Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

January 31, 1910

HOW JUSTICE ROSS
MADE HIS FORTUNE.

DONOR OF MONEY TO MA-
HONEY CHILDREN WAS
ONCE A LAMPLIGHTER.

Formed Partnership With
John Mahoney Twenty-
Five Years Ago.

Justice Michael Ross, of Kansas City, who in the Wyandotte county, Kansas, probate court Saturday gave the children of his dead partner, John Maloney, $50,000, was born in Cincinnati, O., December 19, 1859. His father, Alexander Ross, came to Kansas City in 1866 to aid in the erection of the first gas plant the city had. In June a year later, the family followed him, coming from St. Louis by boat.

"The Missouri was full of boats in those days," said Justice Ross last night, "and was the principal means of navigation between here and St. Louis. Kansas City had a real wharf and it was a busy one."

Two brothers, William J. and James Ross, and a younger sister constituted the children at that time. James was drowned while swimming in the Missouri river in 1872.

"We attended a little frame public school down in the East Bottoms just opposite what was known as Mensing Island," said Justice Ross. "Later we went to Washington school which still stands at Independence avenue and Cherry street. A ward school education was as high as one could go in those days unless he went away, and that was all we received."

After the erection of the gas plant Justice Ross and his brother William secured positions as lamp lighters. It required them to get up at all hours of the night, according to the condition of the weather and the fullness of the moon, both to light and turn out the street lamps. After doing this work at night Justice Ross worked all day on an ice wagon for J. E. Sales. Later on he worked in the old Davis brick yard, which stood about where the Zenith mill now stands in the East Bottoms.

Justice Ross always had in view the day when he would go into business for himself -- be his own boss. With his savings and some help from his mother he started a little grocery and general store on the levee at First and Campbell streets in 1874. After a time his brother, William, was taken into partnership, but remained but a few years. The latter for several terms was a member of the city council.

BOUGHT OTHER STORES.

As the city began to grow away from the river, Justice Ross saw better opportunities and opened a grocery store at 1401-3 East Fifth street, at Lydia avenue, and later another at 1100-2 East Fifth street, at Troost avenue. These two stores were money makers and enabled him later to branch out along other lines.

In September, 1888, Justice Ross was married to Miss Bessie Egan. All of their children, seven boys and four girls, are living, the oldest daughter being away at school near Cincinnati, and the oldest boy at St. Mary's, Kas. Six of the nine children at home attend the Woodland school.

"I knew John Mahoney from the day he came here with the C. & A. railroad," Justice Ross said. "He was doing small jobs of grading in those days and his mother went with him over the country. They used to trade with us at the little store on the levee and when in town Mahoney and his mother stopped at our home."

It was almost twenty-five years ago that Mahoney and Ross went into partnership and the latter has been a silent partner ever since, Mahoney seeing to most of the details and looking after the work. Justice Ross also had other interests, such as tree planting, and planted the trees around the finest residences and along many of the prettiest boulevards. In speaking of some of the work done by himself and Mr. Mahoney, the justice said:

"We built all of the Southwest boulevard, also Fifteenth street, doing the grading work. Roanoke boulevard is another piece of our work, as was the ill-fated Cliff drive, where poor John and his wife met such a tragic fate. We did lots of work on the country roads in Jackson county and built almost all of the roads in Wyandotte county, besides many of the brick-paved streets.

LARGE CONTRACT WORK.

"We also did much work away from here, such as government work on the levee at New Orleans, county roads in Southern Indiana and railroad grading in Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Colorado. Mahoney was a man who made friends wherever he went. I just received a letter from Indiana asking if he and McGuire were the same men who were there asking for all particulars."

As Justice Ross's business ventures thrived he found it impossible to give the time required to his two grocery stores, and a few years ago he disposed of them. Previous to that, however, he had established the Missouri Carriage and Wagon works at 308-10 Broadway, which he still operates.

For many years he has been buying property and erecting modern flats thereon. He does not build flats to sell, but he keeps them for what they bring in. When Admiral boulevard was cut through at Virginia avenue, Justice Ross owned a big row of old flats immediately in the right of way. They are brick and their moving back was the biggest job of that kind ever done in this city. He made them modern and is erecting more flats near them.

The prettiest and most costly structure erected by Justice Ross is a flat building at Benton boulevard and St. John avenue, on a promontory overlooking the entire city. He owns forty or more pieces of improved property in the city.

In the fall of 1898 Michael Ross ran for justice of the peace on the Democratic ticket and was elected. Since then he has held the office for three terms, twelve years, winning each time with ease. He said last night, however, that he would not seek the office again. He intends to build a big home in the southern part of the city and he and Mrs. Ross will devote their time to their children. He now lives at 626 Troost avenue.

"John Mahoney almost decided to go to Jacksonville, Fla., with our party," said the Justice. "The ground was frozen and he could not work. But he was such a home-loving man he hated to leave his family, even for a day. I had a premonition when I left that something would happen. When I got the wire the first thing I thought of was his automobile. We did not get the particulars, however, until we got a paper at Memphis, and did not get full particulars and learn that McGuire was killed and the others hurt until we got The Journal at Paola, Kas.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

January 13, 1910

BIGAMIST PAROLED
FOR FAMILY'S SAKE.

Benjamin Franklin Hughes
Must Support Family and
Avoid Primrose Path.

Benjamin Franklin Hughes, 51 years old, formerly a real estate agent of this city, pleaded guilty yesterday afternoon in the criminal court to a charge of bigamy and was sentenced to six months in the county jail. Hughes was paroled on condition that he would support his wife and family and follow the straight and narrow path. He is to report April 4 to Judge Ralph S. Latshaw of the criminal court.

With bowed head and trembling voice, Hughes stood before the bar of justice and told of his mishaps. He admitted that he had acted a "silly, old fool," but promised, with tears in his eyes, to reform and devote his years to his wife and children. Mr. Hughes has secured a position as a real estate salesman in Illinois. He stood alone in court, deserted by his friends and disowned by his wife and family.

"It is not for your sake, because under ordinary circumstances I would have sent you to jail, but for the sake of your wife and family that I parole you," said Judge Latshaw. "They have suffered as much as you; they are disgraced because of your foolhardiness. It was not so much for the crime of bigamy that you deserve punishment, but a far worse crime -- infidelity to your wife, and family."

Hughes's defense was that he was forced into an unfortunate alliance with Miss Vairie Wilder, aged 17 years, who lived with her mother, Mrs. Cora Westover, 1622 Madison street. The real estate agent married the girl in Kansas City, Kas., early last month when he had a wife and family living in this city.

THOUGHT HIM WEALTHY.

Hughes charged that Mrs. Westover compelled him to marry her daughter. he said she thought he was a wealthy widower. Hughes and the girl met last April, and immediately Hughes became enamored of her. Then he furnished rooms in a flat on Troost avenue and lived with her there.

"I spent hundreds of dollars," he said, buying her clothes and presents. "I was forced to pay this girl's board at home, and all her expenses. Now I am broke and have exhausted my credit.

"When I asked to take the girl to Excelsior Springs for her health, Mrs. Westovermade me deposit $15 with her. Besides that I was forced to pay all the expenses while in Excelsior Springs. We stopped at a $4 a day hotel.

"After the girl got in trouble, Mrs. Westover demanded that I marry her, thinking all the time that I was a wealthy widower. I thought Miss Wilder an innocent young girl and that I alone was responsible. I wanted to do the right thing so I decided to marry her. I thought I would be able to keep it a secret from my family. But the farther I went the more trouble I found. Then the girl faced me and my wife with her charges. I was a fool. Who knows this better than I? A silly old fool."

"Yes, you were a silly old fool," interrupted Judge Latshaw. "Your conduct is inexplainable. How could you expect to gain the love of this young girl? You, with deadened passions, shoulders bending under the weight of years, and with deep-wrinkled brow. Every furrow in your brow was an unfathomable chasm, dividing you from her. The law of nature ordained ages ago that a man of your age could not win the love of a fresh young girl, as is Miss Wilder. It would have been like the union of January and May, as impossible as the laws of nature themselves to overcome. But the fool that you are, you followed your fancies.

" 'Oh what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive,' said the poet.

UNNATURAL ROMANCE.

"The farther you went the deeper your feet sank into the mire. Did you hope to win this girl's love? Do you think that she ever cared for you? It is natural for the young to love the young, and for both to despise the old -- the doting, old fool. With one hand she caressed you and with the other hand she was seeking to take the money from your pockets. It was not you but what your money could buy that she wanted.

"But the crime you committed against this girl and later your becoming a bigamist were the least of your offenses. You violated the trust of your wife. What could be more disgusting or inhuman than a man with a good, pure woman at home, totally forgetting his obligations and duties that marriage has brought upon him.

"When the exposure comes they must suffer the same as you. when the name of Hughes is held up for ridicule, made the subject of ribald just, not you alone suffer, but your wife and family also. No wonder the woman whom you swore to cherish and love, despises and hates you. No wonder you are a disgusting sight to her eyes.

"But I think this one experience has cured you. If you fall again you must end with a suicide's grave or the felon's cell. Go out into the world and start anew. you cannot forget the past, because with your sensitive nature and cultivated tastes, the consciousness of your wrong-doing must remain with you forever. You must retrieve your past black record. The rest of your days should be spent in working for your wife and family, the ones who have suffered so greatly because of your misdeeds. If when you come back here, I find you are not supporting your family, you will be sent to the county jail to serve the sentence just imposed on you. Go and make good."

Labels: , , , , , , ,

January 12, 1910

FINED FOR ASSAULT ON BOYS.

Milkman Brody Had Trouble With
Two Sons of Judge Ross.

On a charge of having assaulted the two small sons of Justice Michael D. Ross, Philip Brody, a milkman, was fined $15 in the municipal court yesterday morning.

Justice Ross lives at 626 Troost avenue and Brody lives in a house to the rear of the premises. The two Ross boys, it is alleged, threw stones at the Brody home and the milkman climbed over a fence and went into the Ross kitchen to chastise them. He was in the act of administering a spanking, it is claimed, when William Ross, the judge's eldest son, appeared on the scene, and after throwing Brody out, called a policeman.

Labels: , , , ,

December 7, 1910

SKATING ON ALL PARK LAKES.

Length of Season for This Sport
Breaks All Records.

There has been consecutive skating on Penn Valley and Troost park lakes and the Parade since December 12 last, and if there is no unusual change in the weather the outlook for this winter entertainment continuing indefinitely seems promising.

"All skating records on the park lakes have been broken this winter," said W. H. Dunn, general superintendent of the system, yesterday. "Old timers tell me that this has been the severest winter Kansas City has had for years, and two feet of ice on the park lakes seems to bear them out. In the early part of the winter of 1908 there was no skating.

"The lakes were more adapted to boating, and the only skating last winter was from January 6 to 10 and from January 29 to February 5, twenty days, all told. There is a fine sheet of ice at the lagoon at Swope park, but thus far very few skaters have taken advantage of it. The downtown lakes are more accessible, and they are crowded afternoons and nights."

Labels: , , ,

December 27, 1909

DREAMS HER STRONG HOBBY.

Mrs. Virginia Gentry, Who Pre-
dicted Steamship Disaster, Is Here.

A woman who says she is the founder of a new sect called the Divine Scientist Healers and predicted the Vallencia disaster in San Francisco in 1906 recently arrived in this city and is living at 1327 Troost avenue. She is Mrs. Virginia Gentry, widow of the late Colonel R. T. Gentry, who commanded a regiment in General Price's army in Missouri and was well known in state politics a score of years ago.

"When my husband died three years ago he left an estate in this vicinity and I am here looking after it," said Mrs. Gentry. "I will probably reside here permanently.

"Most of the talk we hear of people being cured by the laying on of hands is rot. I think Madame Palladino is a faker and I doubt that she can do what she claims she can without pulling wires in one way or another. Maybe that is because her theory of life and things generally differs from mine. My strong hobby is dreams.

"The day before the Vallencia sailed on its fatal cruise I was in San Francisco with my late husband and the captain of the ship was our guest. He told me a dream he had about being stuck in the sand of a desert. Like a flash the inspiration came to me that it was all up with the captain and I told him so. He believed my warning and tried to be excused from the trip."

Mrs. Gentry has the Vallencia flag, an immense piece of woolen bunting. The captain had jokingly promised her that if his ship went down it should be hers and she obtained it from the steamship company by proving that she made the prediction that the good ship would come to grief.

Labels: , , , ,

December 16, 1909

HUGHES ADMITS TWO WIVES,
BUT PLEADS NOT GUILTY.

Arraigned Before Justice Remley,
and Trial on charge of Bigamy
Set for January 11.

Benjamin Franklin Hughes, admitted bigamist and real estate agent, was arraigned yesterday morning in Justice Theodore Remley's court on the charge of bigamy. He pleaded not guilty, and was released on $1,000 bond. His trial was set for January 1.

In a statement made to Norman Woodson, assistant prosecuting attorney, Mr. Hughes admitted that he had two wives living.

"I confess I have two wives," said Mr. Hughes. "The first one I married in Osborne, Mo. Rev. James E. Hughes, my uncle, a pastor in the Baptist church, married us. I have never been divorced from this wife.

"Seven days ago, December 7, I married Miss Valerie Wiler of Kansas City. Judge Prather of the Wyandotte, Kas., probate court married us."

Why did Mr. Hughes marry Miss Wiler and expect to escape prosecution? This question cannot be answered by the prosecuting attorney's office. It is said that he was advised not to, before it was known that he had a wife living. Mrs. Clay, matron of the industrial school for girls at Chillicothe, is quoted as saying she advised him not to, and so did other persons connected with the case. When Mrs. Clay brought the girl here from Chillicothe December 3, to meet Hughes and plan the marriage, the girl was kept at the detention home. It was after an investigation of the case that the advice against marrying was given.

The report was brought to Mrs. Clay that Miss Wiler was in love with another man. Hughes was told that if he married her that she would probably leave him soon and marry the young man who kept company with her, after she and Hughes became acquainted.

Hughes, so it appears from the statement made by Miss Wiler, had a second affinity after he became enamored with her. He rented a flat at 807 Troost avenue, early in August, and he and Miss Wiler lived there together three days and two nights. It was at this juncture Mrs. Cora Westover, the girl's mother, heard of her daughter's wrongdoing and had her sent to the industrial school in Chillicothe.

"After I was taken away," says Miss Wiler in her statement to the prosecuting attorney, "Mr. Hughes got another woman to live with him. They occupied the flat together for some days following."

Labels: , , ,

December 15, 1909

BOY LEAVES HOME
TO JOIN HIS DOG.

LAWRENCE HANSEN, PAROLED,
CAN'T BEAR SEPARATION.

Leaves at Night by Bedroom Win-
dow and Is Found Next Day
Playing in Street With
"Jack."

When Lawrence Hansen, 10 year of age, was released three weeks ago from the Detention home, where he was placed after being arrested for "playing hookey" from school, agreed to give "Jack," his fox terrier, to a neighbor. To get Lawrence away from his former bad associates, of whom one was his pet dog, Mrs. Hansen removed to Kansas City, Kas.

For two weeks following his parole Lawrence was a model boy. He attended school regularly and minded his mother. Then came the relapse. The separation from "Jack" could not be borne. Last Monday night Lawrence packed a few of his belongings, lowered them from his bedroom window, stole downstairs in his stocking feet and took $5 from his mother's dresser.

The juvenile officers in Kansas City, Mo., were warned Tuesday to be on the lookout for the boy, but not until yesterday could trace of him be found, when word came that the boy was at 410 Troost avenue where he had been seen playing with "Jack." Juvenile Officer Holt arrested the boy yesterday afternoon and took him to the Detention home.

With tears in his eyes Lawrence was taken before Dr. E. L. Mathias, chief probation officer. "Jack" had been left behind.

"I want my dog," he pleaded with the juvenile officer. "I want Jack."

When told that he could not have "Jack," he cried his eyes red. And he continued to cry for an hour after being locked up in the detention room. Finally, when told that he would never get to see the dog again unless he quit crying, the boy dried his tears and became his amiable self.

"That boy is a proposition," said Dr. Mathias. "When he has his dog he is a good boy, but he will not be separated. I expect that the dog will have to be returned to him."

"Jack" has neither pedigree nor physical attraction. The boy several months ago picked him up on a downtown street and took him home. But for all his attention, three meals a day and a blanket to sleep on, the dog could never take on the polish of society and culture. He is still an unpedigreed mongrel of the gutter, but for all that, the inseparable chum.

Arrested three weeks ago for truancy, Lawrence told the juvenile officers he would not go to school because he couldn't take "Jack." The boy and his dog were locked in the same cell, where they ate the same food and shared the same bed, three days and three nights. They were companions in misery. That disregard of law and the rights of others, engendered into the dog from his own life on the streets, was bred by association into the life of his little companion.

"Who is responsible, the boy or the dog?" is the question that the juvenile officers are asking.

Lawrence will be given a hearing next Monday in the juvenile court.

Labels: , , , , , ,

December 4, 1909

ZONES OF CONTAGION
NEAR THREE SCHOOLS.

SCARLET FEVER AND DIPH-
THERIA IN SEVERAL SECTIONS.

Tin Drinking Cup Blamed by Medi-
cal Inspectors, Especially at
Benton -- Several Parochial
Schools Involved.

The medical inspectors going the rounds of the public schools have unearthed diphtheria and scarlet fever zones within the confines of Benton, Washington and Karnes schools. They are also learning from the daily returns of practicing physicians, of the existence of the two maladies among pupils of two or three of the parochial schools, but as the authority of the inspectors does not extend to schools of this description Dr. W. S. Wheeler, sanitary commissioner, has not felt justified in taking any voluntary official notice or action.

Of the parochial schools the worst afflicted is St. John's Parochial school, 534 Tracy avenue. This school, located in a district largely inhabited by Italian children, is conducted by the Sisters of St. Joseph. Yesterday Sister Superior Monica appealed to the health authorities to make an investigation. Dr. H. Delamater, chief inspector, made a personal visit to the school and was informed that ninety of the 160 pupils are detained at home by sickness. Within the last six days cases of scarlet fever have developed among the pupils, and Dr. Delameter fears that many who are home at home may have it. He will have an examination made of the school building as to its sanitary condition, and will have class rooms fumigated.

Washington public school is at the southwest corner or Independence avenue and Cherry street, and the Karnes school is at the northwest corner of Troost avenue and Fourth street. Large numbers of the pupils have scarlet fever, the majority of victims predominating among those attending Karnes school. The diphtheria is not as epidemic as scarlet fever. The attendants of these two schools live in the territory bounded on the south by Admiral boulevard, north by the river, west by Grand avenue and east as far as Lydia avenue. The majority of the cases are north of Fifth street and scatter as far to the east as Budd park. As an assistance to the health authorities in keeping in touch with the exact location of the disease, a large map of the city has been prepared, and when a case of diphtheria develops a green-headed pin is driven into the map, designating a particular territory, and when one of scarlet fever is reported the map is perforated with a red-headed pin.

MAP RAPIDLY FILLING.

The map describing the Washington and Karnes school districts is rapidly filling up with the pin indicators, but not as noticeably as the district in which Benton school is situated. At the latter school diphtheria is the most prevalent, and is giving some alarm. The infection is spreading with rapidity. Benton school is at the southwest corner of Thirtieth street and Benton boulevard, in a fashionable and well-to-do neighborhood. There are from twenty to thirty cases of diphtheria among pupils going to this school, and it is feared that the disease got its start from the drinking cups in use there.

"The drinking cup in the public schools is a menace to health and is a communicator and spreader of disease," said Dr. Delamater yesterday. "Its frightful possibilities were fully described by Dr. W. S. Wheeler in his last annual report, and he advises that it be relegated and sanitary fountains installed in the schools. The health of no child is safe when the tin cup is in use. While I am not directly charging the appearance of diphtheria at Benton school to the drinking cup, still there is plenty of room for that suspicion as the school building is new and should be sanitary."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

November 30, 1909

HORSE OF MORE IMPORTANCE.

When Told Car Hit Employe,
Grocer Asks About the Rig.

At Tenth street and Troost avenue yesterday a man got in the way of a trolley car. He was saved by the motorman lowering the fender. The man fell into the basket. Although considerably shaken up he was not hurt seriously.

Joseph Collingwood, a canvasser for the election commissioners, aided the man to a drug store. There the man requested that his employers, grocers, be told of the accident.

Collingwood called up the firm over a 'phone.

"Your delivery clerk has been hurt by a trolley car," he explained.

"How about the horse? Was it damaged?" Collingwood was asked.

The employers were told that the horse and wagon were not in the wreck. The man at the other end said, "That's good."

Labels: , , , ,

November 12, 1909

THOMAS G. BEAHAM
SUCCUMBS AT 68.

FAULTLESS STARCH FOUNDER A
KANSAS CITY BUSINESS MAN
FOR 22 YEARS.

Veteran Army Man Made This City
the Scene of His Many Ac-
tivities -- Became Ill
Last Summer.
Thomas G. Beaham, Faultless Starch Founder & President
THOMAS G. BEAHAM.

Thomas G. Beaham, for twenty-two years a Kansas City business man, died at his home, 2940 Troost avenue, at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Mr. Beaham had been ill since last summer, while on a hunting and fishing trip on the Nipegon river in Canada.

Mr. Beaham was born in Cambridge, O., the only child of John and Harriett Beaham. His boyhood was spent in Muscatine, Ia., where he enlisted September, 1861, in the Union army as a commissary sergeant of the Second Iowa volunteer cavalry in the Civil war. He was appointed second lieutenant December 1, 1861, and promoted to first lieutenant a month later. Mr. Beaham was detached from his regiment in April, 1862, and assigned to duty as aide-de-camp on the staff of General Gordon Granger, commanding a cavalry division in Mississippi, until August, 1862. On November 19, 1863, he was appointed and commissioned major and aide-de-camp of United States volunteers and assigned to the staff of General Granger. While in the department of the Cumberland, in the military division of the West, he participated in the advance and siege of Corinth; occupation of Corinth and pursuit to Boonville; pursuit of Van Dorn to Duck river and defense of Franklyn against Van Dorn's attack. He was in the battle of Chickamauga, Orchard ridge and Missionary hill, and many other historic battlefields. He resigned September 12, 1864, and was honorably discharged from the service. Mr. Beaham was a lifelong friend of Captain Gordon Taylor of Cincinnati, O., who was on the staff of General Granger.

Shortly after the war he went to Cincinnati, O., where he engaged in the wholesale paint and glass business. In 1878 he moved to Zanesville, where he lived until 1887, when he came to Kansas City and entered into partnership with E. O. Moffatt in the whlesale coffee, tea and spice company. The company was formerly Smith and Moffatt, but Mr. Smith was killed in the cyclone of that year and the firm was started anew under the name of Beaham & Moffatt. At that time Mr. Beaham was living with his family in Independence, Mo.

It was early in the history of the firm of Beaham & Moffatt that the Faultless Starch was originated as a specialty. Shortly afterwards Mr. Moffatt returned to the grain trade and the business was conducted as the Beaham Manufacturing Company. Owing to the growth of the starch department the coffee, tea and spice business was disposed of and for several years the business was conducted as the Faultless Starch Company, unincorporated, Mr. Beaham being the sole owner. In 1900 he moved to Kansas City from Independence and in 1903 the business was incorporated as the Faultless Starch Company with Mr. Beaham as president and Gordon T. Beaham as secretary.

Mr. Beaham is survived by a mother, Mrs. Harriett Beaham, 91 years old. Mrs. Beaham has been living with her son for the past seventeen years. His wife, one son and two daughters also survive him. Gordon T. Beaham, the only son, was named after his lifelong friend, Captain Gordon Taylor of civil war fame. Two daughters, Edna and Helen, reside at home.

Mr. Beaham was a member of the University, Country, Midday and Commercial Clubs; also a member of the Loyal Legion. He was very fond of fishing and hunting and was a member of several shooting clubs. For a number of years he spent his summers in Lake Miltona, Minn.

Labels: , , , , , ,

November 1, 1909

NO PLAN BUT TO GET
SON, THEN JUST REST.

ADAM GOD'S WIFE RELEASED
FROM JAIL.

At Home of Police Matron Re-
nounces Husband's Religious
creed, Declaring She Will
Live Only for Boy.

Melissa Sharp, the wife of "Adam God," who started the riot December 8, 1908, that resulted in the death of two officers, two members of the "Adam God" flock and a private citizen, as well as injury to others, slept in freedom last night.

For the first time in nearly eleven months this woman yesterday walked in the open and free air; enjoyed the liberty of persons not guilty of crime, and was entitled to do as she chose.

With this liberty, thrust upon her suddenly yesterday morning when the prosecutor's office decided that there was no charge upon which she could be held, Mrs. Sharp was almost as helpless as she had been when confined by prison walls, and when asked the simple question as to what she intended to do said she didn't know.

HAS NO PLAN.

She had no notion, no plan.

"All I want is rest," she said. "I want to be able to sit down or to lie down and solve this tremendous problem. I want my boy, my 16-year-old son, who is far away. Maybe when I get him I can think of something to do."

When Mrs. Sharp was released from the county jail yesterday morning she did not know which way to turn. She had relatives in Southern Missouri, but she cared not to ask them for aid. Then it was that Mrs. Margaret Simmons, matron of the jail, came to her rescue.

"You come home with me," said Mrs. Simmons. "Come home with me and stay there until you can decide what to do."

And Mrs. Sharp went home with her.

Immediately after the "Adam God" riot the woman was placed in jail. She was transferred from the city holdover to the county jail. Ever since she has remained in prison without trial. What her fate would be she never knew and as the months dragged along she didn't care.

WAS MODEL PRISONER.

"She was a model prisoner," said Mrs. Simmons. "I don't believe that her mind was unbalanced and regardless of what some people may think I decided to take her into my own home. It is an act of charity and I can conceive of no greater charity than the sheltering of this lonely, lonesome woman."

Mrs. Sharp is 38 years old and she appears to be younger. Her husband is 54 and he is now serving a sentence of twenty-five years in the Missouri penitentiary. While Mrs. Sharp wants to be faithful to him, she doesn't care to discuss the fate of her husband or her relations with him.

She has a son and her whole life now is centered in that boy, who, despite his years, is doing a man's work on a railroad in Montana in an effort to earn his own living.

James Sharp, who is the "Adam God," was not alone old, but he was ugly and repulsive. He was many years older than his wife and why she married him only she herself knows and she won't tell why.

MISSOURI FARMER'S DAUGHTER.

She was the pretty daughter of a farmer, living in Mountain Grove, Mo., and Sharp was working on a neighboring farm. It was after their marriage that the religious frenzy got possession of them. they were not converted by the words of a man. They got the idea of fanatical religion and they got it together.

"I can't explain how I began to believe in the strange creed," said Mrs. Sharp. "It just came on me, and it came on him. I am through with that creed now. I still have the faith. I believe in God' I believe in the Bible. What I want to do now is to go into some church; to hear the reading of the Bible; to listen to the instruction of some good minister. I am through with the other form."

When Mrs. Sharp left the jail she expressed no thought of her son. It was when she reached the home of Mrs. Simmons that the mother love pronounced itself. When the woman entered the matron's home on Troost avenue she little realized the character of the friend who had taken her to her own abode to afford her shelter. Mrs. Simmons's son was at home and when he started to leave it he put his arms affectionately around his mother and kissed her. Mrs. Sharp began to weep. The sign of affection between Mrs. Simmons and her son had awakened her to new ideas.

CRIED AT THOUGHT OF SON.

"O, if I only had my boy," she said. "That's what you want to do," said the matron. "Get your own boy. Let him be with you; let him solace you; let him live for you and you live for him."

This simple statement from a simple woman of culture, the widow of Major Simmons, a confederate officer, a former newspaper man of Kansas City and one of the most revered of the town's early-day inhabitants, afforded consolation to the distressed woman.

"I shall send for my boy," she said.

"He must come to me. I'll try to forget this terrible ordeal through which I've passed. I'll live for that boy."

The woman dried the tears in her eyes and seemed comforted.

In the afternoon she took a long walk along Troost avenue, the first walk in the outdoors in nearly a year. She looked at the people and studied them. She came back to Mrs. Simmons refreshed. She still seemed a bit worried, but she appeared as one who expected happiness. She retired about 9 o'clock after bidding Mrs. Simmons goodby for the night.

"I'm tired," she said, "but I feel so much better. I think I can sleep now."

Labels: , , ,

October 14, 1909

WELL-KNOWN SPORTSMAN DIES.

Frank J. Smith Was President of
Kansas City Gun Club.

Kansas City lost one of its oldest and best known sportsmen yesterday afternoon when Frank J. Smith, president of the Kansas City Gun Club, and also president of the Missouri State Fish and Game Protective Association, died at 12:55 of pulmonary congestion, at his home, 811 Troost avenue. Besides heading these two organizations he was an enthusiastic member of the Belt Line Gun Club and Missouri River Gun Club.

He leaves his wife, two daughters and a son. They are: Mrs. G. W. Baehr of 824 Schaefer avenue, Mrs. S. G. Parke of 2508 Chestnut avenue and Frank J. Smith, Jr., of St. Louis. Funeral arrangements have not yet been made. Burial will be in Forest Hill cemetery.

Born in Germany sixty-eight years ago, Mr. Smith came to this country when he was a young man and first settled at Troy, Pa. Later he came to Kansas City where he has lived for forty-four years.

Probably no other person has been so thoroughly identified with the sport of hunting in this vicinity. Sport for sport's sake was the motive that led him in his enthusiasm and he was among the first to agitate for better fish and game laws in this state. Nearly every winter he went down to the Gulf of Mexico to shoot duck and never missed attending a state shooting tournament. At the traps he was considered an expert.

Labels: , , , ,

September 28, 1909

SHOT A NEIGHBOR, THEN
ACTED GOOD SAMARITAN.

German Woman Gardner Attempted
to Frighten Victor Marten With
Gun That Wasn't Loaded.
Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, Who Shot Gardener.
MRS. MARY WILSDORF.

After emptying the contents of a shotgun into the left thigh of Victor Marten, a gardener, Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, 46 years old, wife of a gardener at Seventy-seventh street and Walrond avenue, yesterday afternoon got on a Marlborough street car and came to the city and gave herself up to Chief of Police Frank F. Snow.

Before leaving her home she gave the wounded man a glass of water and left him lying on the ground near her house in charge of her husband, Carl Wilsdorf, who was later arrested by Mounted Patrolman E. B. Chiles.

Mrs. Wildorf and Marten are neighbors, each owning a ten acre tract of land.

From the facts elicited from the woman through Dr. George Ringle, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, who acted as interpreter for the police, the shooting followed a quarrel, about Marten's horses getting into the truck garden of the Wilsdorf's.

She said the horses frequently trampled the vegetables. One of them wandered over from the Marten field yesterday to the Wildorf land and was locked up in the barn.

When Marten went to the Wilsdorf house to get his horse he was asked to pay a small amount of money for alleged damages. A dispute arose and Mrs. Wilsdorf said that Marten held aloft a potato digger and threatened to kill her.

She said she then ran into the house and got her husband's shotgun, and returned to the yard. When within five feet of Marten the gun was discharged and the contents of one barrel entered the left thigh of Marten. He fell to the ground and asked for a drink of water which was given to him by Mrs. Wilsdorf.

Her husband told her she had better go to town and give herself up to the police, which advice she took. when she first entered police headquarters she was a little excited, and, not being able to speak good English, was misunderstood. The patrolman she met believed her to say a man shot her in the leg, so he directed her to the Emergency hospital. At the hospital Dr. Ringle took her in charge, and, learning that she was the person who did the shooting, took her back to the police station. She was turned over to Chief Snow.

Mrs. Wilsdorf informed the police that the man was still lying in the yard at her home and needed medical attention. Dr. George Todd, 4638 Troost avenue, attended to the man's injuries. Dr. Todd called an ambulance from Freeman & Marshall's and had the man taken to the University hospital.

The woman told Captain Whitsett that she had never before handled a shotgun and did not know exactly how to use it. The one she got in the house was broken at the breech and as she was running with it toward Marten she was trying to replace it. Suddenly the gun snapped into place and was discharged. She said she really did not think it was loaded, but was only trying to scare Marten. She was locked up in the matron's room.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

September 25, 1909

JEWS OBSERVE YOM KIPPUR.

Period of Fasting and Prayer Began
at 6 O'clock Last Night.

The Jewish citizens of Kansas City have been fasting and praying since 6 o'clock last night. They are observing Yom Kippur, or the day of atonement, and their fast and prayers will continue until 6 o'clock tonight. Services appropriate to the event were held in all the Jewish churches last night.

The services at the church of Dr. Max Lieberman, 1415 Troost, were especially solemn and impressive and they will be resumed at 7 o'clock this morning and continue throughout the day. The male choir of twelve voices sang several selections at last night's services.

Labels: , , , , ,

September 19, 1909

ANONYMOUS LETTER CAUSES
CHAUFFEUR'S FATAL INJURY.

L. L. Moore, Found Unconscious on
Pavement Friday Night, Dies
at General Hospital.

An anonymous letter was the cause of the fight which resulted in the death of L. L. Moore yesterday afternoon at the General hospital where he had been taken unconscious on the day previous. Moore was a chauffeur and had fought with Benjamin Lamon, another chauffeur at Fifteenth street and Troost avenue. It developed that his injuries were due to his fall on the pavement.

Lamon is employed by Charles S. Keith of the Central Coal and Coke company. He became angry when Mr. Kieth showed him a letter written by an unknown person which accused Lamon of "joy riding" in Keith's motor car. Suspicion pointed to Moore who was desirous of obtaining a position with Mr. Keith and had written an application for position as chauffeur. The handwriting in both cases were similar.

When Lamon accused Moore as the author of the letter at the Missouri Valley Automobile Company, 1112-14 East Fifteenth street, Friday night, Moore refused to make any explanation or denial. A fight followed, and when Moore fell to the sidewalk he struck his head on the curbing, resulting in concussion of the brain, according to surgeons at the General hospital.

Lamon was arrested early morning, and yesterday afternoon was arraigned in Justice Miller's court for second degree murder. He pleaded not guilty. He was released on a $2,000 bond furnished by Mr. Keith. Lamon lives at 1525 Oak street and is married. Moore formerly lived at Maryville, Mo., and had only been in the city a few weeks. He worked for Mrs. Amy Cruise of 1209 Commerce building.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

August 14, 1909

HEAT OVERCOMES ICEMAN.

While Carrying Cake of Ice Jake
Schuyler is Overcome.

While transferring a cake of ice to a house at Forty-seventh street and Troost avenue at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon, Jake Schuyler, an employe of the City Ice Company, suddenly fell over unconscious.

The police ambulance of No. 4 station was called and Dr. Shiras gave Schuyler emergency treatment for sunstroke. He was taken to the emergency hospital. Schuyler is 25 years old. He lives at 1321 Walnut street.

James Burgess, 3717 Woodland avenue, was affected last night about 8 o'clock. The police station was notified and the operator called Dr. S. S. Morse, 3801 Woodland avenue. Burgess is a foreman of the packing department of the Globe Storage Company, and has complained of the heat for several days. He had recovered in a few hours.

A. M. Kissell, 65 years old, a stationary fireman at the Central Manufacturing Company, First and Lydia avenue, about 9 o'clock was overcome by heat and last night he was taken to the emergency hospital for medical attention.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

August 9, 1909

LOCAL RABBI'S BOOK.

Isidore Koplowitz on "Immortality
of the Soul."
'Rabbi
RABBI ISIDORE KOPLOWITZ.

Rabbi Isidore Koplowitz of the Keneseth Israel synagogue, Fifteenth and Troost, is the author of a learned and interesting volume just published by the Franklin Hudson Publishing company of this city, under the title: "Al-Moveth" or "Immortality of the Soul." This is the fifth volume from the pen of Dr. Koplowitz, who was formerly a lecturer at the state university of Georgia and is a scholar of wide attainments. He has been here for the past four years and has taken high rank in Jewish circles.

In his latest book, which is a modest little volume of attractive typopgraphy, Dr. Koplowitz examines exhaustively the whole problem of the soul's immortality. The book is designed as a protest against the prevailing materialism of the day and as a battle cry and slogan in the assault upon this dangerous and insidious tendency. The author's profound scholarship and extensive research are shown in the aptness and variety of the quotations used in support of his argument for immortality, which, he declares, is demonstrable by reason, logic and science. The answer to Job's question "If a man die shall he live again," is a triumphant affirmative.

Labels: , , , ,

August 5, 1909

AGED MAN FALLS FROM CAR.

James R. Collier, Seriously Injured,
Is Found Unconscious in Street.

Lying on the side of the car track on Troost avenue, near Twenty-sixth street, James R. Collier, 75 years of age, was found unconscious last night. Mr. Collier's skull was fractured. His condition, as announced by Dr. C. Lester Hall last night, is exceedingly dangerous.

Mr. Collier was on his way to prayer meeting at the Troost Avenue Methodist church, which he attended regularly. It is thought that he stepped from a car while it was moving.

The janitor of the church saw the man lying in the street and called the attention of Rev. Edgar McVoy, the pastor. The two investigated and found the injured man to be Mr. Collier, whom the minister quickly recognized. It was then that Dr. Hall's services were requested, and the injured man taken to his home at 23 East Twenty-ninth street.

Mr. Collier lives with his son, T. P. Collier, an engineer, at the Twenty-ninth street address. He has not been in good health for some time.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

June 29, 1909

JOSHES NEW COP AND
IS PROMPTLY PINCHED.

AUDITOR'S PAYMASTER SAID
"OH, YOU KID."

A Jewish policeman, the first Kansas City ever had, arrested an Irishman last night for disturbing the officer's peace.

Max Joffy, formerly a porter in James Pendergast's saloon and later a janitor at the city hall under Mayor Henry M. Beardsley, was appointed a probationary patrolman on the police force yesterday morning along with forty-three other men.

Proudly wearing his new star and swinging a white ash club he entered the drug store of Morton Burger at Independence avenue and Cherry street yesterday afternoon. Frank O. Donnely, paymaster in the city auditor's office, was in the drug store. Knowing Joffy for years he was amused at the Jewish policeman's outfit and burst out laughing.

"Holy St. Patrick, look at the new cop," laughed Donnely, making a grimace, "Oh, you kid!"


Joffy's new found dignity was touched. He placed his hand on Donnelly's back and said:

"I'll teach you to talk that way to an officer. Come on down to the station."

Donnelly rose from the fountain, where he was drinking an ice cream soda, with a glass holder in his hand. Joffy drew his revolver, afterwards found to be unloaded, and with the tags still upon it. Donnelly's Irish spirit ebbed and he submitted. He was taken to the central police station where he was booked for disturbing the peace. He afterward gave bond.

"I know nothing of the merits of the case against Donnelly," said Captain Walter Whitsett last night, "but I do know that a police officer's peace cannot be disturbed, according to the law as it is interpreted by the courts."

Donnelly is a rising young Democratic politician in the Sixth ward. He has been paymaster in the city auditor's office for three years. He lives with his family at 632 Troost avenue.

"I couldn't resist the temptation to have a little fun at Joffy's expense," he said. "I have known the man for five years and had never seen him take offense at a well meant joke before. This is the first time I was ever arrested in my life."

STRANGE NAMES IN LIST.

The list of forty-three officers appointed by the board yesterday bears only one Irish name -- that of Daniel R. McGuire, who was made a jailer. There are such cognomens as Obrecht, Zinn, Mertz, Baer, Niemier and Siegfried. They were given clubs, stars and revolvers yesterday afternoon and will be assigned for duty today.

Joffy was not on duty at the time his first arrest was made. He is the first policeman of Jewish descent to be appointed in the city, according to men who have been on the force for many years.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

June 10, 1909

BLOWN UP BY PRESCRIPTION.

Druggist High Loses Part of a
Thumb Through Explosion of
Chemicals, Which Starts Fire.

While preparing a prescription in his drug store at Fifteenth street and Troost avenue yesterday evening, Harley High was badly injured by an explosion of the chemicals which he was using in an evaporating dish. His right hand was badly hurt, and powdered chemicals were blown into his face.

The injured man was treated at the residence of Dr. W. T. Singleton, Jr., directly across the street. It was found necessary to amputate the right thumb at the first joint. The great mass of powder which had been blown into Mr. High's face was picked out. He was taken to his home, 3214 Chestnut street.

Fire which resulted from the explosion entailed a loss of $900 on the building and its contents.

Mr. High was suffering so greatly that he could not tell how the explosion occurred. No one else was near.

Labels: , , , , , ,

June 6, 1909

Y. W. C. A. FUND OF
$300,000 IS RAISED.

THOMAS L. SWOPE DOUBLES
SUBSCRIPTION OF $25,000.

Other Voluntary Donations Make a
Total of $303,000, Which Is
$3,000 in Excess of the
Amount Asked.

Through the donation of $50,000, by Thomas L. Swope, the largest single gift ever made for a similar enterprise in the history of the Y . W. C. A. , a gift of $20,000 by the R. A. Long family and $10,000 from the banks of Kansas City, the hard fought battle of the Young Women's Christian Association for $300,000 to build a new home was yesterday changed from a faded hope to a joyous reality. At the close of the campaign, May 25, the sum subscribed was $37,000 short of the necessary amount.

Since the end of a most strenuous campaign, every day of which was fraught with brilliant prospects which faded, forces have been at work, and yesterday the announcement was made that the money needed had been raised and there was some to spare.

Mr. Swope, feeling the absolute need of an institution such as has been proposed for the women of Kansas City, agreed to double his first subscription, raising it from $25,000 to the magnificent sum of $50,000. The amount was given with the proviso that the donor's name be withheld from the public, but Miss Nettie E. Trimble, general secretary of the association, considered such a proposition unfair to the man through whose charity their hopes are to be realized.

SUBSCRIPTION DOUBLED.

Following the lead made by Mr. Swope, R. A. Long added another $5,000 to his already large donation, making the total $20,000. Then through the Kansas City clearing house, the various banks donated $10,000, making in all a total of $40,000 since the closing of the original campaign. This brings the subscriptions up to $303,000, $3,000 more than was originally asked. This money will be used for equipments for the new building.

A meeting of the members of the board of directors of the association will be held some day next week to decide upon the plans for the new buildings. The "Home," which is to be erected at Eleventh street and Troost avenue, will be started at the earliest moment. Plans for this building have not yet been decided upon, as the national association has agreed to furnish them, provided use can be made of some that have already been used.

"We wish to thank the public spirited people of Kansas City who have helped in this campaign and made our project possible," said Miss Trimble yesterday. "Especially do we feel indebted to the press of Kansas City for the interest it has shown in the work and the good it has done to further the interests of our cause. We feel the responsibility of our position and we will do all within our power to merit the confidence of the people who have put this great sum at our disposal."

Labels: , , , , ,

June 2, 1909

ELECTRICAL STORM
A VIVID SPECTACLE.

LIGHTNING STRIKES HOUSES
AND DISABLES STREET CARS.

Hundreds Drenched Before They Can
Reach Shelter -- Freak Bolt Turns
Dresser Completely Around.
Severe Shock for Woman.

Kansas City was visited by an electrical storm shortly after 8 o'clock last night which for vividness and intensity while it lasted eclipsed anything seen here in years. For three quarters of an hour almost constant lightning flashes, followed immediately by claps of thunder like a volley of rifles close at hand, made a terrifying spectacle. many houses were struck, chimneys dismantled and street cars disabled. No serious accidents were reported.

Beginning about 2 p. m. heavy showers followed one another at intervals until about 5:30 o'clock. Then the sun came out and all looked well, but both barometer and thermometer indicated there was trouble in the air, and it burst in all its fury two and one-half hours later.

When the storm arrived it came so suddenly that hundreds who had been deceived by the evening sunshine and left their umbrellas at home were drenched before they could reach shelter. Even those in street cars, where the windows were down, got their share of the rain which had no direct course, seeming to come from all directions at once.

STREET CARS SUFFER.

The street car system suffered for a time, many of the cars being put out of commission by lightning, and wires were down in several places. At Eighth street and Troost avenue cars were burned out by an electrical shock.

A Westport and a Prospect avenue car suffered similarly while in the vicinity of Fifth street and Grand avenue, an Indiana avenue car was put out of commission at Eighteenth street and Walrond avenue, and a Minnesota avenue car was treated in the same manner at Nineteenth and Walnut streets. The smoke from the burning controllers caused some excitement among the passengers.

The lightning cut some peculiar pranks, possibly the oddest being at the home of George Miller, 4100 Belleview avenue. Here a stone chimney which his built on the outside of the house was struck. Holes were torn in the chimney near the top, and the bolt passed into an upper room and had an engagement with a big dresser which had been standing with its back toward the wall.

DRESSER IS TURNED AROUND.

When the lightning left the room, breaking out a window across from where it entered, the dresser had been turned completely around and faced the wall. The mirror was shattered and scattered all over the room. The family was below when the shock came and no one was injured.

At the home of W. R. Hall, 628 Freemont avenue, Sheffield, the lightning completely dismantled a brick chimney and passed into the house. Mrs. Hall, who was standing in the room, was thrown down and severely shocked.

While the council was in session at the city hall lightning came in contact with an electric light wire supplying the upper house chamber and burned out a fuse, putting all of the wall lights out of commission. One circuit only was involved.

Labels: , , , , ,

May 3, 1909

WHEN TROOST AVENUE
WAS A COUNTRY ROAD

A. J. BLETHEN TELLS OF KAN-
SAS CITY YEARS AGO.

Owner of Seattle Times Comments
Upon Growth and Development
in Thirty Years -- West Has
Few Unemployed.

"Without a doubt the growth and development of Kansas City in the past two decades is nothing short of marvelous, and its splendid parks and drives, with the many handsome residences, rival anything I have seen anywhere in the country." This statement was made last night by Alden J. Blethen, former business manager of The Kansas City Journal, and now editor and owner of the Seattle Times, who is a guest at the Hotel Baltimore.

Mr. Blethen left The Journal twenty-nine years ago, to go to Minneapolis, where he had taken over the management of the Tribune of that city. After twelve years in Minneapolis he went to Seattle, Wash., and purchased the plant of the Times.

"I was in Kansas City about ten years ago as a delegate to the Democratic national convention which nominated W. J. Bryan for the second time. At that time I did not have an opportunity to see much of the city, but this afternoon I took an automobile and with my wife and daughters drove around to look over some of the old landmarks.

TROOST AVENUE A COUNTRY ROAD.

"What we used to call the Southern hills is now one of the most modern and beautiful residence sections I have had the pleasure of seeing. It is almost past belief. Thirty years ago I used to drive over the hills along an old country road where the farm houses were more than a half-mile apart. That road is gone and today Troost avenue occupies its place.

"The business has moved with certain precision to the south as the town extended. The old Journal office at Sixth and Delaware streets was then considered the center of town. The number of new buildings is surprising."

Mr. Blethen talked of the exposition to be held in Seattle this year and declared it would exceed any of the minor fairs held in recent years.

"This fair was conceived as a celebration of the discovery of gold in the Alaskan and Yukon fields," said he, "and we are leaving nothing undone to make it a fitting celebration. Last year Alaska produced $21,000,000 in gold and is second only to Colorado in the production of that metal.

Mr. Blethen, with his wife and daughters, left Seattle last March for a tour of the states. He went to California and over the Southern route, stopping at New Orleans and Mobile, and up the coast to Atlanta. Thence to Washington and New York.

He arrived in Kansas City yesterday morning from Chicago and will leave tomorrow for Denver and Salt Lake, arriving in Seattle May 10.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

April 16, 1909

HE'S A WIRELESS OPERATOR.

Paul Betheman of the Connecticut
a Kansas City Boy.

The honor of being the wireless operator on the flagship Connecticut in the great fleet's cruise around the world belongs to a Kansas City boy, Paul Betheman, of 1521 Troost avenue. Young Betheman has been in Kansas City on a two-weeks furlough, visiting his mother, Mrs. Lena Betheman, but returns to Brooklyn today to join his ship.

Betheman is 24 years old and joined the navy at the time of the telegraphers' strike in 1907. His knowledge of telegraphy was invaluable and he was at once put in charge of the instrument on the battleship.

All of the orders to the different ships in the fleet were sent through Betheman. At present, he is one of the few operators who is glad that the telegraph strike took place.

Labels: , , ,

April 12, 1909

FRACTURED HIS SKULL.

F. A. Tewksbury Injured While
Taking Car to the Barn.

While taking a Rockhill car to the Troost avenue barn, at Forty-ninth and Harrison streets, last night, F. A. Tweksbury, the conductor, leaned out from the car, and his head came in contact with an electric light pole with such force that his skull was fractured.

The ambulance from the Walnut street police station removed the injured man to the University hospital, where he is in a precarious condition. Tewksbury lives at 1512 Washington street.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

March 22, 1909

INJURED WIFE'S MOTHER
DOESN'T BLAME HUNTER.

MRS. SCANLON TELLS SON-IN-
LAW SHE IS HIS FRIEND.

Husband Declares Reform School
Was Suggested as Place for
Girl -- Tells Story of
Marital Troubles.

Charles Hunter, 19 years old, who shot and dangerously injured his wife, Myrtle Hunter, Friday morning, yesterday told visitors of the trouble that led up to his crime, and which is causing his detention at police headquarters. He said he loved his wife, but her waywardness caused the trouble.

When the boy and his child wife were married by Michael Ross, J. P., the mothers went to the court house with them to give consent. The girl's mother called at police headquarters yesterday afternoon to see Hunter. She told him she was still his friend and would do all she could for him.

"Even if Myrtle dies, Charles, we won't blame you," the prisoner was told.

The reform school was suggested by Mrs. Scanlon as the best place for the girl wife. Hunter informed a visitor yesterday. But he said he loved her and wanted to keep her at home if possible.

THREAT OF REFORM SCHOOL.

She left home one day and the mother announced her intention of having the police find the girl and sending her to reform school according to the story Hunter tells. Instead he asked her to wait and allow him to give her another trial. Hunter promised to find her and keep her at home.

After four days' search he declares he found her at a house on East Eighth street in company with another young woman and two men. While Hunter was in the room a rambler placed his arm around his wife and caressed her, which made him frantic with shame and anger. From there he took his wife home and she promised him she would remain away from her former haunts.

Then he says a clerk in a clothing store began to pay her attentions. Hunter said this clerk went to the Scanlon home last Thursday and asked for Myrtle. He made a second trip to the house in the afternoon. Mrs. Hunter opened the door, but refused to allow him to come in. Hunter said he was at the head of the stairs on the second floor and upon asking who the visitor was started down. The man left and his wife and Mrs. Scanlon prevented Hunter from following him.

WAS DRIVEN TO DESPERATION.

From the trials he had with his endeavors to keep his wife at home and the attempts by the clerk to take her away, Hunter claims that he was made desperate and driven mad. The climax was reached Wednesday night when the man is said to have collected a gang and announced his intention of going to the Hippodrome and going home with Mrs. Hunter.

Hunter and his wife were standing near the skating rink when the persistent admirer came up and spoke to the wife. She tried to avoid him and when she was unable to do so Hunter says he objected.

"I'll take her home if you have to go home in the undertaker's wagon," Hunter said he was told.

According to Hunter, his uncle, Claude Rider, 1728 Troost avenue, stepped up and said he was going to take a hand in the affair. As his uncle came up Hunter declares friends grabbed him and took him across the street while the other men fought. The police arrested them and took them to No. 4 police station where they were charged with disturbing the peace.

"I believe my mother-in-law was trying to arrange to send Myrtle to the reform school when I shot her," Hunter remarked.

He said he got the pistol at the Scanlon house and that it belonged to his wife's father. The condition of Mrs. Hunter was worse yesterday, but it was said that she still has a chance to recover.

Of late years Hunter has been following the skating rinks and in the summer has had charge of the rink at Fairmount park. At one time Hunter was an office boy for an afternoon newspaper and later became an advertising solicitor.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

March 20, 1909

GIRL WIFE SHOT BY
HER BOY HUSBAND.

SHORT WEDDED LIFE OF HUNT-
ERS HAD BLOODY END.

Madly Jealous Because She Went
With Another man, Charles
Hunter Wounds Wife at
Parents' Home.

The short wedded life of Charles Hunter, 19 years old, and his wife, Myrtle Hunter, 17 years old, came to a probably tragic end yesterday morning when in a quarrel, the boy-husband shot his wife with a derringer at the home of her parents, 1713 Madison avenue.

Mrs. Hunter lies at the general hospital, where the physicians say she will not live until morning. The husband gave himself up yesterday afternoon to the police, and is in the matron's room at police headquarters where he will not make a statement to the prosecuting attorney.

No one was at the home of the girl's parents except the young couple. They had been married since Christmas, but had not lived together for several months. On several occasions Hunter had visited his wife, but on each occasion the interview generally ended in a quarrel. About 11 o'clock yesterday morning, neighbors heard a shot, and a moment later Mrs. Hunter rushed out of the house and ran to the home of Mrs. Emma Hodder, 1715 Madison avenue. The front of her kimono was covered with blood.

"HE SHOT ME," SHE SAID.

"He shot me," she gasped, and sank to the floor. She carried the derringer in her hands. The Walnut street police ambulance was called, and after giving her emergency treatment, Dr. Ralph A. Shiras took her to the general hospital.

In the meantime Hunter rushed out of the house into the alley, and it was three hours before the police were able to locate him. At last Albert F. Drake, an attorney with offices in the Scarritt building, called police headquarters and said Charles Hunter was ready to give himself up. Charles McVey, desk sergeant, took Hunter from the Scarritt building to police headquarters. In the chief's office he was questioned by an assistant prosecuting attorney, but would sign no statement.

NEVER HAPPY TOGETHER.

"We haven't' been happy since our marriage," Hunter said later as he sat in a cell in the matron's room. His hands were folded across his breast, and he looked the picture of despair. He is small and looks a mere boy. "She has been going with other fellows," he continued, "and last Wednesday I saw her with someone. That made it more than I could bear. Last night I called on her and we quarreled. When we parted I walked the streets until morning, and in a sort of a trance I went back this morning.

"I don't know how I came to shoot her. I do know that I had a derringer, and that I must have aimed it at her. As soon as I shot I clasped her in my arms and then ran out.

I went down the street a short distance and then determined to go back. I backed out and then walked downtown. I went to Mr. Drake's office, who laughed when I told him that I had shot someone."

MOTHER FEARED FOR HER.

At the general hospital the youthful wife laid the blame on her husband.

"I'm going to die," she said faintly about the middle of the afternoon, "but I don't care very much. Charley and I have never been happy. He called this morning and commenced to quarrel. Suddenly he pulled out a pistol and shot me.

" 'Tell them that you did it,' he whispered as he took me in his arms and rushed out doors."

Mrs. Frank Scanlon, the mother of the girl, says that Hunter entered the house after she had left in the morning. She said that he had often threatened Myrtle, and that she was afraid to leave alone.

"I felt like something was going to happen when I left this morning," she said.

Hunter has been employed at the Hippodrome at odd times. He lives with an uncle, Claude Rider, at 1728 Troost avenue.

At the general hospital last night, the youthful wife lay on one of the beds in the surgical ward. She was suffering intense pain but still retained all of her faculties.

"Did they get Charley?" she asked. "Well I'm glad they did for he meant to shoot me."

Mrs. Scanlon, the girl's mother, was at her bedside all night.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

March 1, 1909

ROBBED PINKERTON
CHIEF'S HOME.

Burglars Steal Jewelry From Resi-
dence of W. B. Laughlin.

Thieves apparently believe members of the Pinkerton detective agency "easy pickings," as two have suffered at the hands of burglars within the last three days. Pinkerton Patrolman H. A. Stafford lost his revolver by having a burglar take it away from him. Yesterday a sneak thief entered the home of W. B. Laughlin, 1213 Troost avenue, superintendent of the agency, and stole a lot of jewelry. Articles missing reported to the police were two solitaire diamond rings, one string of gold beads, one gold locket and one gold watch.

Burglars entered the residence of Mrs. Alice Woodard, 1522 Lydia avenue, Saturday night and stole one gold watch, chain, locket, $11 in old coins and a quantity of wearing apparel. Entrance was gained by breaking the lock on a rear door.

Clothes were stolen by a sneak thief from the home of Mrs. G. W. Taylor, 2325 Mersington avenue, late Saturday night.

Labels: , , , ,

February 28, 1909

DEATH OF A WOMAN
BORN 101 YEARS AGO.

MRS. KATHERINE QUIGLEY
NEVER NEEDED MEDICINE.

Was an Intimate Friend of Edgar
Allen Poe and the Poet's
Wife -- Was Born in
Ireland.
101-Year-Old Katherine Quigley
MRS. KATHERINE QUIGLEY.

Mrs. Katherine Quigley, 101 years old, an intimate friend of Edgar Allen Poe and his wife, died yesterday afternoon at the home of her son, John A. Quigley, 3331 Troost avenue.

Mrs. Quigley was active up until the time of her death. Possessed of a naturally strong constitution, inherited from a long line of Irish ancestors, she had never taken a doctor's prescription in her life. One of her grandfathers lived to be 108 years old, and both of her parents saw their 80th birthdays.

Her maiden name was Katherine Bradley, and she was born and reared in a small village in the North of Ireland near the River Boyne. She left there at the age of 25 because, as she told her children, there were no young men eligible for matrimony in her native place. She had wealthy relatives living in New York, and they asked her to come and live with them. She came in a ship owned by one of her uncles, and on her arrival in New York city learned to be a milliner and dressmaker. After a few years her customers included the most fashionable people of the city, and she acquired a small competence.

WHEN SHE MET THE POET.

It was at this time that she made the acquaintance of the young writer and newspaper man, Edgar Allan Poe, and his child wife, Virginia, to whom he wrote Liglia," "The Sleeper," and "Lenore," as well as many of his other great poems. Miss Bradley was a frequent visitor at the house in Fordham. Poe, she often said, was recognized by all his friends as a genius. He was not living in poverty, although he had a penchant for railing at the poor financial returns that were made for works of genius. He was a long haired, egotistical young man, liked to talk about himself and drank, but then, so did everybody else in Fordham. The wife was a lovable and beautiful young girl and when she died the heart of the poet was broken and he disappeared.

Miss Bradley married Mr. James Quigley, a drygoods merchant, in New York, in 1848. The husband died in 1861, but the widow continued to live in New York until eighteen years ago, w hen she came to this city to live with her son.

One of her sons, James A. Quigley, was the incorporator and organizer of the Clover Leaf railway lines. He died last year in New York. Another son, B. A. Quigley, formerly lived in this city and the third, John A. Quigley, is in business here. Seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren survive.

Mrs. Quigley was a Catholic. Funeral services probably will be held from St. Vincent's church, Thirty-first street and Flora avenue, tomorrow.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

February 24, 1909

ROBBER WAS FULL OF "COKE."

Wanted More "Dope," His Defense
for Stealing.

After a cocaine debauch which he said cost nearly $400, Richard L. Hayes, a carpenter, who broke into the harness shop of Pearl Martin, 1720 Troost avenue, last Saturday night and stole a blanket, a shovel and a halter, confessed his guilt before Justice Shoemaker yesterday and was sentenced to serve twenty days in the workhouse.

"It was not I that stole the stuff, judge," said Hayes, "it was the 'coke.' I had spent all my money and wanted more of the drug. I am a carpenter and until last week was employed at the county farm. I had not touched a drop of liquor nor used cocaine for more than three months until I came to town last week.

Labels: , , , , ,

February 18, 1909

HOMEOPATHS ARE BARRED.

Are Not Allowed Priveleges of Gen-
eral Hospital Clinics.

Denying recent published statements connecting homeopathic physicians and members of the faculty of the Hehnemann School of Medicine at Tenth street and Troost avenue with the general hospital investigation, Dr. William E. Cramer, dean of the college and chairman of the local association of homeopathic physicians, declared yesterday that they had no part in the general hospital controversy. Both the college and the local association deny positively any connection with the specific charges brought by members of the Modern Woodmen.

Dr. Cramer said yesterday: "We have nothing whatever to do with the charges brought from other sources against the general hospital staff or the individual physicians regularly employed there or connected with the institution.

Dr. Cramer declared that to Kansas City the courtesy of holding clinics in the public hospitals had been denied Homeopathists. He said:

"For twenty-one years we had the privileges of surgical clinics at the general hospital. Our students were permitted to witness these clinics, and paid the customary fee into the city treasury.

"However, since the new hospital and health board was appointed we have been denied these surgical clinics at the general hospital, although repeated attempts have been made to get them.
At the same time the courtesy is extended to the medical department of the University of Kansas at Rosedale. The Kansas students are allowed to come into Kansas City when we citizens and taxpayers are denied.

"There is not one Homeopathic interne or Homeopathic physician regularly employed int he institution."

Labels: , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory