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February 4, 1910

NEW VAUDEVILLE HOME.

Hippodrome Will Have Theater Large
Enough for Traveling Shows.

Extensive improvements will be made at the Hippodrome, beginning next Monday, and to be completed in ten days. The picture theater in the southwest corner of the building and the Vienna garden immediately south will be thrown into one theater, with a stage as large as any in the city, with possibly one or two exceptions. The theater will seat 1,200 people and will be the permanent home of traveling attractions, such as big vaudeville shows, Yiddish companies and theatrical attractions of all kinds. The marked success of the recent Yiddish productions was a demand for a regular theater in that part of the city, as Twelfth and Charlotte is in the center of a populous neighborhood and is ten blocks from the downtown theater district.

The Hippodrome theater will be ready within ten days.

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February 1, 1910

TO HURRY NEW THEATER.

Work on Empress Starts Today;
To Be Finished May 1.

"We will start the foundation of the Empress theater today," said Fred Lincoln of Chicago, representative of the Sullivan-Considine circuit, which is to erect a new play house at Twelfth and McGee streets. "We expect to put three gangs of men at work on the building, working in 8-hour shifts and will have it ready for occupancy by May 1. Lee DeCamp of Cincinnati, the architect, will be here today. The house will cost about $100,000."

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January 23, 1910

A YIDDISH THEATER HERE.

First Playhouse of This Character
to Be Opened Here Tonight.

Kansas City's first Yiddish theater will be opened tonight in the Hippodrome annex, Twelfth and Charlotte streets. Manager Jacobs has fitted up a snug home for Yiddish drama here, the annex being cut off entirely from the Hippodrome proper by an outside entrance, though there is, of course, an entrance from the inside as well. M. B. Samuylow, who was seen here at the Shubert this season, will head a strong Yiddish company playing "Kol Nidre," a four-act opera with book by Charansky and music by Friedsel. Other Yiddish companies will be seen here from time to time and it is hoped to make the Hippodrome Annex theater the home of permanent Yiddish attractions, as there is a large clientele from which to draw.

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January 4, 1910

CHARGED WITH USURY.

Warrant Issued for Pawnbroker on
Complaint From Prosecutor's Office.

For the use of $16.50 for eleven months, $15 interest, or 10 per cent a month, is alleged to have been charged by O. H. Stevens, a pawnbroker at 125 East Twelfth street, of H. S. Elder. A warrant was issued yesterday for the pawnbroker's arrest on a complaint charging him with violating the state usury law.

The complainant says that November 20, 1908, he pawned a gold watch chain and locket for $16.50. When he went to redeem the jewelry last month, he said, 10 per cent per month interest was demanded.

"This office has not started a crusade, so to speak, against usurious pawnbrokers," said Ruby Garrett, the assistant prosecutor who has these cases in charge, "but anyone who has been held up for exorbitant rates of interest we would consider it a favor if they would report the same."

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December 10, 1909

KNIFE THRUST ENDS SPEECH.

Soldier, Fatally Wounded, Unable to
Make a Statement.

As the result of a fight between privates of Troop F, Fifteenth United States cavalry, which occurred at Twelfth and Central last night, Frank McFadden is at the general hospital with a knife wound below his heart which may prove fatal, and John Chrobel is suffering from a badly gashed back. George Pease, who is supposed to have done the stabbing, was arrested by Patrolman J. J. Lovell and is held at police headquarters.

McFadden was hurried to the emergency hospital. Dr. H. A. Pond, seeing that the man was probably fatally injured, sent for Assistant Prosecutor Norman Woodson. Further examination of the man showed that the vagus nerve had been injured, affecting the vocal chords and rendering him in capable of speech, and the prosecutor could take no statement.

The troops at Fort Leavenworth, where the Fifteenth cavalry is stationed, were paid off yesterday and McFaddden, Chrobel and Pease came to Kansas City together. They spent all day in the North end of town and were on the way to a theater when the quarrel occurred.

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November 29, 1909

FIRST MOOSE FUNERAL.

250 Members of Kansas City Lodge
Honor Departed Brother.

The Kansas City lodge of the Loyal Order of the Moose had its first funeral yesterday afternoon, when it buried in Mount St. Mary's cemetery, Charles Burns, a contracting carpenter of 1316 Walnut street, who died in St. Mary's hospital last Tuesday. Mr. Burns was a charter member of the local order and the first of nearly 1,000 Kansas City Moose to die. Local lodge officials tried for several days to locate relatives of Burns in the East but without success.

Yesterday's funeral procession included 250 members of the order. It was headed by a brass band and started from the Moose club rooms, at Twelfth and Central streets. From there the cortege moved to the Cathedral, where the Catholic ceremonies were held, Father Lyons preaching the sermon.

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November 14, 1909

ARCHBISHOP GLENNON LAYS
ST. TERESA CORNER STONE.

St. Louis Prelate Puts in Two Busy
Days in Kansas City -- Enjoyed
Every Moment.

Several hundred Knights of Columbus were present at the reception given in honor of Archbishop Glennon at their new hall at Thirty-first and Main streets Friday. After renewing many old friendships the archbishop left for St. Louis at 11 o'clock that night.

"It has been a busy two days," he said last night, "but I have enjoyed every moment of my visit. I only wish that I could remain longer. I thank the Lord for the good that He has enabled me to do in Kansas City."

As the result of the prelate's appeal to the public to aid the work that is being carried on by the House of the Good Shepherd, in his lecture at Convention hall last Thursday night, over $5,000 has been collected, and more has been pledged.

Yesterday morning Archbishop Glennon went to the old St. Teresa's academy at Twelfth and Washington streets and celebrated mass. After visiting Loretto academy he returned to St. Teresa's, where a musicale was given in his honor. In the afternoon he laid the corner stone of the new St. Teresa's academy building at Fifth street and Broadway. It rained hard throughout the whole service but over 300 people stood bare headed in the mud while the archbishop put the stone in place and blessed the building.

In the evening Archbishop Glennon was the guest of honor at a dinner given at the home of Hugh Mathews, 1014 West Thirty-ninth street, and attended by Bishop Hogan, Bishop Lillis, Brother Charles and Father Walsh. The party then attended the Knights of Columbus reception.

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November 9, 1909

DOCTORS' VISITS TO
SCHOOLS BEGIN TODAY.

Especial Attention Will Be Given
to Throat and Eye Diseases and
Examinations Will Be Made
in Teacher's Presence.

Eight doctors will visit the public schools today to arrange with the principals suitable hours for the medical examination of pupils, the long-cherished project of Dr. W. S. Wheeler, health commissioner. Dr. Wheeler hopes to have the system in perfect working order by the end of the week.

In his office at Twelfth street and Grand avenue last night, Dr. Wheeler read his instructions to his assistants and furnished each with blanks and other material. The schools are to be visited at least three days a week and those in the North End and river wards every day.

TO HAVE SPECIAL ROOM.

The examiners are to make arrangements with the principal for a room where the pupils can be examined. Not all the pupils in each school are to be brought before the physician. Those who are suspected of having contagious diseases or who have been absent from school are to be called into the room and placed in charge of the medical examiner.

If it is found that the pupil is suffering from a contagious disease, he is at once sent home by the teacher, and can not return until he has again been examined by the physician, and his condition pronounced improved.

Especial attention will be paid to the diseases of the eye and teeth. The dental colleges have agreed to do work free for all pupils who present the proper credentials.

SPECIALISTS' WORK FREE.

Several specialists on eye diseases have agreed to make medical examinations free of charge for all pupils whose parents are not able to consult oculists of recognized standing.

"Remember," said Dr. Wheeler, "that you are not to make an examination unless in the presence of the teacher or principal. No pupil is to be vaccinated unless with permission of the parents. The office of medical examiner is not to be used as a means to solicit personal business."

Dr. Wheeler has spent more than a year studying the systems in use in other cities of the country. He not only has the advantage of the ideas of other cities, but also his personal experience for several years in Kansas City. By the end of the year he hopes to see the high schools in the list.

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November 3, 1909

NEW THEATER OPENS SUNDAY.

Musical Comedy, Vaudeville With
Burlesque Tinge at the Gayety.

The new Gayety theater will open Sunday afternoon with a matinee by the "College Girls" Company. The house is to be devoted to musical comedy and vaudeville with a burlesque tinge. It is owned by the Kansas City Theater Company of New York and will be managed by Thomas Hodgeman, the present manager of the Majestic theater.

The new theater is at Twelfth and Wyandotte streets and has several innovations. The dressing rooms are all outside the theater proper. On the Twelfth street and Wyandotte street sides business houses will occupy the fronts with the exception of the main entrance on Wyandotte street. The theater is surrounded on four sides by open spaces, which provide four exits from the ground floor and two each from the other two floors, in addition to two emergency exits from each of the top floors.

The interior is finished in "art noveau," the colors being gold and yellow. With the exception of the chairs the theater is entirely fireproof. It will have a seating capacity of 1,650. There are three floors, with 550 chairs on the orchestra floor, 400 on the balcony floor, 600 on the gallery floor and 100 in the twelve boxes. The stage will be protected by an ornamental asbestos curtain.

The auditorium of the theater is 72 by 108 feet, of which 40 by 70 feet is taken up by the stage. Inclines instead of stairs will be used to gain access to the first two floors.

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September 26, 1909

NEW ACTS AT HIPPODROME.

East Side Place of Amusement Opens
for the Season.

The Hippodrome, at Twelfth and Charlotte streets, opened for the season last night and nearly 5,000 persons attended, the roller skating rink and the dance hall, both remodeled and redecorated, drawing the most patronage. Last night's visitors saw a brand new Hippodrome. There was a greater floor space, better illumination and a bigger variety of attractions than ever before. The new ball room, which has been latticed and banked with satin roses and artificial shrubbery, aroused the admiration of the Hippodrome dancers.

Last night's visitors found plenty outside the dance hall and the skating rink to interest them. There was the Vienna garden, a new permanent feature, which seems destined to meet with favor. Free continuous vaudeville is offered in the Vienna village, which is laid with tanbark and inclosed by lattice work. Elston's dog and pony show was another new attraction that offered many novelties.

The Great La Salle, one of the most daring of roller skate experts, was the big arena attraction last night. La Salle makes a thrilling descent on a 60 per cent incline from the roof of the Hippodrome, and his exhibition belongs in the division of hair raisers.

Numerous concessions along the Hippodrome "Boardwalk" offer plenty of diversion. The place will open this afternoon at 2 o'clock and the performance will be continuous until midnight.

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September 25, 1909

HIS MOTHER TO A HOSPITAL.

So 10-Year-Old Son Starts to Walk
to Clinton, Mo.

Ernest Wolf, 10 years old, weak from typhoid fever and just out of a hospital, started out last evening to walk from his home in the rear of Holmes and Twelfth streets, from which place his mother is to be taken to a hospital today to his father's at Clinton, Mo.

The little fellow expected to follow the railroad tracks. When he got to the Union depot he saw so many tracks that he became frightened and began asking questions.

According to Ernest's story which Mrs. Everingham verified through the authorities, his mother, Alice, has been so ill that she has not been able to work for almost a month and arrangements were made yesterday to take her to a hospital.

Mrs. Everingham arranged last evening with the Associated Charities to take care of the boy until his mother is able to support him again.

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September 21, 1909

FRIENDSHIP ENDS IN
MURDER AND SUICIDE.

WILLIAM JACOBIA KILLS MRS.
SADIE STOLL AND HIMSELF.

Young Son of Woman Heard Quarrel
and Shooting -- Risks Life Try-
ing to Protect His
Mother.
Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, Murdered Woman.
MRS. SADIE BROWN STOLL.
Wife of Samuel F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company.

Murder and suicide ended a close friendship last night when William Jacobia, 600 East Ninth street, shot and killed Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, 3617 Tracy avenue, during a quarrel in the front hall of the Stoll home at 9 o'clock and a few minutes later committed suicide on the veranda of his wife's residence, 3217 Forest avenue.

Mrs. Stoll was shot through the heart and died at once. Jacobia shot himself in the head.

The only person in the house at the time Mrs. Stoll was murdered was her 14-year-old son Albert. What passed between the couple before the tragedy is not known definitely, but they were quarreling for nearly a half hour before Jacobia fired the shot. Albert Stoll heard part of the conversation between his mother and Jacobia, but was sent to his room by her just before the shooting.


BOY GETS A SHOTGUN.

That the young son expected serious trouble while Jacobia was there is shown by Jacobia's actions, which Albert Stoll graphically described to the police last night. Immediately after firing the shot which killed Mrs. Stoll, Jacobia started up the stairs, threatening to kill Albert, who had provided himself with a shotgun to protect his own life.

Either the shotgun frightened him or the desire to get away from the scene of his crime, Jacobia gave up the pursuit of the boy, and ran from the house, followed by Albert, who gave the alarm by crying for help.

But few minutes elapsed between the first and second shooting. It is only five blocks from the Stoll home at 3617 Tracy avenue to Mrs. Jacobia's suite in the Alabama apartment house, 3237 Forest avenue, and Jacobia ran all the way.


"I HAVE SHOT MRS. STOLL."

A balcony with no outside steps is front of her apartment, which is on the ground floor. Jacobia made his entrance by way of this balcony and in doing so had to climb over a stone balustrade which encloses it. As he entered with much agitation he said to his wife, who had come to let him in:

"Mamma, I had to come home."

She could see that he was greatly excited, and told him to sit down while she got him a glass of cold water.

"No, no!" he protested, excitedly, "I haven't time. I have just shot Mrs. Stoll. It is awful, it is awful."
William Jacobia; Killed His Friend and Then Himself.
WILLIAM JACOBIA.
Slayer of Mrs. Samuel F. Stoll, who committed suicide when the police traced him to his wife's home at 3217 Forest avenue.

Incoherently he was trying to tell her of the shooting when he heard the sound of steps outside.

"There are the officers coming for me," he said.

"Yes, but you will have to nerve yourself and be calm," she told him.

Mrs. Jacobia went to the door to let in Sergeant M. E. Cassidy and Patrolman Isaac Hull of No. 9 station, and as she did so her husband stepped out on the balcony.

"Where is he?" asked Sergeant Cassidy.


WIFE HEARS DEATH SHOT.

Just then they heard a single shot, and the three went hurriedly to the balcony door.

"There he lies," she answered, pointing to the dead body of her husband, prostrate on the stone floor of the porch. The husband of the murdered woman is S. F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company, formerly at Twelfth street and Grand avenue, and now located at 208 and 210 East Twelfth street. He was notified of the death of his wife by W. R. James, 3615 Tracy avenue. Sam Brown Stoll, 18 years old, the oldest son, was at a theater, and friends were unable to reach him by telephone.

According to the facts as told by Albert last night Jacobia telephoned yesterday afternoon about 3 o'clock and asked for Mrs. Stoll. Albert answered the telephone and upon recognizing Jacobia's voice hung up the receiver. About 8 o'clock last night he again called up and was answered by Mrs. Stoll, and a half hour later appeared at the house.

Mrs. Stoll fell dead in the hallway at the foot of the stairs. Her head was lying against the bottom step, while her feet pointed to the front door. Soon after Mr. Stoll reached home he asked neighbors and friends to inform the relatives of his wife of her death. J. H. Brown, a brother, who lives in Atchison, Kas., was informed of the tragedy.

"Tell all of them to come," said Albert, who was telling his father what should be done.

The account of the shooting as told by young Albert Stoll soon after the murder, while not full in all details, shows daring in a boy so young as far as his part was concerned. He said that he and his brother did not like Jacobia, and that a week ago Sam had purchased a shotgun with the intention of killing the man who was his mother's friend. The shotgun had been kept in their room until a day or so ago, when his mother removed it to the attic.

"Yesterday afternoon when Jacobia called up and asked for mamma, I hung up the receiver," said Albert. "Then about 8 tonight he called mother, and soon afterwards he came to the house. I was in my room at the time. When I heard mamma and Jacobia fussing I decided I would get the shotgun, which I did. I took a shell and after taking out the wad and shot I went down to the first landing and stood there.

HEARD HIS MOTHER SHOT.

"I told Jacobia to leave the house, that he did not have any business here anyway. At that he got mad at me and told me to keep still or he would beat me. Then to bluff him I picked up the shotgun and put a load into it. Mamma made me go to my room, saying she would get Jacobia awa.

"I'll not let that little pup talk to me that way," Jacobia is said to have repeated to Mrs. Stoll.

"Just as I reached the upper hall I heard the shot, and then mamma say, 'Albert, he shot me.' 'Yes, and I'll shoot him, too,' I heard Jacobia say as I was hurrying back downstairs. Jacobia was coming up the stairs, and knowing my shell was not good, I ran to my room and put a loaded shell in the gun and then came downstairs.

RAN AFTER JACOBIA.

"As I reached the head of the stairway Jacobia was going out the front door, and I ran down the steps and followed into the yard. He was then going up the street. I cried 'Help, help,' and someone across the street asked, 'What is the matter, Albert?' When I said mamma is shot nearly all of the people started to the house and I came back and called up papa, but he didn't answer. Then someone told the police.

"I wish I had shot him," Albert admitted.

"Oh, God, why didn't you shoot the scoundrel, boy?" Mr. Stoll asked of his son.

Albert insisted that he did not know what his mother and Jacobia were talking about. Whenever Albert endeavored to tell the police just what occurred, and how, Mr. Stoll, who was walking the floor of the lower rooms, would tell him to keep still. Mr. Stoll refused to answer any questions immediately after the murder.

HUSBAND STILL LOVED HER.

"I loved her with every drop of blood in my body," he said, "and I will not say anything against her. I would not say a word that would reflect upon her. Oh, God, why couldn't he have shot me?"

Not until Samuel Stoll, the elder son, came home after the performance at a theater, did he learn of the tragedy. As he hurried up the steps, he was met by J. A. Guthrie, a friend of the family.

"For God's sake, what's the matter?" he said with a perplexed face.

Then he saw the white shrouded figure in the parlor with the undertaker and his assistants standing near. Mr. Stoll, who saw him, threw his arms about the boy's neck and shouted:

"Your friend killed her, that's what he did. And you knew he was coming to see her all the time."

WHEN THE TWO FIRST MET.

Then both were hurried up the stairs by friends.

"I'll kill him myself," said the youth.

"He has done that to save you the trouble," said Mr. Guthrie. "He committed suicide just after he killed your mother."

Then the father upbraided the son for several minutes, but the youth declared he knew nothing about it. Then both began weeping hysterically, and were finally reconciled. But the father could not remain seated. He walked the floor in anguish.

"I knew the first day he saw my wife," he said. "One day when he was building those flats up on Forest avenue, he came in to use the telephone, and my wife met him at the door. He introduced himself, which was the beginning of their acquaintance. I began to get suspicious when I saw him at the house several times.

WAS TOLD TO WATCH WIFE.

"Somehow I had a suspicion that all was not right, and at times I felt sick. On one occasion I asked her about it, but she became angry and upbraided me so much that I felt almost humiliated. She went on occasional visits to Atchison, and I was suspicious every time that she left home.

"On one of the visits to Atchison, I found his picture in the close, and I was so angry when she came home that I could wait no longer. She flew into a rage, and I could do nothing but submit, not wishing to make the affair public.

"My feelings were again wrought to a high pitch when I received an anonymous letter, telling me I ought to watch my wife. I then determined to hire a detective agency to watch her, but after hiring two men I thought differently and canceled my contract with the firm.

"It has been that way for months until tonight when I was called to the telephone and was told that my wife had been shot. I won't harbor any ill will against her for my boys' sake. She was their mother.

Mrs. Stoll was a large woman with a rich mass of dark brown hair. Her face was full and her eyes were dark brown, which matched her olive complexion. She was considered one of the handsomest women in the neighborhood, and always attracted attention on the street by her dignified bearing. A dimple in her cheek was heightened by an engaging smile. She always dressed in clothes of the latest fashion, which while not always expensive, always were tasteful. She was 38 years old.

Mrs. Stoll was the daughter of J. P. Brown, a wealthy man who lived at Atchison, Kas., Her father died about three weeks ago. He was well known in and around Atchison being one of the most prominent men in that community. While the Stolls lived in Atchison Mr. Stoll conducted a drug store there.

JACOBIA 46 YEARS OLD.

William Jacobia, the dead man, was 46 years old and rather stout. Those who had known him in life said last night that he was apparently of a happy disposition, with rare conversational powers. He took uniformly with women and men, the former long remembering his bright wit and ready flow of small talk.

When Mr. and Mrs. Jacobia were married October 8, 1890, he was an engineer on a Kansas branch of the Missouri Pacific railway. Later he left the railroad in favor of the banking business and founded the Farmer's state bank, the stock of which was owned mostly by farmers at Corning, Kas., which was his birthplace. Seven years ago he sold out his interest in the Farmers' bank and came to Kansas City to enter the real estate business.

POLICE "DIDN'T KNOW."

The police notified Dr. B. H. Zwart, coroner, of the double crime and he in turn notified Deputy Coroner Dr. Harry Czarlinsky. The bodies of the murdered woman and suicide were sent to the Carroll - Davidson undertaking rooms by the deputy coroner.

The police who were stationed at the home of Mrs. Stoll and Mrs. Jacobia refused to give any information regarding the tragedy last night. Whenever any of them were asked who shot the woman or why he shot her or an y other question relative to the case the invariable answer was "I don't know."

One policeman was asked if the body lying in the front hall of the Stoll home was a man or woman, and he said, "I don't know."

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August 29, 1909

YOUTHFUL RUNAWAYS
WALKED 10 MILES.

Journey in Hot Sun Made Them
Long for Home.

Three foot-sore and weary runaways arrived in Kansas City last night by rail from Valencia, Kas. They were Uhlen and Juanita Templeton, 16 and 18 years old respectively, and Helen Duncan, 16 years old. The trio left Kansas City Monday morning by the Rock Island and rode as far as Topeka, Kas. When they left, their intention was to get to Stanley, N. M., where John Templeton, father of the Templeton youngsters, has a mining claim.


HELEN DUNCAN.

Their money gave out in Topeka and they decided to walk the rest of the way to New Mexico, working at intervals along the way for "lifts" by rail. Monday was a hot day and the ten miles they walked to Valencia all but exhausted them. Uhlen would not allow his sister or Helen to carry a suit case in which were the trio's belongings. After a few miles it was decided to throw the grip away and "hoof it" without burdens.

FOOT SORE AND WEARY.

They arrived at the depot in Valencia, hungry, penniless, their feet blistered by the walk over the railroad ties in the blazing sun. Their presence, unaccompanied and without baggage created suspicion. After several offers had been made to them a young man named John Moore, a "good Samaritan," took them to his mother's home for the night. Tuesday morning a council of war was held and a collection was taken up by the Ladies' Aid Society of one of the local churches and they were sent home, after the matron at the Union depot had been wired to be on the lookout for them.

JUANITA TEMPLETON.

Mrs. Elizabeth Cole, 3712 East Twelfth street, grandmother of the Templetons, has had the care of them since the death of their mother more than a year ago.

Promising that they would "go straight home," the trio were allowed to leave the Union depot, after the fact concerning Mrs. Cole's residence was learned. They went to the home of Helen Duncan 632 Fremont avenue. When a short distance from that address, Uhlen balked, saying he didn't want to stay there. He left the girls, saying he intended to make his way to his father in New Mexico.

BOY FEARED A SCOLDING.

"He was afraid to go to grandma's," said Juanita at her grandmother's home, "for fear he would be scolded by our brother, Lester. When we were in Valencia, Mr. Moore, who was so kind to us, told Uhlen that if he did not like it at home for him to go back up there and he would see that he was cared for. I believe that he will try to beat his way to where pap is, however.."


UHLEN TEMPLETON.

The police have been ordered to look for Uhlen Templeton, who is 5 feet 2 inches tall and weighs about 120 pounds He has dark hair, dark blue eyes and a fair complexion. When last seen he wore a dark blue serge two-piece suit of clothes and a light shirt. He wore a dark, soft hat and dark shoes. The missing boy, with his brother, Lester, 19 years old, has been working for the Pittsburg Paint and Glass Company, Fifth and Wyandotte streets. His fear of being "roasted" by Lester is said to have been the cause of the sudden departure.

Mrs. Cole, the grandmother, is greatly worried over the absence of the boy, and his sister, Juanita, was in a serious condition from hysterics last night. She said that she had been the cause of Uhlen's going away, and, in her temporary delirium, she believed he had been killed.

"Both of the children are headstrong," said the grandmother. "Uhlen has never left me before. If the police can get Uhlen back for me I believe that both will have been cured of running away."

"It was our intention to work our way to papa in New Mexico," said Juanita, when she became quiet enough to talk. "We had but little money, and after we had been in Topeka a short time it was lost. Then we set out on foot towards the West, Uhlen carrying the grip. After we had walked several miles the brave little fellow nearly gave out, and as he would not allow either of us to carry it, we threw it away. The section hands tried to find it later, but they couldn't. My feet are all blisters, and Uhlen's are worse. I know that I am going to stay right here and never go away again."
Helen Duncan is now safely ensconced at home. The girls had been directed to a boarding house in Valencia where they would be allowed to do housework, while Uhlen did the chores, when they were discovered by Mr. Moore, who took them to his mother.

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August 4, 1909

EMPLOYES OF NICKEL
SHOWS FORM A UNION.

WILL DEMAND MORE PAY AND
DAY OFF A WEEK.

Those in Charge of Movement Claim
Present Salaries Are Too Low,
Considering Work and
Long Hours.

A new labor union, new at least in this city, will spring into life full grown at a meeting of its fifty members at Labor headquarters, Locust and Twelfth streets, tomorrow night. The charter recognizing the Kansas City Nickel Show Operators' Union, which was sent for yesterday, will be read and officers elected. Things will then begin to happen to the managements of the seventy-five or more 5-cent arcades, nickelodeons and electric theaters scattered about the city.

If they do not at once accede to a demand for an immediate raise in salaries, a day off each week for recuperative purposes and shorter hours all around, lantern operators, piano players, doorkeepers and even the blonde haired women cashiers may make a general exit.

SAY THEY ARE POORLY PAID.

"We are the poorest paid employes in the city considering the skill required of us and the long hours we are forced to keep," said H. C. Bernard, Seventy-fifth street and West Prospect avenue, the president of the union, last night. "Door-keepers and operators get $12 a week while girl cashiers and piano players get only from $2 to $4. I can't remember of even having heard of a singer receiving more than $8 in this city for the repeated strain on his or her vocal cords.

"I know of one skillful operator of a lantern who got $25 a week in Chicago a month ago and is now drawing a weekly check for $4 and he often works 15 hours a day with no day off."

A business manager in the Yale 5 cent shows general offices said yesterday that he did not fear a strike and that one if it came would not seriously retard the business of his company.

CLAIMS WORK IS LIGHT.

"I will tough a wire the minute they strike and get 100 operators from Chicago in short order," said he. "The work done by the operators, doorkeepers and singers is very light, although somewhat tedious. As a rule they have the forenoons off and can use them to make money at other things. My company will fight a strike to the last, and if a union is organized will discharge every man or woman caught attending a union meeting."

The new union will be affiliated with the International Theatrical Stage Employes' union, and will have auxiliaries taking in all employes, male and female, of the 5-cent shows. Several secret meetings have been held by the union organizers in a room at labor headquarters and about fifty operators have joined. There are about 500 employes of the nickel theaters in the city.

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July 24, 1909

VULCANIZER IS WRECKED.

Dr. A. S. Kaulbauch, Dentist, Has
Narrow Escape in Office.

Carrying a pressure of 250 pounds to the square inch, a vulcanizer gave way in the work room of Dr. A. S. Kaulbach, a dentist, at Twelfth and Main street, yesterday afternoon. The vulcanizer was wrecked, several sections narrowly missing Dr. Kaulbach. He was splattered with debris from the room, and two windows were blown out.

W. B. Clark, the crossing policeman, was under the impression that an amateur safe cracker was at work, so loud was the noise of the explosion.

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July 22, 1909

LOCKWOOD SOLD HIS FIND.

Unidentified Monster Found in North End
to Be a Circus Exhibit.

James Lockwood, who discovered a peculiar reptile near Second and Wyandotte streets Tuesday, was possessed of a spirit of commercialism yesterday morning and placed the long-tailed creature on exhibition near Twelfth and Main streets. After he had been visited by naturalists and curious ones for half a day and had cleared at least $3, he decided to sell his new found possession. A man who claimed that he was a circus advance agent gave him $15 for sole possession. He promptly took down his sign and left his place of business.

No one was able to tell what the creature really is. It was agreed that it belonged to the lizard family.

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June 29, 1909

CAN'T FIND HER BROTHER.

Gertrude Arlington Came Here to
Keep House for Him.

Gertrude Arlington, 18 years old, who arrived in Kansas City yesterday from Goffs, Kas., expecting to meet her brother, Edward Arlington, at the Union depot was disappointed when the young man failed to put in an appearance. Arlington is a switchman, recently come to Kansas City from Minneapolis, Minn. He had written the girl to come and keep house for him.

That he lived somewhere on West Twelfth street was all the information the girl could give concerning her brother's whereabouts. She had written him a letter the day before telling of her coming and had directed it to the general delivery.

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June 17, 1909

QUIT BRIDE BEFORE
END OF HONEYMOON.

FORMER MATRON HAS HER HUS-
BAND ARRESTED.

Married Just a Month Ago, Mrs.
Frances Rodgers Burgess Charges
Desertion, and Has Earl
Locked Up.

Just one month ago today, Mrs. Frances Rodgers, 32 years old, matron of the George H. Nettleton home, married Earl Burgess, a distinguished looking stranger from St. Paul, whom she had known a month. Last night, Burgess slept in the holdover at police headquarters and will face Judge Kyle in the municipal court this morning on a charge of vagrancy. Mrs. Burgess, who claims that he deserted her a week ago in St. Joseph, after taking her savings, came to Kansas City, and in person saw that he was safely locked up.

"I'm going to prosecute him," she declared as she stamped her foot last night at the police station. "He has taken every cent of my money, and now I'm penniless."

GIRLS' PICTURES IN POCKET.

Burgess, who is 46 years old, and who was wearing a light gray summer suit of clothes, looked extremely downcast when the jailer inspected his pockets. He colored slightly when several miniature photographs of young women were discovered.

"I met him in April," said the wife, "and he represented himself as a retired traveling man. He said that he had property in St. Paul, Oklahoma City and Omaha. In fact he was just traveling because he hated to be idle.

"I became interested at once, and accepted when he proposed marriage. I was then matron of the Nettleton home at a good salary. We went to St. Joseph, my former home, where my two children by my first marriage are in school. He then left me, but returned five days later.

DEAF TO HIS PLEADINGS.

"I forgave the first desertion, but when he again left me last Thursday I couldn't stand it any longer. He claimed that he had gone to St. Paul, but I traced him to Kansas City. I'm mighty glad to see that he is arrested, but I don't know what I'm going to do without money. I don't think he has a foot of property."

Detectives J. J. Raferty and M. J. Halvey arrested Burgess at a rooming house near Fourteenth and Broadway, where he was with a young woman. Mrs. Burgess waited for the detectives at Twelfth street and Broadway, and accompanied them to the station. Burgess implored her not to have him locked up, but his wife ignored his pleadings.

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June 8, 1909

SPENDS HIS TIME PRAYING.

Claud Brooks to Be Hanged for
Murder June 30.

No preparations have been made at the county jail for the execution of Claud Brooks, who is to be hanged June 30 for the murder of Sidney Herndon, owner of the Navarro flats, Twelfth and Baltimore. Brooks will not be put into the condemned men's cell until June 10. It is customary to grant men sentenced to execution an reprieve of sixty days, and this may be done in the case of Brooks.

The condemned man spends most of his time praying.

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June 5, 1909

YOEMEN TO MINNEAPOLIS.

Two Hundred Members Will Parade
Tonight to Special Train.

A parade of 200 members of the Brotherhood of American Yoemen will take place at 8:30 tonight, preliminary to t heir departure for Minneapolis, Minn., to attend the national conclave. The parade will take the route from the hall, 1013 Holmes street, to Fifteenth street to Grand avenue, then to Twelfth street and over to Main street, where it will turn north to Ninth. Cars for the depot will be boarded at the junction.

In the party going North will be the young women's military drill team, young men's military drill team and the degree staff. They have chartered a special train for the trip.

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May 28, 1909

UNKNOWN MAN TRIES TO
KILL ROBERT M'CLINTOCK.

Attacks Him With Knife in Front
of Twelfth Street Entrance to
His Restaurant.

While standing in the front of the Twelfth street entrance to McClintock's restaurant, Twelfth and Walnut streets, Robert McClintock, son of the proprietor, was stabbed three times by one of three passersby, who attacked him without provocation or warning. Hundreds of people were on their way home from the theaters at the time.

Mr. McClintock's stiff hat broke the force of the first blow, but the blade cut a long gash in his scalp. The second cut also was in the head, near the first. McClintock, weak from the loss of blood, then grappled with his assailant, who cut him again on the forehead and broke away, pursued by a dozen men, but eventually escaping.

R. S. McClintock, proprietor of the restaurant, was standing in front of the Walnut street entrance when he saw a man run panting past him. He wore no hat and several men were chasing him. A moment later his son was led into the restaurant with the blood streaming down his face.

"I'm sure I would know the man if I saw him again," said Mr. McClintock last night. "Had I known what he had done, I could have knocked him down as he ran past. I don't know of an enemy Robert has. I will give $100 for his assailant's arrest and conviction.

Young McClintock remembered that he had an altercation a year ago over the payment of a check with a man to whom his assailant bore a strong resemblance.

The assailant left his hat. In the sweatband were the initials "D. D." It bore the brand of the "Lid," and evidently had been worn several months.

A cashier in the restaurant declared that three men a half hour before had come in and asked the whereabouts of Robert McClintock. Without thinking anything peculiar in their actions, she told them that he was likely in the office on the Walnut street side. Satisfied that he was inside, the men waited until he appeared.

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May 28, 1909

BOUNDARIES FOR TENDERLOIN.

Tenement Commission's Advice Con-
cerning "Red Light" Districts.

In a letter to the board of police commissioners yesterday the tenement commission advised the board that conditions on Twelfth street in the neighborhood of Central high school were not ideal, and that many hotels and rooming houses in that neighborhood were frequented by an undesirable class of inmates.

The commission also advised that the "red light" district be segregated to definite boundaries, south of Twelfth street. The letter advised that the boundaries of the district be fixed at Main street on the west, McGee street on the east, Eighteenth street on the south and Fourteenth street on the north. The district in the North End should be bounded on the north by Second street, on the east by Wyandotte street, on the south by Fifth street and on the west by Broadway.

Commissioner Marks was delegated to make an investigation of the matter, and report at the next meeting.

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May 18, 1909

ONE HUNDRED MULES
BURNED IN STABLES.

GUYTON & HERRINGTON SUF-
FER BIG LOSS BY FIRE.

Animals, Fascinated by Flames, Re-
fuse to Escape -- Two Hundred
Horses, Released From Adjoin-
ing Stable, At Large.

More than 100 mules were burned to death in Guyton & Herrington's stables at Seventeenth and Genessee streets last night. Fascinated by the flames, they made no effort to save themselves, but slowly roasted to death, while hundreds of men stood outside shouting to scare the mules away from their death. The building was completely destroyed.

William L. Orvis, salesman for the firm, said there were 300 in the stable. The number of incinerated animals may reach 150.

Sam and Laurence Crane, who live at 2 Kansas avenue, Kansas City, Kas., were the first to see the flames, which had already gained considerable headway inside the locked building. They began trying to lead the already terrified mules out of the fire.

Companies were hurried from Nos. 1, 7, 9, 15 and 16 stations were sent. The Crane boys were inside the building when the first stream of water hit the windows. One of the sashes was knocked off and fell upon the head of Sam Crane, knocking him unconscious. He was dragged out of the flames by his brother and later revived.

Other men rushed into the furnace-like heat and strove to make the mules run out, but the blinded beasts huddled together. Volunteer horse saves raided the barn of Cottingham Bros., next door, and released more than 200 animals, which scattered in every direction. At midnight only sixty-nine had been recovered. A platoon of eight horses rushed up the viaduct of the Twelfth street trolley line and stampeded Twelfth street to Grand avenue, where they turned left and were lost in the North End.

Cottingham's barn next door was not damaged. Two small stables used by Guyton & Herrington, across the alley on Seventeenth and Wyoming streets, were saved.

A watchman was supposed to sleep in the building. What became of him is not known.

The value of the stable, which was of brick, is estimated at $20,000. The mules were worth from $200 to $250 apiece. The building was the property of the stock yards company and was insured. Both Guyton and Herrington were out of town when the fire occurred. They will continue business in the stables on Wyoming street.

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May 3, 1909

NEW VAUDEVILLE THEATER?

Report That William Morris, "The
Independent," Will Enter Kan-
sas City Field.

That William Morris, Inc., the independent vaudeville magnate, who is fighting the vaudeville houses controlled by the Orpheum, Keith & Proctor, Kohl and Castle and others of the so-called United offices, will have a theater in Kansas City next season is reported on excellent authority.

It was said last night that the man who owns the property at the northwest corner of Twelfth and McGee streets contemplated to build a 15-story office building on his site, the building to face on Twelfth street. Back of it will be erected a $100,000 theater, a separate structure which will face on McGee street. A Twelfth street entrance to the theater will be arranged through the office building.

Theodor D. Marks, who is affiliated with the Morris offices, was in Kansas City a month ago when the negotiations were begun. It is said that a Morris representative is due here next Saturday to close the lease on the property.

William Morris, Inc., now has vaudeville theaters in New York, Brooklyn, Boston, Newark and Chicago, and besides, is affiliated with Sullivan and Consadine vaudeville people in the distribution of certain of his bookings. Sullivan and Consadine have a circuit of theaters extending from coast to coast, but have never entered the Kansas City field on a big basis.

By jumping acts from his Chicago theater, Morris could give Kansas City a new vaudeville bill every week without the loss of a performance.

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April 27, 1909

WED, HE SAID, WHILE
IN HYPNOTIC TRANCE.

FOR THAT REASON CATTLEMAN
SUED FOR DIVORCE.

Charles E. Brooks Says Woman
Rubbed His Head Until He Was
Unconscious and Then
Got a License.

Hypnotism was responsible for his marriage, declared Charles E. Brooks, a cattleman, who yesterday secured a divorce from Estella Brooks by default in the circuit court. Judge Porterfield heard the case.

Brooks, who is about 55, while his former wife is 30, said in his testimony:

"I met Mrs. Estelle Neville February 6, 1908. She answered my advertisement for a housekeeper. She called me up and asked me to take her to lunch down town. During lunch she borrowed $30 from me. She said she could buy a $60 coat for $30 at a sale that day. The same evening she paid me back the money.

"At that time she was running a millinery store on Twelfth street. I went there on Saturday night, two days after I had met her. I was suffering from the effects of a street car accident. She asked me if I did not want her to rub peroxide on my forehead. I said no, but she got on her knees and began to rub my forehead. She continued to rub my head and asked me to marry her. She kept on rubbing my head until I did not know what was going on.

GOT LICENSE AT MIDNIGHT.

"Then she called up the recorder -- it was midnight -- and had a license issued. We went to a minister's and were married. On Sunday -- the next day -- I awoke in a hotel on West Twelfth street. I was in bed and she was sitting beside the bed. We went to her millinery store and stayed about an hour. After that I went to my daughter's home. I have never been back to Mrs. Brooks's home since.

In answer to questions by Judge Porterfield, Brooks said:

"She told me she was a hypnotist. She had several books on the subject."

This was Brooks's second attempt to get a divorce. Earlier in the year he brought proceedings to annul the marriage. He was brought into the court of Judge Goodrich, February 1, on a stretcher and taken to a hospital immediately afterwards. Judge Goodrich refused to hear the case, telling Brooks that he should sue for a divorce, as the things complained of had happened before the marriage. Mrs. Brooks filed an answer denying the charges.

The records of the recorder show that the Rev. Frank S. Arnold of 5143 Olive street performed the ceremony.

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April 21, 1909

BOY PRISONERS TELL
OF SEVEN HOLD-UPS.

IMPLICATE OTHERS IN STATE-
MENT TO INSPECTOR BOYLE.

Arrests May Lead to Breaking Up
Band of Highwaymen Which
Has Been Operating Al-
most Nightly.

FRANK M'DANIELS.

In the arrest of Joseph Tent, 20 years old, and Frank McDaniels, 18 years old, the police think that they have solved the identity of the mysterious highwaymen who have bee holding up persons almost nightly in Kansas City. The two, who are mere boys, admit that they have taken part in at least seven holdups in the last six weeks and Inspector Boyle thinks that they can be connected with several others.

For several hours yesterday afternoon, the boys were "sweated" in the inspector's office and at last were willing to make statements to the prosecuting attorney. Two or three others are implicated by the boys' confession and within the next few hours other arrests likely will follow. It is believed the boys are members of a gang of highwaymen, who prowl nightly in Kansas City.

The capture of the youthful bandits came about in a singular manner. In the reports of pawned jewelry that came into the hands of the detectives Monday afternoon was the description of a watch which had been taken from F. R. Hedges of 1004 Forest avenue on the night of April 15. It had been pawned Saturday, the pawn broker said, and a boy had left the watch at his office. Detective John Farrell stationed himself near the store and about 1 o'clock two young men entered the pawn shop and offered to redeem the watch.

PAWNBROKER GIVES TIP.

"Just wait a moment," said the pawnbroker, and he hurried outside. Farrell entered the shop and arrested both men. The younger proved to be Tent, who had secured a prospective purchase for the watch.

"I don't want to go unless you take the fellow that helped me," said Tent. "I don't want to go alone.

The chance to land another highwayman was satisfactory to the officer, and the two went to a photograph gallery at 310 East Twelfth street, where Tent admitted that Frank McDaniels, his partner, was working. The two climbed the narrow stairway and passed into the dark room of the gallery. Farrell was holding the young man to keep from losing his way. Suddenly he felt something pressing against his side, which instinctively he knew was a revolver. He jerked the revolver from the boy's hands. Tent denied that he had intended to fire.

"I was trying to get rid of it," he said to the officer, "and it was so dark that I couldn't see where I was placing it."

McDaniels was caught in the gallery and both were taken to headquarters. Both admitted that they had taken part in several robberies, but only two in each other's company. Experienced highwaymen had been their companions, the boys said, and the police are inclined to believe their story.


JOSEPH TENT.

In the inspector's office, the boys did not appear to realize the gravity of their deeds. Both admitted that older crooks had started them in the business. Both denied that they had started in the holdup business together, and claimed that they had known each other but a few days.

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April 20, 1909

STREET CAR A DAY NURSERY.

Unusual Duties Devolve Upon Mem-
bers of Twelfth Street Crew.

T. J. Randall, 522 Elmwood avenue, a conductor on the Twelfth street line of the Metropolitan street railway, and his motorman, were yesterday forced into temporary custodianship of a 2-year-old baby girl.

"When I helped a number of women to alight from my car at Twelfth street and Grand avenue about noon yesterday I didn't know that one of them was making a nursemaid of me," said Randall last night, "or I would surely have set up a longer and larger howl than the baby did a few minutes later.

"About the time I jingled the bell to get away from McGee street, and began to feel good about the light load I had aboard, with lunch looking strong at me after the next trip, I heard that wail. It was long and plaintive. At first I paid no attention to it, and as it persisted I looked into the car and saw the youngster was alone.

"I went to the little one and asked what was the matter. 'Mamma,' was all the answer I could get. 'Where is your mama?" I asked her, and the saddest, sorriest, most doleful and altogether hopeless 'gone,' from the baby, told the story. It was up to me and I made the best of it. I rocked her and talked to her and carried her up and down the car in an effort to quell the riot that was evidently going on within the breast of my diminutive and unwilling passenger.

"At the end of the line I made Allen, my motorman, take the kid, and he had his troubles for about five minutes while I got some candy. The trap back was really pleasant. The candy was good and the kiddy was better. Not another sound aside from the occasional smacking of tiny lips was heard all the way in. At Grand avenue, where the mother got off, there was a delegation waiting for me; mamma remembered her baby, and say, she was tickled to get that kid back in her arms again. But she wasn't any more tickled to get her than I was to get rid of her. Babies are all right at home, but a conductor's job was never calculated to include nursing."

Crossing Patrolman Heckenburg got the story a few minutes after the car left Grand avenue. The mother was almost frantic for nearly an hour, and stayed close to the bluecoat, anxiously inspecting every car that passed the corner until the right one came along.

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April 20, 1909

TRIED TO SHOOT A RAT.

But In His Eagerness Waiter Shot
Off Finger.

Quick work with a 38-caliber revolver while shooting rats in the store room of the Brooks restaurant at 108 East Twelfth street yesterday afternoon cost Edward Billeison, a waiter, the index finger of his left hand. Billeison had been watching a particularly elusive rodent several minutes trying to get a shot but always the rodent got his head down a hole in the nick of time. finally the waiter, tired of waiting in a manner not prescribed in the restaurant rules, took a sporting chance. He forgot to remove his finger from in front of the gun and while the rat escaped again Billeison had to consult a surgeon. He was attended by Dr. W. S. Wheeler.

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April 17, 1909

ZOO BENEFIT CIRCUS HERE.

Campbell's Elephants Raid an
Italian Fruit Stand.

The Campbell Bros.' big show, on a special train consisting of forty cars, arrived in the city yesterday over the Rock Island from winter quarters in Fairbury, Neb. There will be a parade this at 11:00 and the show opens in Convention hall in the evening, where performances will be given every afternoon and evening until April 25. The greater part of the receipts go to the Kansas City Zoological Society, which intends to establish a menagerie out at Swope park.

The Campbell show has a complete menagerie, has over 200 head of horses and employs over 500 men. After unloading, the animal cages and the horses were located in a vacant lot south of the big hall. The bulls, two herds of elephants and the camels were placed inside the hall.

"The baby camel, which was born three weeks ago and is the only one born in captivity, is doing fine. So is the mother, and the father is also pretty proud of his son."

The big parade will be nearly one mile long. All of the animal cages will be in line along with the trained animals. Performers will ride their trained horses and clowns will cavort for the benefit of the children. Three brass bands and a drum corps will furnish the music.

The elephants, while on the way to the hall, nearly stampeded when they came to a street fruit stand run by an Italian at Twelfth and Wyandotte streets. Alice, who was in the lead, spied the fruit, and, being ravenously hungry, protruded her snout and plucked a large luscious banana from a big bunch hanging on the outside of the stand. The others fell right in line and made a run for the fruit stand. The Italian threw up both hands and deserted his post.

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April 13, 1909

TIPPED HAT TO LYNCH'S WIFE.

For This Did Lynch Return and
Knock McDonald Down.

In the presence of 300 persons at Twelfth street and Grand avenue yesterday afternoon J. J. Lynch smashed John McDonald because the latter tipped his hat to Lynch's wife.

Lynch and his wife started to cross the street. McDonald, standing on the corner, lifted his hat and bowed.

"Do you know that man?" said Lynch.

"I do not," said Mrs. Lynch.

"Let's return and see if he does it again," said Lynch.

They returned and McDonald tipped his hat again and Lynch promptly knocked him down.

The fight waged fast and furious until a bystander separated the combatants.

Lynch and McDonald were arrested on a charge of disturbing the peace.

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April 8, 1909

ROUNDUP OF VAMPIRES
IN POLICE DISTRICT 4

TWENTY-SIX WELL DRESSED
VAGRANTS IN DRAGNET.

"Undesirables," Who for So Long
Have Defied Police, Find Their
Protectors Without Power
to Aid Them Longer.

Acting under express orders from the new board of police commissioners, Captain Thomas P. Flahive's men began yesterday to round up a gang of well dressed vagrants who for years have fattened in district No. 4 on the shame of 500 fallen women.

By midnight twenty-six male vampires were under arrest, and scores of other human vampires had fled from the scene of their long connection with the white slave traffic.

These hold degenerates, who aforetime flaunted their misdeeds in the faces of the patrolmen, and dared them to act, found yesterday that their pulls had vanished and that all crooks look alike to the police.

WOMEN GIVE BOND FOR MEN.

Also caught in the same net, which seined Kansas City from Twelfth to Nineteenth streets and from Locust to Wyandotte streets, were three of the women who supported these same well dressed vagrants.

So quickly did news of the crusade spread among the parasites that the officers who constituted the dragnet had to work quickly and silently. Four of those caught were found with suitcases packed, ready to leave the city. Captain Flahive believes that an exodus of vagrants has taken place. Twenty-four does not complete the count of those men known to the police, those men who live from the wages of unfortunate women. But in spite of the close search last night no more vagrants could be found.

Strangely enough the women seemed not to appreciate the work done by the police in delivering them from bondage, or perhaps it was fear. At any rate it was the woman, in most cases, who paid the $26 cash bond which liberated the arrested vagrant. All yesterday the telephone in the Walnut street police station was busy, and at the other end of the line was a woman who wanted to know if the particular vagrant whom she supported was arrested. Upon being in formed that such a person was under arrest, the woman, or her messenger, speedily appeared at the station with the necessary $26 in cash, and the vagrant was released on condition of his appearance in police court this morning.

Once liberated, all trace of the vagrant was lost and the district south of Twelfth street was as clean a district on the streets as any portion of the city.

IN THE RED LIGHT DISTRICT.

One other order given to the police captain by the board was to keep the scarlet woman off the streets at night. This order was obeyed to the letter last night, and the only three who fared forth were promptly arrested. Formerly it would have been impossible to have walked any block of that district after dark without being accosted. Usually he would have been met by groups of women, but it was different last night.

In No. 4 district, it is claimed, there are eighty-nine of the class of rooming houses referred to by the police commissioners in their orders to Captain Flahive yesterday and who are paying a monthly fine to the city. There are also hotels and rooming houses by the score which pay no fine and have been overlooked by the police entirely.

In order that Captain Flahive may make sure work of his cleaning up of the district, the commissioners have given him the pick of the men on the department, and have given him permission to use extra men. This morning the captain will confer with Chief Frank Snow and pick the men who are to fill the places in the cleanup.

At present the district over which Captain Flahive has control is lacking policemen. Several officers are forced to patrol more than one beat, which is a handicap when it comes to competent police protection.

Concerning the work, Captain Flahive said last night:

"I am going to clean this district. Within two weeks there will be no more well dressed vagrants loitering around the saloons and rooming houses. This order from the commissioners is one for which I have long waited."

"Why hasn't this cleanup taken place before?" the captain was asked. Surely other commissioners knew that these conditions existed here."

NOTORIOUS MEN CAUGHT.

"I have never been ordered to do so before," he replied. "But I do not wish to say anything about that. It is all dead, and I am going to carry out my orders now to the letter. This work is not a spurt, but it will be kept up, and this district will not know the well dressed vagrant after we have finished with them."

Among those vagrants who have been caught by the police are notorious men of the district, ringleaders in every kind of offense against decency. Many have been arrested before, but nothing ever came of the arrests. So bold did these vagrants become that they flaunted their misdeeds in the faces of the patrolmen, and then dared them to exercise the right of an officer.

The same tactics were tried yesterday, but without success. This time the patrolmen did not fear the loss of their stars for doing their duty.

The officers who made the arrests of vagrants yesterday are Sergeant Henry Goode and Patrolmen Mike Gleason and George Brooks.

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April 6, 1909

MONUMENT TO A. R. MEYER.

Sculptor Here to Discuss Unveiling,
Which May Take Place May 7.

Daniel Chester French, sculptor and designer of the monument to be erected to the memory of A. R. Meyer, first president of the park board, on the Paseo near Twelfth street, was here yesterday to consult with the committee of the Commercial club in regard to the unveiling. The members. The members of the committee are: E. M. Clendening, Frank A. Faxon, William Barton, H. D. Ashley, C. J. Schmelzer and George Kessler. The committee and Mr. French visited the site of the memorial and practically decided on May 7 as the date of the unveiling.

The sculptor said that the bronze statue was about finished and would be here in about two weeks. It will be seven and a half feet in height and will be supported by a bronze background.

Mr. French said that it was his second visit to Kansas city and he spoke in admiration of the parks and boulevards. He left for New York last night.

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March 31, 1909

THIS BROUGHAM RAN AWAY.

Unoccupied Electric Machine Scatters
Crowd on Walnut Street.

A crowd which had gathered at Twelfth and Walnut streets was scattered yesterday about noon when an unoccupied electric brougham belonging to Mrs. R. N. Simpson of 109 West Armour boulevard ran away. After it had run a block, however, the fractious car was stopped by a daring chauffeur who leaped from his own machine into the runaway.

The trouble began at Twelfth and Grand by a collision of a west bound Twelfth street car with the brougham, which narrowly missed inflicting serious injury. Mrs. Simpson, who was driving the electric, had with her a woman and a little girl. In her southward course along Grand avenue she had stopped the machine at the intersection of Twelfth street to await the passage of an eastbound car.

In the meantime a westbound car came along. The motorman failed to stop in time, and the front part of the brougham was struck a heavy blow. It was not overturned, however, and a policeman asked Mrs. Simpson to steer it to Twelfth and Walnut to avoid the gathering crowd. She did so, and with her companions, stepped out of the electric to use a nearby telephone.

The impact of the street car had loosened the mechanism of the machine and it caught fire from two crossed wires. In his eagerness to stop the blaze, a bystander inadvertently pushed forward the controller and the brougham started off by itself and got nearly to Thirteenth and Walnut before the chauffeur stopped it.

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March 26, 1909

CHORUS GIRLS IN NEW STUNT.

Will Break Ground for New Theater
at Noon Today.

Forty-two chorus girls will break ground for the new Gayety theater, which the Columbia Amusement Company of New York is to erect at Twelfth and Wyandotte streets at noon today. They are members of the Knickerbocker company, now playing at the Majestic theater, and the Trocadero company, billed there for next week.

"This is an idea of my own, and with all respect to the mayor, I believe it is much more original than to have him present to do the sodturning act," said Thomas Hodgeman, the manager. "Of course, he's tired of such performances, although he's much too good natured to refuse on such occasions."

"Will the girls be in stage costume?" was asked.

"Uh-huh; that is, I don't know. They may, and they may not. It depends on the weather, as manufactured by P. Connor. If it's a little chilly the girls -- oh, I hate to say it, but really, you know, some of them might catch cold."

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March 21, 1909

ACCIDENT STOPS FUNERAL.

Street Car Struck Coal Wagon and
the Wagon Jammed a Hearse.

An east-bound Twelfth street car collided with a coal wagon, which was waiting for a funeral procession to pass, forcing it into the hearse and nearly overturning the latter at Twelfth and Holmes streets yesterday morning. Jesse Roylston, a negro driver, was thrown from the coal wagon. His hip was bruised. He was taken to the general hospital.

The accident happened so quickly that no one could account for it afterward, but it is said to have been partly due to the abruptness with which the coal wagon driver halted his team in front of the car.

The funeral was that of Robert Burns of 1305 East Thirteenth street, and the procession, under the direction of the Woodmen of hte World, was on its way to St. Patrick's church. The hearse belonged to the J. C. Duffy Undertaking Company of Fifteenth street and Grand avenue and was driven by John Muser. It was only slightly damaged.

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March 17, 1909

WM. KENEFICK'S AUTO
SMASHED TO PIECES.

RAILROAD PRESIDENT'S CHAUF-
FEUR WAS HAVING "JOY RIDE."

Limousine Struck by Twelfth Street
Car and Five Occupants Hurled
to Ground -- One Seriously
Injured -- Owner in Paris.

An expensive motor car belonging to William Kenefick, 1485 Independence avenue, was demolished yesterday afternoon at 2:30 by being struck by a street car at Twelfth and Oak streets. Daisy West, 1333 McGee street, who was in the limousine, was seriously injured. The machine was driven by William Tate, a trusted employe of Mr. Kenefick, who is now in Paris. Mr. Kenefick is president of the Missouri, Oklahoma & Gulf railroad.


In the machine at the time of the accident were four friends of Tate' whom he was entertaining.


FOUR FRIENDS WITH HIM.


Taking the machine from the garage yesterday afternoon Tate invited four friends, two men and two women, to go for a ride over the boulevards. Leaving Miss West's home on McGee street, the driver steered the machine over to Oak and started north on that street. As he was crossing the street car tracks on Twelfth street a car going west struck the machine on the right side, just in front of the rear wheels. The machine was thrown over on the side and skidded across the street and onto the sidewalk on the northwest corner of Oak street.


Those persons riding inside of the limousine were thrown from their seats and besides being shaken up were cut by broken glass. Miss West was the only one seriously injured, and she was carried into Hucke's drug store, on the corner, and cared for until an ambulance from Eylar's Livery Company conveyed her to the University hospital.


GIRL SERIOUSLY INJURED.


Dr. George O. Todd was summoned and found the woman to be suffering from a severe wrench of the back, several scalp wounds and possible internal injuries. She was later taken to her home. At the hospital she gave the name of Davis.



The Admiral Auto Livery Company righted the maching and then towed it to the Pope-Hartford Auto Sales Company, 1925 Grand avenue. At the machine shop it was said that the machine was a total wreck and not worth repairing. Thee top was broken and cracked in various places and badly sprung.


NO PERMISSION TO USE CAR?


Mrs. J. W. H offman, 314 West Armour boulevard, a daughter of Mr. Kenefick, last night said that the chauffeur had not informed her of the accident. She said Tate had not been granted permission to use the car and had never before been known to use it secretly. The machine was a Pope-Toledo valued at $6,500 and was about a year old, she said. On Saturday the motor was taken out of the repair shop.


Tate, who is about 27 years old, has worked for Mr. Kenefick since he was 13 years old. Those in the machine at the time of the accident refused to talk aobut it or give their names. Patrolman Patrick Thornton, who walks on Twelfth street, arrived a few minutes after the accident but when the interested parties once refused to talk the patrolman ceased activity. He allowed them to go without getting any of the details as to who they were.

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March 11, 1909

AUTO EXPLODES CITY GAS.

Workman in Manhole Injured in an
Unusual Accident.

An automobile caused one of the most unusual accidents ever recorded in Kansas City, or any other city. The car was passing over an open manhole at Twelfth and Baltimore, where workmen were repairing a leaky gas main, when a spark from the machine caused the explosion of the gases issuing from the chamber.

There was a flash and a dull roar, and W. A. Thompson, 402 Main street, who was working in the hole, came staggering to the opening, his hair and eyebrows badly singed and his face and hands severely burned. Suffering intense pain, Thompson was carried into a nearby drug store for treatment and was later taken to emergency hospital.

The automobile that caused the explosion was not damaged.

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February 15, 1909

HOSE WAGON IS OVERTURNED.

Collides With Curb in Avoiding
Street Car and Three Fire-
men Are Injured.

Dashing down the slight incline on Twelfth street between Main and Walnut last night, hose wagon No. 2, driven by Joseph Stockard, struck the curb on the northeast corner of Walnut and Twelfth streets and overturned, injuring three men. A southbound car was just crossing Twelfth street and it was in attempting to avoid a collision that the heavy wagon was skidded onto the curb.

Captain John Nolan, who was on the seat with Stockard, was thrown violently to the ground and suffered an injury to the back on his spine. Fireman Fred Sans was hit on the head and bruised on the hip. The extraordinary coolness and presence of mind on the part of Stockard, who, though hurled through the air and hurt in his fall, did not relinquish the reins on the horses, but pulled them down to a stop, won him a compliment from his superior officers. Stockard was cut on the face and his arms were temporarily paralyzed. All of the men were taken back to headquarters, where their injuries were examined. None was seriously hurt.

"I did not see the car until I was almost onto it," said Stockard last night. "The street was clear when we crossed Main street, and though we usually take a great deal of risk in going to a fire, I dept the horses down to a much slower trot than usual. I am positive that had we been going faster or that car moved ever so little slower, we would have crashed into it in spite of anything we could have done."

Spectators helped to right the wagon and pick up the hose. Lieutenant John Hartmaier and Fireman Oscar Nelson jumped from the wagon before it struck the curb and were uninjured.

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