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November 23, 1909

TERMINAL DIRECTORS
ACCEPT DEPOT PLAN.

KANSAS CITY'S UNION STATION
TO COST $5,750,000.

Great Structure Will Have Every
Facility for Handling Trains
and Travelers -- Dirt to Fly
in a Few Months.
New Union Passenger Station Faces on Twenty-Third Street and Has a Frontage of 512 Feet.
SOUTH ELEVATION OF NEW UNION PASSENGER STATION.

Five million, seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars will be the cost of Kansas City's new Union passenger station.

The plans prepared by Jarvis Hunt, a Chicago architect, were accepted yesterday by the board of directors of the Kansas City Terminal Railway Company. As soon as the stockholders of the several railroads that are to use the depot ratify the action of their representatives, work will begin on the structure. This consent is expected to be immediate. In a few months dirt will be flying and construction under way.

GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURE.

The main entrance to the station will face south. It's exact location will be twenty-five feet south of Twenty-third street, and 100 feet west of Main.

The frontage of the main building is to be 512 feet. The train sheds are to be 1,400 feet long, and are to be constructed so that trains east and west can run through.

The exterior will be of stone, concrete and steel. The roof will be rounding or barrel shape. The general lobby is to be 350 feet long and 160 feet wide, and the decorations and accommodations will be rich and elaborate.

Especial care has been taken in lighting and ventilation; the ceiling will be arched, and will be 115 feet high. The interior walls will be of marble, and massive columns will grace each side of the passageway into other parts of the building.

The center of the lobby will be the ticket office. Adjacent will be the baggage room, where passengers can check their baggage and not be annoyed with it again until they reach their destination.

ON THREE LEVELS.

In a space of 75x300 feet off the lobby will be the restaurants, lunch rooms, waiting rooms, men's smoking rooms, and other utilities. Telegraph and telephone stations, a subpostal station and other accessories will also find places within this space.

On the upper floors will be located the offices of several railroads using the depot together with rooms for railway employes.

Space has been set apart for dining and lounging, reading, and billiard rooms.

From the center of the lobby and above the track will extend the main waiting room, on either side of which there will be midways or passages leading to the elevators to carry passengers to the trains. Smoke and gases from the locomotives will be s hut out from the station by a steel and glass umbrella shed.

There will be three levels to the depot. These are to be known as the passenger level, the station proper; the train service level, from where passengers take the trains, and which is connected with the midways by eight big elevators on either side, and also, stairways; and the level on which are the baggage rooms, express and postal service.

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October 27, 1909

HUNT MISSING MAILBAGS.

Carrier's Rig Disappears While His
Back Is Turned in Dark.

Raffles, who was reported dead some years by an English author named Hornung, reappeared in a rather clever role at 11 o'clock last night at Twenty-third street and Woodland avenue. The victim this time was the United States directly and Samuel E. Robinson, mail collector No. 59, indirectly, if a certain horse and wagon does not turn up tied to a water plug somewhere, as is confidently expected by the police.

Robinson had driven considerably past a mail box at the Twenty-third street corner. He did not like the idea of turning his wagon around to go back when it was only a few rods and his limbs were aching for the exercise, so he tied his faithful animal to a pole and did the trick on foot.

Coming back in a few minutes he found the wagon and horse had disappeared, as two bags of first class mail matter, one package of second class and one parcel which might have contained a sable overcoat went with the rig. The robbery was deemed of enough importance to stir up things at the postoffice last night.

Several government detectives and numerous police officers were detailed to hunt for the missing bags.

At an early hour this morning no trace of the resurrected Raffles and his booty had been discovered.

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Octoberr 4, 1909

GIFTS TO CITY AND OTHERS.

Swope Park But One of His Contributions.

During his lifetime, Colonel Swope did much for the city in which he amassed his fortune. He gave to the city Swope park, 1,354 acres of land valued at $1,000 per acre. This beautiful tract of land has been converted into one of the finest natural recreation grounds in the Middle West, and it gave the donor much pleasure to see it appreciated as it is.

The land for the new city hospital at Twenty-third and Locust was given to the city by Colonel Swope.

He gave the Young Women's Christian Association $50,000 for its building fund. To the Young Men's Christian Association he gave $5,000.

He gave the ground for the Home for the Aged at Thirty-first and Locust. He recently gave the Franklin Institute, a charitable organization at 1901 McGee street, $50,000 to be used in building a new home, on the condition that the organization raise another $50,000 to add to it.

Many other smaller donations were made toward the work of extending charity to the needy and afflicted and it is said that never did he refuse to heed a plea for funds to conduct such work.

Colonel Swope devoted his time and energy almost entirely to his business. He was at his office early and late. He had been absent from his office but a few days in four or five years until he was taken ill September 2. On that day he was at his office the last time, but he directed his affairs from his sick room and took the same keen interest in the transaction of his business.

HELPED HIS OLD SCHOOL.

The first gift known to have made by the philanthropist was for the sum of $1,000 to the Presbyterian church in Danville, Ky., where he had worshiped so long as a student at Center college. Being a graduate of the famous old institution, Colonel Swope never lost interest in his alma mater, and learning that the school needed a library he made it possible for the old college to obtain one. He offered to give $25,000 to the school for the purpose if another $25,000 was raised. On March 15, 1902, the authorities of the school notified him that the required amount had been subscribed, and he sent his draft for $25,000. The name of the donor had not before been given, as he had requested that it only be given out that an alumnus had offered the money.

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September 10, 1909

NEW DEPOT WINS
BY BIG MAJORITY.

OF 26,368 VOTES CAST ONLY 700
WERE AGAINST.

Kansas City declared in favor of progress at the special election yesterday to decide whether or not the voters favored a new $30,000,000 Union station near Twenty-third street and the Belt Line, and freight and passenger terminals which form a part of the plan.

The vote in favor of progress was almost unanimous. The total vote in the fourteen wards of the city and in the newly added precincts caused by the recent extension of the city limits shows in a general way a uniform expression of opinion by the voters.

The main proposition voted upon was that granting the Kansas City Terminal Company, which is to build the new Union station and terminals, a franchise for 200 years. It was necessary to put this before the voters owing to the state constitution limiting franchises to thirty years. The vote on this was 25,668 in favor of the proposition and 700 against it.

Two other propositions were offered the voters. The most important of these to the people of the entire city was that amending the charter so that the park board would be empowered to sell to the Terminal company certain lands needed for the widening and improvements on the present tracks on the Belt Line. The vote on this proposition was 24,644 for and 639 against.

The third proposition concerned the proposed change of grand of three streets crossing the present Belt line. It will be necessary, in building the passenger and freight tracks of the terminal company, to depress the grades of three crossings, so as to allow vehicle and foot traffic under the railroad tracks. As property owners concerned presented a majority remonstrance, the new city charter provided that the voters should pass upon the proposed plan.

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July 17, 1909

BOY DROWNS IN POND;
EFFORT TO SAVE VAIN.

BODY OF 9-YEAR-OLD STARR
ALLISON YET UNRECOVERED.

Playmate, in Swimming With the
Younger Lad, Makes Heroic
Struggle to Rescue Him, but
Becomes Exhausted.

Starr Allison, the 9-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Allison, 3532 Windsor avenue, was drowned about 2 o'clock yesterday afternoon in a slough immediately west of the entrance to the Milwaukee bridge on the Missouri river.

Clyde Perkins, 13 years old, made a most heroic effort to save his playmate. Twice he was dragged beneath the eddying waters, but becoming exhausted himself, he was forced to release his grasp on the drowning lad to save his own life. The drowned boy's body has not yet been found. Young Perkins is a stepson of K. L. Perkins, a druggist at 3600 St. John avenue.

W. H. Jackson, 3011 East Twenty-third street, was fishing about 100 yards south of where the boys were swimming. Hearing repeated cries for help he looked toward the slough and saw Perkins struggling in the eddy with his little friend. Perkins is said to be an excellent swimmer for a boy his age.

"The Perkins boy was holding to the Allison boy, and at the same time trying to master the swiftly rushing eddy and get his companion to a place of safety," said Jackson. "I believe it was he who made the outcry. While running along the steep embankment of the railroad to get near enough to go in I saw the boys sink twice. The next I saw, Perkins was alone swimming toward the bank just beneath the bridge."

The Perkins boy, after gallant fight to save a human life, was almost exhausted when he reached the bank. Johnson supported him until he was rested. He had swallowed a quantity of water. After a time the two secured little Starr's clothing, and, realizing what the shock would be to the mother, left them with a neighbor next door.

J. L. Allison, father of the drowned boy, is connected with the Allison-Richey Land Company at the Union depot.

"Star went down to Kanoky, as the boys call the place, with some other boys the other day and they all went bathing in the shallow pond," Mr. Allison said. "He was greatly delighted over the new venture, but his mother and I cautioned them.

"This morning when he asked to go down there again with Clyde, his mother refused her consent until he had secured mine. He called me up at my office, but I was out. He begged his mother until she consented after he had promised not to go in the water. We understand the Perkins boy told Starr to stay out, and he certainly made an effort to save our boy."

"Star wanted to go in when we got there," said Clyde Perkins, "but I would not let him. After a short time he went behind some tall weeds and the next I saw he was in the water. Then I told him to stay close to the bank, where it was shallow. While swimming later I saw him wading out from the bank. There is a step off, made by the eddy, and he went down. Then I swam and caught hold of him.

"He was excited and struggled hard or I believe I could have gotten him to shore. After he had dragged me under twice I became so exhausted that I had to release him and make for the bank myself. It seemed to me that I barely made it, too."

W. H. Harrison, former license inspector, Herman Robrock, and Dr. C. O. Teach, neighbors of Mr. Allison, with three men from the latter's firm, went to the slough shortly after the drowning to make a search for the body. Most of the men are expert swimmers. Until 10 o'clock last night they took turns diving from different points in search of the dead boy. Grappling hooks were used and drags made. The men will return to the scene early this morning and renew their search.

Where the eddy swirls about, it has formed a whirlpool, and it is the opinion of some that the whirling waters may keep the body from floating out into the open river.

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May 8, 1909

ATTEMPTED HOLD UP
MAY END IN MURDER.

VICTIM DOES NOT OBEY ORDERS
AND ROBBER SHOOTS.

Charles Zondler, Saloonkeeper, Seri-
ously Injured by Outlaw, Who
Is Captured by Police-
man After Chase.

"I want your money. Hold up your hands."

Charles Zondler, alone in his saloon at Eighteenth and Cherry streets last night at 10 o'clock, looked up into the muzzle of a 38-calibre revolver. He reached for his own gun beneath the bar and the stick-up man shot him twice in the face. The assassin fled from the saloon and darted south through an alley. Zondler fired twice, but missed.

Jerry O'Connell, patrolman on the beat, heard the shots when he was at Nineteenth and Charlotte streets, and caught a glimpse of the flying figure. He cut across lots and headed the man off in the alley. Putting his left hand over the robber's revolver he jammed his own gun close to the fellow's car and brought him to a stop. Then, with the assistance of Patrolman George Brooks, O'Connell marched his prisoner to the Walnut street station.

Zondler, who is an elderly man and has owned the saloon but a few months, was taken to the general hospital in the ambulance from the station. Examination showed that one of the bullets had entered his mouth and passed out through the right cheek. The other bullet entered the left side of the neck and passed out through the right side. He is in a precarious condition.

Lieutenant Michael Halligan put the prisoner through a searching examination at the station. He gave the name of Henry Horton, but a card case had the name of H. S. Seward upon it, and he acknowledged that he sometimes went by that name. Horton admitted to Lieutenant Halligan that he had been arrested in this city before for petty crimes, but said that this was his first attempt at the stick-up game. He had only recently arrived in town, he said, and needed money. A dime and a stamped postcard were in his pockets. Horton asked permission to send the postcard to his mother. He addressed it, "Mrs. W. H. Strain, 3001 Cisna avenue, Kansas City, Kas." On the card he wrote:

"I guess I am gone for good. Come over and see me, Scott."

Horton said that his mother's name was different from his own because she had married twice. He said that he lived at the Kansas City, Kas., address when at home, but had only recently come from Omaha. He made no attempt to deny the act.

Jerry O'Connell, who made the arrest in sensational fashion, is known as the best sprinter in the precinct, if not on the force. He was complimented by Lieutenant Halligan on his capture.

Zondler lives with his family at 3220 East Twenty-third street.

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November 16, 1908

DRUNKEN MAN IS STRANGLED.

Henry Bernard Found Dead in an
Unfinished Building Near Thirty-
Third and Oak Streets.

Boys playing in a building in the course of construction at 3312 Oak street about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon found the body of a man lying in a corner of the building, the head wedged against a wall and the neck pressed against a joist. Death had come apparently from strangulation induced by the position of the man's head. A crowd collected and the body was identified as that of Henry Bernard, 50 years old, a stonemason living at 3228 Summit street.

By the man's side was found a pint bottle with dregs of whisky in it. Bernard had been released from the Walnut street police station yesterday morning at 6 o'clock. The question arises, where did he get the whisky?

Bernard had been locked up for safekeeping. When he was released he had nothing of the sort about him. About noon he appeared at the house of William Gepford, a building contractor, his employer, and received from him $10 which was due him for work done last week. Several times in the next few hours he was seen loafing around the drug store of R. S. McCurdy, at Twenty-third and Oak streets, and was talking to Ray Wells, 3120 Campbell street, and others. About 2 o'clock he appeared to be in an unsettled state of mind and was seen to walk towards the new building of which only the side walls and part of the floors are finished. It is thought that he lay down in a stupor and was strangled by the beam pressing against his throat.

Nominally, the saloons were closed yesterday. Besides, there are no saloons in the neighborhood of Thirty-third and Oak streets. Bernard was not seen to leave the neighborhood from the time he received the money from his employer until the time he was found dead. R. S. McCurdy, the druggist who keeps the drug store at Thirty-third and Oak streets, and the only one in the vicinity, said last night that he had sold whisky to Bernard on prescription, but denied that he had sold any to him that day. He added that neither he nor either of his clerks, Louis Woods and D. Self, had seen Bernard in the store that day.

Bernard leaves a wife and nine children. The body was removed to Lindday's undertaking rooms in Westport and the coroner was notified. He will hold an autopsy this morning at 9 o'clock in the undertaking rooms.

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September 8, 1908

NEGROES ARM FOR TROUBLE.

Symptoms of Race Trouble Out on
East Eighteenth Street.

Fear of an attack by whites kept several hundred negroes living in the vicinity of Vine and Twenty-third streets awake until an early hour this morning. Rumors that the "Eighteenth street gang" was going to come with firearms, tar and ropes and make a second Springfield of the district, caused the negroes to arm themselves and stay up at night, watching on the doorsteps of their houses for the approach of the white mob.

Sunday night the undertaking rooms of A. T. Moore, a negro undertaker at 1820 East Eighteenth street, were burned down and the report was spread that the building had been fired by white men. On the same night a crowd of negroes gathered at Twenty-fifth and Vine streets and eleven officers from the Flora avenue police station were sent to disperse them. They went away quietly.

Yesterday Dave Epstien, a pawnbroker at 1418 East Eighteenth street, reported to the police that all the firearms he carried in stock had been sold to negroes. Other dealers in firearms also sold many weapons.

"We don't want to have another Springfield," said one of the negroes at late hour last night, "but we do intend to protect ourselves if the police will not protect us."

Meanwhile, in the headquarters of the redoubtable "Eighteenth street gang" all was peace. There were no preparations being made to attack negroes, so far as could be learned. The police attribute the scare to the malicious tale bearing of idle negroes.

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June 23, 1908

ADA LANDED ON GLASSWARE.

Noisy Finale of Attempted Escape
From the Workhouse.

Plumbers working in the women's ward at the workhouse yesterday cut a hole 18x24 inches in the floor. When Ada Parker, 23 years old, fat, black and dissatisfied with her environment, saw the hole on going to bed at the usual hour, she began to make plans.

At midnight she stole from her bed, taking with her the blankets and sheets. Those she tied together, securing one end to the leg of her bed, dropping the other into the hole in the floor. Ada chuckled as she contemplated the blackness below. It was of the same complexion as Twenty-third and Vine. She could already feel the night wind tugging at her skirts as she skipped, in fancy, up the dark street to liberty.

She dropped through the hole and slid down her blanket rope and landed in a little pantry packed with workhouse china, glassware, tin pans and cutlery. The noise Ada made in connection with the pans and things was sufficient to rouse even the workhouse guards. She was rescued, bleeding in many soft parts of her anatomy. Dr. George R. Dagg, workhouse surgeon, patched her up. Today the plumbers will nail up the hole in the floor.

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March 5, 1908

STRYCHNINE IN HIS LIQUOR.

Someone Poisoned Edward Whalen,
Bricklayer, in a Saloon.

"Send for a priest I am dying," cried Edward Whalen as he fell to the floor in front of the bar in a saloon at Nineteenth street and Troost avenue last night. As Whalen fell, he was seized with violent convulsions and the bartender, with several men who were standing around the bar, hurried to his assistance. Someone telephoned for the police ambulance, and Police Surgeon Carl V. Bates was hastened to the saloon. At the hospital it was found that Whalen had been poisoned by strychnine His body was badly bruised, bearing out the statement which Whalen made later that he had been kicked in the side and stomach.

The man told the doctors at the hospital that he had been drinking with several men in a saloon -- not at Nineteenth and Troost -- and that they got into a fight during which he was severely pummeled. Whalen said that their difficulties were soon adjusted, however, and that they went back into the saloon to have another drink.

Soon he left there and went the saloon at Nineteenth street and Troost avenue, where he ordered a drink of whisky. It was at this juncture, and before the order had been filled, that Whalen was taken violently ill and the doctor summoned.

The doctors at the city hospital think that Whalen was poisoned by the men with whom he had been drinking, but are unable to find any cause for their desire to kill him, unless it was that they harbored the hared feeling caused by the fight. Whalen was unable to give the names of any of his companions at the saloons.

Whalen is a white man, about 40 years old, and said that his home was at Twenty-Third street and Wabash avenue. He is a bricklayer.

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January 27, 1908

AUTOMOBILE RAN OVER HIM.

After He Had Been Assaulted by
Highwayman and Robbed.

Being slugged, robbed and run over by an automobile within the space of an hour, and coming out of it all without serious injury, is what happened to John Meyer, 2425 Locust street, last night at 12:30 o'clock while he was on his way home. As he started to walk across Gillham road at Twenty-third street he was assaulted by a man who struck him over the head. This rendered Meyer unconscious and he lay in the steret for several minutes after the assault.

An automobile happened along at that time, and the driver, not seeing the fallen man, ran completely over him. He then stopped his machine, notified the police and took the unconscious man to the hospital, where his owunds were dressed. When he was able to talk he told the officers that he had been robbed of a little over $2. A pipe, a handkerchief and some matches were found lying upon the ground where he had fallen, indicating that his pockets had been rifled.

After emergency treatment at the hospital he was taken to his home. The name of the automobile driver was not learned.

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September 19, 1907

HAD FUN WITH DETECTIVE.

After a Long Search Boy Concludes
He Did Not Steal.

Leon Harris, a negro boy, 12 years old, living in the vicinity of Twenty-third and Vine streets, was taken to the detention home yesterday by Detective Boyle charged with the theft of a finger ring.

"This is the most peculiar prisoner I have had to deal with in some time," said Detective Boyle. "When i accused him of stealing the ring he volunteered to take me to the spot where he had hidden it. After prowling around with him for some time and not finding the lost jewelry the little rascal looked me squarely in the eye and innocently remarked:

"Boss, come to think of it, I guess I did not steal the ring you were looking for."

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August 16, 1907

HAS NO HOME OR FRIENDS.

Man of Talents and War Records
Found Lying in Weeds..

Thomas Dean, an old man without a country, was found lying exhausted in the weeds yesterday afternoon near Twenty-third and Washington streets.

To Dr. G. A. Dagg, ambulance surgeon from No. 4 police station, the old man said that he long been a physician coming to the United States when a young man from Berlin, Germany, and serving through the civil war with the rank of captain in the Twenty-second New York regulars.

But now I am past the age when accomplishments count," this veteran in more than one field of effort said. "Though I talk twenty-seven languages and was long a man of affairs, I'm wandering over the country when old and infirm, without money and without friends."

Dean gave his age as 78 years and said he had spent the last winter in California and came here about four weeks ago. He has been staying at various cheap rooming houses and sleeping outside when he had no money. He was taken to the general hospital, where the record states his case as "senile infirmity and general weakness."

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April 29, 1907

IN MEMORY OF A SON.

Mrs. Henry E. Lantry Will Add a
Dormitory to St Anthony's Home.

Mrs. Henry E. Lantry, of 318 West Armour boulevard, has announced to the directors of the St. Anthony's Hospital and Infants' home that she intended to fit up a dormitory of twenty beds in the new building in memory of her son, Henry Jordan Lantry, who died about four months ago. The cost of establishing the memorial room will be about $500.

The women in charge of the home are planning to open the new building in memory of her son, Henry Jordan Lantry, who died about four months ago. The cost of establishing the memorial room will be about $500.

The women in charge of the home are planning to open the new building formally about May 15. Already enough rooms have been fitted through the generosity of friends of the institution to warrant the regular opening. John Long recently furnished an entire suite of eight rooms, and a ward large enough to accommodate fifteen beds. Duff and Repp Furniture Company and the Peck Dry Goods Company have each furnished a reception room in cozy fashion, and the Jones Dry Goods Company are donating the furnishings for a private bed room.

It is planned to make the opening an elaborate affair, in the form of a "pound party," and the management will be assisted by the Elks and the Knights of Columbus lodges. A musical programme will be arranged for the occasion.

St. Anthony's home is a maternal hospital, an infants' home and a day nursery. It is located on Twenty-third street between Walrond and College avenues. The building movement, of which the present commodious structure was the result, was launched several months ago at a meeting addressed by Archbishop Ireland. Donations of from 50 cents to hundreds of dollars were received by the committee in charge until enough money was raised to warrant the building.

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April 10, 1907

WRONG BOY FIRST

TWO ATTEMPTS IN ABDUCTION
OF LITTLE CHARLES M'NEESE.
GRANDMOTHER UNDER ARREST.

REFUSED TO STATE WHEN LAST
SHE SAW DAUGHTER.
Theory of Police That Lad Was Kid-
naped Grows Stronger as Evidence
of Hack Drivers Is Brought to
Their Notice -- Three Persons
Said to Be Involved.

Mrs. Annie L. Sadlier, grandmother of Charles H. McNeese, 2305 Brighton avenue, who disappeared on his way to the Ashland school last Friday, was arrested at her home, 1522 McGee street, by Detective W. H. Bates and Thomas Hayde yesterday afternoon. Though Mrs. Sadlier denies any part in the affair, she was positively identified yesterday afternoon by two hack drivers, one of whom said he hauled her twice while looking for the child and another one who says he drove the very carriage in which little Charles was taken away and that Mrs. Sadlier was a passenger as far as the Ashland school. Charles M. Howell, attorney for Mr. McNeese, said last night that an information would be filed against Mrs. Sadlier this morning, charging her with kidnaping.

There is still another hack driver in the case who has not been located and the police think that he will come forward and assist in identifying the woman under arrest when he learns that no charge will be placed against him. This is the man who drove the hack to the Irving school Twenty-fourth and Prospect, a week ago today, when Garrell Ash, the 6-year-old son of Mrs. Lou Ash, 2413 East Twenty-third street, was taken away protesting. Charles McNeeese used to attend that school and the kidnapers evidently made a mistake. Garrell was taken to a house at 1522 McGee street, questioned for a long time and then sent home on a car. It was this incident, given the detectives yesterday, which led to the first clue, as at that number lives the missing child's grandmother -- mother of McNees's divorced wife. Ash pointed out the house and will be given a chance to see Mrs. Sadler today.

MRS. SADLIER IDENTIFIED.
"Tink" Williams, a driver from the Jackson livery barn, 1309 Walnut street, at once identified Mrs. Sadlier. He told the detectives that he had hauled Mrs. Sadlier and a younger woman with a baby on two occasions and that both times they drove out around the schools on the East side when the children were going to school.
Charles Burch, a negro driver for the Eylar Bros.' livery barn, who also identified Mrs. Sadlier readily, said that it was he who drove the carriage the day young McNeese was stolen. He told of the same two women, one elderly, the other young and with her a baby. He drove them last Friday morning to the Ashland school, Twenty-fourth street and Elmwood avenue.
"I was told to wait about a block form the school," said Burch, "as both women got out. Presently the younger woman and a man returned, leading and dragging a little boy, who didn't seem to want to go. This woman was still carrying her baby. I never saw the older woman until today at police headquarters."
When they got in the cab again Burch was told to drive post-haste to Armourdale, where he was dismissed as the quartette boarded an electric car. They are believed to have transferred so as to reach the Leavenworth electric line in Kansas City, Kas.
Mrs. Sadlier, when first arrested, told Detective Bates that she had seen her daughter, the former Mrs. McNeese, only last week. At the station she denied the statement and said she had not seen her in three years, but heard from her eight months ago in Montreal, Canada. She then said one of her nieces was at her house last week and followed that with a denial, saying that she had seen none of them for eight months.
WOMAN MAKES STATEMENT.
Her statement, taken later in the day, reads in part:
My name is Annie L. Sadlier. My daughter's name now is Mrs. Annie Evans. She married Charles C. McNeese eleven years ago and they had one child, Charles Hiram McNeese. She and McNeese were divorced about four years ago and he given the custody of the child for one year by Judge Gibson, when it was to be given to its mother if she proved herself worthy. She married Bruce Evans afterwards and on March 1 three years ago moved away from here. Don't care to say when I last saw my daughter, if not compelled to answer now. Was home all day Friday, April 5, and not out of the house from 1 to 4 p. m. Don't remember anyone that day at all and don't remember when my brother got home. I am not going to answer the
question whether I saw my daughter Friday and will say no more until the
proper time. I positively declare that I was not in a hack last week at any time. Was not at any liver barn last week, either. I positively declare that I had noting to do with the kidnaping of Charles McNeese last week.

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March 26, 1907

A BOY'S AWFUL CRIME.

For Taking Marbles Worth One-Third
of a Cent He Is Under Arrest

Frank Herd, 13 years old, was sent from his home at 615 West Twenty-third street at 4 p. m. yesterday to renew his father's license as a stationary engineer, in passing a 10-cent store near Twelfth and Main streets he was attracted by a large display of marbles. Young Herd stopped and picked up three of the smallest ones. He was arrested, taken to police headquarters and later locked up in the detention home for trial by the juvenile court.

As the lad did not return home, Philip G. Herd, who is now clerk at the workhouse, went to inquire about him. He thought the boy had been injured, but was indignant when he was told what had occurred.

"It is an outrage," said Mr. Herd. "The boy picked up the marbles just as a man will pick up beans or coffee from a sack. They are what the boys call "tooticks" and sell for about ten for a cent. There are three or four other boys being held for the same offense -- if it is an offense."

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March 7, 1907

GIRL VICTIM OF
AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENT STILL
IN UNCONSCIOUS STATE.
Frances Whitney, automobile victim
Hovering between life and death little Frances Whitney lies on a bed of pain at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Whitney, 3308 Troost avenue. She was struck by an automobile Tuesday afternoon at Thirty-first and Troost avenue. A doctor is constantly at her side. She regained consciousness at about 3 o'clock yesterday morning, long enough to murmur:
"I want a big doll like Beatrice has got, that will talk and open and shut its eyes." Then she lapsed into unconsciousness.
The extent of her injuries has not been determined, save that she is suffering a severe concussion of the brain and bruises about the head. She sustained no broken bones, but it is feared that she has internal injuries. Last night it was said that the outcome could hardly be determined until at least forty-eigh hours more had elapsed.
The little girl will be five years old two weeks from tomorrow, and for a birthday present her mother had bought for her a big doll, of which the little girl spoke during her few lucid moments yesterday morning.
H. C. Whitney, the child's father, is in the coat business with his father, C. S. Whitney. The child is the grand-daughter of Lee E. Bower, 1308 East Twenty-third street, and old resident of Kansas City. The automobile that struck her belonged to J. K. Burnham, but was driven by a chauffeur.

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