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December 6, 1909

LONG AND SHORT MEN BUSY.

Victims of Highwaymen Report to
Police the Loss of More Than
$300 on Sunday.

J. S. Hubert, a member of the United Brewery Workers of America, living at 2518 Charlotte, was felled by a blow from behind and robbed of five $20 bills, ten $10 bills and five $5 bills at Twenty-first and Locust at 9:30 o'clock last night by two men, one of whom, he says was very tall and the other extremely short. He says he saw the same men in a saloon at Nineteenth street and Grand avenue Saturday night. Hubert immediately reported the case to police and he was taken to his home by Officer Sherry. Upon examination of his head no signs of where he had been slugged could be found.

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November 23, 1909

MIDNIGHT ROBBER
KILLS SALOON MAN.

M. A. SPANGLER MURDERED BE-
HIND HIS OWN BAR.

Drops Dead With Bullet Through
Heart -- Son Shot in Pistol Duel
With His Father's
Slayer.

While trying to grasp the revolver of one of two robbers who "stuck up" his saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue at 12:45 this morning, M. A. Spangler was shot across the bar and instantly killed.

In a pistol duel with his father's murderer, Sam Spangler was shot through both arms.

He believes he shot the robber. The latter and his companion escaped.

The murder and holdup occurred in Spangler's saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue about 12:45.

The Spanglers were getting ready to close the saloon for the night. Sam Spangler had removed the cash from the register and was reading the totals from the detail adder, while the father was writing them on a card.

There were two men in the saloon, Al Ackerman, a friend of the Spangler family, and an old man whose identity is not known. Both were seated at tables in front of the bar.

SHOT THROUGH THE HEART.

At this juncture two men, one short and heavy set and the other tall and thin, entered the saloon. They were roughly dressed, and sauntered up about the middle of the room. The tall man walked as far as the big cannon stove at the rear of the bar, but the short man walked up to a point in front of Spangler.

Whipping out a revolver, the short man flourished it and commanded Ackerman and the old man, "Hands up and line up alongside the bar every one of you."

Ackerman and the old man and young Spangler lifted their hands in a hurry to obey the order. Not so old man Spangler. He had been in the street lunch stand business for years and he was not to be bluffed by the sight of a gun.

"Throw up your hands quick," was the second command, this time directed to Mr. Spangler. The latter evidently had been gauging the distance across the bar. Instead of throwing up his hands he lunged forward, grasping for the revolver. He missed the gun and that instant the robber pulled the trigger.

"Oh!" Spangler cried, and collapsed.

Another shot was fired at him, but it missed. The first one had passed through his heart.

SON TRIED TO AVENGE HIM.

Sam Spangler at the first shot pulled open a drawer in the back bar and grabbed a huge navy revolver. Turning around he faced the robber, and began firing. Both emptied their revolvers, the robber retreating toward the front door as he fired his last shot. Meanwhile the tall, thin robber, who had gotten half way behind the bar, turned and fled toward the rear, when young Spangler started shooting. He escaped through a rear door.

Ackerman, who had been standing near the front of the saloon, ran out of the door at the first shot. When the shooting inside ceased he started back but was met by the robber with the revolver who pressed it against his abdomen.

"Get out of my way before I kill you," cried the robber.

Ackerman got out of the way, and returning to the saloon asked for the big revolver.

Young Spangler put a shell in it by this time and Ackerman started after the robber. He chased him to McGee street and half way down to Twenty-first street pulling the trigger several times on the shell, which proved defective and failed to explode.

When he returned to the saloon, he found Sam Spangler bending over the body of his father. He had been shot in both arms and his blood was mingling with that of his father's.

WHO GOT THE MONEY?

It could not be positively ascertained this morning whether the robber got the money which Spangler had taken from the cash register and placed in a glass. During the excitement it is believed that the money was replaced in the register. This was locked and the keys were taken in charge by the police. The sum is said to have been in the neighborhood of $50.

A riot call was sent to No. 4 police station and a squad of police under Sergeant H. L. Goode drove to the saloon. Young Spangler was taken to the general hospital, where his injuries were dressed.

The body of Mr. Spangler was taken to the Stewart undertaking establishment.

M. A. Spangler was about 50 years old. He lived with his family at No. 1322 1/2 Wyandotte street. He leaves a widow and two sons, Sam and William, both grown. The widow and some relatives are in Glasgow, Mo. A telegram was sent to them immediately after the shooting.

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November 17, 1909

BODY ON STOVE EIGHT HOURS.

Stone Mason Found Dead Where He
Had Prepared to Cook Noon Meal.

Peter Gilberg, a stone mason, was found dead in his home, 815 East Twenty-second street at 8 o'clock last night by Matt Gleason, proprietor of a saloon at 921 East Twenty-first street, who sent Gilberg home ill yesterday morning. Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, found that a hemorrhage killed Gilberg.

Gilberg lived alone. He evidently was preparing to cook his noon day meal when he was stricken as uncooked fish and some potatoes were on the kitchen table. One side of the body was cooked from the heat of the gas stove, which had been burning for probably eight hours.

Mr. Gilberg was a member of the Woodmen of the World and carried $1,000 insurance. The secretary of the lodge was called last night but was unable to tell who the insurance was made out to. Mr. Gleason's niece was married about two months ago to a union tailor but whose name was unknown to the uncle. The niece was married in Westport. The body was taken to the Wagner undertaking rooms, Fourteenth street and Grand avenue.

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June 17, 1909

FARE LIFE OF CAR
ENDED BY SUICIDE.

RUNS AWAY AND DASHES IT-
SELF AGAINST POLE.

Deliberately Leaves Barn and Makes
Wild Run Down Ninth Street
Until It Jumps Track at
Wyandotte Street.

Roanoke car No. 604 committed suicide last night at 7:30 o'clock by running down Ninth from Washington street and dashing itself against the trolley pole at the southeast corner of Ninth and Wyandotte streets. So carefully was the act committed that no one was hurt and the tracks were left clear, but the car was smashed to kindling.

No. 604 returned from a hard day's work and was put into the car barn at Ninth and Wyandotte streets by Motorman Floyd Dyer, 809 West Twenty-first street. It was raining and there was a despondency in the air, but the car manifested no signs of the deep design it was nursing within its breast.
INTENT ON SUICIDE
Fifteen minutes later, when none of the street car men was looking, it poked its nose out of the barn and started, gathering speed as it progressed. A girl clerking at a laundry agency across the street from the barn saw it start.

"There was no one on or near the car," she said. "It came out deliberately like a living thing, and ran away before anyone had time to stop it."
Two street car men saw the runaway after it had gone half a block and ran after it. Fortunately there were no cars on the track in front and the rain had driven pedestrians from the streets.
Detective Andy O'Hare, who was waiting for a car at Ninth and Wyandotte streets, saw the car bearing down upon him. The trolley was threshing wildly although it had been on the wire when 604 left the barn.
DASHES ITSELF TO PIECES.
Grinding the speed limit beneath its wheels, the suicide leaped the track at Wyandotte steret, instead of making the turn, and precipitated itself sideways against the granitoid walk at the west side of the Boston Drug Company, on the southeast corner.
It was brought to a stop by an iron trolley pole, and the bed of the car left the trucks and fell sideways on the walk, completely blocking passage. Only two windows in the drug store were damaged. Every window in the car ws broken, the front end was ripped open and a few solid planks were left.
The wreck was entirely clear of the tracks and traffic was not delayed. Dyer, the motorman, is positive that he set the brake before leaving the car.
"Clear case of suicide, probably due to despondency brought on by the whether," was the verdict of the wreckers who cleared the debris away.

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April 5, 1909

BABY CHOKES TO DEATH.

Small Screw Lodged in Child's
Trachea, Quickly Proves Fatal.

From swallowing a small screw a quarter of an inch long, Laura, the 15-months-old baby of Thomas and Bridget Mullins, 921 East Twenty-first street choked to death at 2:10 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

Everything possible was done to save the child and the ambulance of No. 4 police station, with Dr. H. A. Hamilton, was driven at full speed to the place, but the screw had lodged in the trachea and strangulation followed the accident in twenty minutes. Mrs. Mullins was prostrated last night.

The father is in the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company.

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December 19, 1908

GENERAL HOSPITAL IS
ALMOST INACCESSIBLE.

Roadway Is Muddy, Narrow and
Dangerous, Almost Impossible to
Traverse at Night.

The new general hospital is a great thing. The wards are large and airy, the sanitation is perfect, the nurses and doctors are first class and the facilities for treating emergency cases excellent -- in the emergency cases could reach the hospital. In other words, the matter with the new hospital is that it is almost inaccessible, especially after nightfall.

A complaint comes from the police. The ambulance from the Walnut street station takes a case or two to the hospital every night. Last night a man with a broken leg was taken there. The ambulance spent about a minute getting from Nineteenth and Main streets, the scene of the accident, to Twenty-first street and Gillham road. Then it took fifteen minutes to get the last 100 yards of the journey.

There are only two ways by which vehicles can get to the hospital. One was is by Twenty-fourth and Cherry streets, and the other is by the Gillham road entrance. The ambulance entered by the latter way, because it is closer and safer. There are no lights in the vicinity of the hospital and the whole hill is in darkness. The entrance is by a winding mud road and it is so narrow, twisting and dark that a policeman was compelled to walk in front of the horses to pick out the way and prevent the animals from falling in one of the many ditches. Meanwhile the man with the broken leg was suffering excruciating agony.

If the ambulance had gone around by the other entrance it would have been necessary to climb the Holmes street hill, which the horses are compelled to take at a walk. In either case the vehicle would be in danger of overturning several times.

"It seems strange to me," said a police officer last night, "that a couple of hundred dollars could not have been subtracted from the thousands that it took to build the hospital and used to make the place accessible. It is a strange anomaly to see a dozen doctors waiting inside the hospital in the operating room for the patient, who is meantime stuck in the mud outside and possibly dying for lack of attention.

"Within a block of the place is Gillham road, one of the finest thoroughfares to be found in the city, and half a dozen other streets that are kept in good condition. The new hospital has been built several months now and there has been plenty of time to build suitable approaches. I would like to know who to blame."

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December 15, 1907

HILL FELL FROM A CAR.

Mystery in Spaniard's Case Cleared.
Goes to Daughter's Home.


Emanual Hill, the Spaniard who was identified at the general hospital Friday night by a negro woman as being her father, was taken to the home of Claude Lane, the husband of the woman, at 1807 Howard avenue, yesterday afternoon. Hill did not want to go, but as the negro had sufficient proof that he was in reality her father, the hospital authorities told her t hat she might take him home if she desired. After considerable urging he finally consented to leave.
It is now known that Hill received the fracture of the skull, with which he is afflicted, while attempting to get off a Jackson avenue car at Nineteenth street and Flora avenue on December 5. He had come to Kansas City to visit his daughter, who had lived in Flora avenue near Twenty-first street. He did not know that she had moved to the house in Howard avenue.

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July 25, 1907

LITTLE BOYS ARRESTED.

LOCKED IN A CELL BY POLICE TO
"GIVE THEM A SCARE."

"Don't Do It Again," Warns the
Mayor -- Preacher Who Caused
the Arrests Interrogated
by Commissioners.

Two young boys, Jesse Lynch, residing at 2106 Belleview, and his chum, John Rafferty, living next door, gave Sergeant Seldon and Policeman Barton a fright yesterday in the police board room. By way of a by-product, the boys had the fun of hearing the mayor bore in on John Hart, who said he was the "commanding officer" of the Red Cross mission at Twenty-first and Belleview.

The boys had been arrested on a charge of disturbing a religious meeting. Six or eight neighbors were on hand to testify that they had been sitting on their porches watching each other and the boys for an hour or more, so they were able to say there had been no disturbance. The policemen's defense was that "Commanding Officer" Hart had directed them to arrest the boys, "and some of them," said M. G. Hammon, "were not more than 7 years of age."

"I think there were some little fellows in the gang. I got nine," said the policeman. Afterward his sergeant admitted locking them in a cell to scare them. The bad impression this made on the commissioners was wiped out when the sergeant said he had refused to let the "commanding officer" swear out a warrant, but that he had turned the boys loose.

"I do not like that sort of thing," Commissioner Gallagher said.

"That is exactly the way I feel about it," the mayor echoed. "I do not want little boys locked up. I do not even want them arrested if it can be avoided. Here we find this preacher telephoning for the police to rout a gang. Officer Barton comes on the scene, finds two excellent boys, so this testimony every bit shows, sitting peacefully chatting. They are arrested and in the march to the station seven others are picked up. This is not right. Don't do it again." Policeman Barton said he had supposed his duty would compel him to arrest on information filed by a reputable citizen.

"But not women or children for trivial things like this," Commissioner Gallagher said.

"This was supposed to end the case, when the "commanding officer" returned to the attack. He wanted to know if the boys could train dogs to go into his mission and break up the meetings.

"That is not what the commissioners ought to settle," said a Mrs. Parks. "What you ought to settle is whether or not Preacher Hart has the right to shoot into a crowd of boys with a revolver."

"It was a cannon firecracker," the "commander" quickly said.

"It was a revolver, for I saw you loading it after you had fired it, and you put it under a pillow. I could see through my window and yours," Mrs. Parks asserted. By this time the mayor was sitting up and taking notice.

"Let us hear about this shooting," he said, but he heard two sides and had to take his choice. In the end the commissioners decided that Policeman Barton had not been guilty of anything in the arrest of the children. The Red Cross mission "commanding officer" was warned that he could not make another blanket raid on the boys about his church.

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