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September 24, 1909

CLEANING UP M'GEE STREET.

Eight Rooming Houses Must Move
by October 1.

Notice to move before the first of October was served by Lieutenant C. D. Stone of the Walnut street police station yesterday, to eight women now conducting rooming houses between Thirteenth and Fourteenth on McGee street.

The order is direct from the police commissioners and is a movement, Lieutenant Stone said last night, to clean up districts in the line of travel to the new Union station when it is erected.

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September 13, 1909

USED DIAMOND ON
THE STORE WINDOWS.

PLATE GLASS CUT FOR BLOCKS
ON MAIN STREET.

J. E. Stivers Arrested on Charge of
Damaging Property from Fifth
to Thirteenth Street --
Denies He Is Vandal.

All records in plate glass window cutting were broken last night by J. E. Stivers, a candymaker for the Loose-Wiles Cracker and Candy Company. In years past the record in Kansas City has been a few straggling windows, entailing a cost of from $300 to $400, but Stivers's cutting began at Thirteenth street and Grand avenue and he carried the line of march to Main street and down that street to Fifth, where he was arrested. In all, Stivers damaged sixty-three plate glass windows. If the glass has to be replaced, the total cost would not fall short of $5,000, it is estimated. Most of the places which suffered most carry plate glass insurance.

Edward Clark, recently appointed a Gamewell operator at the Walnut street police station, saw Stivers when he made his first cut on a plate glass window at the Ayres Clothing Company, 1309 Grand avenue. He followed him to Main street, along Thirteenth and down Main to Fifth, seeing him use a 1/4 karat diamond ring on all of the most valuable windows along Main street. It did not occur to Clark to make an arrest. The arrest took place while Stivers was making a final slash at a large window of the Hub Clothing Company at Fifth and Main streets. Herman Hartman, a police officer, chanced to be passing and arrested the culprit.




After leaving Thirteenth and Grand, Stivers made his way to Main street, where he wrote his initials on a glazed monument of the M. H. Rice Monument Company at that point. It was shortly after 9 p. m. when he reached Jones' Dry Goods Company's store and many persons were on the street so he succeeded in cutting but seven of the valuable windows. Some of them are cut so deeply that a tap would knock out part of the glass.


Stivers' route from here was made by jumps, he evidently passing some places on account of the night crowds. He missed most of the stores in the block between Eleventh and Twelfth streets on Main. Altogether, he damaged the windows of more than thirty clothiers, milliners, saloons, flower shops, fortune tellers and other retailers and unoccupied buildings.

When Stilvers began by the Jones Dry Goods Company, when his diamond was in good working order, he appears to have done the greatest damage.

When seen in the holdover after his arrest, Stivers was awakened from a stupor. He told who he was and said he had been working for the Loose-Wiles company for twenty years. He is now 22 years old.

"If any of those windows are damaged I did not do it," he said.

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July 26, 1909

NORTH END BEATS TAME NOW.

Clean Up's and Better Lighting
Fatal to Police Excitement.

So many years ago that the oldest member of the police department scarcely remembers it, No. 2 police station in the West Bottoms was a busy point and the number of arrests there for a single night ranged from five to forty-five. Now it is a back number and the happy patrolman walking beats in the No. 2 district has a snap equal to that of being a line man for the Marconi system. This is the result of a forgotten clean-up in the early '90s. Such a clean-up is now relegating No. 4 district to an unimportant one in the city.

Captain Thomas Flahive, lately removed to No. 5 station in Westport, used to book all the way from five to twenty-five "drunks" and "vag" at the Walnut street holdover, and Lieutenant C. DeWitt Stone on his advent there promised to increase the average so that no safe limit could be ascribed to it.

"But now there is a slump in crime there," Stone said last night. "We still make arrests but they are invariably tame ones and the time is about here when there will be practically none at all. Drag nets and the brilliant lighting of McGee street, formerly as wicked as any place in the North End, has wrought a change for the better, fatal to the excitement attendant on being an officer."

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May 28, 1909

GOVERNOR CRITTENDEN
STRICKEN BY APOPLEXY.

FALLS FROM SEAT WHILE
WATCHING BALL GAME.

Age and General Ill Health Believed
by Doctors to Render Recovery
Problematical -- Has Not Re-
gained Consciousness.

As the result of a stroke of apoplexy which came upon him yesterday afternoon while watching a baseball game at Association park, former Governor Thomas T. Crittenden is lying at the point of death at his home, 3220 Flora avenue, with physicians in constant attendance.

Slight hope is entertained for Mr. Crittenden's recovery. His age and general ill health are said to be factors against his rallying. Though Mr. Crittenden had not regained consciousness up to a late hour last night, it was ascertained by the attending physicians, Ned O. Lewis and J. C. Rogers, that Mr. Crittenden's entire left side is completely paralyzed. The left side of his face is badly bruised where he struck the benches in front of him when he fell forward at the ball park.

Mr. Crittenden had been sitting in the grandstand near the third base line during the first of the two games which were played between Kansas City and St. Paul. Other spectators who were sitting near him said that he had not displayed any unusual excitement over the game and had been sitting rather quietly.

It was the beginning of the second inning of the second game when Mr. Crittenden was seen suddenly to fall forward and outward into the aisle.

CONDITION IS CRITICAL.

Thinking that Mr. Crittenden had but fainted, his immediate neighbors rushed to pick him up and placed him on the bench, where they attempted to revive him. Dr. Stanley Newhouse, the park physician, was hastily called from the press box, where he had been watching the game. He gave Mr. Crittenden prompt attention, but was unable to revive him.

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., was summoned from the city hall. He was driven to the park in an automobile, and suggested that he drive his father home in the motor car. Dr. Newhouse advised an ambulance, and one from the Walnut street police station was summoned. Then Mr. Crittenden was taken to his home.

After a long consultation with Dr. Lewis and an examination of Mr. Crittenden, Dr. Rogers stated that while the patient was in a precarious condition and that he was critically ill, there was a little hope for his recovery.

"It all depends upon the size of the hemorrhage on the brain," said Dr. Rogers. "It appears that the hemorrhage is from a ruptured small blood vessel, but we do not know whether or not the flow had been stopped completely. Governor Crittenden has been in poor health for several months. That taken into consideration with the fact that this is the second attack, does not argue well for a speedy recovery."

Dr. Newhouse, who first attended Mr. Crittenden, is not so sanguine as Dr. Rogers. Dr. Lewis remained with his patient all night, and did not make a statement.

HIS SECOND SEIZURE.

Eighteen years ago, while Mr. Crittenden was a practicing lawyer, he had his first stroke of apoplexy. No ill effects resulted from the first stroke, other than to make him more susceptible to the second.

Mr. Crittenden has long been a baseball enthusiast and there have been few games this season, according to his son, that he has missed. It has been his chief recreation, and though his family feared for him to go alone to the games on account of his age and declining health, Mr. Crittenden persisted in doing so. Mayor Crittenden said last night that his family had feared some untoward incident as a probable result of his innocent recreation.

Dr. Newhouse stated last night that he believed the attack was caused from an overwrought nervous condition. He said that it occurred at a lull in the game and excitement, and was the result of a reaction upon the nerves, even though Mr. Crittenden had not appeared excited.

Mr. Crittenden in 77 years of age. He was born January 1, 1832, in Shelby county, Ky. His father was Henry Crittenden, a farmer, and the former governor was one of eight children. He received his education at Center college, Danville, Ky. Among his classmates were Judge John F. Philips of this city, who was by his bedside last night; W. P. C. Breckenridge, John Young Brown, and other noted men.

LAWYER AND SOLDIER.

Mr. Crittenden studied law at Frankfort. Soon after his marriage to Miss Carrie W. Jackson he moved to Lexington, Mo., where he first practiced law. There he remained until the civil war when he and Judge Philips raised a regiment of federal sondiers, and were engaged in the war for three years. Many of his battles were fought in Jackson county.

At the close of the war Mr. Crittenden formed a partnership with Francis M. Cockrell, afterward United States senator. During that time Mr. Crittenden was sent to congress from Missouri.

In 1878 Mr. Crittenden became governor of Missouri, and the four years of his administration were stormy ones. At the close of his term he moved to Kansas city, where, with the exception of four years, he has resided since. That exception is during the time he acted as consul general to Mexico under President Cleveland.

Mr. Crittenden has three sons, H. H., Mayor Thomas T., both of Kansas City, and William J. Crittenden of Pittsburg, Pa., now in Japan.

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May 1, 1909

DEATH OF "PAT" HUNT.

Member of Police Force for Many
Years Dies Suddenly.

"Pat" Hunt, for thirty-five years a member of the Kansas City police force and accounted one of the bravest men who ever wore the star of the department, died yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock at his home, 3272 Oak street. He died in harness, being at the time of his death jailer at the Walnut street police station. Only a few days before his death he was actively attending to his duties.

Patrick H. Hunt was born at Ballylangford, County Kerry, Ireland, and came to this country when a boy. For several years he lived near Corning, N. Y., but about forty years ago came to this city and was one of the grading contractors who helped to construct the Hannibal bridge.

He was made a member of the police force in 1874 and assigned to a beat in "Hell's Half Acre," the toughest district in the city. This hole in the Bottoms was a refuge of thugs, crooks, gamblers and negro bad men. Patrolman Hunt made a record for bravery in this position which has been handed down as a tradition among the class of people with whom he worked. In his declining years every negro who had been brought up in the city doffed his hat to "Pat" Hunt when he entered the Walnut street police station.

Hunt was taken off his beat and made a city detective after six years of service and served in that capacity for twenty years. Former Chief of Police John Hayes, George Bryant and Con O'Hare are some of the men who formerly "worked" with Hunt. When Hunt decided to retire from active work as a detective he was made jailor at the Flora avenue police station, and about five years ago was transferred to No. 4.

He married Miss Madge Sheehan thirty-eight years ago. One child, Henry, was born. Both wife and son are now dead. For thirty-five years, until a year ago, Mr. Hunt lived at 1122 Missouri avenue. A sister, Mrs. Mary Hunt, lives at the Oak street address. No other relatives survive. Funeral arrangements have not been made. Captain Thomas P. Flahive, under whom Mr. Hunt worked for the last five years, said last night:

"I have been intimately associated with 'Pat' Hunt for twenty-seven years, and in my mind there was never a braver or more straightforward man on the Kansas City police force. He was no less beloved for his gentleness and generosity than he was feared for his justness and courage. The police force in Kansas City has lost one of its real heroes.

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April 12, 1909

FRACTURED HIS SKULL.

F. A. Tewksbury Injured While
Taking Car to the Barn.

While taking a Rockhill car to the Troost avenue barn, at Forty-ninth and Harrison streets, last night, F. A. Tweksbury, the conductor, leaned out from the car, and his head came in contact with an electric light pole with such force that his skull was fractured.

The ambulance from the Walnut street police station removed the injured man to the University hospital, where he is in a precarious condition. Tewksbury lives at 1512 Washington street.

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April 8, 1909

ROUNDUP OF VAMPIRES
IN POLICE DISTRICT 4

TWENTY-SIX WELL DRESSED
VAGRANTS IN DRAGNET.

"Undesirables," Who for So Long
Have Defied Police, Find Their
Protectors Without Power
to Aid Them Longer.

Acting under express orders from the new board of police commissioners, Captain Thomas P. Flahive's men began yesterday to round up a gang of well dressed vagrants who for years have fattened in district No. 4 on the shame of 500 fallen women.

By midnight twenty-six male vampires were under arrest, and scores of other human vampires had fled from the scene of their long connection with the white slave traffic.

These hold degenerates, who aforetime flaunted their misdeeds in the faces of the patrolmen, and dared them to act, found yesterday that their pulls had vanished and that all crooks look alike to the police.

WOMEN GIVE BOND FOR MEN.

Also caught in the same net, which seined Kansas City from Twelfth to Nineteenth streets and from Locust to Wyandotte streets, were three of the women who supported these same well dressed vagrants.

So quickly did news of the crusade spread among the parasites that the officers who constituted the dragnet had to work quickly and silently. Four of those caught were found with suitcases packed, ready to leave the city. Captain Flahive believes that an exodus of vagrants has taken place. Twenty-four does not complete the count of those men known to the police, those men who live from the wages of unfortunate women. But in spite of the close search last night no more vagrants could be found.

Strangely enough the women seemed not to appreciate the work done by the police in delivering them from bondage, or perhaps it was fear. At any rate it was the woman, in most cases, who paid the $26 cash bond which liberated the arrested vagrant. All yesterday the telephone in the Walnut street police station was busy, and at the other end of the line was a woman who wanted to know if the particular vagrant whom she supported was arrested. Upon being in formed that such a person was under arrest, the woman, or her messenger, speedily appeared at the station with the necessary $26 in cash, and the vagrant was released on condition of his appearance in police court this morning.

Once liberated, all trace of the vagrant was lost and the district south of Twelfth street was as clean a district on the streets as any portion of the city.

IN THE RED LIGHT DISTRICT.

One other order given to the police captain by the board was to keep the scarlet woman off the streets at night. This order was obeyed to the letter last night, and the only three who fared forth were promptly arrested. Formerly it would have been impossible to have walked any block of that district after dark without being accosted. Usually he would have been met by groups of women, but it was different last night.

In No. 4 district, it is claimed, there are eighty-nine of the class of rooming houses referred to by the police commissioners in their orders to Captain Flahive yesterday and who are paying a monthly fine to the city. There are also hotels and rooming houses by the score which pay no fine and have been overlooked by the police entirely.

In order that Captain Flahive may make sure work of his cleaning up of the district, the commissioners have given him the pick of the men on the department, and have given him permission to use extra men. This morning the captain will confer with Chief Frank Snow and pick the men who are to fill the places in the cleanup.

At present the district over which Captain Flahive has control is lacking policemen. Several officers are forced to patrol more than one beat, which is a handicap when it comes to competent police protection.

Concerning the work, Captain Flahive said last night:

"I am going to clean this district. Within two weeks there will be no more well dressed vagrants loitering around the saloons and rooming houses. This order from the commissioners is one for which I have long waited."

"Why hasn't this cleanup taken place before?" the captain was asked. Surely other commissioners knew that these conditions existed here."

NOTORIOUS MEN CAUGHT.

"I have never been ordered to do so before," he replied. "But I do not wish to say anything about that. It is all dead, and I am going to carry out my orders now to the letter. This work is not a spurt, but it will be kept up, and this district will not know the well dressed vagrant after we have finished with them."

Among those vagrants who have been caught by the police are notorious men of the district, ringleaders in every kind of offense against decency. Many have been arrested before, but nothing ever came of the arrests. So bold did these vagrants become that they flaunted their misdeeds in the faces of the patrolmen, and then dared them to exercise the right of an officer.

The same tactics were tried yesterday, but without success. This time the patrolmen did not fear the loss of their stars for doing their duty.

The officers who made the arrests of vagrants yesterday are Sergeant Henry Goode and Patrolmen Mike Gleason and George Brooks.

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March 10, 1909

MAY BE A NEIGHBOR

WORKHOUSE FOR GALLAGHER IF
HE CAN'T PAY FINE.

Again Assessed $100 for Attacking
Reporter and Old Appeal Bond
Doesn't Hold -- Must Put
Up or Go to Jail.

For forcibly entering a room on July 15 last year in which Albert H. King, a reporter for The Journal, lay injured after being slugged by the defendant a week before, "Jack Gallagher, who says his name is John Francis Gallagher, was sentenced yesterday to pay a fine of $100, with court costs. The case was tried before a jury in Judge E. E. Porterfield's division of the criminal court, which was only a few minutes in making up its mind.

The visit made to Mr. King's room, which Gallagher stated on the stand "was just a friendly call," was made at 5 o'clock in the morning. He was arrested at the time, but by an oversight of an officer at the Walnut street station, who did not realize the gravity of the offense, Gallagher was released on bond of $11. He was no sooner out of the station two hours later than he returned immediately to Mr. King's room, and a second time tried to force an entrance. For this offense he is yet to be tried.

Gallagher was tried before a jury in Judge Ralph S. Latshaw's division of the criminal court last month for an assault committed on Mr. King July 8, last. On this occasion he was also fined $100 and costs, and given a stipulated time in which to pay the fine.

The grand jury found an indictment against Gallagher for the assault, and it was, therefore, a state charge. The case tried yesterday, and the one still pending, are appeals from the municipal court where he was fined for disturbing the peace. Gallagher spent nearly one month in the workhouse before bonds for an appeal could be perfected.

When the jury returned its verdict in Judge Porterfield's court yesterday, Gallagher was allowed to go, the court stating that the bond made by Judge William H. Wallace when the case was appealed, would remain in effect until the fine and costs were paid. Cliff Langsdale, city attorney, who h ad prosecuted the case, was not satisfied with this arrangement, however, and found a recent law which states plainly that when a person is fined in the criminal court, after having taken an appeal from the municipal court, he must settle the fine and costs at once, or be committed to the workhouse until such fine and costs are paid.

Judge Porterfield admitted that the recent law took precedence. An effort was made then to get a commitment from the criminal clerk consigning Gallagher to the workhouse until he had settled up with the court. The clerk's office was closed, however, so the commitment will be asked for first thing this morning.

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December 29, 1908

'GINGERBREAD MAN'
NEARLY DEAD MAN.

PROMPT SURGEON SAVED LIFE
OF WARREN BATES, ACTOR.

HAD QUARRELED WITH WIFE.

LOCKED UP UNTIL EFFECTS OF
DRUG WORE AWAY.

Wife, Who Is a Graduate of Swarth-
more College, Learned Gym-
nasatic Stunts in the Co-
Ed's Gymnasium.

But for the prompt arrival of Dr. R. A. Shiras from the Walnut street police station yesterday at noon the romance of Mr. and Mrs. Warren Bates, begun two years ago while plying in the musical comedy, "The Gingerbread Man," would have terminated fatally. The husband, dejected because the wife turned him away from her door on account of a domestic difference, had taken half an ounce of aconite in order to kill himself. Dr. Shiras gave him an antidote and the ambulance took the young man to Central police station, where he was locked up until he had fully recovered from the effects of the drug.

Bates, who is only 22 years old, handsome, athletic and well dressed, came from a good family in Philadelphia and graduated from a state normal school. While at college he learned to do tumbling stunts in the gymnasium and also devoted much time to amateur theatricals. When he left school he had an opportunity to join the company playing "The Gingerbread man," and seized upon it. With the same company was a pretty young actress who had also a gymnastic turn. Sometimes they used to work together. She was a graduate of Swarthmore college and had acquired her fondness for athletic stunts, while practicing in the co-ed's gym. Being persons from a similar station in life and both attractive, propinquity soon got in its work. They were married, and last year they started out on a vaudeville circuit in the South, doing a tumbling act. In the summer they returned to Philadelphia, where Bates became an agent for a horse and mule company.

"This year," said the young man, "we decided to give up the stage for good. After all the life of an actor must always be an unsatisfactory one and we thought we would settle down in Kansas City and raise a family."

They came here and Bates got a job with the Jones Dry Goods Company. They lived happily until differences began to arise about a month ago. Sunday night Bates went home and there was a lively quarrel, the husband finally leaving the house in anger. Yesterday morning he went back to see her, but she refused to open the door and would only speak to him through it. She told him to go away, that their paths must be thereafter separate. Bates went away and purchased and purchased some horse medicine from a druggist, including half an ounce of aconite. He then swallowed the drug.

"I am going to try to get my wife to make up with me," he said yesterday, "and then I'm going to take her back to Philadelphia, where our people live. Then I think we can be happy."

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December 1, 1908

THERE'S A SURGEON AT NO. 4.

And Because of That, W. I. Gessler
Is Alive Today.

It was related in The Journal Sunday morning that at the Walnut street police station the ambulance had been without a surgeon for a week. It was pointed out that if a call were turned into the station attend to a would-be suicide who had taken poison, the police could do nothing but take the man to the general hospital and he would probably die on the way, whereas if a doctor accompanied the police, emergency treatment might save the man's life.


Dr. W. S. Wheeler, city physician, yesterday stationed Dr. R. A. Shiras, his assistant, at the Walnut street station. This is the first time in the past two years that a doctor who received any pay for his work has been stationed at the post.

This act came just in time to save the life of W. I. Gessler, a young man of 21, who tried to commit suicide by taking four ounces of chloroform in the rear of a dyer's shop at 3226 East Twelfth street. Gessler was out of work and entered the store about 11 o'clock yesterday morning, picked up the bottle from a shelf and drank the fluid. The ambulance surgeon arrived in time to administer emergency treatment, which saved the life of the young man. It is said that had treatment been delayed until the patient arrived at the general hospital he would have died. Gessler lives with his parents at Englewood on the Independence car line. Loss of work is supposed to have been the cause of the attempt.

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November 29, 1908

NO POLICE DOCTOR AT
WALNUT STATION NO. 4.

AMBULANCE RESPONDS TO CALLS
WITHOUT SURGEON.

Room and Meals Constitute Salary
Attached, and the Job Has
Been Shunned for
a Week.

For the past week there has been no doctor at the Walnut street police station. The ambulance from this station, which is supposed to take care of every case of injury where the services of the police department are needed in the district south of Eleventh street, has been forced to respond to calls without any doctor in charge. Whether the call comes from Fifteenth street and the Blue or from Southwest boulevard and state line, all that the officers in charge of the ambulance can do is to make a run as fast as they can to the general hospital.

The cases on which the services of the police ambulance are called for are too frequently those in which a delay may mean the loss of human life. A man or a woman may take carbolic acid several miles from the general hospital. If medical treatment can be administered in fifteen minutes the person might, under ordinary conditions, recover. If, however, the treatment is delayed a few minutes, death is sure to result.

At any moment in the day or night such a case may be telephoned into the Walnut street station, which does almost as much ambulance work as the central police station.

Two years ago the appointment of ambulance and emergency surgeons was taken out of the hands of the police department and placed under the control of the health and hospital board. Under the new charter the same arrangement obtains. The reason given at the time of making the change was that the power of appointment was being used for political purposes.

However, under the old arrangement the police surgeons were paid a so-called salary of $30 a month. When the health and hospital board took charge it fixed a salary for the three doctors at the central police station, but appointed a man to work without pay at the Walnut street station. Internes at the city hospital did the work,, receiving therefor the same salary that they got for their work at the hospital, namely, their room and meals. Strange to say, several young doctors were glad to avail themselves of the opportunity to get a more complete knowledge of their profession by sewing up wounds and coaxing would-be suicides to live. Until last week the station has never been without a surgeon, and they have given excellent services, on the whole. Now no one can be persuaded to take the job.

"Only a few dollars paid to these young doctors every month would settle the whole question," said Captain Thomas P. Flahive last night. "To prevent the loss of human life something must be done at once."

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November 16, 1908

DRUNKEN MAN IS STRANGLED.

Henry Bernard Found Dead in an
Unfinished Building Near Thirty-
Third and Oak Streets.

Boys playing in a building in the course of construction at 3312 Oak street about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon found the body of a man lying in a corner of the building, the head wedged against a wall and the neck pressed against a joist. Death had come apparently from strangulation induced by the position of the man's head. A crowd collected and the body was identified as that of Henry Bernard, 50 years old, a stonemason living at 3228 Summit street.

By the man's side was found a pint bottle with dregs of whisky in it. Bernard had been released from the Walnut street police station yesterday morning at 6 o'clock. The question arises, where did he get the whisky?

Bernard had been locked up for safekeeping. When he was released he had nothing of the sort about him. About noon he appeared at the house of William Gepford, a building contractor, his employer, and received from him $10 which was due him for work done last week. Several times in the next few hours he was seen loafing around the drug store of R. S. McCurdy, at Twenty-third and Oak streets, and was talking to Ray Wells, 3120 Campbell street, and others. About 2 o'clock he appeared to be in an unsettled state of mind and was seen to walk towards the new building of which only the side walls and part of the floors are finished. It is thought that he lay down in a stupor and was strangled by the beam pressing against his throat.

Nominally, the saloons were closed yesterday. Besides, there are no saloons in the neighborhood of Thirty-third and Oak streets. Bernard was not seen to leave the neighborhood from the time he received the money from his employer until the time he was found dead. R. S. McCurdy, the druggist who keeps the drug store at Thirty-third and Oak streets, and the only one in the vicinity, said last night that he had sold whisky to Bernard on prescription, but denied that he had sold any to him that day. He added that neither he nor either of his clerks, Louis Woods and D. Self, had seen Bernard in the store that day.

Bernard leaves a wife and nine children. The body was removed to Lindday's undertaking rooms in Westport and the coroner was notified. He will hold an autopsy this morning at 9 o'clock in the undertaking rooms.

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September 29, 1908

THREW MONEY TO NEWSBOYS.

"Exercising My Rights as a Citi-
zen," Said Jeweler, When Arrested.

Because he was throwing pennies and quarters on the street at Twelfth and Walnut streets at 6 o'clock last night for the newsboys to scramble after, A. W. Wyman, a jeweler of Humboldt, Kas., was arrested and locked up at the Walnut street police station. He arrived in the city yesterday morning, intending to go to Independence to visit a friend last night.

"I was merely exercising my right as a citizen in giving away my money on the street," he said. He spent the night in jail.

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September 13, 1908

TOOK POTASH AND A CIGARETTE.

But Neither Harmed Harry Jacobs,
Cook, With a Poison Record.

An ambulance call was received at the Walnut street police station last night about 10:30, on a report that a man had tried to commit suicide by poisoning himself. When the ambulance arrived the patient, Harry Jacobs, a cook, living at 1508 Olive street, was found on the front porch smoking a cigarette. He did not deny that he had taken potash, but seemed to have completely recovered.

"You ought to remember me," he said to the surgeon, Dr. Warren T.Thornton, "you pumped a dose of carbolic acid out of me a month ago."

He did not give any reason for the attempt.

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August 26, 1908

ASKED BUTCHER TO KILL HIM.

Charles Timberlake Failed to Take
His Own Life With Three Shots.

Accompanied by his 11-year-old brother-in-law, Max Harrington, Charles Timberlake, a traveling salesman out of employment, left the home of his wife at 3501 East Thirty-first street, about six o'clock last evening. They walked to the corner of Thirty-first and Indiana, one block from home. Mr. Timberlake took a few steps around the corner, drew a revolver and fired three shots at himself. Two of the shots took effect and he dropped to the pavement. The boy ran home and told what had happened.

Henry Trott, a butcher at 3329 East Thirty-first street, was a witness to the attempt at self-destruction. He, with the aid of others, took Mr. Timberlake back to his home and the ambulance from the Walnut street station was called. One bullet pierced the left chest just above the heart, the other passed through the right shoulder.

Patrolman Isaac Hull investigated the case. It was found that Timberlake had only arrived here Friday from California. He had been stopping at the home of his mother-in-law, 3501 East Thirty-first street, where his wife had been for the last eight months. Little information could be gained at the house, but it was intimated that Mr. Timberlake and his wife had been separated and that he had come on here to effect a reconciliation. Mrs. Harrington said she believed all had been arranged yesterday. No one would ascribe a cause for the attempted suicide, and though Mr. Timberlake was conscious when removed to the general hospital, he would tell nothing of the affair to Dr. Thornton or to the attendants at the hospital.

More information was gained from the butcher, Trott, than anyone else. He said he was attracted by the sound of the shooting and ran to Mr. Timberlake as soon as he fell to the ground. "When I arrived at his side and asked him what he had done," Trott told the police, "he begged me to take his gun and finish the job, saying he wanted very much to die and had made a botch job of it."

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August 13, 1908

FIGHT AT CITY HOSPITAL.

Three Doctors Tie Up Visitor and
Call Police.

Last week David Casebeer fell out of an upstairs window in a Union avenue rooming house about 1 o'clock in the morning and landed on a pile of empty beer cases, breaking his right arm and bruising himself. Last night his brother Albert called at the city hospital and asked to see him. As the hour for visitors had passed Dr. Paul B. Clayton refused to admit him to the ward. Casebeer then exhibited an order signed by Andy O'Hare, a detective, asking that he be allowed to see the man. A row followed, during which Casebeer struck Dr. Clayton. Dr. C. L. Beeching and another interne then joined in the fray and after a lively contest in which the furniture suffered the most, tied him with ropes and held him for the police.

A wagon from the Walnut street police station was called and Casebeer was escorted to the station in charge of Patrolman Smith Cook. On the way to the station Casebeer tried to take the officer's club from him and Cook was compelled to give him a slap with his open hand, which made him take the count. A charge of disturbing the peace will be placed against him in police court this morning.

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August 10, 1908

CHECKS TELEPHONE PESTS.

Lieutenant Hammil Has Made a Most
Useful Discovery.

Lieutenant H. W. Hammil, stationed at the Walnut street police station, has an infallible method of getting rid of the fellow who wants to monopolize the station telephone. When the bothersome fellow gets the receiver to his ear a monologue like the following ensues:

"Hello, is this Mary?"
"Aw, you know who it is."
"Yes, you do."
"Guess."
"Who have you been thinking about most today?" and so forth, ad infinitum.

Last night such a dialogue was started over the 'phone by one of the beardless youths who frequent the station.

"Watch me make him cut that out," said the lieutenant.

Slipping up behind the unwary youth the officer pulled a common pin out of his vest and inserted it into the cloth wrapping around the telephone wires.

"Hello," said the youth.

A long pause and then he repeated the salutation. Evidently something was wrong with the wire and after calling until he was red in the face, the young man desisted, muttering to himself words not loud but deep.

When he had gone the lieutenant explained:

"You merely insert the pin into the cloth and twist it until it touches both wires at the same time. That causes a short circuit and communication is as impossible as if the other person had hung up the receiver. It is an absolutely sure method of cutting short the conversation, and the recipe is free to all who wish to try it."

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July 27, 1908

FLED IN HER NIGHT ROBES.

Essie Waldron Ran From Rough Hus-
band and Was Arrested.

A clerk named Shields and two women were the only ones in Bolen's candy store at 112 East Twelfth street last night about 10 o'clock when the rear door opened and a young woman, clad only in a nightdress, rushed in calling for help. Her feet were bleeding and her arms were begrimed from climbing over the roofs. Mr. Shields promptly blushed and turned his back, and the women took off some of their own clothing and gave it to the woman. Then she explained.

Her name is Essie Waldron, and she is the wife of Vergil Waldron, a cook in the Saffire restaurant. They have been married three years, but separated three weeks ago. Mrs. Waldron first moved to 311 East Fourteenth street, but when her husband found that she was there, she moved to the Canadian hotel, Twelfth street and Grand avenue. There her husband found her yesterday and went up to her room last night and hid behind a curtain. Then, according to the story Mrs. Waldron tells, he waited until she had disrobed and then jumped out and choked her. She broke away from him and leaped out of an open window, landing on a rear porch. Crazed with fear she made her way to the ground in some manner she cannot explain and ran into the nearest doorway, which happened to be that of the candy shop.

A patrolman arrested both the husband and the wife and took them to the Walnut street police station, where the man was locked up and the woman released on bond. A charge of disturbing the peace will be placed against them in police court this morning.

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July 24, 1908

SLEEPS IN A WINDOW;
FALLS OUT ON A WOMAN.

Major Richardson, Negro, Injures
Himself and Mrs. Dave Gross-
man by Falling From Perch.

Major Richardson, a negro stonemason, 30 years old, has a bad habit of siting down in the window sill of his room in the second story at 1802 East Eighteenth street and falling asleep. Several times his roommate has narrowly saved him from falling out on the granitoid paving below. Yesterday, Major did an unusually hard day's work in the hot sun and about 10 o'clock last night he set in the open window and, of course, fell asleep.

Just at the moment that Major was slipping into slumberland, Mrs. Dave Grossman, 45 years old, who lives in the shop below, was carrying a tub of waste water out into the street, assisted by her daughter, Mary. As Mrs. Grossman opened the screed door directly below where Richardson was sitting, the latter entered the gates of sleep and came tumbling down upon her. In his descent one of his feet passed through the transom over the door and he was turned over so that he alighted on Mrs. Grossman's chest on his head. Then he bounced off and fell on the paving, almost fracturing his skull.

Mrs. Grossman's shrieks called neighbors to the scene and they took her into the house. The ambulance from the Walnut street police station was called, and the negro was taken to the general hospital, where he was reported in a serious condition last night. Mr. Grossman refused to go to the hospital at first, but after Dr. E. L. Ginsberg was called he recommended that she be taken to the German hospital, which was done. Mrs. Grossman's chest was severely bruised.

Mrs. Grossman is the wife of Dave Grossman, an express driver, and had charge of the little grocery store. She has four children and lives in rooms behind the store. They have only been in the neighborhood two weeks.

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July 16, 1908

WAS HIS OBJECT MURDER?

Jack Gallagher Calls on King
and Creates a Disturbance.
Jack Gallagher, Bully and Attacker of Albert King.
JACK GALLAGHER
(From a sketch made in the Police Matron's Room at Central Station Yesterday Afternoon

Following his vicious inclinations, Jack Gallagher attempted to assault Albert King, a reporter for The Journal, who is lying seriously injured as the result of a previous attack made upon him by Gallagher, in Mr. King's apartments at 720 East Fifteenth street yesterday morning at 5 o'clock. Failing in his first attempt to satiate his brutal desires because of arrest, Gallagher returned to Mr. King's rooms after having been released on an $11 bond, and again tried to force entrance into the room, uttering violent threats while trying to break in the door. Again he was arrested, but this time he was held without bond, because he was taken before a police officer who knew his duty.

Shortly after 5 o'clock yesterday morning Gallagher went to the hotel in which Mr. King is staying and asked Mrs. Etta Condon, the proprietress, to show him to Mr. King's room. Mrs. Condon replied that it was too early for visitors, especially too early for a sick man to be awakened. Gallagher and a friend who had gone to the hotel with him insisted, saying that they were very intimate friends of Mr. King from St. Louis, and that they only had an hour to stay in Kansas City.

Mr. King, who is well known in Kansas City, had been receiving many visits from friends since he was injured; so Mrs. Condon said that she would see if Mr. King would see them.

NURSE ORDERED HIM OUT.

Gallagher did not wait until she had awakened the injured man, but brushed past her and stood over his bedside. Mr. King was aroused and turning in bead, saw his former assailant.

"Hello, Albert. How do you feel about it?" asked Gallagher.

"I feel pretty tough since you got through with me," replied King, "and I don't want to talk to you. Get out of here."

"I want to introduce my friend, Mike O'Brien, to you before I go," replied Gallagher, beckoning to the friend who had remained in the doorway. "You remember Mike, don't you, Al?"

King replied that he might have seen O'Brien before but did not recall the circumstance. Then he ordered them out of the room, saying that he did not wish to have anything to do with them. By this time Miss Mayme Lefler, Mr. Kin's nurse, had returned to the room. Noticing that her patient did not treat his visitors in a cordial manner, she bent over them and asked who they were.

Upon being told that one of them was Jack Gallagher she ordered them from the room. Gallagher stood and laughed at her until she finally pushed him towards the doors.

"Oh, I'll step outside and let you all talk it over for a minute," said he; "but I'm goin' to stay here till I see your finish," addressing the last remark to Mr. King.

Once the bully was out of the room, Miss Lefler locked the door and writing a note for passers-by, telling them to call the police station for help, she slipped to the open window ready to drop it out on the street.

Meanwhile Mrs. Condon had gone downstairs to a telephone and called the police. She was followed by O'Brien.

PACED THE HALLWAY.

Mrs. Condon returned to her hotel and saw Gallagher pacing up and down the hallway, bellowing out his mad threats to the closed door. Soon he stopped his loud talking and hid behind a turn in the hall. Every time a door would open or close he would hasten to Mr. King's door to see if King had left the room or if he might be caught in the act of leaving. Mrs. Condon tried to argue with Gallagher, but her words had no effect. Then she tried threats and told Gallagher that if he did not go she would call for help.

"Don't you dare call for help you--" he rasped between his closed teeth. "If you do I'll fix you," and he shook his fist in Mrs. Condon's face.

Just then Officer James Mulloy was seen hurrying across the street. He had been notified by the operator at No. 4 police station that Gallagher was threatening Mr. King. Miss Lefler called out to him and the officer hastened up the steps. When he reached the hallway he heard Gallagher threaten Mrs. Condon. Approaching Gallagher, the patrolman told him to come with him to the police station.

"It will take four of you to take me there," boasted the bully, as he began to beat and kick on Mr. King's door.

"Not this morning," said the officer as he dragged Gallagher to the head of the stairs. There they were met by three officers who had gone to the house with the patrol wagon from the Walnut street police station. Once in the patrol wagon Gallagher quited down.

When he was taken before Patrolman Gus Metzinger, acting desk sergeant, he was charged with disturbing the peace and locked up. His friend, O'Brien, pleaded with Officer Metzinger for his release on bond, saying that he would see that Jack went directly home and did not bother King again. The officer graciously complied and made the bond $11, which Gallagher himself deposited.

Twenty minutes afterwards Gallagher was back at Mr. King's door, demanding entrance. As Gallagher hurried up the hotel steps he was healed by Mrs. Condon, who tried to get him to go back. Finding that her p leas were of no avail she called out in a loud voice so that King could just hear her, "Jack Gallagher, you get out of this house at once."

KING WAS ARMED THIS TIME.

But Gallagher thrust her aside and went directly to the door of King's room. Miss Lefler had locked the door and helped King to a sitting posture in the bed. Armed with a large revolver which had been secured after the first disturbance, King sat ready for his assailant should he manage to break through the door.

Gallagher was demanding entrance, but he got no answer from behind the door. Through the door Mr. King and his nurse could hear Mrs. Condon pleading with him to desist in his bestial endeavors, saying that Mr. King was not in the room and that he had gone home immediately after Gallagher's first visit.

But Gallagher would not be satisfied. He demanded that the door be unlocked. Mrs. Condon replied that the maid had the keys and that he would have to wait until she could be found.

Inside the room, Albert King sat in bed with the revolver pointed at the door.

"I am going to shoot through the door at him," he told his nurse.

"No, don't do that," she cautioned, "you might hit Mrs. Condon. You can't tell just where she might be standing.

As a matter of fact, Mrs. Condon was standing between Gallagher and the door, keeping him from reaching the knob as he had attempted. For five minutes they stood at the door and argued whether or not King was in the room.

"Haven't you enough trouble already?" asked the woman of Gallagher.

"Yes, but King and The Journal have given it all to me, and now I'm going to give King his. He and The Journal run the whole police department, and they have put me down and out, so it's me or King now."

"Well, he's gone home now, out on Wabash avenue, so you can't find him here. You had better go on and leave me alone."

"I don't believe King has gone, I'm going to see, anyhow."

WAS READY TO SHOOT.

The it occurred to Gallagher to look over the transom and see for himself.

"Stand clear of the door," wh ispered Mr. King to Miss Lefler. "The minute his head comes up over that transom I'm going to shoot. I believe that I will be justified in doing so."

Gallagher grasped hold of the knob, with one hand upon the top of the door, which he with his great height could easily reach. He was just in the act of swinging up to the transom when Patrolman W. K. Latcham came bounding up the stairs. He had been called by H. F. Hollecker, a saloonkeeper at 716 East Fifteenth street.

"You're under arrest, Gallagher," he called, being warned by Mrs. Condon that Mr. King was inside the door waiting to shoot at the first opportunity. That stopped Gallagher, and probably saved his life; for if his head had appeared above the transom Mr. King says that he would surely have shot.

Then Gallagher began to beg to get inside the door or to look over the transom. By signs only Mrs. Condon had told Officer Latcham that Mr. King was in the room waiting for a sight of Jack Gallagher. The officer would not allow him to climb up the door.

"You've got to come with me," said the officer, "and you've got to come at once. You know I'm able to take you and take you alone, so come along and behave."

GALLAGHER KNEW HIS MASTER.

Officer Latcham said afterwards: "The coward began to crawl like a whipped cur and came right along, not giving a bit of trouble. I did not even have to draw my revolver on him. When we got downstairs we found the patrol wagon waiting for us and nothing else happened."

At the station the day shift of police had come on and Sergeant Halligan booked Gallagher for disturbing the peace and refused to allow him to be released on bond. He was taken to police headquarters with the rest of the prisoners who had been arrested during the night.

Gallagher said that he would not go in the patrol wagon with the rabble, but he found out that the officers were determined that he should and soon stopped his bullying and took his seat in the wagon beside a drunken man.

"S-a-y," was the word used by Gallagher when he was brought before Theodore Remley, acting police judge.

"Now you keep quiet until your time comes," remonstrated Judge Remley.

"All right, judge," Gallagher replied in his blustering, bullying manner. "I suppose you are going to fine me because Albert King said for you to."

After James Mulloy, the policeman making the arrest, Miss Lefler, the nurse, and several witnesses had told their stories to the court, Gallagher asked permission to ask questions of Miss Lefler.

His first question was so insulting and foreign to the case that Judge Remley told her not to answer.

"That's right," Gallagher snarled at the judge, "you take away my rights after convicting me on their testimony. Now fine me if you dare to."

"Your fine is $500," replied the judge.

"How about signing a personal bond' asked Gallagher.

"Wait a minute, Gallagher, I have another case against you," Cliff Langsdale, the city attorney, said as Gallagher was being led back to the holdover.

"That's right, stick me, fine me another $500, the police and papers are against me and I guess you are, too."

A few necessary steps required by law and Judge Remley levied a fine of $500 on the second charge of disturbing the peace.

Looking over towards the table occupied by the newspaper men, Gallagher said: "I know when the police reporters leave the station They leave here at 2:45." Swearing vengeance against the police and the newspapers, Gallagher was placed in the holdover, later to be removed to the matron's room.

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June 14, 1908

CAUGHT A "PEEPING TOM."

Broke Away From Police, but Was
Caught After Exciting Chase.

The family of E. C. Miller, livintg at 221 East Fourteenth street, was annoyed for several days by a "peeping Tom," and Mr. Miller complained to the police. A. B. Cummins and John Rooth, plain clothes men, were detailed on the case. Last nigth they caught a man peering into a rear window of the house and arrested him. They started down Fourteenth street with the prisoner between them, but at the alley between McGee and Grand avenue the man broke away from the officers, knocking down a passing pedestrian and throwing Officer Rooth, who tried to hold him by the coat, to the ground. Officer Cummings immediately drew his revolver and shot at the man, but missed. He then took up the chase, but was losing ground when, after they had run a block, the man stumbled on a heap of old iron and fell. Even then he showed fight, and Cummins was compelled to hit h im with the butt end of his gun before he submitted.

When taken to the Walnut street police station the prisoner gave the name of Thomas Randolph, and said he was a paper carrier. His wounds were dressed by Dr. Carl V. Bates and he was locked up . A charge of disturbing the peace was placed against him.

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June 7, 1908

AGED WOMAN FOUND
STARVING BY POLICE.

CRACKERS AND WATER HER
SOLE DIET FOR DAYS.

Feebly Resists Being Taken From
Bare Room and Begs for Her
Slender Larder -- Taken to
General Hospital.

While investigation curious noises, which came from the rear of 722 Campbell street yesterday afternoon George Brooks and James Malloy, policemen, discovered an old woman wrapped tightly in two torn and soiled sheets, lying on the floor of the room. It was from this woman, Miss Kate Thuey, that the sounds came, which had attracted the attention of neighbors for the past week.

As the police entered the room they heard the woman repeat over and over: "Crackers and water and the power of God." Too weak to rise, the woman had placed a box of crackers and a large can of water withing her reach. Crackers and water with the power of God were all that had sustained her and kept body and soul together for the past week, according to her statement.

The police aided her to her feet, and the old sheets dropped away displaying the emaciated form. In her demented condition caused from long sickness and privation, the woman tried weakly to fight the police away from her, saying that she wanted to be alone. She was too weak and her struggles so exhausted her that she fell to the floor again.

Seeing her pitiful condition, the officers called the ambulance from the Walnut street police station and she was taken to the general hospital. When the officers had placed her on the stretcher to take her to the ambulance, the demented woman pleaded urgently for her box of crackers and can of water.

The officers tried to explain that they were going to take her to a place where she could have plenty of substantial food and drink. Nothing would satisfy her, however, until the officers had brought her musty crackers and a pail stale water to her. Guarding them closely she said nothing more, even after being taken to the hospital.

When the hospital authorities questioned her she would say nothing except to repeat over and over again her raving of "crackers and water and the power of God."

The neighbors at 722 Campbell street said last night that the old woman had always kept to herself and did not care to make friends or receive help from any of them. Every morning it had been her custom to leave her dingy little room in the rear of the flat and go out, apparently to work. In the evening she would return and nothing more was seen of her until next morning.

Last Sunday evening she was seen to come home and from that time until yesterday she was lost trace of. The neighbors tried to get in her room, fearing that she had come to some harm, but the door was locked. Yesterday they heard the noises coming from her room which sounded like groans, and so they notified police.

The hospital physicians say that Miss Thuey is in a dangerous condition due to the lack of food. Whether her demented state was caused by her privation or not, they are unable to tell. Good food and absolute rest, they say, are all that can possible effect a cure in her case.

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May 5, 1908

POLICE FIND OWNERS
OF CANNED JEWELS.

BOY'S DISCOVERY BRINGS GLAD-
NESS TO ONE HOME.

Porch Climber Had Stolen Watches
on December 26, 1906, and
Buried Them in a To-
mato Can.

By a thorough search of police records Fred G. Bailey, secretary to the inspector of detectives, yesterday located the owners for most of the jewelry which was found Saturday night at Nineteenth and McGee streets. The valuables were found by John E. Linings, 317 East Nineteenth street, a boy who was digging for worms. It was all safely planted in an old rusty tin can which, according to the record, had been in the ground just one year, four months and two days when found. The can, which was delivered to Lieutenant Hammil at the Walnut street station, contained four gold watches, one gold cross, one gold cuff button, two brooches, one an old came; one gold and one enamel heart, and one string of three-strand gold beads.

Bailey began at January, 1906, and it was not until he reached December 26 of that year that his efforts were rewarded. On that night porch climbers entered the home of E. H. Stimson, 3145 Broadway, while the family was in the siting room below. The thief or thieves secured two ladies' gold watches, one an open face watch, with E. A. S. on the case in big letters, and the other marked "Emmett to Olive." They also got a long gold watch chain and five gold rings.

On the same evening the home of C. M. Gilbert, then living at 3129 Washington street, was entered, probably by the same "climbers" as it was in a similar manner. There three gold watches were stolen. One, an open face watch, had "1876" engraved on it and there was a long chain to it. Another was engraved "Annie B Gilbert" and the last was undescribed. The thief also got a black seal card case and $40 in cash.

The gold engraved cross, the cuff button, two brooches and two hearts have not yet been identified. Detective Ralph Trueman was sent out to locate the robbed families and tell them of their luck. He found Mr. Stimson still living at the same number but Mr. Gilbert, he said, had left the city. Neighbors said the family had moved to Ohio. They believed it was Dayton. Secretary Bailey will endeavor to locate Mr. Gilbert and make him happy.

Mr. Stimson, who is a real estate man, was very much pleased when told of the find. "I recall the night we were robbed," he said. "It was the night after Christmas and about 8 o'clock. The thieves climbed the front porch and ransacked the two front rooms. The watch marked 'E. A. S.' is the property of my daughter, Edith Aileen Stimson. She will be more pleased than anybody as she was broken hearted over her loss."

Many conjectures have been made as to how and why the can of jewelry was buried in the ground and especially why it was left there. Many police believe that the thief, after burying his loot, fell into the hands of the law and may now be doing time in some prison. Others think the man who put the can there must be dead.

It is not an unusual thing for burglars to bury plunder, especially watches and other jewelry which is easily identified. After it has been buried long enough for the police to cease to look for the lost valuables they can easily be dug up and either sold or pawned with less chance of detection. If the thief is in prison the police believe he would have some day returned and disposed of his loot.

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May 3, 1908

SAYS POLICEMAN HIT HIM.

Ernest Hiatt Had Cuts on the
Back of His Head.

Ernest Hiatt, 19 years old, of 1215 Jefferson street was playing ball in the street near Fourteenth and Jefferson streets yesterday afternoon, when a park policeman ordered him to stop. The boy was sent to the Walnut street station later with two cuts on the back of his head. He said that the policeman had hit him with his club as he was about to recover the ball when the game was ordered stopped. Alderman James Pendergast was a witness, and has interested himself in the affair.

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March 27, 1908

HE SHOT A MESSENGER BOY.

Charles Greenburg Fatally Wounded
by Restaurant Keeper.

Fearing that he was about to be mobbed, as he claims, J. A. Quinlan shot and fatally wounded Charles Greenburg, a messenger boy, in the restaurant conducted by him at 105 East Thirteenth street, at 12 o'clock last night. There are several different versions of the shooting, each one who witnessed the affair having a different story to tell. The one which seems the most probably, however, is that Greenburg entered the restaurant with the intention of securing change for a quarter which he had borrowed from a fellow messenger boy, Joe Kelly.

Quinlan says that Greenburg became boisterous and drew a dangerous looking knife, threatening to cut up everything and everybody in the place. What caused Greenburg to show signs of violence is not known.

At any rate, Quinlan says he threw the boy out of the back door, and that Greenburg immediately returned, brandishing his knife and starting towards Quinlan. Quinlan then drew a revolver and fired three shots, one of which struck the boy in the stomach The police ambulance was called and the boy taken to the general hospital, where he was operated upon. The doctors express small hope for his recovery.

Just before he was placed upon the operating table one of the surgeons told him how serious was his condition and asked if he wished to make a statement. Greenburg told him that he did not know the man who had shot him nor why it was done. He gave a description of the man and it tallied with that of Quinlan.

Quinlan was arrested and taken to the Walnut street police station, where he admitted that he shot the boy.

Greenburg lives at 1827 Oak street, and was out on parole from the workhouse where he was sentenced a year ago to work out a $500 fine imposed for carrying concealed weapons. He is 19 years of age.

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March 11, 1908

TOY SQUIRT GUN HIS WEAPON.

But Jones Wouldn't Be Bluffed and
Landed With Stiff Uppercut.

Roy Jones was walking slowly along Troost avenue near Fifteenth street around 2 o'clock yesterday morning. He was humming a love tune and paid little attention to a man who came up behind him, until he was jabbed in the ribs with something hard, held in the man's right hand.

"Hold up your hands! Give me your money!" the man commanded.

Jones was in for arguing the question, but the man was insistent. As the argued they passed beneath an electric arc light, and James saw the man had a toy squirt gun pistol as a weapon. With one stiff punch, Jones landed an uppercut on the man's jaw.

Just as the man ran away, Patrolman Michael Meany appeared and took a shot at him At Fifteenth and Holmes streets, almost exhausted, the bluff criminal ran into Patrolman James Mulloy and was arrested.

At the Walnut street station he gave the name of Howard A. Watson, an upholsterer. He told Captain Whitsett late in the day that he was "just kiddin'" an' wouldn't harm a fly." Captain Whitsett didn't like that sort of fun between entire strangers, and Watson was charged with highway robbery. He was arraigned before Justice Shoemaker, pleaded guilty and was bound over to the criminal court for trial.

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February 12, 1908

ADMITS THEY'RE SHOPLIFTERS.

Two Women Are Arrested in a Main
Street Store.

"Just a plain case of shoplifting," remarked City Detective Hoover as he and Detective McDonald led two fashionably dressed women up to the desk in the Walnut street police station yesterday afternoon. The women gave their names as Mattie Jones and Stella Morris, but when the truth of this statement was challenged they readily admitted that those were not their right names, refusing to tell officers who they were or where they lived.

Detectives Hoover and McDonald had been told of shoplifters in the large department stores, and were detailed to keep a lookout for them. They had followed these two women from Jones's dry goods store to another Main street concern. While standing at the lace counter in the latter store, Officer Hoover saw one of the women deftly slip a large piece of lace from the counter and place it in a small black bag which she carried.

The two officers then arrested the women. At the station they refused to talk further than to admit having taken the article which the officer had seen one of them place in the bag. They will be held for further investigation.

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January 22, 1908

DOG CALLED CENTRAL;
POLICEMAN RESPONDED.

Joyful Bowwows When Officer
Entered the Home.

Nakomis is a dog, he is a beautiful Scotch Collie with almost human intelligence, consequently he gets very lonesome when left by himself. He lives at 1721 McGee street with Robert Stoll and his wife. When it happens that both Stoll and his wife are away from home, a little girl who lives next door keeps Nakomis company in her home.

Yesterday morning Mrs. Stoll left her home to go shopping. Forgetting that the dog was in the house, she locked the doors and went on her way. Soon Nakomis had a strong desire for caresses and scampered about the house to find his mistress. No one answered to his pleading barks and no human was in the house. The feeling of lonesomeness began to grow upon him.

Now, as has been said, Nakomis is a dog of almost human intelligence. He had been taught to bark through the telephone to his master at his place of business. Thought he had been taught to talk through the instrument, no one had shown him how to take the receiver off the hook. This did not long disturb him, however, and he soon knocked the receiver down with his paws, barking all the while.

"Number, please. What number," called the gentle voice of the operator over the wire. "Hello-hello."

But no answer came back to her, save the barking of a dog. Believing that something was wrong in the house, the operator called up the Walnut street police station and told the officers that there was trouble of some kind at 1721 McGee street, it was murder from the way it sounded. Officer Robert Dunlop was detailed to see what the matter was at that address. When he neared the house he, too, heard the loud barking on the inside.

Drawing his revolver he forced his way into the house and was greeted with joyful barks and playful leaps from Nakomis. He had someone to play with at last. The officer went to the phone and found the instrument lying upon the floor.

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December 11, 1907

SHOT DOWN IN BARROOM ROW

W. H. BARNES KILLS JAMES E.
WHITE, A MOTORMAN.

PISTOL AGAINST HIS HEART

"WHY DID I GET DRUNK? WAILS
DYING MAN.

Murderer Surrenders and Is Now in
Jail -- Holds Weapon Leveled at
His Victim Some Minutes
Before Firing.

In a barroom brawl yesterday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, W. H. Barnes of Argentine shot and killed James E. White, a motorman in the employment of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, living at 816 Bank street. The fight, according to the story told by an eye witness, was begun by White. Barnes, or "Hank," as he was commonly known, was standing by the bar in Peter McDonnell's saloon, Twelfth and Charlotte streets, with a friend. White entered the room and, seeing some of his acquaintances, began to joke and jostle them in a familiar way. He had been drinking heavily.

Going down the line of men at the bar and speaking to each of them, he stepped up to the young man who seemed to be under the protection of Barnes, and spoke to him, lurching heavily against him as he did so.

The young man resented the drunken familiarity and demanded an explanation of White. But White did not choose to explain matters, and went on teasing the boy, who finally started to strike him. At this juncture Barnes interfered and began to make threatening gestures at White. They were standing within two feet of each other when White made a move towards his hip pocket with his right had as if attempting to draw a revolver. Barnes immediately drew a revolver himself and leveled it at White's heart.

Not believing that either man meant his move in any other manner than a joke, White threw off his coat and turned completely around, evidently to show that he was not the possessor of a revolver. Barnes did not lower the revolver, which was pointing at White. This made the drunken man angry, and he called Barnes many vile names.

FISTS AGAINST REVOLVER.

Mere words and threats did not lower the revolver which Barnes, with a steady hand, kept aimed at his heart for fully two minutes, so White started in bare-handed to disarm Barnes. He struck at him twice, neither blow reaching Barnes. Barnes said nothing, but stepped a little nearer White and pulled the trigger of the revolver. The cartridge did not explode, and Barnes waited another instant before pulling the trigger a second time.

This time the revolver did its work, the bullet striking White in the left breast slightly to the left of the heart. White did not stagger or fall, but kept to his feet and walked steadily to the rear of the saloon where several men had been playing cards. One man who had been standing in the inner doorway during the fight hastened forward to help the wounded man, who tried to throw him aside, saying: "I can whip him any time, but he got me like a coward just now."

He finally consented to sit down after considerable urging on the part of his friends. The minute that he sat down in the chair he became deathly sick and lost consciousness for a short time.

"I HAD TO DO IT."

After firing the last shot, Barnes walked out of the door leading into Charlotte street, remarking to a friend whom he passed, "Bob, I had to do it, didn't I?" He then jumped into his buggy, which was standing by the sidewalk, and drove rapidly south on Charlotte.

Hearing the shot, Officer Ed Doran ran into the saloon to investigate. By the time he arrived, Barnes had gone. The officer telephoned to the Walnut street police station for the ambulance. White was treated by Police Surgeon Dagg, who, seeing his critical condition, ordered him taken immediately to the general hospital.

On the way to the hospital White tried to talk and to answer questions, but the effect of the liquor and the mortal wound were too much for him, and he would only cry out hoarsely: "I know him. I know him. What is his name, I forget? He got me, yes, he got me. Oh, why did I get drunk!"

He died within two hours after he arrived at the hospital, from an internal hemorrhage caused by the bullet, it is thought that the bullet was one of the 38 caliber, as it pierced the body through.

THE MURDERER SURRENDERS.

Several hours after the shooting Barnes appeared at the county jail, where he surrendered. He is now in jail.

Barnes had owned the saloon in which the shooting occurred up to a little over a year ago, when he sold it to Rube Snyder, who sold it to its present owner, Peter McDonnell, a month ago.

White had been a motorman on the Metropolitan for about four years. He ran the Troost avenue owl car for some time, when he was transferred to a daylight run on the Broadway line.

White had been granted a divorce from his wife, Pearly White, by Judge Powell at Independence Monday afternoon. The divorce was granted on the grounds of desertion. His wife does not live in this city and her present address is unknown.

White was born in Caldwell county, near Breckenridge, Mo. He was about 35 years of age. He lived on his father's farm up until four years ago when he moved to Kansas City. His fellow workmen say that he was one of the best natured men in the service of the street car company.

SALT WATER IN HIS VEINS.

It was believed from the first that White would die from the effects of the wound, but the doctors and nurses at the hospital did all in their power to save his life. Word was received from Captain Thomas Flahive of the Walnut street police station that he would be out to the hospital in order to take a dying statement, but when he arrived he found White too near dead for the police to gather much information from him.

While lying upon the operating table he called time and again for Gertrude Stevens, moaning desperately, "I want my girl. I want my girl." He gave her name and said that she worked at the Fern laundry. When she arrived it seemed to have a good effect upon him, for he no longer groaned and was willing to lie quietly, a thing he had refused to do before.

She stooped over and kissed him upon the forehead, talking soothingly to him. He asked to be moved over on his right side, that he might better see her and talk with her. "He shot me," was all that he would say, and then closed his eyes as if everything was satisfactory.

Three nurses and Miss Stevens stayed with during the hour he survived. His sweetheart stood over his body for several minutes after his death, and then left the hospital without a word. It is said that his recent divorce was procured so that he and Miss Stevens might be married.

SELF-DEFENSE, SAYS BARNES.

When seen at the jail last night, Barnes made the following statement in regard to the shooting: "There is not much left for me to say. I shot him in self-defense. He was a man about twice my size, and was ready to fight with me. I am much older than he and knew that I would stand now show with him when it came to a test of strength. For that reason, and to protect myself, I drew a revolver."

"If I had to go through it again, I would let him wipe up the earth with me rather than to even threaten him with a revolver. I did not try to evade the offense, but I just wanted to be the first to tell the unfortunate affair to my wife and family. I live on a farm about a mile and half from Argentine. It took me some time to drive out there and back again. As soon as I opened my front door I told my wife of the affair and told her that I had to go back to the city and surrender. I then drove directly to the jail.

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November 9, 1907

ONE PRISONER DIDN'T WAKE.

In Jail for Safe Keeping, S. A Helin
Died in the Night.

When the turnkey at the Walnut street police station went to the cell room early this morning to arouse the prisoners one man did not respond. An examination proved that he was dead.

The man is supposed to hae been S. A. Helin. A letter in his coat pocket bore that name. It was addressed to 441 Twelfth street, Toledo, O., and evidently was written by a daughter, who is an actress with the Imperial Stock company, playing in Northern Illinois. The letter indicated that the man was an old soldier and was going to the Soldiers' home in Leavenworth for medical treatment. A patrolman found Helin wandering on Main street and took him to the station for safe keeping.

The coroner will hold an autopsy to-night to determine the cause of death.

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