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August 5, 1909

AGED MAN FALLS FROM CAR.

James R. Collier, Seriously Injured,
Is Found Unconscious in Street.

Lying on the side of the car track on Troost avenue, near Twenty-sixth street, James R. Collier, 75 years of age, was found unconscious last night. Mr. Collier's skull was fractured. His condition, as announced by Dr. C. Lester Hall last night, is exceedingly dangerous.

Mr. Collier was on his way to prayer meeting at the Troost Avenue Methodist church, which he attended regularly. It is thought that he stepped from a car while it was moving.

The janitor of the church saw the man lying in the street and called the attention of Rev. Edgar McVoy, the pastor. The two investigated and found the injured man to be Mr. Collier, whom the minister quickly recognized. It was then that Dr. Hall's services were requested, and the injured man taken to his home at 23 East Twenty-ninth street.

Mr. Collier lives with his son, T. P. Collier, an engineer, at the Twenty-ninth street address. He has not been in good health for some time.

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February 13, 1909

GETS FIRST FIREMAN PENSION.

Captain McDonald Profits Under New
Law -- Served 25 Years.

The fire and water board on Wednesday granted a pension to Captain W. H. McDonald, who has been a member of the fire department for twenty-five years. This is the first fireman's pension granted under the new law.

An applicant for a pension must have served twenty years in the department and be at least 50 years of age. Captain McDonald had served twenty-five years and is 58 years old. The pension fund is derived from a 2 per cent deduction from the members' salaries.

Lieutenant John Burns of No. 18 engine company, Twenty-sixth street and Prospect avenue, was elected captain to fill the vacancy made by the pensioning of Captain McDonald.

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December 12, 1908

FUNERAL OF OFFICER MULLANE.

Brave Officer Will Be Buried Today,
Wearing His Uniform
and Star.

Dressed in his full uniform of blue, the same uniform he had so gallantly defended only a few brief days ago, and with his badge of authority, star No. 151, shining from his breast, the body of brave Michael P. Mullane lay in a casket at his home, 931 West Twenty-fourth street, all day yesterday. Hundreds called out of respect for the widow's grief, looked upon the face of the gallant man whom they had once called dear friend, and departed.

Michael Mullane is the first officer in Kansas City to be buried in full uniform, his star and all. It had been his request in life that should he die in the discharge of his duty to be laid away "Just as I fought, with my uniform on."

The funeral will be this morning at 8:30 o'clock. There will be a short service at the home at that hour. At 9 a. m. solemn requiem high mass will be said at the Sacred Heart Catholic church, Twenty-sixth street and Madison. Burial will be in Mount St. Mary's cemetery.

Yesterday Chief Ahern received many telegrams from police departments in nearby cities and over the country. All were of condolence, and many spoke with praise for the officer who had made such a gallant fight, only to sacrifice his life because he refused to shoot a woman.

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December 11, 1908

MICHAEL MULLANE IS DEAD.

Heroic Patrolman Succumbs to the
Wounds Received in the City
Hall Riot Tuesday.
Patrolman Michael Mullane
MICHAEL MULLANE,
Police Patrolman Who Lost His Life in the Line of Duty.

Michael Mullane, patrolman, died at 1:10 p. m. yesterday at St. Joseph's hospital from his wound received in the riot Tuesday afternoon. Funeral services will be held at 9 o'clock Saturday morning at Sacred Heart church, Twenty-sixth and Madison. Solemn high mass will be conducted by Father Hogan. Burial will be in Mount St. Mary's cemetery.

Mr. Mullane was 34 years of age. He was born in Athea, County Limerick, Ireland. He came to America in July, 1897, coming directly to Kansas City. He obtained employment with the Western Grocery Company and remained with that company till November 16, 1905, when he was appointed as a probationary officer. On December 31, of the next year, he was put on as a regular member of the force. Mr. Mullane was one of the best men on the force, as well as one of the largest. Standing six feet two inches and weighing 260 pounds, he was a powerful man. He was not corpulent, but was a man of big bone, muscle and sinew. Strict attention to duty in the worst part of the city, with total abstinence from liquor and not a black mark against him, had won for him the high regard of his superior officers and the friendship of everyone.

A widow and two children, a girl baby of 3 months and a boy of 8, constitute his family. One child, a little girl, had preceded him to the great beyond. She took sick about a year ago this week and died on December 16. Besides his immediate family, he has two brothers and a sister residing in the city, John P. Mullane, an insurance agent of 1102 West Fortieth street; Patrick P. Mullane of 2542 Belleview and Mrs. Mary Dalton of the same address. His father is dead, while his mother and older brothers live in Ireland. He has many cousins who are residents of Kansas City.

The body was removed from the hospital to O'Donnell's undertaking rooms yesterday evening and later to his late home, 921 West Twenty-fourth street.

Mr. Mullane leaves life insurance amounting to about $5,000. Besides he owned a residence at 2631 Belleview.

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August 25, 1908

HE BEGGED TO BE ARRESTED.

Police Kindly Complied With Roy
Schultz's Request.

Roy Schultz, who formerly conducted a saloon at Tenth and Wyandotte streets, rushed into police headquarters last night, folowed by a pretty young woman, and requested to be locked up, saying that he had stabbed her. The woman, who gave the name of Anna Crisp and said she lived at Twenty-sixth street and Park avenue, declared that Schultz had not stabbed her.

When questioned she admitted that she had been stabbed in both hips in a quarrel while out buggy riding. The horse had started to run away and each held a line and it was to settle the question of which should hold both reins in the emergency that the stabbings occurred. Miss Crisp said that they had been quarreling because he had spent $3,000 on her in the last three years, and he had now only $50 to his name. The woman's injuries were trivial.

Both were locked in the holdover for a short time, and then released on $11 bond each, furnished by Schultz.

Schultz and Miss Crisp came into the lime light last New Year's night when she had trouble with H. R. Schultz, Roy's father, in the north lobby of the Midland hotel. Seeing her with Roy the father tried to induce the son to go home. Miss Crisp objeted and there was a regular hand-to-hand tussle for the possession of the youth. Finally the row reached the street and young Schultz tried to get Miss Crisp into a hack, but she was yanked back by the elder Schultz and then Miss Crisp alleged he struck her. At any rate she was arrested and later released on bond put up by J. H. Adams, a big-hearted real estate man from Texas, who had witnessed the affair.

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August 2, 1908

AUSTRIAN NOBLEMAN
LIVED IN OBSCURITY.

Hugo V. Watterich, Who Died on the
Street Friday.

There is a mystery in the life of Hugo V. Watterich 41 years old, who dropped dead at Twenty-sixth and Pennsylvania avenue Friday evening. About thirteen years ago Watterich came to Kansas City and became an artist, doing etching and pencil drawings. He was an Austrian of pleasant manners but of imperfect English, and he was very reticent about his past life. No one, except his wife, whom he married soon after coming to Kansas City, could extract from him any reference to his life before coming to this country.

And yet Watterich was a man of apparently excellent education. When the children in the neighborhood where he lived caught any strange insect or animal they would take it at once to the artist who immediately classified it. His manners, also, betokened that he had moved in society better than that in which he was thrown daily.

About four years ago he was employed by the management of Fairmount park to be swimming instructor there, a position for which his athletic prowess made him competent. He made a capable instructor and seemed to be on the road to prosperity when an accident happened which resulted in the sickness that brought on his death. A man was drowned at the bathing beach one night. As soon as Watterich heard of the accident he set about to find the body. He plunged into the water in his swimming suit and searched for the corpse. Time after time he dived, searching every part of the bottom of the lake where it was likely to be found, but without success. Cold and exhausted, he gave up search at 1 o'clock the next morning. Then he went home in a state of collapse.

From that day he never regained his health. Heart trouble, resulting from overstrain, set in, and he was soon compelled to give up his position at the park. He then became unable to work and his young wife began taking in dressmaking to support them and their small son. In periods, when he felt stronger, Watterich did a little drawing and lettering at his home, 3425 Garfield avenue. Friday night he was walking at Twenty-sixth street and Pennsylvania avenue, when he suffered a hemorrhage and dropped dead. Dr. E. A. Burkhardt was called, and sent the body home in an ambulance.

"Before he died my husband told me many things about his life," said Mrs. Watterich, "but he charged me to keep them a secret. All that I am permitted to tell is that he came of a noble family in Austria and was educated in one of the best universities in Europe. He left his fatherland while he was yet a young man for reasons which he charged me not to reveal. He then spent several years roving over every part of the world, but finally settled in this country. He never told anyone of his past life except me."

Besides the widow a 12-year-old son, Vincent, survives. Funeral services will be held at the residence Thursday morning at 9 o'clock. Burial will be in Union cemetery.

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June 23, 1908

CASTLE IN PENN VALLEY PARK.

Is to Be Built by Park Board on
Highest Point.

When Penn Valley park is completed, a castle is to be built on the crest of the hill east of the present lake, overlooking Twenty-sixth street, the Union depot and the West bottoms. It will be the highest elevation in the city park system. George E. Kessler, park landscape engineer, is now planning the structure.

J. C. Ford, 201 New England Life building, yesterday asked the board to consider his suggestion that a building to cost not less than $5,000 be erected on the high elevation. He wanted the building to have a restaurant and a roof garden with a flag polie above to distinguish it. It was after hearing Mr. Ford's suggestion that the members of the board let out the secret that just about such a structure is to be built and that the plans are now being made for it.

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March 11, 1908

POSEY'S HALL WAS TOO SMALL.

Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., and James
A. Reed Spoke There Last Night.

For the first time in the history of Tenth ward Democracy, Posey's hall, Twenty-sixth and Prospect, was not large enough to accommodate the hundreds that turned out to hear the speeches last night of Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., James A. Reed, Hamil Brown, former Congressman Butler of Ohio and others. Thre were a number of women present. Mr. Crittenden promised, if elected mayor, a safe, sane and business administration of city affairs and to appoint a utilities commission that will fearlessly and honestly investigate the public service corporations.

Mr. Reed was in a particularly entertaining mood and presented facts and figures relating to municipal affairs that seemed to take well with his hearers.

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January 20, 1908

LOSS OF LOVE
CAUSES SUICIDE.

EARL LEMMON SHOOTS HIM-
SELF IN THE HEAD.

GIRL BREAKS ENGAGEMENT.

"Do Not Trifle With a Man as If He
Were a Dog," the Last
Words by Lem-
mon.
Earl Lemmon.
EARL LEMMON.

Because Nellie Hickey, 2521 Myrtle avenue, had broken her engagement to marry him, Earl Lemmon, 24 years old, killed himself in his room at Twenty-sixth and Mersington streets yesterday afternoon. Less than two hours after he had bed Miss Hickey a cheerful adieu, his body was found lying across a bed in his room, a 38 caliber pistol lying beside it and a wound in the head revealing the course of the bullet. Upon a table near by the coroner found the following letter:

To All of My Friends. Please forgive me for what I am about to do. I have suffered as no one knows in the last four or five months, but cannot stand it any longer. You will find my plicey at Mrs. Hanifin's. One deed to a lot at Thirty-third and Brighton, a deed to two lots on Leeds road in that box also. If hell is any worse than what I have went through with, I am willing to welcome it.Mr. Cook, you will find a few bills unpaid. If my brothers care for me, they owe me enough to pay all my bills. Give my watch to Mr. Cook and my ring to Nellie. You don't konw what I went through with for you, and you shall never know. But be square next time. Do not trifle with a man as if he was a dog, because they bite back. I must stop now. God bless you. Love and best wishes to Nellie. (Signed) EARL.
(P. S.) God forgive me for this. Goodby all. What money I had I lost some six or seven months ago in a freind-turn-you-down-style.


TWENTY KISSES FOR NELLIE.

Beside this letter was found a souvenir postcard with the photograph of a girl upon it. Upon this card, scrawled in the dead man's handwriting, were the words: "Twenty kisses; goodby, Nellie. Be a good girl."

Young Lemmon was employed by Clayton E. Cook of the Home Produce Company at 2446 Cleveland. He roomed in the home of Clarence Stumpff, a fellow employe, in a cottage near Twenty-sixth and Mersington streets. During the eighteen months he had been in the employ of Mr. Cook he was said to have been a sober, industrious, hard working young man. He had managed to save a little money which he had invested in real estate.

Early yesterday morning he called at the home of Miss Hickey. About n oon he returned to his room and ended his life.

Miss Hickey is the daughter of Lawrence Hickey, a Missouri Pacific switchman. She was very much distressed at the news. When she was seen at her home several hours after the suicide, her eyes were swollen with weeping.


JEALOUS OF THE GIRL.
Miss Nellie Hickey, Lost Love of Earl Lemmon.
MISS NELLIE HICKEY.
For the Loss of Whose Love Earl Lemmon Ended His Life.

"Earl and I have been sweethearts from childhood," she said. "We have been betrothed for several years. But he was insanely jealous of me, and several months ago I broke off the engagement on that account. At that time he threatened to kill himself, but I never thought he would do it. He seemed very much grieved because I had received attentions from other young men, but I didn't think ghe took it so much to heart. This morning he called upon me and we chatted pleasantly. When he started home, he called out, 'Goodby Nell,' very cheerfully. There was nothing in his manner that indicated he was thinking of killing himself.

The story was corroborated by Mr. and Mrs. Hickey. Both said there had never been any parental objections to the affair between their daughter and Lemmon, and that ever since the engagement was broken off the young man had been on terms of close friendship with the family.

Lemmon has a brother, bert Lemmon, who lives at the home of a Mrs. Hanifin at 3315 East Twenty-second street. He has four other brothers, a foster sister, who lives in Armourdale, and his father, who lives in California.

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July 8, 1907

LATE LOCATING FIRE.

Department on Scouting Tour finds
Burning House in Ruins.

The dwelling of Charles Bosley, 3211 Myrtle avenue, was almost totally destroyed by fire together with its contents, just before midnight last night. The family were absent in Kansas on a visit and when neighbors discovered the flames the structure was doomed.

A remarkable feature of the fire was that while many people telephoned fire headquarters that a fire could be seen in the southeast part of town, all who phoned said they were not near it and could not give its location. William Rothrum, fire alarm operator, could do nothing but send out a scouting company to try and locate it. Hose company No. 18, of Twenty-sixth street and Prospect avenue, was given the task, and on finding the location also found it useless to call for help as the house was six or seven blocks outside of the fire zone and was beyond saving. The total loss was estimated at $2,500.

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