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September 28, 1909

SHOT A NEIGHBOR, THEN
ACTED GOOD SAMARITAN.

German Woman Gardner Attempted
to Frighten Victor Marten With
Gun That Wasn't Loaded.
Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, Who Shot Gardener.
MRS. MARY WILSDORF.

After emptying the contents of a shotgun into the left thigh of Victor Marten, a gardener, Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, 46 years old, wife of a gardener at Seventy-seventh street and Walrond avenue, yesterday afternoon got on a Marlborough street car and came to the city and gave herself up to Chief of Police Frank F. Snow.

Before leaving her home she gave the wounded man a glass of water and left him lying on the ground near her house in charge of her husband, Carl Wilsdorf, who was later arrested by Mounted Patrolman E. B. Chiles.

Mrs. Wildorf and Marten are neighbors, each owning a ten acre tract of land.

From the facts elicited from the woman through Dr. George Ringle, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, who acted as interpreter for the police, the shooting followed a quarrel, about Marten's horses getting into the truck garden of the Wilsdorf's.

She said the horses frequently trampled the vegetables. One of them wandered over from the Marten field yesterday to the Wildorf land and was locked up in the barn.

When Marten went to the Wilsdorf house to get his horse he was asked to pay a small amount of money for alleged damages. A dispute arose and Mrs. Wilsdorf said that Marten held aloft a potato digger and threatened to kill her.

She said she then ran into the house and got her husband's shotgun, and returned to the yard. When within five feet of Marten the gun was discharged and the contents of one barrel entered the left thigh of Marten. He fell to the ground and asked for a drink of water which was given to him by Mrs. Wilsdorf.

Her husband told her she had better go to town and give herself up to the police, which advice she took. when she first entered police headquarters she was a little excited, and, not being able to speak good English, was misunderstood. The patrolman she met believed her to say a man shot her in the leg, so he directed her to the Emergency hospital. At the hospital Dr. Ringle took her in charge, and, learning that she was the person who did the shooting, took her back to the police station. She was turned over to Chief Snow.

Mrs. Wilsdorf informed the police that the man was still lying in the yard at her home and needed medical attention. Dr. George Todd, 4638 Troost avenue, attended to the man's injuries. Dr. Todd called an ambulance from Freeman & Marshall's and had the man taken to the University hospital.

The woman told Captain Whitsett that she had never before handled a shotgun and did not know exactly how to use it. The one she got in the house was broken at the breech and as she was running with it toward Marten she was trying to replace it. Suddenly the gun snapped into place and was discharged. She said she really did not think it was loaded, but was only trying to scare Marten. She was locked up in the matron's room.

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December 2, 1908

JUDGE WALLACE ENJOINED
FROM MOVING HIS HOUSE.

His Neighbors Say It Would Destroy
Valuable Trees in Norledge Place.

Beset in front with the dragon quo warranto, Judge W. H. Wallace, advancing to give battle, has been assaulted from the rear. He has been enjoined from moving his own house. The temporary order was issued yesterday afternoon by Judge J. E. Goodrich in the circuit court and made returnable today.

William C. and Edward L. and Nathan Scarritt and Mrs. Annie E. Hendrix are the plaintiffs in the action, which is brought against William H. Wallace, Elizabeth C. Wallace and Grant Renne. The last named is a house mover, who has the contracting for transporting the Wallace dwelling from its old to its new site.

Boiled down to the briefest terms, the petition seeks to prevent the moving of the Wallace home westward from its present site along Walrond avenue or Norledge Place. It is stated that an agreement was made last October by the Wallaces by which they agreed not to remove their dwelling except in an easterly direction, so as to locate it east of Indiana avenue. The objective point for the house is now Norledge Place, to a lot adjoining on the west the home of W. C. Scarritt.

The real reason of the suit is an endeavor to prevent the destruction of the fine shade trees which line Norledge Place. One large oak is especially spoken of in the petition as having great value. Says the petition: "At least twenty trees would be destroyed, of great value, of more value, in fact, than the building."

At first R. A. Long's was mentioned in the papers as a plaintiff, because the Wallace home, according to the petition, is to be moved across Mr. Long's land. "Mr. Long's name was taken from the papers because he is not in the city and could not read over the petition," said W. C. Scarritt. "However, he is in sympathy with us and moving the house across his land would be done without his consent and against his will."

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April 24, 1908

FORMER FRIENDS
BITTER ENEMIES.

E. J. RICHARDS SEEKS BIG DAM-
AGES OF J. C. HUMES.

President of Ginger Club Asks $100,000
for Alleged Alienation of
Affections -- "Contemp-
tible, Says Humes.

Ms. Emma Richards, wife of E. J. Richards, a hatter and president of the Ginger Club in the "300" block on Twelfth street, yesterday forenoon sued for divorce and a restraining order to prevent her husband from selling their household goods or disposing of his property. The Richardses live at 3910 Walrond avenue.

In the afternoon Mr. Richards brought suit against John C. Humes, president of the J. C. Humes Crockery Company, 1009 Walnut street, for $100,000 on a charge of alienating the affections of Mrs. Richards.

Enough charges and counter charges are made to fill a book. John T. Harding, Mrs. Richards's attorney in the first suit, also represents Humes in the second. Mrs. Richards charges that her husband has abandoned her many times and as many times has begged to be taken back. He has often accused her of improper conduct, she says, and has always later denied the truth of such charges. She also alleges cruelty. Three times, in his fits of suspicion that she wanted to talk to someone he did not wish her to talk to, she charges, he has torn the telephone from the wall of their house.


PARTNERS IN BUSINESS.

According to Richards's petition Humes and Mrs. Richards became acquainted April 25, 1907. Humes loaned Richards $6,000 and became a partner in the hat store. Last summer Mr. and Mrs. Humes spent in Europe. Richards alleges that Humes wrote a letter or a postcard daily to Mrs. Richards, in which he called her by pet names, and that Mrs. Richards answered daily.

John C.Humes, when seen at his home at 4006 McGee street, talked freely and frankly, saying:

"I loaned Richards $6,000 to keep his hat store afloat. He squandered it and now owes nearly as much more to various creditors. Because I wouldn't pay his bills he brings this suit. He offered to settle the case before he filed it.

"I have known Richards for years and thought he was a nice fellow and a promising young business man. I allowed him to live in my house rent free all of last summer, while I was in Europe. He and his wife have taken Sunday dinners with me and my wife and daughter, ever Sunday almost, until two weeks ago. I can only say now that he is a contemptible cur. I am innocent of everything he charges or hints at in his suit. I could not have settled for money, but did not because I am not afraid of a trial."


MAY NOT BE TRIED

Attorney John T. Harding of Brown, Harding & Brown says:

"I don't believe that Richards's suit against Humes will ever be tried. Richards came to my office last Friday at 2 o'clock and offered not to file the case. Humes was present and refused."

Battle McCardle, Richards's attorney, comes back with a flat denial of the statements that any offer has been made to settle the case.

"I talked with Harding and Humes on two afternoons of last week," McCardle says, "and urged humes to let Richards's wife alone. Humes wouldn't talk to me at all. There was nothing said about money."

Mrs. Emma Richards is living with her mother, Mrs. Martha Pursell of Indianapolis, Ind., and her 10-year-old son in the Doris apartments. All the windows were dark last night and repeated rings on the hall bell failed to bring an answer. A knock on the door, at the head of the first flight of stairs brought the troubled face of a pretty woman of about 30 years.

"You are Mrs. Richards?"

"Yes."

"Will you testify for or against your husband in the suit he today brought against John Humes?"

"Oh, I won't talk of that. I can not believe," she began, "I can not believe that Ed would use my name for --" Sobs finished the sentence.

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January 28, 1908

CRUSHED BY WAGON WHEELS.

Miguel Condino, 5 Years Old, Killed
While at Play in the Street.

Miguel Condino, 5 years old, was killed in Missouri avenue near Gillis street yesterday afternoon by being run down by a candy wagon. He was knocked down by the horses, the front wheels passed over his neck and the rear wheels had to be lifted from his crushed skull. The boy, a son of Dominick Condino, a laborer, lived at 725 Missouri avenue.

The wagon which crushed the child belonged to the Brown-Gibbons Candy Company, jobbers, 547 Walnut street, and was driven by W. H. Brown, senior member of the firm. Brown, who lives at 305 Walrond avenue, wept bitterly after the accident. After the boy had been taken into his home nearby Brown drove immediately to police headquarters and surrendered. He was released on his own recognizance.

"I was driving west on Missouri avenue at an ordinary gait," Brown said in his statement to police. "As I cleared an alley between Gillis and Harrison streets, four or five small boys scampered out to the south right in front of my team. I was not driving fast. I never drive fast through that district, as there are always children in the streets. I called, 'Look out there,' to the boys and one of them -- the little fellow who was killed -- turned and ran directly into my near horse. He was knocked down. To show that I was not driving very fast, I stopped my team by the time the rear wheels caught the boy. I have a little child of my own and the accident was a great shock to me. I did all I could to prevent it."

An inquest will probably be held.

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September 13, 1907

SHOT DEAD BY BOY

TRAGIC DEATH OF EDNA
CALLAWAY OF KANSAS CITY.
WAS VISITING IN DENVER.

WITTE ELLIS WAS "FOOLING
WITH THE PISTOL."

In a Spirit of Playfulness He
Pulled Trigger and Bullet Passed
Through Miss Callaway's Brain.
Mother Accompanying Body
Home for Burial.
Edna Callaway, Kansas City Girl Shot and Killed in Denver, Co.
MISS EDNA CALLAWAY, A KANAS CITY GIRL, WHO WAS ACCIDENT-
ALLY SHOT AND KILLED IN DENVER BY WITTE ELLIS, A FRIEND.

Death at the hands of a cousin of her fiance was the tragic ending of a summer vacation to Miss Edna Callaway, a young Kansas City society woman, at Denver, Col., Wednesday night. Witte Ellis, formerly of Kansas City, accidentally shot and killed her with an automatic pistol at the home of his mother in the presence of her sweetheart, W. Lysle Alderson, who with his mother and Miss Callaway were visiting at the Ellis home. The tragedy occurred on the evening Miss Callaway was to start upon her return trip to Kansas City.

The shooting occurred after the return of the party, composed of Mrs. J. M. Ellis, of Denver, the hostess; Mrs. D. P. Alderson, of Kansas City; W. Lysle Alderson, Miss Callaway, and young Ellis, from a dinner at the Shirley hotel.

MOTHERS PLAY PRANKS ON BOYS.

It seems that for a prank the two women had gone into their sons' bedrooms and concealed some of their night clothing. When the boys discovered the joke they decided upon a reprisal which would turn the laugh the other way. Accordingly young Alderson produced an automatic pistol with which it was proposed to scare Miss Callaway, whom they believed responsible for the original joke.

The pistol was arranged to be loaded by placing a "clip" full of cartridges in a place provided for the insertion so that the top shell would be in position for firing. Ellis took the pistol and removed the "clip" containing the bullets.

Then the two ran into a hallway, where their mothers were awaiting the outcome of the joke. Miss Callaway,, hearing the commotion and knowing some prank was on, peeped from her door and then came out. They flourished the pistol some moments, Ellis exclaiming,

"Where's the fellow who stole my clothes? I want my clothes!"

He turned from his mother to Mrs. Alderson and then back again to his mother. At that moment Miss Callaway came out, laughing, and asked what the trouble was. Ellis told her that someone had gone into his room and stolen his night-clothes.

"HANDS UP!" CRIED ELLIS.

Then he turned to the young woman, accused her of stealing his clothes and ordered her to put up her hands. She was standing beside Mrs. Alderson, at the time, and both women raised their hands in mock terror. Ellis pulled the trigger and sent a bullet crushing into the young girl's brain. One shell had caught when the clip was removed and remained in position for its work of destruction.

Miss Callaway sank back in the arms of her sweetheart's mother. Death was instantaneous. Mrs. Alderson eased the body gently to the floor and then fainted. Mrs. Ellis also fainted, while her son stood for a moment dumbfounded. When the realization of what he had done came to him, he became frantic, sobbing and crying that he would kill himself. He was prevented from this by friends who heard the noise of the gunshot and went into the house.

ALDERSON RAN TO SWEETHEART.

When his sweetheart fell, young Alderson ran to her, took her into his arms and placed her upon a bed. It was some moments before he realized the awful truth, but when he discovered Miss Callaway was dead, his grief was pitiful In a few moments he became hysterican and had to be led away from his fiance's bedside.

Added sorrow in the tragedy comes from the fact that young Ellis' father, former Judge J. M. Ellis, perished in a hotel fire in Goldfield, Nev., less than a year ago. Mrs. Ellis' health was undermined by that occurrence and she came to Kansas City several months ago for rest and a change of climate. The visit of the party of Kansas City people to her home at this time was in return for the one Mrs. Ellis had made in Kansas City. Witte Ellis accompanied his mother while she was here in this city.

FIRST REPORT BLAMED FIANCE.

Immediately after the shooting word of the unfortunate affair was sent to Kansas City by telegraph. The first reports were badly garbled, one account having it that the shooting had been done by W. Lysle Alderson, fiance of Miss Callaway. The news created a profound sensation in social circles where both the young woman and Mr. Alderson are well known.

The body of the unfortunate young woman will be brought to Kansas City this morning, accompanied by Mrs. Alderson and her son. Mrs Robert Stone, the girl's mother, who had been spending the summer at Excelsior Springs, returned to her home at the Elsmere hotel last night. She was completely prostrated at the news of her daughter's death.

The first report was that young Alderson himself held the revolver which ended Miss Callaway's life in such a tragic manner. This report almost completely prostrated D. P. Alderson, the father of the young man, a member of the firm of Bradley-Alderson Company, but a private dispatch from young Alderson later stated that the revolver was held by Witte Ellis, the son of Mrs. J. M. Ellis, whom Mrs. Alderson and her son and Miss Callaway were visiting at the time. The knowledge that his son was not responsible for the death of his fiancee was a great relief to Mr. Alderson, and mitigated to some extent the circumstances surrounding the unfortunate affair.

Mrs. F. P. Neal, of 318 Walrond avenue, is an aunt of Miss Callaway. Mr. Neal, vice president of the Union National bank, received several telegrams during the day, one of which was from young Alderson, stating that the body of Miss Callaway would be brought to Kansas City at once. The entire party will leave Denver this morning, arriving tomorrow morning.

Mrs. L. F. Rieger, of 426 Gladstone boulevard, is a distant cousin of Miss Callaway.

Miss Callaway was the daughter of Mrs. Robert Stone, who was, before her marriage to Mr. Stone, Mrs. R. P. Callaway. The girl was 19 years old and was a graduate of the Central high school two years ago. She lived at the Elsmere hotel with her mother and stepfather, who were in Excelsior Springs yesterday when the affair occurred. Miss Callaway went to Denver last summer to visit her aunt, Mrs. J. M. Ellis. Two weeks ago young Alderson, to whom she was engaged, went to Denver with his mother to spend his vacation with his fiancee. Young Alderson is also 19 years of age and a graduate of the Central high school in the class of 1905. The two have been sweethearts for years and had been engaged for some time, though no definite time for their marriage had been set.

A specially unfortunate feature of the affair was that it occurred on the eve of the departure of the Kansas City party for home. They were expected to start last night.

D. P. Alderson received a dispatch yesterday from his son which read:

Edna shot tonight; Witte held revolver; death immediate; come at once.

Mr. Alderson had intended to leave for Denver to be with his sone but it was later decided that this would be unnecessary and the arrangements were made to bring the body to Kansas City immediately.

ELLIS HELD BLAMELESS.

The coroner's inquest was held over the body of Miss Calloway in Denver yesterday. W. W. Ellis testified that he held the automatic revolver when it was discharged.

The jury decided that the killing was entirely accidental and did not recommend any disposition of young Ellis. The district attorney was present at the hearing, but gave no indication of any intention to hold Ellis for trial.

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April 29, 1907

IN MEMORY OF A SON.

Mrs. Henry E. Lantry Will Add a
Dormitory to St Anthony's Home.

Mrs. Henry E. Lantry, of 318 West Armour boulevard, has announced to the directors of the St. Anthony's Hospital and Infants' home that she intended to fit up a dormitory of twenty beds in the new building in memory of her son, Henry Jordan Lantry, who died about four months ago. The cost of establishing the memorial room will be about $500.

The women in charge of the home are planning to open the new building in memory of her son, Henry Jordan Lantry, who died about four months ago. The cost of establishing the memorial room will be about $500.

The women in charge of the home are planning to open the new building formally about May 15. Already enough rooms have been fitted through the generosity of friends of the institution to warrant the regular opening. John Long recently furnished an entire suite of eight rooms, and a ward large enough to accommodate fifteen beds. Duff and Repp Furniture Company and the Peck Dry Goods Company have each furnished a reception room in cozy fashion, and the Jones Dry Goods Company are donating the furnishings for a private bed room.

It is planned to make the opening an elaborate affair, in the form of a "pound party," and the management will be assisted by the Elks and the Knights of Columbus lodges. A musical programme will be arranged for the occasion.

St. Anthony's home is a maternal hospital, an infants' home and a day nursery. It is located on Twenty-third street between Walrond and College avenues. The building movement, of which the present commodious structure was the result, was launched several months ago at a meeting addressed by Archbishop Ireland. Donations of from 50 cents to hundreds of dollars were received by the committee in charge until enough money was raised to warrant the building.

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February 26, 1907

FUNERAL OF A CAR VICTIM.

Margaret Blume, Killed on Eighteenth,
A Neighborhood Favorite.


Margaret Blume, the 5-year-old child killed by a street car Sunday at Walrond avenue on Eighteenth street, will be buried this morning in St. Peter and St. Paul's cemetery, Twenty-fifth and Brooklyn.

MARGARET BLUME.
The funeral service will be at Sacred Heart church at 9 o'clock, Rev. Father R. G. Lyons officiating. Margaret was the oldest of three children and was a neighborhood favorite.

Motorman Jesse F. Cannon, who was running the car, was arraigned on a charge of manslaughter and criminal negligence yesterday before Justice Theodore Remley. His preliminary hearing was set for March 7 and he was released on a bond of $500.

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