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June 25, 1909

KILLED BY A GUN HE
SAID WAS UNLOADED.

WILLIAM CLARK, 18, SHOT DEAD
IN DOORYARD.

Pistol in Hands of Younger Com-
paion, Whom He Told It Con-
tained No Cartridges, Just
Before Discharge.

William Clark, 18 years old of 2610 Lister avenue, was accidentally shot through the right eye by a playmate, and almost instantly killed, in the dooryard of Mrs. J. A. Avery at 2617 Lawn avenue at 8 o'clock last night.

"I did not know it was loaded," said Clem Burns, 14 years old, to his mother, Mrs. D. R. Webb, a moment later, as he threw the smoking revolver from him and burst into tears.

Clem lives with his mother and stepfather at 2625 Lawn, right next door to where the shooting occurred.

According to young Burns, the two boys, who were the best of friends, were sent by his mother to the grocery store of the Worries Bros. at Twenty-fourth street and Elmwood avenue for a box of matches. Before leaving the house Clark drew aside his coat and showed his companion that he had a cheap 38-caliber revolver in each hip pocket.

"He told me one of them was empty but that the other had one load in it," Clem told the police last night. "I asked him why he had the guns and he said he had been trying to kill a cat which had been killing chickens belonging to Mrs. Avery.

"As he turned to lead the way to the grocery I reached under his coat tails and got a revolver.

SAID WEAPON WASN'T LOADED.

" 'Oh, now I've got your revolver and I am as big a man as you are,' I said, but he laughed at me and replied:

" 'You're not so big as you think you are; that gun isn't loaded.'

"I began snapping the revolver at him at that. He didn't wince and I snapped three times. Suddenly there was an explosion from the weapon.

"William sank down on the lawn. I knew at once what I had done and called to my mother:

" 'Oh, mother,' I cried, 'I've killed Willie.' Then I threw away the gun. I don't know why I did this, but I wanted to get the nasty thing away and out of my hands as quick as I could."

The boy's cries and protestations of innocence of any intent to commit murder as he was taken to No. 6 police station after the accident brought tears of sympathy to the eyes of neighbors, many of whom had known both boys for several years.

Ray Hodgson of 2608 Lawn, who was the only person besides Clem who saw the shooting, says he saw the two boys playing about Mrs. Avery's yard.

"They were always good boys, but full of pranks," said Mr. Hodgson. "However, Clark had a mania for carrying guns. He was seldom seen without one or more. Ususally the weapons were the kind which policemen call 'pot metal.' "

The story of the shooting told by Mr. Hodgson agrees in every particular with that given by the boy himself.

Young Clark was an orphan and lived at the house on Lister avenue with G. M. and J. P. Farnswowrth, brothers, for four years past. As the Farnsworths are unmarried and have work to do in the daytime, and Clark was out of a job, he was allowed to keep up the home in the way of a general housekeeper.

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April 21, 1909

15-YEAR SENTENCE IMPOSED.

Edward Cassidy Convicted of the
Murder of Aged Shoemaker.

Edward Cassidy was tried in the criminal court yesterday on a charge of first degree murder for the killing of Nathan Bassin, an aged shoemaker, at Twenty-fourth and Mercier streets, October 24. The jury found Cassidy guilty and fixed his punishment at fifteen years in the penitentiary.

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March 28, 1909

FIVE HOLD UP TWENTY IN
BOLD SALOON RAID.

HIGHWAYMEN SECURE $160 AND
WATCH FROM VICTIMS.

Compelled to Hold Up Hands Ten
Minutes After Robbers Left.
May Have Been Aided
by a Woman.

One of the most sensational holdups in recent years occurred about 10 o'clock last night when five men robbed the saloon of John Galvin at 1419 West Twenty-fourth street. The twenty or more men in the place all held up by two of the bandits and compelled to remain in the saloon fully ten minutes before they dared to leave. About $160 was secured by the highwaymen.

It was unusually crowded in the saloon last night. A dozen men were lined up at the bar, and Thomas McAuliff, the bartender, was so busy that he had hardly time to visit with the frequenters. But he stopped at his work when a woman began to yell in the back yard.

A moment later she burst into the barroom through the rear entrance and yelled, "Murder!" All eyes were fixed in her direction when two men stepped in behind her. Each had a red handkerchief over his face and each held a revolver.

"Up with your hands," commanded the taller of the two.

A few of the patrons tried to slip through the front door, but they changed their minds when they saw three more men with guns on the outside. In a moment they had all backed up against the wall and were holding their hands as high as possible. In a businesslike manner the short man went down the line and searched the pockets of each of the victims. He was evidently disappointed at the small amount of change that he managed to extract.

"The cash register must have it all," he said.

Maculiff was also standing with his hands in the air and made no objection to the robber's familiarity with the cash register. Not satisfied with the $100 which the register contained, the highwaymen searched the bartender. He secured $60, besides a watch which Maculiff valued at $65.

The woman, on whom all the attention was at first directed, had left the room. It was getting tiresome for the twenty victims who were leaning against the wall and they were more than glad when the operations of the robbers seemed to be about over. But the prospect of freedom was not so good when one of the men said:

"Now, if a single one of you move in the next ten minutes, he gets his head blown off." The two men backed out of the saloon through the front entrance and ran eastward on Twenty-fourth street. They were joined by their companions, though the patrons and the bartender were not aware of the fact. All remained in the same tiresome position for fully ten minutes. When Maculiff got to the door he saw that the coast was clear.

The police at the Southwest boulevard police station were notified and hurried to the scene. A few clews were picked up which made the officers believe that the holdup gang had been in the neighborhood all evening. The part that the woman played in the holdup was still a topic of conversation at closing time at midnight. Several affirmed that she was an accomplice to the robbers, while others said that she was some woman who lived in the neighborhood and had run in the saloon for protection.

The frequenters of the saloon were too excited to talk about the robbery in a coherent manner last night. Henry Beadles, who lives at 2014 Summit street, said he thought that there were only two men in the gang, but Michael Connolly, who lives at 2136 Madison street, said that he saw three others plainly through the door.

John Reed, 2312 Terrace street, was sure that he could recognize the robbers should he ever see them again. One of them had high cheek bones, and limped slightly in walking. All of the victims said that the ten minutes which they spent against the wall after the robbers had left were the longest ten minutes they had ever experienced. About $3 was secured from the men.

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December 12, 1908

FUNERAL OF OFFICER MULLANE.

Brave Officer Will Be Buried Today,
Wearing His Uniform
and Star.

Dressed in his full uniform of blue, the same uniform he had so gallantly defended only a few brief days ago, and with his badge of authority, star No. 151, shining from his breast, the body of brave Michael P. Mullane lay in a casket at his home, 931 West Twenty-fourth street, all day yesterday. Hundreds called out of respect for the widow's grief, looked upon the face of the gallant man whom they had once called dear friend, and departed.

Michael Mullane is the first officer in Kansas City to be buried in full uniform, his star and all. It had been his request in life that should he die in the discharge of his duty to be laid away "Just as I fought, with my uniform on."

The funeral will be this morning at 8:30 o'clock. There will be a short service at the home at that hour. At 9 a. m. solemn requiem high mass will be said at the Sacred Heart Catholic church, Twenty-sixth street and Madison. Burial will be in Mount St. Mary's cemetery.

Yesterday Chief Ahern received many telegrams from police departments in nearby cities and over the country. All were of condolence, and many spoke with praise for the officer who had made such a gallant fight, only to sacrifice his life because he refused to shoot a woman.

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December 11, 1908

MICHAEL MULLANE IS DEAD.

Heroic Patrolman Succumbs to the
Wounds Received in the City
Hall Riot Tuesday.
Patrolman Michael Mullane
MICHAEL MULLANE,
Police Patrolman Who Lost His Life in the Line of Duty.

Michael Mullane, patrolman, died at 1:10 p. m. yesterday at St. Joseph's hospital from his wound received in the riot Tuesday afternoon. Funeral services will be held at 9 o'clock Saturday morning at Sacred Heart church, Twenty-sixth and Madison. Solemn high mass will be conducted by Father Hogan. Burial will be in Mount St. Mary's cemetery.

Mr. Mullane was 34 years of age. He was born in Athea, County Limerick, Ireland. He came to America in July, 1897, coming directly to Kansas City. He obtained employment with the Western Grocery Company and remained with that company till November 16, 1905, when he was appointed as a probationary officer. On December 31, of the next year, he was put on as a regular member of the force. Mr. Mullane was one of the best men on the force, as well as one of the largest. Standing six feet two inches and weighing 260 pounds, he was a powerful man. He was not corpulent, but was a man of big bone, muscle and sinew. Strict attention to duty in the worst part of the city, with total abstinence from liquor and not a black mark against him, had won for him the high regard of his superior officers and the friendship of everyone.

A widow and two children, a girl baby of 3 months and a boy of 8, constitute his family. One child, a little girl, had preceded him to the great beyond. She took sick about a year ago this week and died on December 16. Besides his immediate family, he has two brothers and a sister residing in the city, John P. Mullane, an insurance agent of 1102 West Fortieth street; Patrick P. Mullane of 2542 Belleview and Mrs. Mary Dalton of the same address. His father is dead, while his mother and older brothers live in Ireland. He has many cousins who are residents of Kansas City.

The body was removed from the hospital to O'Donnell's undertaking rooms yesterday evening and later to his late home, 921 West Twenty-fourth street.

Mr. Mullane leaves life insurance amounting to about $5,000. Besides he owned a residence at 2631 Belleview.

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October 28, 1908

LONELY OLD MAN WEEPS
FOR HIS MURDERED SON.

Elle Bassin Has a Load of Grief and
Labor Almost Too Heavy
to Bear.

Sitting alone in his little shoeshop at 1221 West Twenty-fourth street there is an aged, white-haired man. The police say he has no more heart for work. He stares vacantly into space and occasionally a tear drops from his furrowed cheek. The old man is Elle Bassin, father of Nathan Bassin, the young man murdered in the shop at 10 o'clock Saturday night by highwaymen. The aged man is nearly blind and depended upon his son to take the work off his hands. Now the support of the widowed daughter-in-law and her two children has fallen on him, and the burden is a heavy one.

Edward Cassidy, Slayer of Nathin Bassin
EDWARD CASSIDY.
Confessed Slayer of Nathan Bassin.

Confined in separate cells two young men sat in the county jail all day yesterday. It was their first day there, and no one called on them. They were Edward Cassidy, who has a home at 908 West Thirty-first street, and Thad Dyer, 703 Southwest boulevard. They are the cause of the aged shoemaker's grief. Cassidy confessed that he and Dyer went to the shop bent on robbery. They met with resistance from Nathan, the son, and Cassidy shot him dead. Dyer was guarding the door at the time. Both men say they are sorry, really sorry, that they took a human life.

Thad Dyer, Accomplice in the Killing of Nathan Bassin.
THAD DYER.
Accomplice of Cassidy in the Bassin Murder.

Dyer's father, Edward Dyer, is a member of the fire department, and the boy had a good home, but he was wild and often fell into the hands of the police. Both boys were born and reared near the Southwest boulevard, and have known no such thing as restraint since childhood, the police say. Cassidy has an impediment in his speech that gives the impression that he is not very strong mentally. Neither boy attended school to any great extent.

They are being held in the county jail without bond awaiting trial by the criminal court on an information charging them with murder in the first degree.

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October 27, 1908

CONFESS MURDER OF
SHOEMAKER'S SON

EDWARD CASSIDY AND THAD
DYER CAUGHT BY POLICE.

Went to Bassin's Shop to Rob Him
and Killed the Young Man When
He Interfered With
Their Plan.

When Edward Cassidy and Thad Dyer entered the little shoe shop of Elle Bassin and his son, Nathan, 1221 West Twenty-fourth street, at 10 o'clock Saturday night, they were bent on robbery. The confession of Cassidy to Captain Walter Whitsett late yesterday afternoon settled that question. They figured no interference, but when Nathan Bassin objected and grappled with Cassidy, the latter said he drew a revolver and shot him dead.

The murder took place in the shoe shop at 10 o'clock Saturday night, and when it was discovered it was a mystery. It remained so until Sunday morning, when Patrolmen Fred Nissen and W. J. Graham got a clue which led to the arrest of Dyer and Cassidy. A grocer, William Doarn, at the southwest corner of Twenty-fourth and Mercier streets, remembered that the two men had been in his place just before the killing and had said, "If you see anything happen around here tonight you haven't seen us."

Dyer was the first to confess yesterday morning after being questioned a long while. Then he laid the crime on Cassidy and said: "We went into the the shop with the intention of trying on a pair of shoes and wearing them out without paying for them . When we started out the young man grabbed Casssidy and he shot him . Then we both ran."

PURPOSE WAS ROBBERY.

This story didn't sound, as there were no shoes for sale in the shop. Dyer stuck to his story until Cassidy confessed; then he said the latter's version was correct. Casssidy told the following story to Captain Whitsett and afterwards made a statement to I. B. Kimbrell, county prosecutor.

"We were broke and wanted some money. We met in Water's saloon on Southwest boulevard about 8:30 p. m. Then we visited different places until about 9:45 o'clock, when we decided to hold up the old shoemaker. We went to Doarn's grocery store, across from the shoeshop, and saw Will Doarn in the door. We asked him not to say anything about seeing us in the neighborhood if anything happened.

"I'M AWFULLY SORRY."

"Then we went across the street," continued Cassidy. "Dyer stood in the door of the shop as I entered and ordered 'Hands up." The young man grabbed me, and I shot him. I wanted to get away. That's all. I'm sorry, awful sorry. I never went into the thing with the intention of killing anybody."

Cassidy and Dyer both ran from the place immediately after the shooting and separated. Cassidy remained about the Southwest boulevard until late and then went home with a friend. He lives at 908 West Thirty-first street, and Dyer at 703 Southwest boulevard. Dyer said he went home.

Dyer is the son of Edward Dyer, a member of the Kansas City fire department. The father was at police headquarters insisting upon his son's innocence yesterday just after he had confessed his part in the murder.

Both men are well known to the police. Cassidy was recently arraigned in the municipal court by Sergeant Thomas O'Donnell on a charge of vagrancy. They were taken before Justice Festus O. Miller late yesterday afternoon and arraigned on a charge of murder in the first degree. They waived preliminary examination and were committed to the county jail without bond to await trial in the criminal court.

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October 25, 1908

THRIFTY COBBLER
FOULLY MURDERED.

SHOT DOWN IN HIS SHOP BY
TWO ASSASSINS.


MOTIVE IS YET A MYSTERY.

BUT IT IS BELIEVED ROBBERY
WAS CONTEMPLATED.

Father and Son Had Finished Count-
ing Up and Dividing Day's
Receipts When They
Were Attacked.



At 10 o'clock last night Elle Bassin, 60 years old, and his son, Nathan, 30 years old, were sitting in their little frame shoe shop mending shoes. Without warning the door of the little frame building was pushed open.

"Throw up your hands," commanded a voice.

At the same moment a hand clasping a revolver was thrust into the room. The young man arose from his seat and fell forward on the floor with a bullet through his heart. After firing the shot the assassin fled.

"There were two men," said the father of the murdered man. "I could see their faces for an instant, but not long enough to recognize them. They were young men, probably 20 to 25 years old."

Bassin said this in German. He is of German Jewish extraction. He cannot speak English. The father lives at 213 Circle avenue and the son, who is married, lived at 2111 Mercier avenue. He leaves a widow and two children, Ida, 5 years old, and Samuel, 2 years old. There are four brothers. The father and the murdered man conducted the business in partnership.


ROBBERY THE MOTIVE.

Robbery is thought to have been the motive of the crime. The Bassins' place of business is a little frame shack, 8x10 feet, at 1221 West Twenty-fourth street, with one door and a window about four feet wide in front. Every night they took the money received during the day out of the drawer in front of the window where it was kept, counted it, and the young man put it in the pockets of his trousers. This process had just been finished a few minutes before the fatal shot was fired last night. The money in the drawer usually amounted to $7 or $8.

The police say that a very tough gang of young fellows infest the neighborhood where Bassin's shop is located, and the old man himself complained that they had bothered him by throwing stones and refuse against his shop. It is thought that, seeing the young shoemaker count the money taken in by the day's work, two men who were passing by planned to step in, hold the shosemakers up with their revolvers and rob them of the money. When the young man rose as though to make resistance, the robbers, being amateurs and therefore nervous, fired.


WOMAN SAW THE MEN RUN.

Mrs. Enoch Dawson, who lives at 1208 West Twenty-fourth street, heard the shot and looked out in time to see two men running east on Twenty-fourth street. She saw one of them turn north in an alley between Mercier avenue and Holly street. Patrolman Maruice Scanlon, who walks the beat where the shooting occurred, heard the shot and came running toward the place. As he crossed Twenty-fourth street at Holly, under the electric light, he saw the man run across the street and disappear in the alley. The patrolman did not give chase but hastened to the scene of the shooting.

Dr. E. C. Rieger, 1105 West Twenty-fourth street, was called and pronounced the man dead. He had died almost instantly, saying no word. Coroner George P. Thompson was notified and the body was taken to Eylar Bros. undertaking rooms.

So far as can be ascertained, Bassin had no enemies. He was a quiet man and a steady worker. He had lived in the neighborhood three years, and before entering into partnership with his father had worked in the shoe repairing department of the Jones Dry Goods company. No arrests have been made.

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October 18, 1908

HEAD SEVERED BY AN AX.

Negro Fell Dead and Police Followed
Blood Stains to Crap Game.

William Williams, a negro 19 years old, fell dead in a doorway at Penn street and the Southwest boulevard at midnight. His head was nearly severed from his body. He had been seen running in Penn street just before he died.

Spectators telephoned police station No. 3 and officers were sent to the scene. The coroner was called and stated that it appeared to be the work of a strong man with an ax.

Sergeant Thomas O'Donnell followed a trail of blood in Penn street, picked up bloody dice on the way, and finally followed the stains to a spot near a box car on the Belt line tracks near Twenty-fourth and Penn streets. He said the place looked like it had been the scene of a crap game.

The body was sent to an undertaker and the police threw a patrol out through the district in an attempt to apprehend the murderer.

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August 25, 1908

ASHLAND CORNERSTONE LAID.

School Building Will Be One of
The Best in the City.

Accompanied by appropriate ceremonies the cornerstone for the new Ashland school, in course of construction at Twenty-fourth street and Elmwood avenue, was laid yesterday afternoon.

Joseph L. Norman, president of the board of education, who was to have delivered the principal address, was unable to attend the ceremonies because of illness, his place being taken by Hale H. Cook, a member of the board. Mr. Cook, during the course of his remarks explained that when the new school, when completed, would be one of the best in the city, and that he was of the opinion that within the course of a short time an addition would become necessary.

A. C. Wright, who was acquainted with the school in its earlier days, delivered an interesting address. Mr. Wright said that he could remember when the school was a small one-story frame, a considerable distance out in the country. He read some interesting documents having to do with transfers of the property when the first permanent building was erected. Ex-Mayor H. M. Beardsley also was one of the speakers.

Before the stone was placed in position a box containing the superintendent's last annual report, documents having to do with the history of the school, coins contributed by pupils and other articles were deposited in it by Mrs. Gertrude Edmondson, principal of the school.

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July 12, 1908

BOOZE CLAIMS TWO MORE.

Victims of Whisky Habit Die in
Emergency Hospital.

Two deaths occurred in the emergency hospital last night, and alcohol was the immediate cause of each death. W. Morris, 26 years old, Twenty-fourth and Summit streets, was a patient at St. Margaret's hospital, Kansas City, Kas., and was sent to this city to be placed in the city holdover for safekeeping. Later he was taken to the emergency hospital. It is said he was in the hait of consuming one uart of whisky a day.

H. P. Kemper, 305 Walnut street, was taken from Scott's saloon, Third and Walnut streets, to the emergency hospital. The physicians were not able to make a definite diagnosis of his ailment. Kemper died while having a spasm rought on from acute alcholism or morphia poisoning.

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July 3, 1908

A PRIZE-WINNING TOAST.

Kansas City Man Wins With
"The Soul of the Toast."

Walter N. Foster, 1320 East Twenty-fourth street, of this city, is the winner in the Toast and Sentiment contest for the month of July, conducted by What to Eat, published in Chicago. Mr. Foster's contribution is entitled "The Soul of the Toast." These toasts may be old or new, original or copied. The winner's toast is as follows:
"It isn't so much what you say,
Or the word -- that is heard;
It's the spirit within and the way
That the heartstrings are stirred.

It isn't so much what you drink,
Nor the how -- nor the where,
It's the truth, in the things that you think
That is fair -- that is rare.

It isn't the drink in the bowl,
With its flow cheer you so,
It's the radiant glow of the soul
Of the toast -- don't you know.
--From Over the Nuts and Wine

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October 15, 1907

LEADER OF GANG IS FINED.

South Side Grocer Was Set Upon by
Rowdies.

As C. T. Baker, a grocer at 1321 West Twenty-fourth street, left a car at Nineteenth street and Grand avenue Saturday evening he was struck by a stone. Seeing a crowd of young men near at hand he approached and asked, "Do any of you know who threw that stone?"

"With that," Baker said in police court yesterday, "I was immediately set upon by half a dozen of them and had I not taken refuge in a grocery store I believe I would have been beaten to death."

Baker identified W. P. Peppinger as the one who led the rowdies. Peppinger said he "had some trouble" but that he "didn't start anything."

"Your fine is $15," said Judge Kyle. "I only wish I had the rest of that gang in here. You'd better tell the others to steer clear of that kind of business or there will be something doing in the $500 fine line."

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September 4, 1907

HORSE FELL INTO BASEMENT.

Man Arrested Blames the Mishap to
a Woman Driver.

Patrolmen Abbey and Fagan arrested Edward Vaughan late on the evening of Labor day, alleging that he was beating a livery horse which landed in the basement of a saloon at Twenty-fourth street and Southwest boulevard. There is a fire station at that point and the firemen had to cut the harness to extricate the horse from the basement.

"I was lighting a cigar," explained Vaughan, to Judge Kyle yesterday, "and one of the young women took the lines. Just then an engine whistled and away went the horse. I didn't drive it into a basement to get all skinned up as I did and try to hurt others."

Justice Young defended the case. Vaughan was discharged.

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June 19, 1907

CITY WINS BEER TEST CASE.

Grocer Who Sold Less Than Five
Gallons Pleads Guilty.

The city won an important test case yesterday morning before Judge Wallace, of the criminal court, when Martin O. Brandmeyer, of Brandmeyer Bros. Grocery, 924 West Twenty-fourth street, who was arrested last week for selling beer in less than five gallon lots, pleaded guilty and was fined $100.

The arrest was made on the complaint of W. H. Harrison, city license inspector, who announced that it was a test case, and the beginning of a crusade to stop the rather general sale of beer in less than five-gallon lots by grocery stores throughout the city.

The specific charge to which Martin Brandmeyer pleaded guilty was selling a case of twenty-four pint bottles of beer, or a total of only three gallons, and delivering it from his store to a residence.

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April 10, 1907

WRONG BOY FIRST

TWO ATTEMPTS IN ABDUCTION
OF LITTLE CHARLES M'NEESE.
GRANDMOTHER UNDER ARREST.

REFUSED TO STATE WHEN LAST
SHE SAW DAUGHTER.
Theory of Police That Lad Was Kid-
naped Grows Stronger as Evidence
of Hack Drivers Is Brought to
Their Notice -- Three Persons
Said to Be Involved.

Mrs. Annie L. Sadlier, grandmother of Charles H. McNeese, 2305 Brighton avenue, who disappeared on his way to the Ashland school last Friday, was arrested at her home, 1522 McGee street, by Detective W. H. Bates and Thomas Hayde yesterday afternoon. Though Mrs. Sadlier denies any part in the affair, she was positively identified yesterday afternoon by two hack drivers, one of whom said he hauled her twice while looking for the child and another one who says he drove the very carriage in which little Charles was taken away and that Mrs. Sadlier was a passenger as far as the Ashland school. Charles M. Howell, attorney for Mr. McNeese, said last night that an information would be filed against Mrs. Sadlier this morning, charging her with kidnaping.

There is still another hack driver in the case who has not been located and the police think that he will come forward and assist in identifying the woman under arrest when he learns that no charge will be placed against him. This is the man who drove the hack to the Irving school Twenty-fourth and Prospect, a week ago today, when Garrell Ash, the 6-year-old son of Mrs. Lou Ash, 2413 East Twenty-third street, was taken away protesting. Charles McNeeese used to attend that school and the kidnapers evidently made a mistake. Garrell was taken to a house at 1522 McGee street, questioned for a long time and then sent home on a car. It was this incident, given the detectives yesterday, which led to the first clue, as at that number lives the missing child's grandmother -- mother of McNees's divorced wife. Ash pointed out the house and will be given a chance to see Mrs. Sadler today.

MRS. SADLIER IDENTIFIED.
"Tink" Williams, a driver from the Jackson livery barn, 1309 Walnut street, at once identified Mrs. Sadlier. He told the detectives that he had hauled Mrs. Sadlier and a younger woman with a baby on two occasions and that both times they drove out around the schools on the East side when the children were going to school.
Charles Burch, a negro driver for the Eylar Bros.' livery barn, who also identified Mrs. Sadlier readily, said that it was he who drove the carriage the day young McNeese was stolen. He told of the same two women, one elderly, the other young and with her a baby. He drove them last Friday morning to the Ashland school, Twenty-fourth street and Elmwood avenue.
"I was told to wait about a block form the school," said Burch, "as both women got out. Presently the younger woman and a man returned, leading and dragging a little boy, who didn't seem to want to go. This woman was still carrying her baby. I never saw the older woman until today at police headquarters."
When they got in the cab again Burch was told to drive post-haste to Armourdale, where he was dismissed as the quartette boarded an electric car. They are believed to have transferred so as to reach the Leavenworth electric line in Kansas City, Kas.
Mrs. Sadlier, when first arrested, told Detective Bates that she had seen her daughter, the former Mrs. McNeese, only last week. At the station she denied the statement and said she had not seen her in three years, but heard from her eight months ago in Montreal, Canada. She then said one of her nieces was at her house last week and followed that with a denial, saying that she had seen none of them for eight months.
WOMAN MAKES STATEMENT.
Her statement, taken later in the day, reads in part:
My name is Annie L. Sadlier. My daughter's name now is Mrs. Annie Evans. She married Charles C. McNeese eleven years ago and they had one child, Charles Hiram McNeese. She and McNeese were divorced about four years ago and he given the custody of the child for one year by Judge Gibson, when it was to be given to its mother if she proved herself worthy. She married Bruce Evans afterwards and on March 1 three years ago moved away from here. Don't care to say when I last saw my daughter, if not compelled to answer now. Was home all day Friday, April 5, and not out of the house from 1 to 4 p. m. Don't remember anyone that day at all and don't remember when my brother got home. I am not going to answer the
question whether I saw my daughter Friday and will say no more until the
proper time. I positively declare that I was not in a hack last week at any time. Was not at any liver barn last week, either. I positively declare that I had noting to do with the kidnaping of Charles McNeese last week.

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April 10, 1907

FOR MORE SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

Board of Education Wants $600,000
in Bonds Issued.

The board of education held a special meeting yesterday and adopted a resolution unanimously ordering a special election to be held in the school district of Kansas City May 4, at which a proposition will be voted upon to issue $600,000 in school bonds, to meet the growing needs of the district.

Of this amount, about $200,000 will be needed to complete the new Westport high school and the rest will be spent as needed in additions to present building and in new buildings in crowded or newly established sections. There is an urgent need for a new building in the vicinity of the Ashland school, which is at Twenty-fourth and Elmwood. This district is growing very rapidly and the Ashland school is already badly overcrowded. A new building would relieve this congestion.

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