepherd Ran Out of Topeka
in 1870 on Santa Fe.

A. B. Shepherd, one of the three conductors who were with the Santa Fe railroad when it started out of Topeka in 1870, and one of the oldest passenger conductors working out of the Union depot, died yesterday morning at his home, 1216 Washington street, at the age of 67 years. For several years Mr. Shepherd has had a night run on the Missouri Pacific line from Kansas City to Coffeyville, Kas.

Born and reared in Wellsville, O., Mr. Shepherd enlisted in the One Hundred and First Ohio volunteers at the outbreak of the civil war. At its close he was discharged with the rank of sergeant. Immediately he became a brakeman on the Cleveland & Pittsburg railway and had been in the railway business since, working out of Kansas City for thirty years.

Mr. Shepherd was a member of the Order of Railway Conductors. A widow and two sons, Charles, who lives in Armourdale, and Wilbur B., who lives at the Washington street address, survive.

Funeral services will be held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home. Rev. Dr. George Reynolds, pastor of the Second Presbyterian church, will officiate. Burial will be in Forest Hill cemetery.

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May 21, 1909

WED AT 13, AT 15 DIVORCED.

Judge Porterfield Grants Decree to
Mamie May Carroll.

Married at 13 and divorced at 15 is the record of Mamie May Carroll. She was granted a decree yesterday by Judge Porterfield of the circuit court and given the custody of her baby girl. Daniel Carroll, her former husband, is a teamster. The allegation was non-support. At the time of her marriage Mrs. Carroll's mother, Mrs. Maggie Ehlin, 2130 Washington street, gave her consent.

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May 19, 1909

THIRD PARALYTIC
STROKE WAS FATAL.

FRANCIS M. FURGASON WAS ILL
THREE WEEKS.

Seventy-Six Years Old, Mr. Furgason
Had Long Been Active in
the Charities of
the City.

As the result of a paralytic stroke which came to him over three weeks ago, Francis M. Furgason, president of the Furgason & Tabb Underwriting Company, with offices in the Dwight building, and a pioneer among the progressive men of this city, died quietly at his home, 1006 East Thirty-third street, at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon. He was 76 years old.

Until a few days ago it was hoped that the stricken man might partially recover, although it was conceded by family physicians that a third stroke would cause his death. At times there seemed to be even chances that the third stroke would not come, for the patient and frequent rallies and the advantage of a hardy physique. Monday, however, he began to fail and early yesterday morning it was known that there was no hope for him. The funeral will be held Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from Calvary Baptist church. Dr. F. C. McConnell, Rev. J. M. Cromer and Rev. H. T. Ford will officiate in the services. The deacons of the church will act as active pallbearers. Interment will be in Elmwood cemetery.

WAS ONCE Y. M. C. A. PRESIDENT.

Mr. Furgason was born near Indianapolis, Ind., April 1, 1833. His father was a pioneer of sturdy Scotch extraction, who had pushed west to the Hoosier state when it was yet a wilderness and staked out a farm at what is now the very center of Indianapolis. Mr. Furgason spent his first years on the farm, but at 18 his father sent him to Franklin college.

Mr. Furgason was graduated at Franklin when he was 22 years old, at the head of a large class for that time. The following year he was made a teacher at the college, and three years later elected to the presidency, which place hie filled, it is said, with credit to himself and the institution until the year 1867, when he gave up his collegiate work and came to Kansas City, where he became involved in the insurance trade.

In 1861 the Y. M. C. A., which was then only an infant organization, was in bad financial straits and temporarily suspended. The war, which had been the cause of the trouble, was now over and many members had returned and were anxious to revive the association on a more active basis than ever before. The board met and Mr. Furgason was elected president of the Y. M. C. A. D. A. Williams, an electrician, was made secretary. The move proved a fortunate one for the associaton.

Under Mr. Furgason's management headquarters and a reading room were established on the south side of Missouri avenue on Delaware. Rent was obtained free from the late D. L. Shouse, then a banker, and the four years of the Furgason administration saw the Y. M. C. A. on an improved financial basis, with a membership that was twice as large as it had been at any previous period. Mr. Furgason never gave up his interest in the Y. M. C. A. and other organizations for the benefit of the younger element of the city.

Soon after his connection with Y. M. C. A., Mr. Furgson was hired as a teacher in the Franklin school at Fourteenth and Washington streets, and served in this capacity eight years. After this he resumed his former occupation of insurance agent and followed it until his retirement from active business a few years ago.

MEN RESPECTED HIM.

"He was one of the kindest and gentlest old men I have ever had the pleasure of knowing," said the Rev. F. C. McConnell of the Calvary Baptist church recently. "I knew Mr. Furgason for thirty-five years," said George Peake, a veteran accountant, who has offices in the First National bank building. "It seemed as if he had the perpetual desire to extend sunshine in all directions."

Mr. Furgason was married twice, once in the early 50s, the last time to Mrs. Laura Branham in 1858. His widow and one son, Frank, who has taken his place in the firm of Furgason & Tabb, survive him. A son, Arthur, and a daughter, Emma, died within a few months of each other three years ago.

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April 12, 1909

FRACTURED HIS SKULL.

F. A. Tewksbury Injured While
Taking Car to the Barn.

While taking a Rockhill car to the Troost avenue barn, at Forty-ninth and Harrison streets, last night, F. A. Tweksbury, the conductor, leaned out from the car, and his head came in contact with an electric light pole with such force that his skull was fractured.

The ambulance from the Walnut street police station removed the injured man to the University hospital, where he is in a precarious condition. Tewksbury lives at 1512 Washington street.

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December 25, 1908

BUSINESS WORRIES DROVE
HOTEL WOMAN TO SUICIDE.

Mrs. Alvina Morrell, of the Mon-
damin, Left a Note Saying,
"I Am So Tired."

Worry because her business was losing money caused Mrs. Alvina Morrell, 38 years old, the owner of the Mondamin hotel at Twelfth and Washington streets, to commit suicide last night by taking bichloride of mercury. Mrs. Morrell came here last August and assumed charge of the hotel, and had been losing money steadily ever since.

A note hastily scribbled on a piece of cardboard, probably after the poison had been swallowed, read as follows:

"Let me sleep. I am so tired. Give all I have to mother. Lillie, by-by, I am sick. ALVINA."

The Lillie referred to is her sister, who lives in St. Louis. A telegram from her was received in the afternoon my Mrs. Morrell, saying that the former could not come to this city for Christmas, but would be here the next day. Mrs. Morrell's mother also lives in St. Louis and is very ill. Mrs. Morrell was a widow.

Deputy Coroner Harry Czarlinsky was summoned and made an examination. The body was removed to O'Donnell's undertaking rooms.

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October 1, 1908

POLICE ARE HUNTING
FOR MISSING PEOPLE

FRANTIC RELATIVES THINK
THEY ARE HEADED THIS WAY.

The List of Nine Includes a 75-Year-
Old Farmer Who Forsook
the Plow for Gay
City Life.

The reports made to the police yesterday concerned missing people principally, there being nine in all, whose ages range from 13 to 75 years. E. L. Barrett of Hamilton, Mo., telephoned that his daughter Nellie, 17 years old, whom he described, had left on an early morning train without leaving her future address. He was following on the next train and wanted the police to detain the girl.

For some reason or other George W. Shepard, 75 years old, took French leave of the dear old farm near Lone Jack, Mo., and headed for the gay city with its turmoil and strife. His aged wife was worried about him and, through a friend, asked the police to keep a weather eye out for Mr. Shepard. He is described as "black suit, sandy whiskers, soft black hat and blind in left eye."

Mrs. H. Gunther, 309 Washington avenue, Chicago, Ill., who signs herself "a broken-hearted mother," wants the police to find her son, Georg, 17 years old, who has been missing from home since June 25 last. She gives the police a minute description on which to work.

W. Emerson, 713 Washington street, this city, asks aid of the police in locating his wife. She is 27 years old, he says, five feet four inches tall and weighs 112 pounds. She has dark complexion, dark eyes and hair. Mr. Emerson said she left home with a man whom he names and describes.

The county attorney of Bedford, Ia., telephoned the police to be on the lookout for Fred W. Evans. Among other distinctive features given the poilce to aid in the identification is a "Roman nose that turns up." An officer went to Bedford to take Evans back to Cripple Creek, Col., it is said. He got out on a writ of habeas corpus and left for here. Henry von Pohl, sheriff of Teller county, Col., offers $50 reward for Evans.

W. Harry Walston, pastor of the Christian church at Minnie, Ill., writes that his son, Eugene Walston, 13 years old, left home last Friday with the intention of beating his way to Clearwater, Kas. As he would have to pass through Kansas City, the police were asked to be on the lookout for and detain the boy.

Thomas Atkins, chief of police of Davenport, Ia., wrote that Mrs. Chris Miller, aged 19 years, but looks more like 16, had left home and was headed this way. He gives a very accurate description of the missing woman, from her gold teeth to the four points on her jacket. He does not say w2h y she left home or what is wanted with her, only asking that she be arrested and notice given him.

Mrs. R. D. Curren, 811 Robidoux street, St. Joseph, Mo., said that her boy, Cleo Curren, 14 years old, had been missing since September 21. The Carnival, she thinks, may draw him there.

W. L. Myers, 1313 West Jackson street, Bloomington, Ill., is shy his son, Bert Myers, who has been missing from home for some time. Thinks he may head in here for Carnival week.

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August 7, 1908

LOSES LIFE IN RIVER?

Coat and Hat of Newspaper Solicitor
Found on Bank of Blue.

Harry Taylor, a newspaper solicitor of 1514 Washington street, is thought by the police to have lost his life in the Blue river, near the Kansas City Southern railroad bridge, some time yesterday. A coat and hat which afterwards were identified by Mrs. Taylor were found on the river bank by a policeman. A bottle of phenol was found in one of the pockets. An effort is being made to find the body.

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May 5, 1908

POLICE FIND OWNERS
OF CANNED JEWELS.

BOY'S DISCOVERY BRINGS GLAD-
NESS TO ONE HOME.

Porch Climber Had Stolen Watches
on December 26, 1906, and
Buried Them in a To-
mato Can.

By a thorough search of police records Fred G. Bailey, secretary to the inspector of detectives, yesterday located the owners for most of the jewelry which was found Saturday night at Nineteenth and McGee streets. The valuables were found by John E. Linings, 317 East Nineteenth street, a boy who was digging for worms. It was all safely planted in an old rusty tin can which, according to the record, had been in the ground just one year, four months and two days when found. The can, which was delivered to Lieutenant Hammil at the Walnut street station, contained four gold watches, one gold cross, one gold cuff button, two brooches, one an old came; one gold and one enamel heart, and one string of three-strand gold beads.

Bailey began at January, 1906, and it was not until he reached December 26 of that year that his efforts were rewarded. On that night porch climbers entered the home of E. H. Stimson, 3145 Broadway, while the family was in the siting room below. The thief or thieves secured two ladies' gold watches, one an open face watch, with E. A. S. on the case in big letters, and the other marked "Emmett to Olive." They also got a long gold watch chain and five gold rings.

On the same evening the home of C. M. Gilbert, then living at 3129 Washington street, was entered, probably by the same "climbers" as it was in a similar manner. There three gold watches were stolen. One, an open face watch, had "1876" engraved on it and there was a long chain to it. Another was engraved "Annie B Gilbert" and the last was undescribed. The thief also got a black seal card case and $40 in cash.

The gold engraved cross, the cuff button, two brooches and two hearts have not yet been identified. Detective Ralph Trueman was sent out to locate the robbed families and tell them of their luck. He found Mr. Stimson still living at the same number but Mr. Gilbert, he said, had left the city. Neighbors said the family had moved to Ohio. They believed it was Dayton. Secretary Bailey will endeavor to locate Mr. Gilbert and make him happy.

Mr. Stimson, who is a real estate man, was very much pleased when told of the find. "I recall the night we were robbed," he said. "It was the night after Christmas and about 8 o'clock. The thieves climbed the front porch and ransacked the two front rooms. The watch marked 'E. A. S.' is the property of my daughter, Edith Aileen Stimson. She will be more pleased than anybody as she was broken hearted over her loss."

Many conjectures have been made as to how and why the can of jewelry was buried in the ground and especially why it was left there. Many police believe that the thief, after burying his loot, fell into the hands of the law and may now be doing time in some prison. Others think the man who put the can there must be dead.

It is not an unusual thing for burglars to bury plunder, especially watches and other jewelry which is easily identified. After it has been buried long enough for the police to cease to look for the lost valuables they can easily be dug up and either sold or pawned with less chance of detection. If the thief is in prison the police believe he would have some day returned and disposed of his loot.

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March 8, 1908

HE STOLE BABY FROM
ITS MOTHER'S ARMS.

FATHER ESCAPED, ALTHOUGH
PURSUSED BY A MOB.

Mysterious Case, in Which the Prin-
cipals, After Causing a Grand
Furor, All Dropped
Out of Sight.

To kidnap a baby from the arms of its mother on a public street at high noon, run several blocks pursued by 250 people and the frantic mother and to finally make good his escape through a basement on West Fifth street, was the record made by a father yesterday.

A woman was walking on Sixth street near Central at noon yesterday, carrying her baby. As she neared the corner a man appeared, grabbed the child from its mother's arms and ran north on Central street -- the baby under his coat. At Fifth street he turned west as far as the Coca-Cola Bottling Company, 302 West Fifth street. In the door he darted, slamming it after him. The kidnaping caused great excitement and the man with the baby was pursued by a mob which jammed about the door.

The woman from whom the baby had been snatched was a blonde, tall and wore a brown cloak and a small hat with a white veil. As she ran she cried to the pursuers, "Stop him! He's my husband and has got my child and will kill it. I know he sill. Stop him!"

An elderly woman dressed in black appeared on the scene, from where no one seemed to know, and overtook the fleeing mother. Several times she tried to detain her, but when frantic efforts failed, the woman in black grabbed a small hand satchel from the other woman and gave up the chase.

Charles E. McVey, desk sergeant at police headquarters, was passing and saw the crowd. The woman in brown appealed to him to get her baby which was being stolen, saying again that it would be killed. McVey ran into the bottling works and took a freight elevator to the top floor, having been told that the man with the baby had gone that way. When he descended, however, he was informed that the man had left by the basement door in the rear.

J. B. Jewell, manager of the bottling works, said: "The man who went through here with the baby in his arms was Loren Gaulter, who formerly worked here. The woman who pursued him was his wife. They have been married about two years and the baby is probably 6 months old. They last lived in Independence, Mo., but I never knew of their having had any family troubles."

Until five days ago, Gaulter was employed in the mail department at the Union depot as a truck handler. At that time he quit suddenly and what became of him no one there knew.

The man with the baby ran through an open lot in the rear of the bottling works and made his way to Fourth and Broadway, where, witnesses said, he was met by another woman The two were later seen to board a Leavenworth car, it was said. McVey had trouble in dispersing the crowd, and when quiet was restored all the principals in the affair had disappeared.

The distracted mother made her way around the block and through the alley by which the man and baby had escaped. To a man loading a car in the rear of the Richards & Conover Hardware Company's store she appealed to help her. That man, who said he knew the woman, gave the name of Young. He said she was Mrs. Gaulter, but he did not know where she lived. Harry Williams, a negro porter in a barber shop at 316 West Fifth street, saw the man with the baby under his coat leave the bottling works by the rear basement door. When he called out, "That man's stolen that baby," he said the man ran faster than ever.

Jewel said that after all the excitement was over a young woman, known to him as Gaulter's sister, called on him. She asked where "the folks" had gone, Jewel said, and intimated, that she would have gone with them. The wife was heard to remark that if her husband got out of town, she new he would take the baby to Iowa.

The kidnaping was not reported to the police or to the Humane Society, consequently neither worked on the case.

Mrs. Belle Slaughter, who formerly lived at 1639 Washington street, is the mother of Mrs. Gaulter. Until two days ago the Gaulter's lived at 612 East Ninth street, and appeared to be happy, neighbors say, until Mrs. Slaughter appeared. It is thought that Mrs. Slaughter is the woman who appeared and took Mrs. Gaulter's handbag during the chase after the husband and child.

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February 3, 1908

CAUGHT BABY
AS IT FELL

EXCITED WOMAN HAD TROWN
INFANT FROM THIRD STORY.

BUILDING WAS IN FLAMES

MRS. HILDA HOLMQUEST OBEYED
A CROWD'S YELLS TO JUMP.

Man Caught the Baby as It Dropped,
but the Woman Struck the
Hard Pavement and
Was Badly Hurt.
Mrs. Hilda Holmquest.
MRS. HILDA HOLMQUEST.
Who Heeded an Excited Crowd's Advice to Leap From a Burning Building, and was seriously hurt.

Cut off from escape by the stairs in a fire in 406 Landis court yesterday afternoon, Mrs. Hilda Holmquest rushed to a rear fire escape three floors above the paved alley, with another woman's child in her arms and stood a moment dazed while flames shot up at her from a window on the floor beneath. It seemed impossible for her to descend the ladder through the flames and the excited crowd below cried to her to jump.

"Oh, take the baby," she said, "it is not mine."

Then she threw the infant and jumped after it.

George M. Thomas of 910 Wyandotte street, one of the crowd beneath, caught the babe by one arm and both feet and dodged Mrs. Holmquest's falling body.

The child was unhurt. Mrs. Holmquest struck the brick pavement and suffered a broken knee, a serious scalp wound and internal injuries. She may recover.
RESCUED BY FIREMEN.

Two minutes after Mrs. Holmquest jumped the truck and ladder company from No. 4 fire station arrived and rescued all of the other people imprisoned by the fire in the upper floors. They are: Mrs. Edward McNamara, wife of the police sergeant; Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Bushnell and Mr. and Mrs. Mellin.

Others than Mrs. Homlquest, who were injured in the blaze, were people on the first floor. The fire started from an unknown cause in a closet in the apartments of Mrs. Frank Alley, on the first floor, and when she opened the closet door it had gained such headway that already it was eating its way through the ceiling into the rooms above and it burst out of the closet upon her, singeing her hair and burning her hands.

A Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, who were visiting Mrs. Alley, were unable to reach a door before the flames cut them off. Mitchell's face was burned deep into the flesh. Mrs. Alley was unable to save anything from her apartments.

The rescue of Mrs. McNamara from a window above the floor from which Mrs. Holmquest leaped was a thrilling one. When she discovered the fire she rose from her bed, where she had lain for six weeks because of sickness, crept to a window, and seeing nothing below her but smoke and flame, climbed along the window ledge on the third floor to the window of hte adjoining apartment, No. 408. There she remained until Captain John Vaughn of the fire company put up a ladder, climbed it and carried her to safety.
WENT DOWN THE LADDER.

Mr. and Mrs. Bushnell and the Marlins, their guests, were also on the third floor. Smoke and flame coming up the stairs and enveloping the fire escapes compelled them to sit in their windows and await the arrival of the firemen. No. 4 truck company ran up three ladders and brought them all to safety.

When the work of rescue was finished the firemen turned their attention to the blaze and extinguished it after a hard battle. Two companies were called and assisted No. 4. The fire damage was confined to the three foors of the one apartment, although tenants of the apartments on either side suffered damage by water.

CAUSE OF FIRE UNKNOWN.

Last night no cause for the fire had been discovered. M. G. Harmon, agent for the property, said that the loss will probably amount to $4,000 or $5,000. The "court" runs from Broadway to Washington street on Eighteenth street on both sides and includes twenty-two houses, accommodating four families each on as many floors. Howard B. Waldron, mayor of Hisllsdale, Mich., bought the property five years ago for $200,000 and $80,000 insurance is carried.

Mrs. August Josephson, mother of the baby that was dropped three stories, returned soon after the fire and found her child at her sister's, Mrs. H. O. Axene, at 402 Landis court.

Mrs. Holmquest is 28 years old and came here from Providence, R. I. She has been married eight months and is the wife of Theodore Holmquest, a porter, employed at the Emery, Bird, Thayer Dry Goods Company. He was at work yesterday and she had left her home at 1638 Pennsylvania avenue to visit Mrs. Josephson and was caring for the baby, Velma, while Mrs. Josephson attended a funeral. Velma is eight months old.

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January 18, 1908

THREE BIG FINES FOR
THREE BAD MEN.

Judge Kyle Has a Session
With Wife Abusers.

"I wish I had before me this morning every man within my jurisdiction who abuses or in any manner mistreats his wife. I am just in the mood to give such men the limit. There are many more in this city and I wish they all could be apprehended," said Harry G. Kyle, police judge, yesterday morning just after he had fined three husbands $500 each.

The first one to come to bat was John Forest of 1311 1/2 Washington street. He was charged with disturbing the peace of his wife.

Frank Andrews of 417 East Eighteenth street was charged with non-support. He is a stock cutter for the Caton Printing company. Mrs. Andrews said that her husband came only only two or three nights in the week and that the rent and grocery bills were unpaid. He makes good wages. Andrews fondled his 6-year-old boy while the trial was in progress, and Judge Kyle said:

"You seem to think a lot of that boy now, but you certainly did not when you remained away from home over half the time. Five hundred dollars for you, too."

Andrews's mother and his wife both appeared against him.

In the trial of Clyde DeLapp, a bartender, charged with disturbing the peace of his wife, there was evidence hinting that an abortive attempt had been made to railroad Mrs. Helen DeLapp, the wife, to an asylum.

The DeLapps lived at 2625 Wabash avenue when most of the trouble occurred. After Mrs. DeLapp left her husband, on January 7, however, she had been staying with Mrs. R. A. Shiras at 1406 East Tenth street. Mrs. DeLapp's testimony, which was corroborated by Mrs. Shiras and by Mrs. J. H. Morse of 2622 Wabash avenue, was to the effect that DeLapp had dragged her from her home by her hair, choked her and beaten her.

Mrs. DeLapp said that an effort had been made to send her to an asylum by the certificate of two doctors, only one of whom she had ever seen, and that one had not examined her as to her sanity. DeLapp was fined $500.

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December 21, 1907

HE WAS DETERMINED TO DIE.

Man Thought to Be Charles Corbett
Killed by Sightseeing Car.

A man believed to be Charles Corbett, a railroad laborer from Rossville Station, Ill., was run down and instantly killed by a "Seeing Kansas City" car at Eighth and Delaware streets about 3:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. There were a dozen or more witnesses to the man's death. It is said Corbett was under the influence of liquor.

Harry Criner, 707 Washington street, and William Houser, who gave his address as the Santa Fe cutting house, were standing waiting for a car when Corbett started across the tracks. "Houser grabbed hold of the man," said Criner, "and eh jerked away from him. Just then, seeing the car approaching, I stepped forward and the man was so intent on crossing that he struck me across the nose for trying to interfere with him."

There was nothing in the dead man's pockets but what appeared to be a laborer's transfer from Rossville Junction, Ill., on the Chicago & Eastern Illinois railroad, to some other point. The name of Charles Corbett is on that. The same name appears in several places in a small account book he had. Not a cent of money, not even a pocket knife, was found.

The dead man probably was 30 years old, five feet seven or eight inches tall, and weighed about 135 or 140 pounds. He had dark hair, blue eyes, fair complexion and smooth face. He wore a blue flannel shirt, blue overalls and black trousers.

The records at police headquarters show that twice this week a man by the name of Charles Corbett was held for safe keeping. Both times he had been drinking heavily and once went into the station himself claiming that he was being followed. From the description given them of the dead man the police are sure that it is the same one.

Fritz Braden, conductor, and Lowry Burke, motorman, of the car, were arrested by Sergeant James Hogan and Patrolman John T. Rogers. At headquarters they refused to make a statement to Captain Whitsett and were sent to the county prosecutor. They were released after their names had been taken. They promised to be on hand when wanted.

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September 27, 1907

SHE HAS NOT GONE AWAY.

Wife of Missing Michael Donnelly
Still in the City.

Mrs. Michael Donnelly, who, it was reported, had followed in the wake of her husband, Michael Donnlly, national organizer of the Butcher Workmens' union and mysteriously disappeared from the city, is at 1810 Washington street.

She stated last night that she gave up her restaurant and boarding house at 3103 Southwest boulevard because the expense was too great. Most of the boarders that she had there will still be with her at the Washington street cottage.

She has at yet received no word from her husband and refuses to express any opinion as to what has become of him, on the ground that her fears are of too serious a nature to be given publicly.

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September 22, 1907

FATAL ENDING OF STABBING.

Benjamin Clay Dies from Knife
Wounds Inflicted by Jesse Walker.

Benjamin Clay, 30 years old, a bottler, living at 2443 Penn street, died yesterday morning at his home from a stab would in the left temple inflicted by Jesse Walker, 19 years old, who lives at 2436 Washington street, the night of September 11. Dr. George B. Thompson, coroner, performed an autopsy yesterday. Walker is being held at police headquarters. Statements were taken from both the young man and his father, Albert Walker, yesterday. Should Jesse Walker be tried on a charge of murder, it is probable self-defense will be his plea. In his statement he says that Clay attacked him in a saloon at Southwest boulevard and Penn street, grabbed him by the hair and beat him on the face. He broke away from Clay and ran into a side room with Clay pursuing him, and that Clay was reaching in his pocket, apparently to draw a knife. Walker pulled out a knife and stabbed him three times, twice in the body and once on the left temple. Walker then ran and Clay chased him a block.

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August 16, 1907

HAS NO HOME OR FRIENDS.

Man of Talents and War Records
Found Lying in Weeds..

Thomas Dean, an old man without a country, was found lying exhausted in the weeds yesterday afternoon near Twenty-third and Washington streets.

To Dr. G. A. Dagg, ambulance surgeon from No. 4 police station, the old man said that he long been a physician coming to the United States when a young man from Berlin, Germany, and serving through the civil war with the rank of captain in the Twenty-second New York regulars.

But now I am past the age when accomplishments count," this veteran in more than one field of effort said. "Though I talk twenty-seven languages and was long a man of affairs, I'm wandering over the country when old and infirm, without money and without friends."

Dean gave his age as 78 years and said he had spent the last winter in California and came here about four weeks ago. He has been staying at various cheap rooming houses and sleeping outside when he had no money. He was taken to the general hospital, where the record states his case as "senile infirmity and general weakness."

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August 2, 1907

A THIEVES' PARADISE.

Ten Robberies in a Night Follow
Demoralization of Police Force.

Taking the reports of robberies and the work of pickpockets on Wednesday night immediately following the removal of Chief Hayes, it would seem that the crooked gentry are fully informed of the Folk police reorganization and the consequent demoralization of the force. Here is a list of one night's robberies:

L. C. Stein, 542 Park avenue, who has an office in the New York Life building, was robbed of a diamond valued at $200 on a street car at Eighth street and Grand avenue in the early evening. No arrests.

The room of Harry B. Monroe, 607 Walnut street, was entered and clothing and $10 taken. No arrests.

The Manhattan Ice Cream Company, 1710 Walnut street, was broken into, and property valued at $28 stolen. No arrests.

A burglar entered the room of Miss Lillian McDonaled, 1214 Troost avenue, and stole three rings valued at $50 and $5.75 in cash. No arrests.

Mrs. J. C. Frailey, also rooming at the foregoing number, lost $75 worth of jewelry by the visit of the same thief. No arrests.

Charles Payne, of Kansas City, Kas., was robbed of a gold watch valued at $40 at Sixth and Wyandotte streets. No arrests.

T. A. Nelson, 1634 Washington street, was robbed of a gold watch valued at $25. No arrests.

The barber shop of Fred Millick, 1507 Grand avenue, was broken into and property valued at $50 stolen. No arrests.

James Dowling, a guest at the Ashland hotel, reported that while asleep in his room a burglar entered and stole from beneath his pillow a watch valued at $100. No arrests.

The office of the Eadle Coal Company, Second and Wyandotte streets, was broken open and brass valued at $15 was stolen. No arrests.

Thomas Randall, a Kansas City, Kas. detective, reported that a man just across the line had been robbed of $220 in cash and the thief had made for Kansas City to be on "neutral ground." The police were given the name of the thief and a complete description of him. They say they are "working on the case." No arrests.

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July 25, 1907

BITING WORM IS ACTIVE.

Another Case Reported From Thir-
teenth and Washington Streets.

Residents of the neighborhood of Sixteenth and Washington streets are excited over a small worm that has bitten several living in that section. Yesterday Patrick O'Brien, 18 years old, 1619 Washington street, almost directly across the street from where O'Brien lives, was bitten Tuesday on the neck in almost identically the same place where the worm bit O'Brien.

This worm, which seems to show a partiality toward left sides of necks when it bites, is described as about an inch long, and is covered with long white fur. Several who passed opinion on the genus of the vermiform creature say that the results of its bite are similar to that of what is commonly called a fever worm, but in appearance this worm differs somewhat.

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July 24, 1907

WOMAN BITTEN BY WORM.

Faints After Knocking Wooly Crawler
From Her Neck.

Mrs. C. F. Thompson, 1626 Washington street, was bitten on the left side of the neck by a worm yesterday afternoon, and immediately a place about the wound swelled to almost the size of a baseball. Mrs. Thompson had been in her yard caring for her flowers and walked into her kitchen, when she felt a sharp stinging sensation on the neck.

She placed her hand to her neck and felt a woolly worm about an inch in length. Knocking it from her neck, she fainted. Dr. George F. Berry, 609 West Sixteenth street, was summoned. The worm that bit Mr. Thompson is believed to be what is known as a fever worm, and its bite, though not necessarily fatal, is said to be of a poisonous character.

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July 1, 1907

BY A FIST BLOW.

JAMES WILSON, UNION OFFICIAL,
KILLED AT PARK.
TWO BROTHERS ARE HELD.

ALLEN AND RUDOLPH POINDEXTER
WERE IN FIGHT.
Alleged That Trouble Over Labor
Matters Caused Ill-Feeling Which
Resulted in Fatal Meeting
at Fairmount -- Victim's
Neck Broken.

In a fight near the dancing pavilion at Fairmount park about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon with Allen Poindexter, 23 years old, and Rudolph Poindexter, about 19 years old, James Wilson, business agent for the Teamsters' union, was killed by a blow to the chin.

The Poindexters live at 4100 East Ninth street, their father, J. M. Poindexter, being a conductor in the employ of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company. Wilson, who was about 23 years old, lived with his widowed mother and a sister near Twelfth and Holmes.

The fight that caused Wilson's death was the culmination of an altercation between young Poindexter and Wilson near Twelfth street and Grand avenue Saturday night. This fight is said to have arisen over union troubles. A friend of young Poindexter had been dismissed from the Teamsters' union, and he accused Wilson of being instrumental in his dismissal. However, Poindexter, though reluctant to talk of the affair, said yesterday that the trouble was the outcome of a quarrel over a girl.

POINDEXTER FOLLOWED?

Wilson went to the park yesterday afternoon. It is said that the Poindexters learned of his being there and immediately set out for the place. They had been in the park no more than fifteen minutes when they came upon Wilson, it is said.

No one seems to know who struck the blow that started the fight, though there were hundreds within sight of the trouble. W. C. Rice, chief of the park police, was standing within a hundred feet of the fight when it first started. He said that he saw young Poindexter and Wilson fighting, and he started toward them to interfere, when the elder brother, who saw that Wilson was getting the best of the altercation, ran up and struck Wilson. Wilson then turned upon his assailant, and as he did so Poindexter landed a blow on the point of his chin that felled him, it is said.

Just as this blow was struck the marshal had almost reached the two, but Poindexter had turned and started through the crowd. The marshall followed, and compelled him to stop at the point of his revolver. The brothers were arrested by park police officers.

Wilson was taken to the park hotel, where he was treated by Dr. Z. J. Jones, 709 Washington street, who happened to be at the park. The man died within a few minutes. His neck was broken.

TAKEN TO INDEPENDENCE
The two Poindexters were taken to the county jail at Independence by Marshal Rice, where they are held without bail.
Dr. H. O. Parker, deputy coroner, was summoned immediately, and after viewing the body ordered its removal to Newcomer's undertaking establishment.

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June 28, 1907

FIRE UNDER FIREWORKS.

Boys Attempt to Burn Carload
Among Which Men Worked.

A carload of fireworks in the Southwestern News Company's warehouse at Third and Washington streets had a fire built under it yesterday noon by mischievous boys. The corrugated iron structure is built two feet above the ground and the boys splashed a quart of coal oil around on the under side of the floor and touched a match.

Their scampering away caused a teamster to investigate, and the fire was found. It was rapidly eating through the wooden floor before it could be extinguished. Once through the floor, the entire car of explosives would have gone in a flash. Four men were at work among the stuff, filling orders.

The house is on an isolated hill and was built for storing fireworks.

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April 19, 1907

SUICIDE IN A HOTEL

LIQUOR SALESMAN OF CINCIN-
NATI DRINKS CARBOLIC ACID
STOCK MARKET LOSS BLAMED

SEALED LETTER TO WIFE AND
NOTE TO FRIEND HERE.
Walter Jacobs, to Whom It Was Ad-
dressed, Offers Only One Ex-
planation for Death of S. B.
Horwitz -- Kansas City
Not His Territory

Samuel B. Horwitz, a liquor salesman of Cincinnati, O., committed suicide at the Kupper hotel yesterday afternoon by drinking carbolic acid. The body was discovered at 7:45 o'clock. Two sealed letters were left, addressed one to his wife, Mrs. S. B. Horwitz, 727 South Crescent avenue, Avondale, Cincinnati, and the other to his father, B. T. Horwitz, Middleton, O. An open note on the writing table read:



Notify Walter Jacobs, care of May, Stern & Co.

Below on the same sheet he wrote:



Walter: Notify the folks in Cincinnati. My name is Sam B. Horwitz.

Walter Jacobs, who clerks at May-Sterns's local store, was found at the Alta Vista hotel, at Eleventh and Washington streets. He was unaware that Horwitz was in Kansas City. He said:


It has been a year and a half since I saw Sam and that was back East. He was
traveling for a liquor house, but I do not know the name of it. I know,
however, that Kansas City was not in his territory and I had no idea he ever came
here. He is a brother-in-law of my brother, A. Jacobs, in Cincinnati; also of
Manah Bower, one of Cincinnati's iron masters. I can conceive of no motive for
the suicide, unless Sam may have been losing money on the stock market. He
always speculated some. His family consisted of the wife and one child, 9 years
old."
Horwitz appeared at the Kupper hotel Wednesday forenoon about 11:30 o'clock. He carried no baggage. His manner was nervous, but did not excite the suspicions of the clerk, Sam Wilson. Later in the day, Wilson observed his nervousness as he would go through the lobby and remarked that he should have to put a man in a more remote room who has light baggage and took a room for only one day. Yesterday forenoon the clerk on duty, J. C. Boushell, needing the room, sent to see if it had been vacated. The door was open and a collar and tie were on the dresser. It was thought that the guest was in the bath or out of the house. When he left his key is not known, but two hours after noon he called for it and went upstairs. That was the last seen of him alive.

After 7 o'clock the clerk called his room on the phone to ask if he would stay over the night.

Receiving no answer, the key was twisted out of the lock. Horwitz was lying on the bed, dressed in a union suit. A bottle unlabeled, stood by a drinking glass, which contained acid. The man's suit of clothes hung in the closet. There was not a single coin in his pockets nor anything of value. His bunch of keys lay on the table. Aside from the notes left there was nothing in the room but a magazine and a Cincinnati newspaper.

Deputy Coroner O. H. Parker, who viewed the body, sent it to Freeman & Marshall's morgue and the family was notified by wire.

The absence of any baggage suggests that some misfortune may have been encountered in which his personal belongings were lost. The signature he put upon the hotel register was "S. Goldstein, Cincinnati." The bellboy who showed him to his room found the former occupant's baggage still there and was starting downstairs for a change of room, when Horowitz, noting that room 223 was unoccupied, said, "I think I should like this room." His request was granted by the clerk.

Mr. Horowitz was about 38 years old, and his appearance was that of a prosperous business man. Mr. Jacobs directed that the body be prepared for burial, and held until either the wife or some of his relatives are heard from. In case they do not come to Kansas City for the body, Mr. Jacobs will direct its removal to Cincinnati.

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April 7, 1907

2 RUN-AWAY WIVES

SISTERS FLEEING FROM HUS-
BANDS SEEK REFUGE HERE.

ONE OF THEM
UNDER ARREST.

SHE IS ACCUSED OF SELLING
MORTGAGED PROPERTY
Mrs. Jennie D. Smith, of Denver, and
Mrs. Narcissus Smith Tell Their
Troubles to the Police
-- "Plot to Get Me to
Denver," Says Jennie D.
There must have been all kinds of discord in the Smith family when two Mrs. Smiths, sisters, made up their minds to run away. Both are now in the matron's room at police headquarters. Both are pretty, brown eyed and auburn haired.

One of them is being held a prisoner. Her name is Mrs. Jennie D. Smith from Denver, Col. An officer from there will be here after her this afternoon. A wire to the chief here said that a charge of welling mortgaged property had been placed against her.

Mrs. Jennie D. Smith said that she left her husband in Denver three months ago, going to her sister, Mrs. Narcissus Smith, in Memphis, Tenn.

"My husband threatened to kill me more than once," said Mrs. J. D. Smith. "My sister was there at the time and heard him do so many times. When we separated he gave me all the furniture and told me to keep the roomers or do what I pleased. He said he would make the payments for it. When I got ready to go to Memphis with my sister I sold the furniture, $350 worth of it, for $115. The auction house to which it was sold lost it afterwards to the instalment house. My husband simply wants to get me back there, and into trouble, with the idea that I will go back to him -- but I won't. Not much."

The two sisters went on to Memphis, where two weeks ago, Mrs. Narcissus Smith concluded that life with George Smith, a machinist, could not be endured any longer. So they both "up and left," taking the Memphis woman's 3-year-old baby, Ruth, along with them. Mrs. George Smith was preparing to go back to Denver with her sisters.

Yesterday morning a small, bald, stockily built man went into the office of Chief Hayes and announced that he had come to town to "kidnap me child." After a short talk it was learned that he was after "Baby Ruth," a golden haired beauty.

"I am going to take that kid away from my wife and take it to the home of my sister," he announced. Chief Hayes, however, told Smith that he would walk into all sorts of trouble if he attempted anything of the sort in Kansas City. He was referred to Colonel J. C. Greenman, Humane agent.

It was the order of the colonel that an officer be sent out with Smith, and that all three, husband, wife and baby appear at his office. While Smith and Detective William Bates were scouting in the vicinity of Hasbrook place, Twelfth and Washington streets, where the Mrs. Smiths had resided, Mrs. George Smith appeared at the matron's room to see her sister. When she was told that her husband was here after the child she was more than frantic.

"He'll steal it. He'll steal it, just as sure as fate," she said, hysterically. "I never did him but one mean trick and that was to use his last month's pay check with which to get away. He was just preparing to leave me and go to Panama, and I knew it. Now he wants the baby just for spite."

She was going right home to protect her baby, but was told that Smith was with an officer,and would not dare to do such a thing. On her way downstairs to see Chief Hays and ask his protection, which Colonel Greenman advised, after hearing her story, she encountered "George" right face to face in a narrow hallway.

"Don't you touch me! Don't you speak to me!" she exclaimed, as she sought protection behind a big policeman. Smith wilted when the policeman said, "Phat ye tryin' to do here, hit a lady? G'wan wid ye, er Oi'll drive ye into th' flure like a tack."

Chief Hayes sent Holly Jarboe with Mrs. Smith No. 2 to her rooms at Hasbrook place, where the child was found with a neighbor. She moved right then and there, bag, baggage and baby, to the matron's room at police headquarters, where the chief said she could remain until her sister left for Denver. This afternoon an officer will accompany her to the train to see that no trouble occurs in the Smith family.

"If Smith wants to steal his baby let him go to Denver," said the chief. "We don't allow that here when we know it."

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January 15, 1907

DISROBES IN DOCTOR'S OFFICE.

Young Woman, Believed to Be
Demented, Surprised Physician

A young woman, believed to be demented, entered the reception room of Dr. J. D. Griffith, 520 Rialto building, about 5:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon and removed most of her clothing. She was found there by Dr. Walter C. Klein, Dr. Griffith's assistant. He did not know that any one was in the room and was preparing to leave when he found her.

The woman was taken to the general hospital She gave the name of Myrtle Moore and her home on Washington street. Dr. J. P. Henderson, assistant city physician, diagnosed her case as emotional insanity.

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