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January 16, 1910

KYLE RENTS HEADQUARTERS.

Candidate Will Erect Electric Sign
at Eighth and Walnut.

The Kyle canvass for mayor promises to take on a spectacular hue. The entire second floor of the Gumbel building, Eighth and Walnut streets, has been leased as campaign headquarters and they will be opened Wednesday night with music, song and oratory.

An immense electric sign of red, white and blue lights, having in the center a profile of Judge Kyle, is to be strung across Walnut street. Beneath the picture of the candidate will be the words, "The Man of the People -- Harry G. Kyle, Republican Candidate for Mayor."

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December 26, 1909

"LEAN" CHRISTMAS FOR COPS.

Only One Exception Was Made to
Order Prohibiting Gifts.

Yesterday, in the annals of the police department, went down as a lean Christmas. It was owing to the order issued by the board of police commissioners shortly after the members went into office last April.

On the official records it reads, "No member of the police force shall give or receive presents." Short and to the point it caused clouds of gloom to settle right around the city hall. This year the patrolman on the beat was forced to wave aside all offers of boxes of cigars, black bottles, etc., and the family turkey was bought from the officer's monthly stipend.

One exception to the rigid rule of the police commissioners was made yesterday, however, and the officer in question is not likely to be called upon to answer for infringement.

On "Battle Roy," known officially as Beat 7 and the roughest beat in the central district, an old shoe string peddler plies his trade. Worn and bent, the old man walked into headquarters last night and asked for Officer Herman Hartman who, for the past five years, has patroled out of headquarters.

"Yes, he saved my life once," he stated to the desk sergeant, Robert Smith. "He pulled me out of the way of a runaway team. I haven't got any money but I would like you to give him this half dozen pair of shoe laces."

The sergeant took the gift and placed it in an envelope for the officer, who is at present a member of the traffic squad and stationed at Eleventh and Walnut streets.

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December 22, 1909

HIS GOOD CHEER PERENNIAL.

Gray Haired Elevator Operator the
Original "Sunny Jim."

"To You All a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year."

This little inscription, signed "Elevator Man, Merry Building," is the way L. G. Chase, the gray-haired man on the lift expresses his sentiments of good cheer to his friends and patrons. The cards bearing greetings of the season are pinned on the sides of the elevator at the Merry building, 1009-11 Walnut street, embedded in a mass of Christmas greens and holiday emblems.

Every Christmas t his gray-haired elevator man enters into the spirit of the season and decorates his car in a lavish manner. This season he has done better than before. With streamers of tinsel, which are entwined around Christmas bells, fern wreaths, holly bells and little bits of mistletoe here and there, Mr. Chase has transformed his little elevator from a simple black iron cage to one of holiday beauty.

But it is not only at this season of the year that the passengers in the Merry building elevator find a plethora of good cheer, for the man who runs the elevator has the same sunny disposition the year round.

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December 21, 1909

ZOO AT LAST HAS OCCUPANTS.

Gus Pearson's Four Lions Transferred
to Swope Park Yesterday.

The four lions that are to form the nucleus for Kansas City's zoo at Swope park were yesterday transferred to the building from the barn they have been kept in at Dodson. Two buffalo, male and female, presented to the park board by A. Weber, arrived from Kansas last night. They will be exhibited for a few days at the store by Mr. Weber on Walnut street, after which they will be sent to the zoo buildings. C. W. Armour has presented several deer and the Elks several elks, but before they can be shipped from the West to Kansas City a permit will have to be secured from the state game warden.

"After we get all the animals and birds together we will have a pretty fair collection," said Gus Pearson, city comptroller and father of the zoo, last night. "Beside the lions and the buffalo, we have three monkeys, a badger, a wildcat and several smaller birds and animals."

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December 1, 1909

CHANGE ON "TOUGHEST" BEAT.

"Hoboes' Friend" Transferred From
"Battle Row" to Traffic Squad.

"Battle Row," adjoining police headquarters and generally conceded the "toughest" beat in town, owing to the number of cheap saloons and the rough element, will be patrolled by a new man today. It is the first change in five years.

Patrolman Herman Hartman, "the hoboes' friend," has been transferred to the traffic squad and will be stationed at the intersection of Eleventh and Walnut streets. Hartman is the heaviest officer on the force, tipping the scales at 330 pounds.

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November 29, 1909

FIRST MOOSE FUNERAL.

250 Members of Kansas City Lodge
Honor Departed Brother.

The Kansas City lodge of the Loyal Order of the Moose had its first funeral yesterday afternoon, when it buried in Mount St. Mary's cemetery, Charles Burns, a contracting carpenter of 1316 Walnut street, who died in St. Mary's hospital last Tuesday. Mr. Burns was a charter member of the local order and the first of nearly 1,000 Kansas City Moose to die. Local lodge officials tried for several days to locate relatives of Burns in the East but without success.

Yesterday's funeral procession included 250 members of the order. It was headed by a brass band and started from the Moose club rooms, at Twelfth and Central streets. From there the cortege moved to the Cathedral, where the Catholic ceremonies were held, Father Lyons preaching the sermon.

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November 28, 1909

WOLFERMAN LEASES CORNER.

Six-Story Building to Be Erected at
Fourteenth and Walnut.

A 50 x 115 foot tract on the northeast corner of Fourteenth and Walnut streets was leased for 99 years yesterday afternoon by O. H. Dean to Fred Wolferman of the Fred Wolferman Grocery Company, 1108-10 Walnut. The terms of rental are: $2,500 for the first year, $3,000 for the second, $3,500 for the third, $4,000 for the fourth, $5,000 for the fifth, $5,500 for the next five years and $6,000 a year until the expiration of the contract.

Mr. Wolferman is allowed five years in which to erect a six-story fireproof building which he will probably occupy with his store. The Walnut street property was purchased by Mr. Dean four years ago for $27,500. He is now leasing it on a basis of $100,000.

"I am renting the property with an eye to insuring a place for my store in the future when space becomes cramped," said Mr. Wolferman yesterday. "I have plenty of time to build, but will probably begin within a year. I may build a larger building than required by the contract. It is doubtful whether I will move into the building with my store for years yet as my lease at 1108-10 has a long time to run and the location with a little economy will supply my present needs."

The deal yesterday was through Charles E. Forgy of the Junction Realty Company.

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October 21, 1909

FOR CITY'S TRIBUTE TO SWOPE.

Relatives in Letter to Mayor Thank
Kansas City People.

In a communication addressed to Mayor Crittenden, Mrs. L. O. Swope, sister-in-law of the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope, yesterday formally thanked the citizens of Kansas City for the public funeral tendered him. Mrs. Swope's letter follows:

"I wish to express to you, and to all of the city officials, on behalf of the Swope family, our high appreciation of the most beautiful tribute of honor and affection shown our dead. We feel that not a stone was left unturned to show him honor and gratitude.

"The services at the church were all that could have been. All the singing was sweet, but the solo, "One Sweetly Solemn Thought," was almost a voice from heaven. Once more thanking you for your great kindness, I remain, very sincerely, MRS. L. O. SWOPE. October 15, 1909."

It is said that the last legal transaction performed by Colonel Swope was the signing of a deed to a piece of property to the city on the north side of Fourth street, between Walnut and Main. It is a part of the square bounded by Walnut, Main, Third and Fourth, to be used for market purposes. There is a three-story brick building on the land, and this will be razed together with the four remaining buildings which the city will soon get posession of. there has been a delay in the formal transfer on account of the city having to deal with heirs.

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October 10, 1909

GEO. P. OLMSTEAD
DIES AT 80 YEARS.

PASSES AWAY WHILE SEATED
AT BREAKFAST TABLE.

Was Connected With Many Promi-
nent Institutions in Kansas City
Where He Lived Nearly
Forty Years.
The Late George P. Olmstead.
GEORGE P. OLMSTEAD.

George P. Olmstead, an octogenarian, half of whose life was lived in Kansas City, died yesterday morning at the breakfast table in his home at 1311 Forest avenue. Until five years ago he was a member of the Cady & Olmstead jewelry firm at 1009-11 Walnut street, which still retains his name. Prior to that he was one of the leading lumbermen of the Missouri valley.

Mr. Olmstead had seated himself at breakfast, and was glancing over the morning paper when his daughter, Mrs. Ben F. Qualtrough, was about to serve the coffee. As she came in she noticed his head was bowed, but thought little of it, as he often became drowsy when sitting.

Mr. Olmstead's head fell lower and touched the paper, and Mrs. Qualtrough became alarmed. Unable to awaken him, she called her husband, but they could do nothing and he had lapsed into unconsciousness. Dr. R. T. Sloan was summoned, but when he arrived the aged man was dead.

Besides his wife he leaves a son and a daughter, C. B. Olmstead and Mrs. Ben F. Qualtrough, both of 1311 Forest avenue, Miss Catherine G. Olmstead, a sister, 88 years old, has been at Wesleyan hospital for three years with a fractured limb.

The funeral will be held from the hours Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Rev. Burris A. Jenkins, pastor of Linwood Boulevard Christian church, in charge. Temporary burial will be in the vault in Forest Hill cemetery.

Mr. Olmstead was born September 17, 1829, at Little Falls, N. Y., where he grew to manhood and learned the carpenter's trade. Early he made the journey by canal, lake, river and gulf to Corpus Christi, Tex., but did not remain there long.

Later he engaged in the lumber business at Pontiac, Ill, where he was married in 1859 to Miss Cornelia E. Hunt, who survives him. He remained there for several years and again removed to Tuscola, where he lived until they came to Kansas City in 1869. Mr. Olmstead built a home at 800 Jefferson street and lived there until 1887, when he bought the present family home at 1311 Forest avenue. The Jefferson street house was sold at the time of the construction of the cable incline.

On coming to Kansas City Mr. Olmstead became a member of the lumber firm of Leach, Hall & Olmstead, all of the members of which are now dead. Their lumber yard was west of the Union depot and the site is now occupied by a number of large wholesale houses. In 1882 he became a partner of L. S. Cady in the jewelry firm of Cady & Olmstead and in 1887 the lumber firm was dissolved. Four years ago he sold his interest in the business of Cady & Olmstead. For a number of years he was identified with R. M. Snyder, now dead, in Texas and Arizona ranch properties.

Current events drew much of Mr. Olmstead's attention and he took a vivid interest in the happenings of the world at large. His large library attests that he was a wide reader and he was known as a close and intelligent student of the Bible. During the pastorate of Rev. T. P. Haley, he was an active member of the First Christian church at Eleventh and Locust streets. Mathematics and astronomy held an odd fascination for him.

Mr. Olmstead was a close friend of Col. R. T. Van Horn and frequently he would contribute keen and well-written comments on public affairs to the columns of The Journal.

Last fall he was invited to Pontiac to attend the fiftieth anniversary of the Masonic lodge there, which he founded, but he was obliged to decline.

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October 4, 1909

ESTATE WORTH $3,000,000.

Much in Kansas City and Nearby
Realty -- Gifts to City More Than
$1,500,000.

It is conservatively estimated that Colonel Thomas Swope's estate amounts to more than $3,000,000. With keen foresight he acquired many years ago lands in what is now the heart of the business section of Kansas City, and it is in such properties that the greater part of his fortune was made and is now invested.

Some of the more important properties included in the estate are:

The lot and block at the southeast corner of Eleventh and Grand, occupied by the Keith Furniture Company; the northeast corner of Twelfth and Walnut, occupied by McClintock's restaurant and other business firms; the Majestic theater building; the three-story building at 915 Walnut, the two-story building at 1017-1019 Main street, occupied by the Carey Clothing Company and other firms. The business blocks at 916-918-918 1/2 Main, occupied by the Snyder Dry Goods Company and the Seigelbohm Jewelry Company; the seven-story building at the southeast corner of Eighth and May, occupied by the Burnham, Hanna, Munger Company, the three-story building at 419 Walnut, occupied by a commission firm; the two-story building at 1012 East Fourth street, occupied by a commission company; the building at the southeast corner of Union avenue and Mulberry streets, occupied by the Union Avenue bank; the five-story warehouse at the northwest corner of Mulberry and Eleventh; the two-story brick building at the southeast corner of Twelfth and Hickory, used as a warehouse.

OUT OF TOWN REALTY.

There are other and less important properties in various parts of the city, beautiful family homes at Independence, Mo.

The out-of-town property owned by Colonel Swope consists of the 240-acre tract occupied by the Evanston Golf Club, bounded on the east by Swope parkway, the north by Sixty-third street, the west by Prospect avenue and the south by Sixty-seventh street, a 320-acre tract east of and adjoining Swope park, a 50-acre tract on the north of the park, a 400-acre farm near Columbia, Tenn., improved property in Knoxville, Tenn. and Middleboro, Ky, and vacant property in Syracuse, N. Y., Lawrence, Kas. and Topeka, Kas.

Colonel Swope also owned some mining claims near Butte, Mont., the value of which cannot be estimated. He recently said that if he were a young man, he could take one of the claims and dig a fortune out of it. He evidently believed that the claims were very valuable.

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October 1, 1909

WESTON GAINS ON KLING.

At End of Second Round Local
Player Leads 400 to 389.

"Cowboy" Weston last night in the second round of his championship pool match with Johnny Kling at Kling's, 1016 Walnut street, cut down the lead the local player secured on him the first round by thirty-six balls and the score now stands: Kling 400, Weston 389.

At the beginning of the second round last night Kling had made 202 balls. Weston had made 155. In the first eight innings, the champion played rings around the local man and scored 97 while Kling was making 19. Kling then settled down to business and managed to get the best of the play thereafter. Throughout the evening Kling excelled, as on the opening night, in long shooting and side cutting. He had much the better eye and execution while Weston showed better judgement.

Play will be resumed in the match at 8 o'clock this evening. The tournament will be of 800 balls for the world's pool championship.

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September 30, 1909

KLING BEATS WESTON IN
OPENING OF TITLE MATCH.

Pool Champ Plays Out of Form and
the Local Aspirant Wins 202 to
155 Victory in a Walk.

Johnny Kling had much the best of "Cowboy" Weston, champion pool player of the world, in the first of a series of four matches for the championship title at Kling's pool and billiard hall, 1016 Walnut, last night, winning the match 202 to 155 with apparent east Weston did not seem to be in form and Kling won as he pleased.

In the first frame Kling took the lead and was never headed. From the twelfth to the seventeenth frame he gained such a margin that Weston gave up all hope and the finish was not in doubt.

The play will be resumed this evening at 8 o'clock. The tourney is 800 balls. Wagers are being freely made that Kling will win from the champion. A gallery of more than 100 pool enthusiasts witnessed last night's game.

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September 27, 1909

TELLS A WEIRD LIFE STORY.

Waif Picked Up by Police Gives
Account of Himself.

To justify his presence in Kansas City, Theodore Kautz, 14 years old, picked up yesterday by the police in an alley between Walnut and Main streets, Tenth and Eleventh, and placed in the Detention home, told a weird life story of melodramatic interest.

While the family, consisting of his parents, his baby sister and himself, lived in Coffeyville, Kas., eight years ago, Theodore said, a woman nurse left in charge of the baby, angered because the child would not sleep during the mother's absence, shoved it into the oven of the kitchen stove, put on her bonnet, left the house, and was never heard of again.

The mother, he said, drew the baby out of the oven alive, but it died after a few days., and the woman within a year was a maniac. The father, he said, placed her in the asylum and disappeared, leaving the boy to drift.

Coffeyville officials, he said, sent him to the Christian orphans' home in St. Louis, where he lived until a short time ago when, dissatisfied with the treatment, he ran away.

Theodore told the police he rode most of the way from St. Louis to Kansas City in the caboose of a freight train, coming in here on top of the cars. He was ill clad and suffering from cold and hunger. Mrs. Joan Moran, the police matron, gave him an overcoat.

Theodore says he came to Kansas City because he heard his mother was here in an asylum. Probation officers will investigate his story.

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September 16, 1909

BUY LAND FOR NEW STATION.

Western Sash and Door Company
Sells Grand Avenue Site and
Buildings for $125,000.

As forcasted in The Journal a week ago, $125,000 was paid yesterday by the Grand Avenue Building Company to William Huttig, president of the Western Sash and Door Company, for the property and building of the company at Twenty-third and Grand avenue.

There are 45,000 square feet in the tract, wh ich faces 168 feet on Grand avenue and runs through to Walnut street. About 5,500 square feet will be taken by the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company in the building of the Union passenger station, and it is understood that eventually a hotel will be built on the remaining part of the property.

The offices of the sash and door company will be occupied and used at once by the engineering forces of the terminal company, and the balance of the building will be used by the Huttig company for one year.

"A year from today the Western Sash and Door Company will have a big new plant built somewhere along the line of the Belt railway," said Mr. Huttig yesterday. "We have three different sites under construction."

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September 13, 1909

USED DIAMOND ON
THE STORE WINDOWS.

PLATE GLASS CUT FOR BLOCKS
ON MAIN STREET.

J. E. Stivers Arrested on Charge of
Damaging Property from Fifth
to Thirteenth Street --
Denies He Is Vandal.

All records in plate glass window cutting were broken last night by J. E. Stivers, a candymaker for the Loose-Wiles Cracker and Candy Company. In years past the record in Kansas City has been a few straggling windows, entailing a cost of from $300 to $400, but Stivers's cutting began at Thirteenth street and Grand avenue and he carried the line of march to Main street and down that street to Fifth, where he was arrested. In all, Stivers damaged sixty-three plate glass windows. If the glass has to be replaced, the total cost would not fall short of $5,000, it is estimated. Most of the places which suffered most carry plate glass insurance.

Edward Clark, recently appointed a Gamewell operator at the Walnut street police station, saw Stivers when he made his first cut on a plate glass window at the Ayres Clothing Company, 1309 Grand avenue. He followed him to Main street, along Thirteenth and down Main to Fifth, seeing him use a 1/4 karat diamond ring on all of the most valuable windows along Main street. It did not occur to Clark to make an arrest. The arrest took place while Stivers was making a final slash at a large window of the Hub Clothing Company at Fifth and Main streets. Herman Hartman, a police officer, chanced to be passing and arrested the culprit.




After leaving Thirteenth and Grand, Stivers made his way to Main street, where he wrote his initials on a glazed monument of the M. H. Rice Monument Company at that point. It was shortly after 9 p. m. when he reached Jones' Dry Goods Company's store and many persons were on the street so he succeeded in cutting but seven of the valuable windows. Some of them are cut so deeply that a tap would knock out part of the glass.


Stivers' route from here was made by jumps, he evidently passing some places on account of the night crowds. He missed most of the stores in the block between Eleventh and Twelfth streets on Main. Altogether, he damaged the windows of more than thirty clothiers, milliners, saloons, flower shops, fortune tellers and other retailers and unoccupied buildings.

When Stilvers began by the Jones Dry Goods Company, when his diamond was in good working order, he appears to have done the greatest damage.

When seen in the holdover after his arrest, Stivers was awakened from a stupor. He told who he was and said he had been working for the Loose-Wiles company for twenty years. He is now 22 years old.

"If any of those windows are damaged I did not do it," he said.

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September 13, 1909

ARM SCALDED; BLAMES COOK.

Boy Helper in Restaurant Causes
Arrest of Kitchen Boss.

Because Marion Bell, 18 years old, upset some water in the kitchen of a lower Walnut street restaurant where he is employed, yesterday, he claims Fred Geddes, the cook, shoved him so violently he fell, his right arm being immersed in a pail of scalding water. He says he was then kicked from the building.

Dr. Fred B. Kyger, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, found that the boy was dangerously burned, and advised him to report the matter to the police. After hearing his story, Sergeant Robert Smith ordered the cook's arrest. He was released on $101 bond for trial in the municipal court tomorrow.

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September 12, 1909

FINEST WEST OF CHICAGO.

Kansas City Women's Athletic
Club's New Home Ready.

The Kansas City Women's Athletic Club expects to be in its new quarters, 1015 Grand avenue, by next Wednesday, and a formal opening has been planned. The rooms will be open all day and in the evening a ball will be given for club members and their friends.

The club formerly occupied quarters at 1024 Walnut street, but on the second floor of the new Mancuitt building, 1015 Grand avenue, it will have what are said to be the finest club rooms west of Chicago. Its magnificent tea room will be a feature in the new quarters.

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September 10, 1909

HAND CAUGHT IN A ROLLER.

Mrs. A. R. Miles Dangerously Hurt
by Laundry Machinery.

While working in the Swan laundry at 560 Walnut street last night, Mrs. A. R. Miles, 18 years old, of 893 Wayne avenue, Kansas City, Kas., was dangerously injured when her right hand was caught in a hot steam roller. Dr. Fred B. Kyger and Dr. W. L. Gist, surgeons at the Emergency hospital, treated the young woman. She was sent to her home.

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August 30, 1909

LIEUTENANT RYAN MAY DIE.

In Critical Condition as Result of
an Operation.

Lieutenant M. E. Ryan of the police, is in critical condition at St. Joseph's hospital, following an operation performed yesterday afternoon. The operation was to remove a growth inside his right ear. He was unconscious early this morning. His physicians had little hope of his recovery.

Lieutenant Ryan has been on the police force twenty years, having been appointed a patrolman while Thomas M. Speers was chief of police. He was stationed for years at No. 4 police station at Fifteenth and Walnut streets. A year ago he was removed to police headquarters.. Mr. Ryan lives at 3711 Woodland avenue. He is married and has four children.

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August 14, 1909

HEAT OVERCOMES ICEMAN.

While Carrying Cake of Ice Jake
Schuyler is Overcome.

While transferring a cake of ice to a house at Forty-seventh street and Troost avenue at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon, Jake Schuyler, an employe of the City Ice Company, suddenly fell over unconscious.

The police ambulance of No. 4 station was called and Dr. Shiras gave Schuyler emergency treatment for sunstroke. He was taken to the emergency hospital. Schuyler is 25 years old. He lives at 1321 Walnut street.

James Burgess, 3717 Woodland avenue, was affected last night about 8 o'clock. The police station was notified and the operator called Dr. S. S. Morse, 3801 Woodland avenue. Burgess is a foreman of the packing department of the Globe Storage Company, and has complained of the heat for several days. He had recovered in a few hours.

A. M. Kissell, 65 years old, a stationary fireman at the Central Manufacturing Company, First and Lydia avenue, about 9 o'clock was overcome by heat and last night he was taken to the emergency hospital for medical attention.

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July 30, 1909

PIONEER BLACKSMITH DIES
LEAVING $150,000 ESTATE.

Henry Nevins Came to Kansas City
in 1869, and Opened Shop
on Third Street.

Henry Nevins, pioneer horseshoer of Kansas City and in the early days a fair prototype of Longfellow's "Village Blacksmith," died at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the family residence, 1032 Olive street. He was 70 years old.

He was born in Tipperary county, Ireland, and came to this country when a young man, spending some years in Canada, where he learned the blacksmith trade and where he married. Later he crossed the line into the United States, settling first in Burlington, Ia., and from there removing to Kansas City in 1869.

He first opened a shop at Third street and Grand avenue and for twenty years Nevins's blacksmith shop was a landmark.

In those early days when railroads were in their infancy and mules and horses were yet the main standby for transportation, the blacksmith was a most important person.

Nevins met the situation with an energy that never seemed to tire, and it is on record that during rush seasons he has been known to stand in the smith forty-eight hours at a stretch, without sleep, eating in the shop meals brought to him by his wife.

Early in his career in Kansas City Mr. Nevins began to put his savings into real estate, and this policy he continued throughout his career. But once in his life did he part with real estate he had purchased, and that was about eight years ago, when he sold to the Armour Packing Company the property at 306 West Eighth street for $10,000, and for which he had paid $900 in early days. For an other property next to the Gillis opera house, which cost him $800 he recently refused an offer of $800 a foot.

Practically all his wealth is in inside Kansas City real estate and a conservative estimate of his estate places the figure at $150,000.

Later he moved his blacksmith shop to 512 Walnut street, and when that property became too valuable for a blacksmith shop he moved once more to 512 Grand avenue, where he continued in business until five years ago, when he retired, owing to advancing age and continued ill health.

He leaves a wife and six children, three sons and three daughters. The children are: John M., James H., William J., Elinore, Catherine Marie and Rose.

The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Aloysius's church, and burial will be at St. Mary's cemetery.

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July 25, 1909

CHINESE DON JUAN
ARRESTED IN CHICAGO.

CLAIMED GAW WING ELOPED
WITH MRS. ETHEL GORDON.

Celestial of Many Love Affairs
and Woman, Who Is Said
to Be From Kansas
City, Fine.

White women have a strange fascination for Gaw Wing, a Kansas City Chinese. Gaw has been arrested in Chicago in company with a woman who gave her name as Mrs. Ethel Gordon, also of Kansas City. The two eloped recently, it is claimed, and Chicago was the destination.

Gaw at one time, so it is said, went to Topeka where he fell love with a white school teacher. He flashed his bundle of bills and the school teacher became Mrs. Wing. She was at the police station in Kansas City yesterday looking for her recreant husband.

About a week ago, having forgotten his school teacher wife long since, it is claimed, he and Mrs. Gordon, both known to the police in the person of inspector Edward P. Boyle, left Kansas City. It was common gossip among the Chinese of West Sixth street that Gaw left a wife in Kansas City. This wife to who they refer says she was Mrs. Charles Wilson before she married the flighty Wing. She and the Mongolian also eloped to Chicago and were arrested January 26 of this year and were fined in the municipal court of that city. Mrs. Wilson has a child 2 years old.

Gaw's friends in Chicago paid his fine and he and Mrs. Wilson were released.

They came back to Kansas City and their domestic bark suddenly ran upon breakers. Mrs. Wilson Wing dropped out of sight.

Wing and Charlie Chu, a restaurant keeper at 125 West Sixth street, were fast friends and Gaw spent much of his time at the restaurant. White women came and went and from the lot Wing, it is alleged, selected Mrs. Gordon, who the police say lived at the Madison house, Independence avenue and Walnut street. Gaw, it is said, took up his abode at the Madison house and a rapid courtship followed. Gaw and his new spouse left for Chicago about two weeks ago and from that city last night came the news of their arrest.

Gaw was passing under the name of Charles Foy and Mrs. Gordon was registered as his wife. Inspector Boyle says that he is certain the eloping Chinaman is Gaw Wing. Mrs. Gordon told the Chicago police that she had been living in Chicago for over a year with her brother at 516 North Ashland avenue.

The Chinese and the woman were arrested by Chicago detectives after having been seen to enter a questionable hotel together and register as Charles Foy and wife. They were fined $200 and court costs there yesterday morning.

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July 21, 1909

AGED BRIDEGROOM DIES.

Veteran of 65 Married Woman of
27 Last May.

Broken alike in health and spirit without his bride of just two months, Henry C. Porter, the lame Civil war veteran, who at the age of 65 married Miss Carrie Clements, 27 years old, in the Moore hotel here May 10, returned to the scene of his nuptials July 10 last and found surcease from sorrow in death at the St. Mary's hospital Friday. On his advent in Kansas City, Porter pawned his watch for $9 in order to pay his room rent at the apartment house of Mrs. Mary A. Millichif at 1231 Walnut street.

"I am a broken down old man and the worst kind of a fool," Porter told Mrs. Millichif as he paid her the money. "I don't want pity; all I want is a little rest and time to think."

The body was taken to Wagner undertaking rooms. Attempts made by the proprietors of the establishment to locate Mrs. Porter have failed. Two brothers of the dead man, R. M. Porter of Williamston, Mich., and F. C. Porter of Englewood, Col., were notified by telegraph and they have replied to the effect that Porter had plenty of money and a pension of $45 a month. Had he lived until August 4 $138 would have been coming to him in accumulated pensions.

The old soldier first appeared here in the early part of last May when he broke into print with the announcement that although 65 years old, with his right leg missing and his right arm paralyzed, he was to marry Miss Clements, lately of Colorado Springs, who was fully a generation his junior.

The ceremony took place in the Moore hotel, Ninth and Central streets. The couple then departed on a tour of the East and were to sail around the Horn of San Francisco later.

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July 19, 1909

LURE OF THE CIRCUS
AS STRONG AS EVER.

CROWDS STREAMED THROUGH
SHOW GROUNDS YESTERDAY.

Performers Were Not in Evidence,
as It Was a Day of Rest.
Parade in Downtown
Section.
The Circus Makes Everyone Feel Young Again.
WE ARE ALL "SMALL BOYS" TODAY.

PARADE STARTS AT 9:30

The route is north from the grounds, on Indiana avenue to Fifteenth street, west of Fifteenth to Walnut street, north on Walnut to Fifth street, west on Fifth to Main street, south on Main to Fourteenth street, east on Fourteenth to Grand avenue, south on Grand to Fifteenth street, east on Fifteenth to Indiana avenue, south on Indiana to the circus grounds.


You have heard people say that the circus is no longer the magnet it once was, but if you were able to persuade yourself into this opinion, take a car out to Seventeenth street and Indiana avenue, where Ringling's circus city is encamped, and behold your mistake; for it's dollars to dill pickles that you'll suddenly be bereft of your enthusiasm.

Crowds streamed through the grounds all day yesterday just because it was a circus that held all the charm that circuses have always held in the popular heart. Big red wagons; forests of pegs and guy ropes; great hollow mountains of belying canvas; roustabouts seeking a minimum of warmth in the scant shade of the vans; squads of cooks and scullions making the next meal ready for the circus army vendors of cool drinks and hot meats, barking their wares; the merry-go-round, grinding out its burden of popular airs, all these things to be seen and heard constituted the lure that drew perspiring thousands to the show grounds, even though no performance was given Sunday.

PERFORMERS' REST DAY.

It was remarked that few of the performers could be seen on the grounds.

"That's because it is their day off," said one who has eleven years of circus experience behind him. "They're at all the parks and other places of interest. More of them are in church than you would guess, too."

No one was allowed in the menagerie yesterday and the animals had the big tent largely to themselves and their keepers. Beasts ranging in disposition from mild to fearsome, crouched, paced and slept behind the bars. A large herd of elephants was lined up on one side of the tent and the huge pachyderms stood quietly swaying their trunks, and munching the wisps of hay they would now and then tuck under their proboscises.

Jerry, the Royal Bengal tiger. lay peacefully asleep in his cage. He is the Apollo Belvedere of the feline species. Out of all tigers and near-tigers in captivity, he was chosen as a model of his kind for the two bronze guardians of the entrance of old Nassau hall, Princeton.

TIGER AS A MODEL.

Jerry was chosen as a model by A. Phimister Proctor, the sculptor, who was commissioned by the class of '79 to replace the two lions that now stand before the famous old hall.

Weather and undergraduate ebullience made their marks on the lions and the class of '79 decided to have them replaced by two bronze tigers which will not only be more durable but more emblematic. They will be presented to the university by the class next commencement week.

Two performances will be given today, the first at 2 o'clock in the afternoon and the second at 8 o'clock at night. The parade will start at 9:30 a. m. The circus will give two performances at Manhattan, Kas., Tuesday.

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July 10, 1909

CUT IN TWO ON CAR TRACK.

Body of Unidentified Man Discov-
ered at Walnut and Second.

While rounding the curve in the old Holmes street cut on Second street between Walnut street and Grand avenue at midnight last night, J. A. Franklin, the motorman of a Vine street car, noticed that his car bumped slightly at one particular place. He stopped the car, got off and went back to investigate.

In the middle of the track was the body of a man which had evidently been lying there for several hours. More than a dozen cars had passed over the body before any one noticed it. Dr. Harry Czarlinsky was notified and ordered it taken to an undertaker.

From papers found in the dead man's pockets it was presumed that his name is Walter A. Rosh of Enid, Ok.

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July 4, 1909

PROMISES NEW ERA
FOR THE NORTH END.

MIDLAND ARCADE BUILDING TO
START NEXT MONTH.

Three Story Structure at Seventh
and Walnut Will Contain Ten
Stores and Hotel -- Im-
provement Plans.
Proposed Midland Arcade Building.
PROPOSED MIDLAND ARCADE BUILDING, TO BE ERECTED AT SEVENTH AND WALNUT.

The rejuvenation of the North End will begin next month, when work upon the Midland Arcade building will be started. The building, owned by Godfrey A. Jones and the Berlau brothers, will be situated at the northeast corner of Seventh and Walnut streets. It will be an office building and hotel combined. The location is at the entrance to the North End, and Mr. Jones makes it plain that it is an effort to bring into public realization the value of the North End as a business location.

It is also given out that the new Midland Arcade building will be only the first of similar improvements in the locality. The North End is the location of the great produce market of Kansas City, and the produce houses are becoming rapidly overcrowded.

The new building is to be three stories high, and constructed of brick, stone and stucco. The lower floor, which will be given over entirely to stores and an arcade, will be glass. The upper floors will be in the shape of an "L," with the north and east fronts facing the court and will be fitted up for a thoroughly modern European hotel, with outside rooms.

Merchants in the North End are enthusiastic concerning the improvement and all have asserted their willingness and desire to further the work begun by Mr. Jones and his associates. In the district which is now known as the North End, north of Eighth street, are the Hiest building, Water Works building, court house, Temple building and Temple block, Grand opera house, Gilliss theater, city hall, market square and many other places of business interest. The streets in that location are always as busy as any others in the retail district in Kansas City and, it is asserted, just as much money passes hands in business transactions in proportion to the area as does any other part of the city.

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July 3, 1909

AGED "CABBY" A SUICIDE.

Dan Marvin Kills Himself to Join
Wife Who Divorced Him.

Love for his wife from whom he had been divorced for four years, and who died a week ago, caused Dan Marvin, 68 years of age, to commit suicide at his home, 405 1/2 East Fifteenth street, early this morning. Marvin used a revolver and shot himself through the heart, death resulting instantly For the past week Marvin has been disconsolate and bemoaned the death of his wife to many of his friends.

"She was the best pal I ever had," he was wont to say, "and I am ashamed of the way she has been treated. She is dead now, dead."

Dating form the death of his wife, who had remarried and was deserted by her second husband, Marvin had not been in a cheery frame of mind. He made continual threats to join her and to repair the wrong which he had done her.

After his body had been removed to an undertaker's the following note was found:

"Friend Will: Please pay Egan $50 to put me away decent and oblige, D. A. Marvin."

The Will referred to is Will Mayberry, at whose liver stable Marvin stabled his horses. Marvin has been a cab driver for many years and for the past eight years he has stood out in front of McClintock's restaurant, on Walnut street.

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June 13, 1909

KANSAS CITY'S CROSSING SQUAD.

A Fine Appearing Body of Men.

CROSSING SQUAD OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT.

It doesn't take the oldest inhabitant to remember the time when the crossing squad, which now numbers twenty-nine men, was limited to one or two members. At one time Sergeant James Hogan was the whole squad himself with the exception of a patrolman who has been stationed at the Junction for more than twenty years. Kansas City cannot boast of the largest squad in the country, but its members are noted for their general efficiency.

In the mind of the ordinary person the crossing man leads a life of ease. In fact, the majority of the police department envy the crossing men until they have been given a trial. Then it is found that a man must know the location and name of all the office buildings, the streets in every section of the city, the routes of the different street cars and most of the public men.

"Can you tell me the way to the depot?" is a question heard every five minutes.

"Where is the nearest shoe store?" asks a woman.

"Do you know Charley Smith?" asks a farmer who feels hurt when the crossing man shakes his head. "You see he was a great feller to make acquaintances in our town, and I was sure you would know him."

Answering questions, directing the careless drivers who persist in driving on the wrong side of the street and dodging street cars on his own account, are only mere incidents. The constant strain on the system is generally the cause for a man's departure from the squad. Some men ask to be relieved in less than a week.

When the cable cars formerly ran on Ninth street and when some one was injured nearly every week as the cars swept around the corner at high speed, a patrolman was always stationed at that particular spot. The second patrolman to be placed at a crossing was James Hogan, who commenced patrolling the corner at Eleventh and Walnut streets, just eleven years ago.

Four years ago the crossing squad was increased from eight members, who worked from 8 o'clock in the morning until about 7 o'clock in the evening. Patrolman Hogan on account of his seniority and his general knowledge was made a sergeant of the squad.

Two years ago the squad was increased to fourteen members and more crossing were included in the list. But the hours were long and the men asked to be relieved. At last the problem of long hours was solved by Sergeant Hogan, who recommended that the squad be doubled and the hours shortened. Fourteen of the men now go to work at 8 o'clock in the morning and are relieved at 1 o'clock in the afternoon by the other division. After six hours of rest they report at police headquarters and are assigned to the parks and theaters. On the following day the second squad are given the same hours and report at 8 o'clock in the morning, as did the opposite squad on the previous day.

Sergeant Hogan, who has been on the force for nineteen years, probably has a better general knowledge of Kansas City than any other man. One glance through an information guide can tell him whether the pamphlet is up to date or not.

"I don't see the name of the Sharp of finance building," he informed a book dealer the other day when his opinion was asked in regard to the reliability of a guide recently issued. He also knows the name of every street in both Kansas Citys and places of general interest. With such a leader it isn't any wonder that the crossing squad is rated as highly efficient.

Names of the officers, from left to right:

First row -- Crowley, Kennedy, Quayle, Darnell, Rogers, Kincaid.
Second row -- Kearns, Keys, Madigan, Harkenberg, Doman, Nichols.
Third Row -- Lillis, O'Roark, Noland, McCormick, Briden, Jackson.
Fourth Row -- Roach, Coffey, J. T. Rogers, Ryan, McFarland, Hoskins.
Fifth Row -- Hodges, Koger, Sergeant Hogan, Zirschky, Wilhite.

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May 28, 1909

UNKNOWN MAN TRIES TO
KILL ROBERT M'CLINTOCK.

Attacks Him With Knife in Front
of Twelfth Street Entrance to
His Restaurant.

While standing in the front of the Twelfth street entrance to McClintock's restaurant, Twelfth and Walnut streets, Robert McClintock, son of the proprietor, was stabbed three times by one of three passersby, who attacked him without provocation or warning. Hundreds of people were on their way home from the theaters at the time.

Mr. McClintock's stiff hat broke the force of the first blow, but the blade cut a long gash in his scalp. The second cut also was in the head, near the first. McClintock, weak from the loss of blood, then grappled with his assailant, who cut him again on the forehead and broke away, pursued by a dozen men, but eventually escaping.

R. S. McClintock, proprietor of the restaurant, was standing in front of the Walnut street entrance when he saw a man run panting past him. He wore no hat and several men were chasing him. A moment later his son was led into the restaurant with the blood streaming down his face.

"I'm sure I would know the man if I saw him again," said Mr. McClintock last night. "Had I known what he had done, I could have knocked him down as he ran past. I don't know of an enemy Robert has. I will give $100 for his assailant's arrest and conviction.

Young McClintock remembered that he had an altercation a year ago over the payment of a check with a man to whom his assailant bore a strong resemblance.

The assailant left his hat. In the sweatband were the initials "D. D." It bore the brand of the "Lid," and evidently had been worn several months.

A cashier in the restaurant declared that three men a half hour before had come in and asked the whereabouts of Robert McClintock. Without thinking anything peculiar in their actions, she told them that he was likely in the office on the Walnut street side. Satisfied that he was inside, the men waited until he appeared.

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May 22, 1909

FIRE,WATER, STREET KIDS.

Latter Causes Greatest Damage at a
Peanut Wagon Conflagration.

A fire company dashed down Walnut street last night, led by the insurance patrol and the chief's wagon. Several hundred people followed with legs or eyes to see what business house was afire. The wagons halted at Ninth and Walnut streets.

An insurance man jumped out of the wagon and turned his extinguisher upon a peanut and candy wagon, in which the flame of the heater had become unmanageable. The glass was broken and a crowd of street urchins made a raid on the goods, carrying off all they could eat of burnt candy, popcorn and peanuts.

The owner of the stand, who gave a name sounding something like Giovanni Lucio, returned in time to rescue a few cents' worth of property. He blamed the fire upon a bootblack he had employed to watch the stand. When the fire broke out, the lad fought the flames for a short time, and then ran away to escape his employer's anger.

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May 19, 1909

BOHN REFRIGERATORS.

Interesting Demonstration by Son of
the Manufacturer.

There has been going on all week at the Bunting-Stone hardware company's store, 804-806 Walnut street, a particularly interesting demonstration of the celebrated Bohn Syphon refrigerators. The demonstration will continue till the end of the week and is in charge of Will R. Bohn, son of the inventor and manufacturer, who is on a tour of the principal cities of the country. Mr. Bohn is treasurer of the company, whose headquarters are at St. Paul. He is a specially pleasant gentleman, who backs up his enthusiasm for his wares with a record that would be difficult to excel. Dryness is the prominent features of the Bohn refrigerators but there is nothing "dry" about Mr. Bohn's demonstrations.

The Bohn refrigerators are in use on all the railroads of America, Mexico and Canada, and in exclusive use on the Pullman system, the Fred Harvey, and Rock Island eating systems. A more significant indorsement of their merits would be hard to require. They are turned out in St. Paul at the rate of from 1,000 to 1,500 per month and have been on the market for about ten years, their popularity increasing each year. The syphon system prevents condensation on articles in the refrigerator and thus keeps them perfectly dry all the time, the air having complete access to all parts of the box and the condensation being centered on the ice. This obviates all "clamminess" and at the same time prevents the unpleasant mixture of odors. Cheese may be kept next to cake and bacon in the same compartment with strawberries, as an example.

Mr. Bohn is fond of demonstrating the exceeding dryness of his refrigerators with this experiment: He soaks matches in water and in five hours after being placed in the refrigerator they are dry enough to strike. This dryness is accompanied by specially low temperature, which is another strong feature of the Bohn, a uniform temperature of from 38 to 48 degrees being maintained at all times. The demonstration has attracted hundreds of housekeepers this week.

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May 12, 1909

LIVERYMAN OWN DETECTIVE.

Independence Man Recovers Valu-
able Horse and Buggy.

As Thomas Hughes, an Independence liveryman, was walking on Walnut street near Missouri avenue, yesterday afternoon he was wondering what had become of a fine horse and buggy, which had disappeared from his barn the night before. Hughes was on his way to police headquarters, in fact, to talk it over with the cops, when lo and behold, he espied the missing nag and vehicle. Walter Ayers and W. H. Dunn, young men, were in the buggy.

Hughes grabbed the horse by the bridle and then called Patrolman Henry Harris, who arrested Ayers and Dunn. The former lives about five miles from Independence, while Dunn says his home is in Kansas City. Hughes took his horse and buggy to Independence. The young men are being held for investigation.

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May 11, 1909

NEW 12-STORY BUILDING.

Gloyds to Erect Skyscraper on
Walnut Street.

Work is to begin at once on the new twelve-story concrete office building to be built at 921-923 Walnut street by the F. E. and S. M. Gloyd Lumber Company. It will be of reinforced concrete walls, girders and floors and will cost about $500,000.

The outside dimensions will be 48 x 110 1/2 feet. In addition to the twelve stories there will be a basement and a sub-basement. The outside construction of the building will be completed by September 1, and it will be ready for occupation probably by January 1.

The tract at 921-923 Walnut was purchased by the Gloyd lumber company from John Wilson of Orange, Mass., in 1905. The price was $175,000.

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May 4, 1909

MOTOR CAR ON HIS TOES.

Al S. Bright Has Close Call at
Eleventh and Walnut.

The sharp cry of a pedestrian saved Al S. Bright from being run down by a reckless chauffeur yesterday noon. Mr. Bright was crossing Walnut street at Eleventh when a rapidly moving motor car turned out of Eleventh street. It was nearly upon Mr. Bright when a man behind shouted "look out." Mr. Bright sprang backward, but not in time to clear the machine. The front wheels passed over his left foot, crushing the toes. The chauffeur did not stop to see how badly Mr. Bright was injured. The car was clearly exceeding the speed limit. Mr. Bright has offices at 317 R. A. Long Building.

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April 3, 1909

PEDESTRIAN HAS AN INNING.

Eleventh Street Gets a Bath and the
Autos Stampede.

The pedestrian -- that meek and lowly man who ducks and dodges the restless and unruly benzine buggy in Kansas City's crowded thorougfares, and who is smile upon benignly by the carefree chauffeur, had his inning yesterday, or he might have had he been along Eleventh street, between Grand and Walnut, for automobilists who attempt to frisk up and down "Petticoat lane" have their troubles.

Early yesterday afternoon the street springling brigade took special pains to give the aforementioned section of Eleventh street a good bath. They succeeded in mixing a mud that made the surface of the asphalt as slippery as the floor of the oleo room in a packing plant. And when the first autoist to attempt to perform on the slippery surface rounded the corner of Eleventh and Grand the pedestrian's fun began, for the auto refused to make a scheduled stop. In a few minutes the street was full of smoking machines that groaned and chugged to no avail. They were all stuck.

There were cross words from chauffeurs and merry "ha-has" from assembled pedestrians. As the wheels of the autos whirled about like a buzzsaw and the cars did not move an inch, the merry crowds on the sidelines offered numerous suggestions.

"Give 'er the sand, pal," suggested a man who wore the garb of a motorman.

What they did give a majority of the stubborn cars before they got them out of the trouble district was plenty of push.

And the "common people" stood by and smiled broadly.

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April 1, 1909

HAMMIL WEARIED OF
SITTING ON A BOMB.

GREW NERVOUS THINKING OF
WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN.

Police Lieutenant Resigns to
Become Private Detective for Hotel
Baltimore -- Succeeds Ed Hickman
at the Hostelry.
FORMER POLICE LIEUTENANT HAMMIL.
FORMER POLICE LIEUTENANT HAMMIL.

Police Lieutenant H. W. Hammil yesterday resigned to become a private detective at the Hotel Baltimore. Hammil succeeds Edward Hickman, who leaves the hotel to go into business with his brother.

Lieutenant Hammil has been a member of the police department for nineteen years. Seven years ago he was promoted to a seargency and two years ago was made lieutenant. While his advancement may not have been as rapid as many who went on the force after he did, there were reasons for it. He was always averse to turning "crooks" loose because some petty or big policeman requested it and he always did his full duty in spit of who it hurt or what political interests were disturbed. That one thing, more than anything else, mitigated against rapid promotion.

REMOVED FROM HEADQUARTERS.

Hammil was made a lieutenant during the Governor Folk "rigid police investigation," while it was in its incipency, in fact. One day an officer who had made charges against John Hayes, then chief of police, was cursing the chief and Frank F. Rozzelle, then a commissioner, down in Central station. Hammil ordered the man to stop such talk or something "would be doing." As soon as Governor Folk had peremptorily removed Commissioner Rozzelle by wire and the new board had been organized and John Hayes dropped from the department, Hammil was ordered removed from headquarters, where he had served the better part of his life, to No. 4 station at Fifteenth and Walnut streets.

The records will show that while other districts, notably headquarters, have had a full quota of men and more, too, No. 4 has been handicapped with barely half enough men to do proper police duty. Hammil's watch, especially, never had a full complement of men the whole time he was there. It is said that if an officer got sick, crippled or otherwise "defunct," he was detailed to Hammil's watch. Handicapped as he was, however, he always went along with out complaint and kept up his end of the string.

As soon as Hickman resigned from the detective position at the Hotel Baltimore, D. J. Dean sent for Hammil and offered him the place. It is better pay and far more pleasant work -- no more knockers, no politics.

GLAD TO GET AWAY.

"I am sorry to leave some of my old friends on the department," Hammil said yesterday, "but I am glad to get away from a place where you felt all along like you were sitting on a dynamite bomb. If one 'crook' was arrested here would come a kick from his political friend, and when another fell into our hands here would come another 'gang' of political kickers. I always let 'em kick, though they always threatened to get my job."

The board took no action on Hammil's successor yesterday, Commissioner Elliott H. Jones being away hunting ducks. It may be left for the new board to fill.

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March 31, 1909

THIS BROUGHAM RAN AWAY.

Unoccupied Electric Machine Scatters
Crowd on Walnut Street.

A crowd which had gathered at Twelfth and Walnut streets was scattered yesterday about noon when an unoccupied electric brougham belonging to Mrs. R. N. Simpson of 109 West Armour boulevard ran away. After it had run a block, however, the fractious car was stopped by a daring chauffeur who leaped from his own machine into the runaway.

The trouble began at Twelfth and Grand by a collision of a west bound Twelfth street car with the brougham, which narrowly missed inflicting serious injury. Mrs. Simpson, who was driving the electric, had with her a woman and a little girl. In her southward course along Grand avenue she had stopped the machine at the intersection of Twelfth street to await the passage of an eastbound car.

In the meantime a westbound car came along. The motorman failed to stop in time, and the front part of the brougham was struck a heavy blow. It was not overturned, however, and a policeman asked Mrs. Simpson to steer it to Twelfth and Walnut to avoid the gathering crowd. She did so, and with her companions, stepped out of the electric to use a nearby telephone.

The impact of the street car had loosened the mechanism of the machine and it caught fire from two crossed wires. In his eagerness to stop the blaze, a bystander inadvertently pushed forward the controller and the brougham started off by itself and got nearly to Thirteenth and Walnut before the chauffeur stopped it.

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March 16, 1909

BUILDING FOR WOOLF BROS.

New Structure on Site Formerly Oc-
cupied by T. M. James & Son.

Ground is being cleared for the construction of Langston Bacon's new five-story building to be occupied by the Woolf Brothers Furnishing Goods Company at 1020-22 Walnut street. The contract for the ten-year lease of the building by Woolf Brothers was closed yesterday by Blanchert & Kipp, who were agents in the transaction. The tenants will move in about August 15. Although only five stories will be built at first, the foundation will be so constructed as to carry three additional floors.

The present building was occupied by T. M. James & Sons who were burned out February 11. Woolf Brothers, who have been in business in Kansas City for thirty years, will pay an annual rental of $20,000, or a total of $200,000 for ten years' use of the building.

Root & Siemens are the architects.

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March 9, 1909

GYPSY SMITH'S COUSIN,
SAID WOMAN IN BLACK.

TALKED RELIGION TO VICTIM,
WHO IS SHORT $130.

Police Searching for Mysterious
Female, Who Used Hypnotism on
Domestic and Got All the
Money She Had.

A mysterious "woman in black," purporting to be a cousin of Gypsy Smith, has been reported to the police by one of her victims, Mary Anderson, 1836 Pendleton avenue, a domestic in the employ of J. L. DeLong, as having muleted her of $130 after advising her to draw the money out of the bank. The woman claimed to be a fortune teller, possessing the marvelous powers of foresight, and told Miss Anderson that unless she withdrew her deposit before March 5 it would be lost.

Friends of the girl believe the woman to have been a hypnotist, the girl's story of her experience with the "seeress" seeming to bear out this belief. The money is supposed to have been taken by the woman while she and Miss Anderson were in one of the waiting rooms at Emery, Bird, Thayer's store on Walnut street.

SHE'S A FORTUNE TELLER.

"The woman first came to the ho use on Monday afternoon a week ago and asked to be allowed to tell my sister's fortune," said the girl yesterday, "but, as my sister does not understand English well enough to carry on a conversation, I was approached. I told her I did not have time to talk to her and didn't want my fortune told, anyway.

"The next afternoon the woman appeared again and this time she insisted upon reading my hand. She told me that my people in the old country were having some trouble with their property and that all was not well with them. This was true and I began to put some credence in what she told me. Then she declared that the property would be lost and that there would much trouble come of it.

"After telling me this she looked right at me and said that I had money in the bank. 'You had better be careful of that, too,' she said, 'for I can see that you are going to have trouble with it. That institution will fail before March 5, and if your money is not out by that time you will lose it.' She then asked me how much I had and I told her I did not think it was any of her business. 'I know how much it is,' she declared, 'you have $130 or $150 in t he bank, but you had better take it out.' "

DREW MONEY FROM BANK.

The victim of the plot, after this seeming marvelous revelation of "powers," made an excuse the next day and went down to the bank and drew out her $130, her saving of more than seven months, the money that was to bring relief and help to her family across the ocean, and help to bring another sister from Sweden to America. She had lost some of her savings once before when a bank failed three years ago.

At the office of the bank the "woman in black" was waiting, but Miss Anderson says she was not there when she came out with the money.

"I had my money tied up in a handkerchief and that inside a leather handbag I carried," she said. I walked into Emery, Bird, Thayer's and went up to the waiting room. Here I met the woman again and she came to me and said, 'What , you again? I am glad to see you.' "

Sitting down to a table by themselves, the two women, according to the girl's story, began to talk . The "woman in black" began by asking the girl if she had been to hear Gypsy Smith. A reply in the negative brought a torrent of upbraidings. The woman declared she would suffer the torments of hell and the fires of everlasting damnation if she did not change her ways, and live the right life, as set forth in the teachings of the revivalist. She urged the girl to go with her to Convention hall, but this she would not do.

SHE WANTED THE BANK ROLL.

"I experienced the queerest sensation all the time the woman talked," she said. "Her beady black eyes seemed to burn into mine, and I could not take my eyes away from hers. I kept saying to myself, 'You cannot get my money, you cannot get my money.' And then she asked me to give it to her, saying she would return it to me the next day. I asked her if she thought I was crazy, and she told me that she thought I was one of the brightest girls she had ever known.

"She left me saying 'God bless you, I'll see you tomorrow.' and went out of the room. I did not get up for a moment, and when I did try I could hardly stand on my feet. I felt dazed and sleepy, and thought I should not be able to get home. There was no one in the room during all the time we were in there together. It was not until after I was on the street car on my way home that I noticed the money was gone."

THE BEADY BLACK EYES.

The police were notified of the occurrence, but so far nothing definite has been learned. Several persons in the neighborhood of Pendleton avenue saw the "woman in black," and declared she had tried to gain entrance to a numnber of residences on the plea of telling fortunes. She is described as wearing a black hat with several large black plumes, a black skirt and a black cloak reaching about to the knee. Her expression is said to be unpleasant and forbidding, the beady black eyes which stare at you directly seem to fascinate against the will, make the face repellent.

The woman told Miss Anderson that she lived in a tent in Kansas City, Kas., in the old Electric park, and that she was gypsy and still kept to the traditions of her race.

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February 19, 1909

J. C. ALTMAN TAKES BRIDE.

Was Married to Mrs. Florence Ma-
hannah in St. Joseph.

J. C. Altman and Mrs. Florence Mahannah slipped quietly away from friends and family, took a morning train for St. Joseph and were married, although the banns had been announced and Easter was set as the day for the wedding. Mr. Altman is the proprietor of the Altman Shoe Company at Eleventh and Walnut streets, and his bride was formerly employed at the Klein Jewelry Company, 1119 Main street.

The couple arrived in St. Joseph about noon time and proceeded directly to the court house where they secured the license. From there they went to St. Joseph's cathedral, where the ceremony was performed by Father Malloon. Mrs. Lou Harper, a sister of the bride, was present and W. X. Donovan of St. Joseph acted as best man. Mr. and Mrs. Altman will make their home at 1231 Holmes street. They returned to Kansas City late last night.

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February 15, 1909

HOSE WAGON IS OVERTURNED.

Collides With Curb in Avoiding
Street Car and Three Fire-
men Are Injured.

Dashing down the slight incline on Twelfth street between Main and Walnut last night, hose wagon No. 2, driven by Joseph Stockard, struck the curb on the northeast corner of Walnut and Twelfth streets and overturned, injuring three men. A southbound car was just crossing Twelfth street and it was in attempting to avoid a collision that the heavy wagon was skidded onto the curb.

Captain John Nolan, who was on the seat with Stockard, was thrown violently to the ground and suffered an injury to the back on his spine. Fireman Fred Sans was hit on the head and bruised on the hip. The extraordinary coolness and presence of mind on the part of Stockard, who, though hurled through the air and hurt in his fall, did not relinquish the reins on the horses, but pulled them down to a stop, won him a compliment from his superior officers. Stockard was cut on the face and his arms were temporarily paralyzed. All of the men were taken back to headquarters, where their injuries were examined. None was seriously hurt.

"I did not see the car until I was almost onto it," said Stockard last night. "The street was clear when we crossed Main street, and though we usually take a great deal of risk in going to a fire, I dept the horses down to a much slower trot than usual. I am positive that had we been going faster or that car moved ever so little slower, we would have crashed into it in spite of anything we could have done."

Spectators helped to right the wagon and pick up the hose. Lieutenant John Hartmaier and Fireman Oscar Nelson jumped from the wagon before it struck the curb and were uninjured.

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February 14, 1909

STREETS COVERED WITH ICE.

Pedestrians and Horses Had Perilous
Time of It Last Evening.

Slipping, sliding, skidding, gliding horses and wagons delayed traffic, blocked the street cars, frightened pedestrians and were generally in the way of each other and everybody else in the downtown district yesterday afternoon, when, after 4 o'clock, a drizzling rain froze on the pavements and sidewalks, covering everything with a thin coating of ice. Horses and men, as well as many women, fell on the streets.

On Main street, on the grade between Tenth and Eleventh streets, and on Eleventh street from Walnut to McGee it became necessary to station extra police to assist the regular crossing policemen in handling teams. Loaded wagons were not allowed to pass up or down on these grades, the experience of a year ago, when a large wagon, heavily loaded, skidded down Eleventh street, overturning in its slide damaged obstacles in its path, and broke a plate glass window at the corner of Eleventh and Walnut streets, being sufficient warning.

There were numerous minor accidents with street cars and several collisions with wagons. At Thirteenth street and Troost avenue, a wagon skidded into a Troost car, smashing the front end of the car and delaying traffic for a while.

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February 12, 1908

FOUR CARRIED FROM
SMOKE-BOUND BUILDING.

FIREMEN CLIMB 4 STORIES TO
SAVE MOTHER AND CHILDREN.

Morning Fire Guts Walnut Street
Bulding -- T. M. James & Sons Suf-
fer Loss of $85,000 -- Aggre-
gate Damage, $170,000.

The alertness and bravery of Firemen William Pahlman and John Hughes probably saved Mrs. E. A. Johnson, her two daughters, Anna and Pearl, and her son, Forrest, from suffocation as the result of a fire at 1020-1022 Walnut street at 3:30 o'clock yesterday morning, when a blaze from an unknown origin ate its way through a four-story building, gutting it, and almost completely ruining the rich stock of T. M. James & Sons, dealers in china and glassware. A dozen other firms suffered, and the total loss is estimated at $170,000.

It was after the firemen had turned water on the building occupied by T. M. James & Sons that a woman's head was seen protruding from a window on the fourth floor of the Owen building, adjoining the burning structure.

Dense volumes of smoke were pouring through the four floors of this building, and the woman, almost prostrated from fright, yelled for help.

FIREMEN TO THE RESCUE.

Pahlman and Hughes started up the stairway of the Owen building, but were hampered by the smoke and gas. It was with extreme difficulty that they reached the fourth floor, where they found Mrs. Johnson and her family terror stricken and unable to find their way from the building.

Mrs. Johnson, almost overcome, was carried downstairs to safety, the children remaining, so that the firemen could bring blankets with which to protect them from the fire and weather. These were secured, and on the second trip Pahlman and Hughes carried the remaining three from the building.

The fire was discovered in the rear of the James store by H. A. Stafford, a watchman. The first company arrived on the scene three minutes after the fire was reported. A general alarm was turned in, and all but three crews responded.

ONE FIRM LOSES $85,000.

The loss of T. M. James & Sons is placed at $85,000, with $70,000 insurance. The building was built twenty-five years ago, and was owned by Langston Bacon. The loss was $30,000 and insurance $23,500.

The Kansas City Mantel Company, another occupant, lost $30,000, with insurance of $19,000. The Hewson building, next door, was damaged to the extent of 8,000, covered by insurance. Johnny Kling's billiard room, on the second floor of the Hewson building, was water soaked, and suffered a loss of $2,000. The Davis photograph studio, on the fifth floor of the Hewson building, was damaged to the extent of $2,500. The Carter Pleating Company, on the same floor, lost $2,500 and carried $1,500 insurance.

In the Owen building, the gymnasium of the Women's Athletic Club was filled with smoke. A piano and many rugs were ruined, and the varnish on the gynmastic apparatus scorched.

The loss to the building, which is owned by J. C. Williams and leased to Ball & Thwing, was $5,000, covered by insurance.

The piano house of Waite & Sons, on the third floor, was damaged to the extent of $1,500. The Acme Amusement Association club rooms, on the second floor, were slightly damaged. Taft's dental rooms, on the second floor, were damaged by water. The damage to the clothing house of J. B. Reichle, on the first floor, amounts to $2,000, covered by insurance.

Langston Bacon will begin rebuilding at once.

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