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February 8, 1910

MONSTER STADIUM
WILL BE BUILT.

TEN-ACRE TRACT BOUGHT NEAR
ELECTRIC PARK FOR AN
ATHLETIC FIELD.

Kansas and Missouri Uni-
versities Offered Use of
Park for Football.

A monster stadium which will seat 30,000 people, and an athletic field large enough for football games, track meets and baseball will be constructed on a ten-acre tract of ground within two blocks of Electric park by the Gordon & Koppel Clothing Company within the next six months. The ground was purchased yesterday for $30,000 and work on the stadium will start immediately.

The land is located between Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth streets and Lydia and Tracy avenue. It is on two car lines and crowds can be handled as well as they are handled at Electric park. The stadium will be of wooden construction, and it will be an up-to-date athletic field, such as has been proposed in the many stadium propositions talked of recently for football games between Kansas and Missouri universities. It will be known as the Gordon & Koppel Athletic field and will be under the management of George C. Lowe, a member of the firm.

TO VISIT M. S. U. TODAY.

This project is the result of the talk of erecting a stadium for university football, although the management has made no proposition to the universities to date and has not been promised the annual Thanksgiving day game. Mr. Lowe will go to Columbia, Mo., today to put the proposition before the athletic management of the university. He will then outline his plans to the Kansas university management. He will offer the field to those institutions for 10 per cent of the gross receipts of the annual game, but says that no matter whether those schools can be interested in it or not his plans will be carried out because football is but one of the many athletic events this stadium will be used for.

This is a private enterprise. For more than two months the backers have been trying to purchase the ground, but did not agree to terms until yesterday, when the transfer was made. The ground belongs to the Davis estate and the sale was made by G. E. Bowling & Co. The stadium will be built on ground 500 by 600 feet, the rest of the tract of ground to be used for other purposes. The inside of the field will be large enough to allow a quarter of a mile track to be built, which will be outside of the baseball diamond, and football gridiron.

MODERN IN EVERY RESPECT.

There will be bath rooms and lockers for the players. The stadium will be so constructed that there will be five entrances in front of it and as patrons of the park enter they will go up incline walks to the top of the seats, as they do in Convention hall. A walk will be built around the top. A grandstand will be constructed on each side of the athletic field and the ends will be bleachers. A row of boxes will be constructed around the entire field. The field will be laid out so that in case football crowds are more than 30,000 people, about 5,000 can be seated in chairs on track.

This field will be open to the public for use for all athletic evens and the management announced last night that in case a circus or anything of that nature could be put in the inclosure it will be rented for such purposes. Director Barnes of the Y. M. C. A. favors the enterprise for athletic events in which his men take part. City League baseball will be played there and Sunday School Athletic League and ward and high school athletic meets will have the privilege of using this ground.

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January 15, 1910

PARISH FOR COLORED CATHOLICS.

St. Monica's Catholic Mission
Organized by Franciscans.

A Catholic mission, known as St. Monica's Parish for Colored Catholics, has been organized by the Franciscan Fathers of the city at 2552 Locust street. The first divine services of the new mission will be held at St. John's school, 534 Tracy avenue, tomorrow. Regular services will be held at the parish headquarters on the second and fourth Sundays of each month, a Sunday school service following the services.

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December 29, 1909

DIES IN GROCERY STORE.

Nebraska Visitor Had Just Pur-
chased Cigars When Stricken.

While handing the clerk a dollar to pay for some cigars he had just purchased, Isaac N. Mothershead, 57 years old, a farmer of Niponee, Neb., died of heart disease in Edward Kendall's grocery store, at Fourteenth and Harrison streets, yesterday morning. Mr. Mothershead and his wife had been spending the Christmas holidays at the home of their daughter, Mrs. O. P. Haslett, 1420 Tracy avenue.

The body was taken to the Stine undertaking rooms in the police ambulance. A widow and five daughters survive him.

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December 4, 1909

ZONES OF CONTAGION
NEAR THREE SCHOOLS.

SCARLET FEVER AND DIPH-
THERIA IN SEVERAL SECTIONS.

Tin Drinking Cup Blamed by Medi-
cal Inspectors, Especially at
Benton -- Several Parochial
Schools Involved.

The medical inspectors going the rounds of the public schools have unearthed diphtheria and scarlet fever zones within the confines of Benton, Washington and Karnes schools. They are also learning from the daily returns of practicing physicians, of the existence of the two maladies among pupils of two or three of the parochial schools, but as the authority of the inspectors does not extend to schools of this description Dr. W. S. Wheeler, sanitary commissioner, has not felt justified in taking any voluntary official notice or action.

Of the parochial schools the worst afflicted is St. John's Parochial school, 534 Tracy avenue. This school, located in a district largely inhabited by Italian children, is conducted by the Sisters of St. Joseph. Yesterday Sister Superior Monica appealed to the health authorities to make an investigation. Dr. H. Delamater, chief inspector, made a personal visit to the school and was informed that ninety of the 160 pupils are detained at home by sickness. Within the last six days cases of scarlet fever have developed among the pupils, and Dr. Delameter fears that many who are home at home may have it. He will have an examination made of the school building as to its sanitary condition, and will have class rooms fumigated.

Washington public school is at the southwest corner or Independence avenue and Cherry street, and the Karnes school is at the northwest corner of Troost avenue and Fourth street. Large numbers of the pupils have scarlet fever, the majority of victims predominating among those attending Karnes school. The diphtheria is not as epidemic as scarlet fever. The attendants of these two schools live in the territory bounded on the south by Admiral boulevard, north by the river, west by Grand avenue and east as far as Lydia avenue. The majority of the cases are north of Fifth street and scatter as far to the east as Budd park. As an assistance to the health authorities in keeping in touch with the exact location of the disease, a large map of the city has been prepared, and when a case of diphtheria develops a green-headed pin is driven into the map, designating a particular territory, and when one of scarlet fever is reported the map is perforated with a red-headed pin.

MAP RAPIDLY FILLING.

The map describing the Washington and Karnes school districts is rapidly filling up with the pin indicators, but not as noticeably as the district in which Benton school is situated. At the latter school diphtheria is the most prevalent, and is giving some alarm. The infection is spreading with rapidity. Benton school is at the southwest corner of Thirtieth street and Benton boulevard, in a fashionable and well-to-do neighborhood. There are from twenty to thirty cases of diphtheria among pupils going to this school, and it is feared that the disease got its start from the drinking cups in use there.

"The drinking cup in the public schools is a menace to health and is a communicator and spreader of disease," said Dr. Delamater yesterday. "Its frightful possibilities were fully described by Dr. W. S. Wheeler in his last annual report, and he advises that it be relegated and sanitary fountains installed in the schools. The health of no child is safe when the tin cup is in use. While I am not directly charging the appearance of diphtheria at Benton school to the drinking cup, still there is plenty of room for that suspicion as the school building is new and should be sanitary."

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November 5, 1909

SAMUEL LIEBERMAN AT REST.

Funeral Held From the Family
Home on Tracy Avenue.

With the casket in which his body reposed hidden by flowers the funeral of Samuel Lieberman, 15 year old son of Rabbi and Mrs. Max Lieberman, was held at the family home, 1423 Tracy avenue yesterday. The services were conducted by Rabbi Isadore Koplowitz. Scores of friends of the family and of the boy called at the home during the day and the house could not hold the throng that was present during the services. Burial was in the Tefares Israel cemetery at Sheffield.

Rabbi Lieberman has asked The Journal to express his family's thanks to their friends for many kindnesses during the illness and death of their son.

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November 4, 1909

SAMUEL LIEBERMAN DEAD.

The End Comes to The Journal's
"Sammie, the Office Boy."

Samuel Lieberman, 15 years old, son of Rabbi Max Lieberman, pastor of the Kenneseth Isreal congregation, died at 7 o'clock yesterday morning at the German hospital, after an illness of one day. The cause of his death was arterial sclerosis, or hardening of the arteries -- a disease that rarely attacks persons in their youth. The funeral will be at 2 o'clock this afternoon from the family home, 1423 Tracy avenue.

Samuel Lieberman was known to readers of The Journal as "Sammie the office boy." Small of body, quick of wit and cheerful to a degree rarely encountered even in hopeful youth, he became a favorite with editors and reporters, who encouraged him to write the small news stories he occasionally picked up on his daily rounds. At first the stories he wrote were given to the copy readers to be edited, but one night one of his stories was published just as he had written it, and credited to "Sammie, the Office Boy." Mr. Taft felt no greater elation when the wires conveyed to him the information that he had been elected president of the United States than did Sammie, the office boy, when he saw his first signed story in print. He became a frequent contributor to The Journal's columns and numerous inquiries were received at the office as to whether "Sammie, the Office Boy" really was an office boy or a reporter concealing his identity under the pseudonym.

Never strong in body, Sammie taxed his physical strength to the uttermost. He kept the same hours as the reporters, though it was not necessary for him to do so, and on election nights when the men were on the "long stunt," from noon to dawn, he stayed with them and it was useless to try to get him to go home. He liked the atmosphere of the local room. He said he hoped, one day, to become a great editor.

Once he ran away. He visited and worked in Milwaukee, Chicago, Cleveland, Buffalo and other places. He was at home in the larger cities. He had early learned that the peregrinating reporter always gravitates to Central police station, where the "dog watch" men from the various papers hold out. Sammie could talk shop like a veteran who had worked "with Dana of the New York Sun." Whenever a group of reporters gathered in the local room Sammie could be found lurking on the outskirts. He learned the reporters' distinction between a "good story" and a "bad one" and on occasions aired his knowledge with the positiveness of a managing editor.

Not many months ago a veteran reporter, after hearing Sammie talk about newspapers and newspaper making, removed his pipe from between his teeth, pointed a long finger at the door through which the boy had just passed out and said:

"That boy isn't long for this world. He's going to die young. He's smart beyond his years -- too smart. Why, he's a man, almost, already. He thinks and reasons better than lots of men I know. And there's a peculiar brightness in his eyes that doesn't look good to me. Mark my words, that boy isn't long for this world, and it's a pity, too, for he would be heard from if he should live to manhood."

The random observation of the veteran soon came true. Sammie was at the office Sunday. "I don't feel very good," he told one of the boys, "but I'll be all right when I rest up a bit." There was a hopeful smile on his face Tuesday afternoon as he lay on a cot at the hospital. "I'll be back to the office soon. I hurt awful at times. I ain't going to stay here long."

Soon after dawn of the following day his final words were verified. "Sammie, the office boy," had heard the fateful "Thirty" that, in newspaper offices, signifies the end.

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September 22, 1909

BODIES OF VICTIMS
TO REST IN ATCHISON.

FUNERALS OF MRS. STOLL AND
WILLIAM JACOBIA TODAY.

Interment of Principals in Monday
Night's Murder and Suicide
to be Made at Former
Residence.

With the burial in Atchison, Kas., today of the victims of the tragedy enacted Monday night at the home of S. F. Stoll, 3617 Tracy avenue, in which Mrs. Sadie Stoll was murdered by William Jacobia, who later committed suicide at his wife's home, the last chapter of their story will have been concluded.

Mrs. Stoll's body was taken to Atchison at 6:30 o'clock last night. It will be buried beside that of her father, who died several weeks ago.

Mrs. William Jacobia, 3235 Forest avenue, will this morning take the body of her husband to Atchison where he will be buried. The wife and child will be the beneficiaries of life insurance carried by Jacobia. The life insurance was partly placed in fraternal organizations. Jacobia carried about $5,000 insurance upon his life. The fact that he left no will gives his wife and son all of his personal property. The insurance is all he left.

That Jacobia formed the Linwood Investment company for the sole purpose of placing his property beyond the possibility of being taken from him in a suit for the alienation of the affections of Mr. Stoll's wife was denied yesterday by his attorney, W. F. Guthrie. Mr. Guthrie for a time acted as trustee of the property owned by Jacobia for the latter and his wife, and later assisted in the financial separation between them.

While Mrs. Stoll refused to give up Jacobia, and give all of her love to her husband, she is said to never have countenanced any idea of leaving her husband and children. While she informed a friend that she loved Jacobia, she said she w ould stay at home on account of her two boys. For a year she drifted along in this fashion, meeting Jacobia daily, and when suspected by her husband pacifying him.

Those persons intimate with the family relations of the Stolls said yesterday that Mr. Stoll never knew of the friendship that existed between his wife and Jacobia, though he became suspicious on many occasions. At such times he is said to have spoken to his wife regarding the rumors he heard, but she always talked him out of his suspicious mood, and it ended by Mr. Stoll apologizing for his mistake. The night of the murder and suicide Mr. Stoll told one of h is intimate friends that he had seen his wife with Jacobia on but two occasions.

The report that Mrs. Stoll's father, J. P. Brown, had assisted in meeting the expenses of the Stoll household was denied yesterday. It was admitted that he often made presents of various sums of money, but that he gave the money to his daughter because she was a favorite.

Albert Stoll, the 14-year-old son who was in the house at the time his mother was murdered, yesterday asserted that he did not know what subject was being discussed by his mother and Jacobia during the quarrel.

Albert did not inform his fatherr of the clandestine meetings because of the love for his mother. The older son, Sam, also failed to tell his father for fear he would kill either Mrs. Stoll or Jacobia and thus create a scandal that might otherwise be dept from the public.

Attorney W. F. Guthrie last night made a written statement in which he denied that Stoll had ever employed him to bring an alienation suit. Speaking for Mr. Stoll, the attorney said that the druggist had never hired detectives to shadow his wife or Jacobia. the attorney said that Mr. Stoll had accused a man of being too intimate with his wife while living in Atchison, and that it became public. The affair caused people to lose confidence in Mr. Stoll, and he was forced to seek another location.

A denial was made by the attorney, who was also attorney for Mrs. Stoll's father, that Mr. Stoll ever received or expected any sum of money from his father-in-law as the price of his continuing to live with his wife.

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September 21, 1909

FRIENDSHIP ENDS IN
MURDER AND SUICIDE.

WILLIAM JACOBIA KILLS MRS.
SADIE STOLL AND HIMSELF.

Young Son of Woman Heard Quarrel
and Shooting -- Risks Life Try-
ing to Protect His
Mother.
Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, Murdered Woman.
MRS. SADIE BROWN STOLL.
Wife of Samuel F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company.

Murder and suicide ended a close friendship last night when William Jacobia, 600 East Ninth street, shot and killed Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, 3617 Tracy avenue, during a quarrel in the front hall of the Stoll home at 9 o'clock and a few minutes later committed suicide on the veranda of his wife's residence, 3217 Forest avenue.

Mrs. Stoll was shot through the heart and died at once. Jacobia shot himself in the head.

The only person in the house at the time Mrs. Stoll was murdered was her 14-year-old son Albert. What passed between the couple before the tragedy is not known definitely, but they were quarreling for nearly a half hour before Jacobia fired the shot. Albert Stoll heard part of the conversation between his mother and Jacobia, but was sent to his room by her just before the shooting.


BOY GETS A SHOTGUN.

That the young son expected serious trouble while Jacobia was there is shown by Jacobia's actions, which Albert Stoll graphically described to the police last night. Immediately after firing the shot which killed Mrs. Stoll, Jacobia started up the stairs, threatening to kill Albert, who had provided himself with a shotgun to protect his own life.

Either the shotgun frightened him or the desire to get away from the scene of his crime, Jacobia gave up the pursuit of the boy, and ran from the house, followed by Albert, who gave the alarm by crying for help.

But few minutes elapsed between the first and second shooting. It is only five blocks from the Stoll home at 3617 Tracy avenue to Mrs. Jacobia's suite in the Alabama apartment house, 3237 Forest avenue, and Jacobia ran all the way.


"I HAVE SHOT MRS. STOLL."

A balcony with no outside steps is front of her apartment, which is on the ground floor. Jacobia made his entrance by way of this balcony and in doing so had to climb over a stone balustrade which encloses it. As he entered with much agitation he said to his wife, who had come to let him in:

"Mamma, I had to come home."

She could see that he was greatly excited, and told him to sit down while she got him a glass of cold water.

"No, no!" he protested, excitedly, "I haven't time. I have just shot Mrs. Stoll. It is awful, it is awful."
William Jacobia; Killed His Friend and Then Himself.
WILLIAM JACOBIA.
Slayer of Mrs. Samuel F. Stoll, who committed suicide when the police traced him to his wife's home at 3217 Forest avenue.

Incoherently he was trying to tell her of the shooting when he heard the sound of steps outside.

"There are the officers coming for me," he said.

"Yes, but you will have to nerve yourself and be calm," she told him.

Mrs. Jacobia went to the door to let in Sergeant M. E. Cassidy and Patrolman Isaac Hull of No. 9 station, and as she did so her husband stepped out on the balcony.

"Where is he?" asked Sergeant Cassidy.


WIFE HEARS DEATH SHOT.

Just then they heard a single shot, and the three went hurriedly to the balcony door.

"There he lies," she answered, pointing to the dead body of her husband, prostrate on the stone floor of the porch. The husband of the murdered woman is S. F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company, formerly at Twelfth street and Grand avenue, and now located at 208 and 210 East Twelfth street. He was notified of the death of his wife by W. R. James, 3615 Tracy avenue. Sam Brown Stoll, 18 years old, the oldest son, was at a theater, and friends were unable to reach him by telephone.

According to the facts as told by Albert last night Jacobia telephoned yesterday afternoon about 3 o'clock and asked for Mrs. Stoll. Albert answered the telephone and upon recognizing Jacobia's voice hung up the receiver. About 8 o'clock last night he again called up and was answered by Mrs. Stoll, and a half hour later appeared at the house.

Mrs. Stoll fell dead in the hallway at the foot of the stairs. Her head was lying against the bottom step, while her feet pointed to the front door. Soon after Mr. Stoll reached home he asked neighbors and friends to inform the relatives of his wife of her death. J. H. Brown, a brother, who lives in Atchison, Kas., was informed of the tragedy.

"Tell all of them to come," said Albert, who was telling his father what should be done.

The account of the shooting as told by young Albert Stoll soon after the murder, while not full in all details, shows daring in a boy so young as far as his part was concerned. He said that he and his brother did not like Jacobia, and that a week ago Sam had purchased a shotgun with the intention of killing the man who was his mother's friend. The shotgun had been kept in their room until a day or so ago, when his mother removed it to the attic.

"Yesterday afternoon when Jacobia called up and asked for mamma, I hung up the receiver," said Albert. "Then about 8 tonight he called mother, and soon afterwards he came to the house. I was in my room at the time. When I heard mamma and Jacobia fussing I decided I would get the shotgun, which I did. I took a shell and after taking out the wad and shot I went down to the first landing and stood there.

HEARD HIS MOTHER SHOT.

"I told Jacobia to leave the house, that he did not have any business here anyway. At that he got mad at me and told me to keep still or he would beat me. Then to bluff him I picked up the shotgun and put a load into it. Mamma made me go to my room, saying she would get Jacobia awa.

"I'll not let that little pup talk to me that way," Jacobia is said to have repeated to Mrs. Stoll.

"Just as I reached the upper hall I heard the shot, and then mamma say, 'Albert, he shot me.' 'Yes, and I'll shoot him, too,' I heard Jacobia say as I was hurrying back downstairs. Jacobia was coming up the stairs, and knowing my shell was not good, I ran to my room and put a loaded shell in the gun and then came downstairs.

RAN AFTER JACOBIA.

"As I reached the head of the stairway Jacobia was going out the front door, and I ran down the steps and followed into the yard. He was then going up the street. I cried 'Help, help,' and someone across the street asked, 'What is the matter, Albert?' When I said mamma is shot nearly all of the people started to the house and I came back and called up papa, but he didn't answer. Then someone told the police.

"I wish I had shot him," Albert admitted.

"Oh, God, why didn't you shoot the scoundrel, boy?" Mr. Stoll asked of his son.

Albert insisted that he did not know what his mother and Jacobia were talking about. Whenever Albert endeavored to tell the police just what occurred, and how, Mr. Stoll, who was walking the floor of the lower rooms, would tell him to keep still. Mr. Stoll refused to answer any questions immediately after the murder.

HUSBAND STILL LOVED HER.

"I loved her with every drop of blood in my body," he said, "and I will not say anything against her. I would not say a word that would reflect upon her. Oh, God, why couldn't he have shot me?"

Not until Samuel Stoll, the elder son, came home after the performance at a theater, did he learn of the tragedy. As he hurried up the steps, he was met by J. A. Guthrie, a friend of the family.

"For God's sake, what's the matter?" he said with a perplexed face.

Then he saw the white shrouded figure in the parlor with the undertaker and his assistants standing near. Mr. Stoll, who saw him, threw his arms about the boy's neck and shouted:

"Your friend killed her, that's what he did. And you knew he was coming to see her all the time."

WHEN THE TWO FIRST MET.

Then both were hurried up the stairs by friends.

"I'll kill him myself," said the youth.

"He has done that to save you the trouble," said Mr. Guthrie. "He committed suicide just after he killed your mother."

Then the father upbraided the son for several minutes, but the youth declared he knew nothing about it. Then both began weeping hysterically, and were finally reconciled. But the father could not remain seated. He walked the floor in anguish.

"I knew the first day he saw my wife," he said. "One day when he was building those flats up on Forest avenue, he came in to use the telephone, and my wife met him at the door. He introduced himself, which was the beginning of their acquaintance. I began to get suspicious when I saw him at the house several times.

WAS TOLD TO WATCH WIFE.

"Somehow I had a suspicion that all was not right, and at times I felt sick. On one occasion I asked her about it, but she became angry and upbraided me so much that I felt almost humiliated. She went on occasional visits to Atchison, and I was suspicious every time that she left home.

"On one of the visits to Atchison, I found his picture in the close, and I was so angry when she came home that I could wait no longer. She flew into a rage, and I could do nothing but submit, not wishing to make the affair public.

"My feelings were again wrought to a high pitch when I received an anonymous letter, telling me I ought to watch my wife. I then determined to hire a detective agency to watch her, but after hiring two men I thought differently and canceled my contract with the firm.

"It has been that way for months until tonight when I was called to the telephone and was told that my wife had been shot. I won't harbor any ill will against her for my boys' sake. She was their mother.

Mrs. Stoll was a large woman with a rich mass of dark brown hair. Her face was full and her eyes were dark brown, which matched her olive complexion. She was considered one of the handsomest women in the neighborhood, and always attracted attention on the street by her dignified bearing. A dimple in her cheek was heightened by an engaging smile. She always dressed in clothes of the latest fashion, which while not always expensive, always were tasteful. She was 38 years old.

Mrs. Stoll was the daughter of J. P. Brown, a wealthy man who lived at Atchison, Kas., Her father died about three weeks ago. He was well known in and around Atchison being one of the most prominent men in that community. While the Stolls lived in Atchison Mr. Stoll conducted a drug store there.

JACOBIA 46 YEARS OLD.

William Jacobia, the dead man, was 46 years old and rather stout. Those who had known him in life said last night that he was apparently of a happy disposition, with rare conversational powers. He took uniformly with women and men, the former long remembering his bright wit and ready flow of small talk.

When Mr. and Mrs. Jacobia were married October 8, 1890, he was an engineer on a Kansas branch of the Missouri Pacific railway. Later he left the railroad in favor of the banking business and founded the Farmer's state bank, the stock of which was owned mostly by farmers at Corning, Kas., which was his birthplace. Seven years ago he sold out his interest in the Farmers' bank and came to Kansas City to enter the real estate business.

POLICE "DIDN'T KNOW."

The police notified Dr. B. H. Zwart, coroner, of the double crime and he in turn notified Deputy Coroner Dr. Harry Czarlinsky. The bodies of the murdered woman and suicide were sent to the Carroll - Davidson undertaking rooms by the deputy coroner.

The police who were stationed at the home of Mrs. Stoll and Mrs. Jacobia refused to give any information regarding the tragedy last night. Whenever any of them were asked who shot the woman or why he shot her or an y other question relative to the case the invariable answer was "I don't know."

One policeman was asked if the body lying in the front hall of the Stoll home was a man or woman, and he said, "I don't know."

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August 24, 1909

WITH 5,000 NEGRO DELEGATES.

SUPREME LODGE WILL OPEN
THIS MORNING.

Every State in Union Wil Be Rep-
resented on Roll Call -- Recep-
tion at Second Bap-
tist Church.

With a delegation of 5,000 negro men and women from every state in the Union, the supreme lodge of negro Knights of Pythias opens this morning in Ivanhoe hall, Nineteenth street and Tracy avenue, and continues until Friday night. It is the largest gathering of its kind ever held in Kansas City. Among the delegates are doctors, lawyers, bankers, merchants, clerks, porters, barbers, teachers, editors, farmers and every other profession, trade and business followed by negroes.

A reception was held last night at the Second Baptist church, Tenth and Charlotte streets. Grand Chancellor A. W. Lloyd of St. Louis presided and music was furnished by the choir of the Second Baptist church.

Nelson C. Crews, chairman of the local committee, made an address of welcome.

A solo by Miss Ennis Collins followed.

Welcome to the state was extended by Professor W. W. Yates, who represented Governor Hadley. His address was short and cordial. A selection by the Calanthian choir then followed.

S. W. Green of New Orleans, supreme chancellor, responded to this address.

S. C. Woodson represented Mayor Crittenden in an address of welcome.

There was a solo by Wiliam J. Tompkins and a selection by the choir, "The Heavens Are Telling." Other addresses were made by Prof. J. R. Jefferson of West Virginia; Dr. J. E. Perry, E. D. Green, of Chicago; Dr. W. P. Curtiss, St. Louis; Dr. J. A. Ward, Indianapolis; Mrs. Janie C. Combs and A. J. Hazelwood.

The Supreme Court of Calanthe will be presided over by John W. Strauther of Greenville, Miss. The session will be held at the Hodcarrier's hall. In this meeting every phase of the negro's home life will be discussed. Strauther is one of the most noted men of his race in the country.

At 2 o'clock this afternoon a band concert will be given at Cap Carrouthers by the Bixton, Ia., band, and dress parade at 5:30 p. m. by the entire uniform ranks.

Rev. B. Hillman of Terra Haute, Ind., made the opening prayer last night.

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August 7, 1909

MAY RELEGATE THE BROOM.

School Board Considering Vacuum
Cleaning for Buildings.

Vacuum cleaning of the public schools may possibly be substituted for the old process of sweeping with brooms and occasional scrubbing of floors. At the meeting of the board of education last night Charles Smith, architect for the board, was instructed to ask for bids for equipping the new Bancroft school, Forty-third street and Tracy avenue, for vacuum cleaning.

It would require nearly $165,000 to put the system in all of the school buildings. The board will probably have it placed in a few buildings at a time as the funds will allow if the plan is found to be practicable.

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July 6, 1909

CHILD HURT TRYING
TO SAVE HER SISTER

ETHEL AND NORINE AINS-
WORTH INJURED BY CAR.

When 6-Year-Old Girl Was Caught
by Fender, Sister, 9 Years Old,
Grabbed Her -- Both
Will Recover.

ETHEL AND NORINE AINSWORTH.

In an effort to save her sister, Norine, 6 years old, from impending death beneath the wheels of a street car at Eighth street and Tracy avenue, yesterday afternoon, Ethel Ainsworth, 9 years old, was struck by the fender and knocked several yards away on the asphalt pavement. The younger girl was rolled beneath the car, and when it was stopped was found wedged under the motor casing of the forward truck. The child was taken from beneath the car after about five minutes' hard work, during which operations were directed by T. P. Wood, a passenger.

Norine's injuries are serious. The child's head was cut, her right arm dislocated, her abdomen injured and the skin torn from her limbs. Ethel's injuries were not so serious. She suffered a slight concussion of the brain, a scalp wound and injuries to her side, arms and limbs.

TRIED TO SAVE SISTER.

Norine and Ethel are the children of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Ainsworth of 1312 East Ninth street. About 5:30 o'clock they left a store at Eighth street and Tracy avenue. Ethel carried the bundles and Norine led the way.

In crossing the street they avoided a westbound street car, but Norine failed to see eastbound car No. 142 on the Independence avenue line, manned by Motorman L. A. Towhouser and Conductor W. H. Donahue. Norine did not hear the warning cry of the motorman, but her sister Ethel did. Norine was struck by the fender and felled. The fender was forced up and the child rolled beneath it. Dropping her parcels, Ethel grabbed for her sister. Just then the front end of the car struck the elder girl, hurling her unconscious into the street.

Motorman Towhouser applied the air and reversed the power, coming to a quick stop. Women in the car fainted when they heard the child's cry.

Volunteers were many in the effort to rescue the imprisoned child. She lay in one of the sunken spots in the paving and it is believed this had much to do with preventing her hips being crushed. She did not lose consciousness, and did much to assist her rescuers in extricating her. The child was seized by the frantic father and carried to her home a block away, where doctors attended her injuries.

DAZED CHILD FORGOTTEN.

Half an hour later neighbors took Ethel home. She was dazed from the shock, but the first question she asked was as to the condition of her baby sister. When told that she would recover, she smiled her satisfaction. The girl had been lost sight of in the excitement which followed the accident, and it was not until neighbors found her wandering about in a dazed condition that it became generally known she had been injured.

"I did not see the car until it was right on us," said Ethel last evening. "Sister was in front of the car, and I knew the motorman could not stop it. I tried to grab her, and then felt something strike me. I do not remember how I got home."

Motorman Towhouser declared that the accident was unavoidable. He said that if his car had not been running slowly the child probably would have been killed.

"I managed to stop the car within ten feet, and this I think saved the child's life," he said.

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July 6, 1909

TURNS A SOMERSAULT AT 80.

Grandpa Brueckmann's July 4th
Antics Amused the Children.

The German Baptist Sunday school, Seventeenth and Tracy, held its annual basket picnic at Budd park yesterday. A crowd of children, with hands joined, danced in a ring, while a man stood in the center and sang a German holiday song. At the end of each verse he would do something and each one in the circle had to imitate him.

With the children, and apparently enjoying himself as much as they, was Henry Brueckmann, 80 years old. He made faces, clapped his hands, pulled his neighbor's hair and did everything suggested by the leader, until the latter turned a somersault. The children all went over in a hurry, and then besieged "grandpa" to turn one. And Grandpa Breuckmann, 80 years old, did turn a somersault -- a good one, too -- much to the delight of the children. There were 140 at this picnic.

The Swedish Methodist church Sunday school, 1664 Madison street, headed by O. J. Lundberg, pastor, and the Swedish mission at Fortieth and Genessee streets, held a big basket dinner in the east end of Budd park. About 150 enjoyed themselves.

Not far from them the Swedish Baptist church Sunday school, 416 West Fourteenth street, with Rev. P. Schwartz and a delegation from a Swedish church in Kansas City, Kas., headed by Rev. Carl Sugrstrom, was holding forth about 300 strong.

There were many family and neighborhood picnics in the park.

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March 28, 1909

FOIL MARITAL PLANS OF
AN AGED COUPLE.

RELATIVES RUTHLESSLY BREAK
UP WEDDING FEAST.

Now Jacob Rieger, Aged 75, Is
Speeding Away From His
Intended Bride of
60 Years.

Jacob Rieger, 75 years old, who lives with his son, Alexander Rieger, a wholesale liquor dealer at 4121 Warwick boulevard, believes that at that age he is eligible to the order of benedicts. But others of Mr. Rieger's household had different opinions and as a result a pretty wedding supper was interrupted last Thursday evening at the home of the prospective bride, Mrs. Rosa Peck, 60 years old, a milliner at Sixth and Main streets. Also there is an attachment on $1,100 which Mr. Rieger had in the National Bank of Commerce and a fast train is now hurrying him to New York, where he is to remain until he has outgrown his love for the woman.

Since his wife died a year ago, Mr. Rieger, the elder, has complained of lonesomeness, but could find no one among his near relatives who would even offer a suggestion of a cure.

"It is a pity," he is said to have often remarked, "that an old man like me must stay a widower."

No one, however, paid much attention to the yearnings of the old man. He took his evening walks the same as usual and made no allusion to any woman in particular as a fit subject for his affections, and as he has for several years been a partial invalid no developments were expected.

LOVED HIM AND LIKED HIM.

Up to last Wednesday things went as usual with the old man except it was noticed he had gradually been lengthening his outdoor walks, sometimes absenting himself for hours at a time. Then the word was brought to Alexander Rieger that his father and Mrs. Peck had been to Kansas City, Kas., and obtained a marriage license.

Alexander Rieger immediately went to the telephone and called up his lawyer, Samuel Eppstein of the law firm of Eppstein, Ulmann & Miller, with offices in the Kansas City Life building.

Mr. Eppstein went to see Mrs. Peck that same afternoon in hopes of talking her out of the notion of marrying the elder Mr. Rieger. He told her that her prospective groom, through his retirement from the liquor business, was not exactly in independent circumstances, and that in addition he was suffering from chronic stomach trouble.

Mr. Eppstein is eloquent and talked long and earnestly but by all his entreaties he received a decided "no."

"I love him and I like him," was the double-barreled manner in which Mrs. Peck, in broken German accents, expressed her regard for Mr. Rieger.

"You can't take him from me," she said. "You don't know the love we have for each other, and I wouldnt give him up for $25,000," and there the argument ended.

ATTACHED HIS MONEY.

The day following was stormy, but in spite of this fact the elder Mr. Rieger took a car for downtown early in the day. No one saw him go. It was hours before his absence was noticed and the alert lawyer again notified.

Mr. Eppstein at once hurried to the Sixth and Main street millinery store. He found Mrs. Peck had closed shop and was also missing.

Before starting out to forestall the wedding Mr. Eppstein arranged for a bill of attachment on all money Mr. Rieger had on deposit at the bank. Then he took a fast automobile ride to the home of Rabbi Max Lieberman at 1423 Tracy avenue, where he suspected the marriage ceremony would be performed.

As he expected, Mr. Rieger was there arranging for the nuptuals to be solmnized at 5:30 o'clock. After a good deal of argument Mr. Rieger consented to ride in the automobile back to the home of his son.

This was at 4 o'clock. About 5 o'clock he was again missing. This looked like buisness to Mr. Eppstein and the automobile was again brought into play and headed for the millinery store.

When the door of the living apartments at the rear of the store burst opeon to admit the excited lawyer it found a large table spread with a wedding feast and several guests, relatives of the propective bride assembled.

"This wedding can't go on!" shouted Mr. Eppstein. "I have arranged with the rabbi and he will not come."

LED THE BRIDEGROOM AWAY.

"Oh, yes it will," said the bride calmly. "We'll arange for another minister, won't we, Jacob?"

"No, there is nothing doing in the marriage line," replied the lawyer. "It's all off. You see, it isn't legal because you got the license in Kansas City, Kas. That's the law, you know."

Mr. Eppstein did not wait to hear any more, but took the bridegroom by the arm and led him away.

At midnight he was placed aboard a fast train for New York. Mrs. Alexander Rieger went along for company.

Alexander Rieger has maintained a mail order trade under the name of his father, Jacob Rieger, at Fifteenth and Genesse streets for many years, the father now having no interest in the business. Mrs. Peck has been a milliner in the North End over twenty years and is said to have laid by a snug sum of money. Her husband died many years ago, leaving the business exclusively to her.

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March 23, 1909

PROMOTER UNDER ARREST.

John W. Roberts Held Under $2,000
Bond on a Charge of Bigamy.

John W. Roberts, a promoter, with offices in the Jenkins building, Thirteenth street and Grand avenue, was arraigned before Justice Richardson yesterday, charged with bigamy. The complaint was filed by Mrs. Maggie Roberts, 2305 Minnie avenue, who claims that Roberts, after deserting her nearly four years ago, married Teressa Helmer in Denver, Col., in June, 1906. Roberts was released on $2,000 bond for preliminary examination April 2.

"I was married twenty-two years ago, and lived with my wife until about four years ago," said Roberts yesterday. "We simply could not get along together, and I left her. Since that time I have sent an average of $75 a month to her. She came into my office last Monday, and demanded that I give her $100. This I refused to do, and told her that I would allow her $40, which she took.

"We had two children, Lillian, aged 19, and William T. aged 17. My daughter is living with her mother, and the boy just arrived in Kansas City today from Texas, where he has been working. He probably will make his home with me at 1122 Tracy avenue, if he remains in this city."

William T. Roberts met his father in the Jenkins building last night. He said that with a few exceptions Roberts had provided regulary for his first family.

The second Mrs. Roberts is living at 1122 Tracy avenue and is the mother of a 7-months-old baby girl.

When asked what his plans were, Roberts said:

"I have no plans. When the proper time comes I will make my statement. These charges have been brought against me and they will have to be proved. There is nothing farther to say."

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February 17, 1909

GENERAL HOSPITAL IS
TO BE INVESTIGATED.

EX-PATIENTS MAKE CHARGES
AGAINST MANAGEMENT.

Cruel Treatment Alleged in Affida-
vits Read Before Council -- Com-
mittee Is Appointed to
Sift Complaints.

The lower house on the council last night named Alderman W. P. Woolf, C. J. Gilman and J. G. Lapp to a committee to investigate charges of inhumane treatment towards patients at the new general hospital.

The investigation was made upon the request of Alderman Darious Brown, who read a number of affidavits said to have been signed by patients.

Alderman Miles Bulger openly asserted that the move was a political one to embarrass the administration.

"I do not believe that Alderman Brown is any more sincere in this than he has been with his moves for a gas pressure regulation," declared Bulger.

Alderman brown denied with emphasis the charge of insincerity in wanting the alleged cruelties investigated. He added that it was impossible for him to believe that the prominent men comprising the health and hospital board would want such aspersions cast upon their management of the institution without having to falsity or correctness of them established.

FOUGHT AGAINST OPERATION.

Affidavits outlining complaints of patients who claimed to have been abused were read by Mr. Brown.

F. A. Wolf, 4237 Tracy, was taken to the hospital December 1, he affirmed, suffering from a nervous complaint, but declares the house physicians said he had a hernia and should be operated on. He says he fought being taken to the operating room and succeeded in escaping an operation until his wife could be communicated with. She called Dr. Charles E. Allen, the family physician, and Wolf was removed to Wesley hospital.

Wolf charges cruelty to other patients, declaring he had seen a patient whipped with a leather strap for asking for something to eat after regular meal hours, and had seen a man suffering from pneumonia die after being forced into a tub filled with cold water.

MODERN WOODMEN INTERESTED.

Wolf claims to be a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and a local lodge of the order is supporting him in his charges.

Frank E. Jefferson made affidavit that on October 22 he underwent an operation at the hospital, and the incision was not dressed until the 25th. Later he was moved to Hahneman Medical college.

Arthur Slim, a brick layer, declared that while he was in the hospital with an ulcerated leg and suffering much pain, a doctor ordered him to the kitchen to work. He replied "that if he had to work, he might as well be laying brick."

SLIM ACCUSES PHYSICIAN.

Then the doctor repeated his order that Slim must either work in the kitchen or leave. Slim says he left, and limped to the emergency hospital and asked they physicians there to dress his sore leg. They refused, he avers, because he had left the general hospital.

Then Slim went to the University hospital, where his leg was dressed, and he was ordered back to the general hospital.

"December 23 I went back to the hospital," claims Slim, "and when the doctor saw me, he told others he would 'fix' me. He poured a quart bottle of acid over my sore leg."

EAGLES TOOK HIM AWAY.

Signor Friscoe was a trapeze performer. He swears that on January 16, 1909, he fell from a trapeze at the Hippodrome, breaking five ribs and paralyzing his lower limbs. He complains that he was roughly handled both in the ambulance and at the hospital, and that when he asked to be allowed to communicate with the Benevolent Order of Eagles, of which he is a member, his request was denied. Finally, he got into communication with officials of the Kansas City aerie, and was removed to another hospital.

W. O. Cardwell asserts that Walter Gessley died at the hospital, and that a doctor refused to state the cause of death or furnish a death certificate until he was paid $2.

An attack on the hospital management came up in a different form in the upper house of the council. The board asked for authority to spend $5,000 for surgical instruments, an X-ray machine and fitting up a laboratory.

DR. NEAL WILL NOT DENY.

Dr. J. Park Neal, house surgeon at the general hospital, said last night:

"Neither I nor any member of the hospital staff care to deny the charges made against the hospital. We simply ignore them. They are too absurd to make a denial necessary."

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January 29, 1909

GOT HER DIAMOND RING BACK.

Man Who Tried It On Held to the
Criminal Court.

"I am not inclined to regard very highly any young girl or young woman who, after an acquaintance of a single week, would allow a man to wear or even take her diamond ring," said Justice Shoemaker to Ethel Donohue, 1112 Tracy avenue, yesterday. Ethel was in court as prosecuting witness against Thomas C. Tracy, whom she charged with stealing her diamond ring and afterwards pawning it.

It developed that Tracy had tried on the ring and was unable to remove it from his finger. He promised to have it cut off, which he did. Then he would have it repaired and return it, which he did not. Instead, he took the ring to a pawn broker and got $15 for it. Then he departed for Chicago. Detective James Orford went to Chicago and brought him back. Tracy's father sent the money to Detective Orford to redeem the ring. Ethel was given h er ring in court yesterday.

"I would like," concluded the justice, "to free this young man on these charges, and I am inclined to think that you," said he to the girl, "are as much to blame as he." Tracy was held for the criminal court on $500 bond.

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December 31, 1908

NEGRO EDUCATORS WOULD
TEACH AGRICULTURE.

Want Money For Such a Department
at the Lincoln State Nor-
mal School.

The twenty-fourth annual session of the negro branch, Missouri State Teachers' Association, opened at the Lincoln high school, Nineteenth street and Tracy avenue, Tuesday morning. Several important papers were read and discussed that day.

Supplementary to the regular programme of yesterday was a lecture on the prevention of tuberculosis by Dr. W. J. Thompkins of this city. There were three meetings of the association yesterday and there will be only two today, morning and afternoon. This evening there will be a reception tendered the visiting teacakes by the local committee. That will close the session.

The most important work was done at the meeting yesterday afternoon. The matter under discussion was the establishment of an agricultural department in the Lincoln state normal school at Jefferson City. A committee was appointed to draft a petition to the incoming legislature, asking for an appropriation to that end.

"There are about 600 pupils in attendance at the state normal," said R. L. Logan of Columbia, Mo. "About forty to fifty of them are graduated each year, most all of them as teacakes. The field for negro teachers is small, and many of them regard it as a sacrifice, after spending four years at school, to go out into the rural districts and take schools which only pay from $25 to $45 per month.

"You would be surprised to know the number of men in this city, St. Louis and St. Joseph, all graduates of the state normal, who have gone to waiting tables in the best hotels. Why? Because they can earn more money at that. We feel that with an agricultural department at our state normal many a negro boy who comes there from the farm will be willing to go back there better equipped, as he will have learned practical farming. As it is, if they can't get schools, they drift to the cities and have to take what is offered to them. There are so few chances offered to the negro that we feel that the state ought to do this much to aid those who can and will profit by it. We know that the branch of the work, agriculture, will be taken up by many as soon as it is opened to them."

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December 23, 1908

WILBUR GAVE RABBIT MONEY.

To Help Make Christmas Bright for
the McCune Home Boys.

An unusual donation to the Christmas fund for the boys at the McCune farm came to Judge H. L. McCune yesterday. It was a letter from Wilbur McLaughlin, 8 years old, 3351 Tracy avenue. In the letter the boy said that he had read of the forty boys under the judge' care who might not have a merry Christmas if someone did not help.

"I sold two of my white rabbits and got $1 for them," writes the lad in conclusion, sending the money.

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December 9, 1908

PRAYING FOR HIS RECOVERY.

"Pat Must Get Well," Says the Wife
of Brave Sergeant Pat-
rick Clark.
Sergeant Patrick Clark, Wounded by Adam God
SERGEANT PATRICK CLARK
Brave Officer Who May Die from Wounds
Received in Fight with Fanatics.

Upon the death of his father in England, twenty-seven years ago, Patrick Clark came to America. He was then but 15 years of age, and came directly to Kansas City, where some of his relatives had come before him. In England he had learned the trade of a stone mason, and for two or three years after his arrival in Kansas City he worked at that occupation. Later he became a stone contractor, and at that time constructed, or aided in the construction of several stone buildings in Kansas City. One of the contracts which he filled, and which he is most proud, is the First Presbyterian church at Marshall, Mo. That church was the first stone building to be erected in Saline county.

At an early age he married, and then went on the police force, giving up his chosen trade. Sergeant Clark delighted in telling of his struggles to make "both ends meet" during those first years of his married life. How he saved from his meager salary as a patrolman enough money to purchase his home.

Sergeant Clark is the father of four girls and two boys. There is no subject about which the sergeant would rather talk than his romps with his children after his day's work. It was this same love of home and domestic happiness which led the sergeant to be lenient at all times with persons brought before him, particularly young men and women.

One of Sergeant Clark's peculiar traits of character as a police officer was that he seldom thought of his weapons. He has been sent to make arrests of desperate characters while he himself was wholly unarmed.

To bear out his faithfulness to his duty and his valor, Sergeant Clark left the station yesterday afternoon without a weapon, coat or hat, to arrest a man who had already shot and wounded a patrolman. Sergeant Clark fought with him barehanded, against a knife and a revolver.

At Sergeant Clark's home, 538 Tracy avenue, his wife and six children were gathered in a room last night, praying for the recovery of the husband and father. There is nothing left for them to do but wait for news, and hope and pray. Word that the sergeant was holding his own set them all rejoicing, and now they confidently expect his recovery.

Mrs. Clark has seen her husband and talked with him. "Pat will get well; he must get well," said she last night. "He's only 42 years old and so big and strong that the doctors say he has a good chance. He must get well and back to his home that he loves so much, and that can't get along without him."

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September 23, 1908

TURNED ON HIS GAS JETS.

Then Hoyt Stanley Went Out for a
Match -- Biff! Ban-n-g!

Hoyt Stanley, a musician, aged 86 years, of 1219 Tracy avenue, at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon turned on several gas jets in a room of his residence and then discovered that he had no matches. Leaving the gas on, he went in quest of a light, but for some reason did not return until 7 o'clock last night. The he lighted a match. He was blown a considerable distance into the rear yard and later removed to the general hospital, where his badly burned face, hands and legs were attended.

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August 14, 1908

CORN IN A BABY'S NOSE.

Doctors May Operate to Relieve Lit-
tle Charles Baker.

Charles Baker, 2 years old, who lives with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Baker, at 2204 Tracy avenue, ws out in the yard yesterday while his mother was feeding the chickens. Picking up a large grain of corn, the boy inserted it into his nose, and the more his mother tried to get the corn out the further in it was pushed. Late last night young Charles was in the hands of two physicians who were discussing whether or not to operate to remove the obstruction. Mr. Baker is a Gamewell man at police headquarters.

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August 14, 1908

POISON ENDS LIFE
OF GIRL OF TWELVE.

FRIEND OF ANNA MAY WIL-
LIAMS A SUICIDE.

BROODED OVER
CHUM'S END.

"ANNA WAS PERSECUTED," SAID
VIVIAN BURDEN.

Then She Went to a Drug Store and
Purchased 10 Cents Worth of
Carbolic Acid as the Wil-
liams Girl Had Done.

Did the fact that Anna May Williams committed suicide prey upon the mind of 12-year-old Vivian Burden until she yesterday took her own young life by the same method -- carbolic acid? No other reason but mental suggestion has been ascribed as a cause for the girl's death by her family and the coroner.

Little Vivian had gone to the Woodland school with Anna May Williams, the 15-year-old girl who killed herself Tuesday afternoon at her home, 816 Euclid avenue. A discussion of the number of suicides, especially with carbolic acid, took place at the breakfast table in the Burden home yesterday. The death of Ana May Williams, Vivian's acquaintance, was, of course, discussed more than the rest.

"The girl was persecuted," she said "That's the way with step-papas, anyhow."

The child seemed much wrought up over the matter, but as she cooled down afterwards, little was tought of it.


NO TROUBLE TO GET ACID.

Yesterday afternoon Vivian left her house at 800 Lydia avenue, and went to the drug store of E. D. Francisco, Eighth street and Tracy avenue.

"I want 10 cents worth of carbolic acid," she said. "My mamma wants it to make roach poison."

The child, for she was nothing more, sallied when she said this, and seemed restless, as children do, to get away. "Before she left, however, she bought an ice cream soda and ate it at the counter. With the deadly poison clenched in her childish hands she went to the Bazaar, a store at the corner of Independence and Tracy avenues. There she took some time in selecting a pretty doll for her 5-year-old sister, Helen.

All of this took up about an hour, so that Vivian arrived back home about 3 p. m. Calling her little sister she gave her the doll, for which she had paid 35 cents and seemed delighted in the little one's pleasure when the doll was placed in her hands and she was told it was all hers.

No one suspected there was anything wrong with Vivian when she went upstairs to her room. Louise, 17, and Myrtle, 19 years old sisters of Vivian, were busy in the kitchen when Vivian ran in and said: "Call a doctor quick; I've taken some of mamma's roach poison." The sisters at first thought she was joking, but when they saw the condition of her lips and smelled the deadly carbolic acid they were thrown into consternation.


DOCTOR'S EFFORTS WERE IN VAIN.

Dr. Oliver F. Faires, who has an office over Francisco's drug store, was then summoned, and though he worked over the child until 5 o'clock, she died, having been long unconscious before the end came. Coroner George B. Thompson was summoned and sent the body to Newcomer's undertaking rooms.

Vivian Burden was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Burden. The father, a butcher, was not at home, being employed in Bartlesville, Ok. He was notified of his child's rash act and left for home last night.

"What cause can you assign for your daughter, Vivian, taking carbolic acid?" was asked of Mrs. Burden last night.

"I cannot believe the girl committed suicide because of any trouble either at home or with her playmates," the mother replied. "She was of a very happy and bright disposition and was never moody." Vivian regularly scanned the newspapers each day and was particularly interested in stories about suicides. The sad girl named Anna May Williams may have inspired her," the mother said, "as she constantly talked about the girl and the poor girl's sad life."

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August 8, 1908

IT'S TO BE FINISHED AT LAST.

Apartment House at Thirty-First and
Tracy Has Been Landmark.

After having stood in its unfinished condition over two years, the five-story brick building at Thirty-first and Tracy avenue is to be completed. Finding that there were not the necessary fire walls in place, and that the interior iron was too light, the building inspectors refused to permit the finishing of the building.

Labor troubles were frequent, and to that is laid the fact that some of the exterior walls are not true. Plans have now been submitted and accepted for putting in reinforcing steel, and the building, which is to be an apartment house, is to be finished.

The unfinished building has been a blot on the pretty landscape, with its roofless walls and gaping windows and wilderness of debris strewn about. Thousands passing on the Thirty-first street cares have gazed on it and wondered. Property owners of the neighborhood have gazed on it and done something else. That it is to be finished at last will be bright news to many indirectly concerned.

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July 2, 1908

GENERAL H. S. HALL IS DEAD.

He Was Awarded a Medal for Bra-
very During Civil War.

H. S. Hall, brigadier general and veteran of the civil war, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Charles M. Kemper, 2914 Tracy avenue, yesterday morning. He was born in New York and entered the Union army as a private in 1861. He participated in many engagements and lost his right arm while leading his regiment at the battle of Petersburg. He was awarded a medal for bravery on the field by congress and raised to the rank of general on his retirement in 1866.

When the was was over General Hall moved to Missouri and settled in Carroll county, where he lived until 1888, when he removed to Lawrence, Kas. He came to this city four years ago. A widow and four children survive. The children are Mrs. C. M. Kemper Mrs. Dana Templin, 121 Olive street; J. G Hall, a teacher in the state agricultural school of North Carolina, and C. S. Hall, who lives at Lawrence, Kas. Burial will be in Lawrence tomorrow.

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May 6, 1908

FIRE DAMAGES
ELECTRIC PARK.

BELIEVED TO HAVE BEEN IN-
CENDIARY -- LOSS $20,000.

MUSIC PAVILION IS BURNED.

OPENING OF PARK WILL
NOT BE DELAYED.

Indications Point to a Deliberate At-
tempt to Burn the Buildings.
Oil Used to Start
the Fire.


Fire, supposed to be of incendiary origin, completely destroyed the music pavilion, one side of the German village and part of the promenade at Electric park, Forty-sixth street and Tracy avenue, last night about 9:30 o'clock. The damage is estimated at $20,000.

Flames were first seen pouring out of the northwest corner of the music pavilion and it is believed the fire was started in that vicinity. Harry Alexander, who lives at Forty-sixth street and Virginia avenue, was one of the first to discover the fire and turned in an alarm. He stated that within twenty minutes after he first discovered the fire the music pavilion was a mass of flames, and in a few minutes more was burned to the ground. The roof fell within fifteen minutes after the fire was discovered.

As soon as the fire was discovered the Electric Park fire department, members of which live near the park, turned out and made an attempt to subdue the fire, but it was beyond their control. Jack Hutson, a watchman at the park and one of the firemen, was overcome by smoke and had to be carried to the office. He recovered in a short time.

OTHER BUILDINGS SAVED.

Firemen from No. 22 hose house were the first to arrive, and by fast work managed to get the flames under control before they spread to the other buildings. They were assisted by several other companies which arrived later The music pavilion was completely demolished. It is next to the German village, and the side wall connecting them was destroyed. Part of the promenade in front of the building was destroyed.

That the fire was of incendiary origin is the belief of the fire department, M. G. Heim, one of the owners of the park, who arrived soon after the fire started, and the watchmen. The park has a private electric plant, and all currents were turned off the buildings so that the fire could not have originated from that source. No workmen have been in the pavilion or adjoining buildings for weeks, and nothing was in the pavilion to have caused the fire.

George Barker, a laborer living at 4501 Tracy avenue, made a statement at the park that he saw two negroes running from the scene of the fire shortly after the flames were discovered, but later stated that two children claimed they saw the negroes. He did not know the children's names.

HEIM SAYS "INCENDIARY."

M. G. Heim stated that he believed the fire must have been of incendiary origin. "There was no current on the electric wires in the music pavilion and nothing that could have caused a fire there," said Mr. Heim. "The saloon is to be established in another building, not far from the music ha, and it may have been the intention to destroy that building, but the attempt was not a success. The damage is about $20,000."

A squad of police was sent to the park after the fire and ordered to watch the buildings until morning to see that no further attempts were made to burn the buildings.

A score of workmen will be put to work early this morning clearing away the debris and preparing the music hall for the opening which will take place May 17. Mr. Heim stated that the fire will not postpone the opening of the park. A temporary open air shell will be erected for the band and the wall on the side of the German village will be rebuilt.

SAYS OIL WAS USED.

Jacob Baas, night watchman for the south side of the park, is positive in his belief that the fire was not only incendiary, but that a good quantity of oil was used in starting it. At 8:45 o'clock he made his rounds with a lantern, and there was perfect stillness and darkness all over the grounds. Being chilly, Baas went into his shack on the south and to the rear of the "boat tours" concession. He barely had time to light a fire and remove his shoes when a sheet of flame across the grounds above the music pavilion caught his attention.

When he rushed out there was far more smoke than flame -- great clouds of blackness that seemed to suggest that much of the interior was burning before the flames showed on the outside. Baas's immediate decision then was that "a plenty of oil must have been used to get that kind of a quick start."

His belief is that the start was below the German village back of the band stand, though when he got close the fire was spread so generally that there was nothing about the fire itself to suggest where it started.

Manager Rohrer of the People's Amusement Company, who lives at 4507 Tracy avenue, came upon the grounds soon after this, and with Jack Hutson, head night watchman, whose station is in the office near the gate, did what could be done to manipulate the company's fireplugs and hose. Hutson was practically overcome by getting into the thick of the smoke.

H. Smith and B. C. Smith, brothers, who work at the park days and board at 4619 Tracy avenue, saw Edward Solberg, park electrician, shut off all electricity early in the evening as he was leaving the park, and there is no possibility that the fire could have started from the electric wiring.

CHILDREN IN PERIL.

Sam Benjamin, the park manager, who lives in the clubhouse on the grounds was with his wife at the Majestic theater when told of the fire. An old negro servant had been left alone with the two small children of the family. All were in bed and the woman being hard of hearing, it was some time before she and her charges were aroused. Early in the fire the roof of the clubhouse caught, but a sudden downpour of rain quenched the blaze before it had a good start. Had it been a dry evening the clubhouse, starting to burn at this time, would probably have been in ashes before the intervening structures, and have rendered the rescue of the nurse and children difficult.

THEY CLIMBED THE FENCE.

After midnight last night M. G. Heim and the park manager, Sam Benjamin, discovered what they believed to be proof that incendiaries caused the fire. Two men had climbed the eight-foot board fence in the rear of the pavilion, using a large overhanging elm tree to aid in scaling the wall. Barbed wires along the boards had been cut and the footprints of the two men were plain, leading from the foot of the tree to the northwest corner of the pavilion, where Baas, the watchman, thought the fire must have started. The footprints were measured and watchmen left to guard them until morning, when the police will have opportunity to make minute observations of the prints.

Electric park, at its present location, was opened only a year ago this month. It comprises twenty-eight and one-half acres in extent, and represents an investment, M. G. Heim said last night, of $500,000.

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May 3, 1908

SHE CHASED AUTOMOBILES.

Antics of Woman on Twelfth Street
Brought Many Police.

A deranged woman chasing automobiles in the neighborhood of Twelfth street and Tracy avenue last night about 10 o'clock brought police from three districts to that vicinity. Finally she ran into a party of three bluecoats at Thirteenth street and Forest avenue. When taken to No. 6 police station she was found to be the wife of a contractor. She was evidently under the influence of liquor and some drug. She was held for safekeeping.

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April 19, 1908

A HOME FOR LITTLE "PAT".

Tracy Avenue Couple May Adopt the
Little Foundling.

If everything goes well today a good home may be secured for the foundling who was discovered in a dark hallway at 584 Harrison street late on the night of March 17 and later christened "Little Pat" by Mrs. Lizzie Burns, police matron , in honor of St. Patrick's day.

Seeing in the news yesterday that a baby girl had been left with the matron for adoption Friday, Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Kelly of 1403 Tracy avenue, called to see the little one. They were told that it had been taken to the detention home and were just about to leave when Eugene Burns, a son of the matron said: "What's the matter with 'Little Pat?' Why can't you take him and adopt him? He's a boy, you know."

Mrs. Kelly said she thought that Patrick had long ago been given a home, but when informed that illness had kept him at St. Anthony's home, though now he had thoroughly recovered, she at once spoke for "Little Pat."

"Yes, Mrs. Kelly was out here with Eugene Burns," said Sister Cecilia at the home. "She is coming back tomorrow with her husband. It looks very much like Pat is to secure a good home at last."

Mr. Kelly is a traveling salesman. He and his wife have no children.

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April 13, 1908

TEFARES ISRAEL
IN ITS NEW EDIFICE.

SACRED BIBLICAL SCROLLS CAR-
RIED IN PROCESSION.

Militant Parade to Commemorate
March of Children of Israel Out
of Egypt and Through
the Red Sea.

With all the wonted ceremonies and pomp the congregation of Tefares Israel synagogue took possession of its new house of worship, Admiral boulevard and Tracy avenue, yesterday afternoon. The congregation left the former church, Fifth and Main streets and marched down Admiral boulevard, the rabbi and trusted members of the church guarding the sacred biblical scrolls, eight in number.

These scrolls are all written in Hebrew, supposed to be an exact reproduction of the writing which was on the tablets bearing the Ten Commandments that were entrusted to Moses on Mount Sinai. They are the most precious belongings of the church and when not in use are kept under lock and key. Before they were taken from their accustomed place in the old synagogue prayers were offered and then they were removed during the chanting of hymn.

The militant procession through the streets upon the change of Jewish house of worship is to commemorate the march of the children of Israel out of Egypt and through the Red sea. At that time the high priests carried the sacred scrolls of the Jews with them and guarded them safely throughout the perilous march.

The congregation of Tefares Israel numbers about 250 persons. Rabbi M. Wolf is in charge of the synagogue. J. L. Gandal is president; S. Dimant, vice president; S. R. Alisky, trustee and M. Kasol is secretary.

Rabbi Max Lieberman, at the head of the Keneseth Israel synagogue, assisted in the dedication of the new church. The Tefares Israel congregation had occupied the building at Fifth and Main streets for fourteen years and was organized with a membership of ten persons.

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April 8, 1908

CRITTENDEN WINS BY
LARGE MAJORITY.

MOST REMARKABLE DEMONSTRA-
TION EVER WITNESSED IN KAN-
SAS CITY TAKES PLACE WHEN
RESULT IS LEARNED.

KYLE RE-ELECTED
POLICE JUDGE.

BAEHR IS ALSO ELECTED
CITY TREASURER --
THE REST IS DEMOCRATIC
-- CRITTENDEN'S MAJORITY
1,320.

THE WINNING TICKET (Majorities).

Mayor -- Crittenden, D ..........................1,320
Police Judge -- Kyle, R ...........................2,213
Treasurer -- Baehr, R ............................1,220
Auditor -- Greene, D ..............................2,478
Attorney -- Langsdale, D .......................1,708
Upper House President, Gregory, D .....1,344

Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., Democrat, was elected mayor of Kansas City yesterday over Mayor Henry M. Beardsley, Republican, by 1,320 majority, with one precinct of the Twelfth ward missing. Harry G. Kyle, Republican, was re-elected police judge over Michael E. Casey, Democrat, and William J. Baehr, Republican, was elected city treasurer over Thomas S. Ridge, Democrat. Kyle's majority was 2,213.

The upper house Democratic ticket, with Robert L. Gregory president, elected three of its candidates, making that branch of the council still Republican. The lower house is overwhelmingly Democratic.

It was a big Democratic victory, and for the first time in four years the Democrats will be back in the city hall for a term of two years one week from next Monday.

While in the city ten days ago Attorney General Hadley warned his Republican friends that the issues advanced were false, and he quietly passed the word that if they were persisted in it could mean nothing but defeat. The result proves that Hadley was right.

Overcast clouds and intermittent showers ushered in the day. Despite the unfavorable aspect of the weather, voters were up and astir long before the break of day, and at 6 o'clock, when the polls opened, the voting places of the 164 precincts in the fourteen wards were besieged by long and patient lines of men awaiting the time and opportunity to cast their ballots.

The voting was rapid, the record in some precincts being one to the minute. Merchant, banker, professional man vied with the laborer to get to the ballot boxes.

SOME ARRESTS MADE.

In a majority of the precincts over half the total registration had been voted by noon, and from that time to the close of the polls at 7 o'clock the voting was by jerks and starts. It was stated in some of the precincts as early as 6 o'clock that all the votes that could be depended upon to be cast had been delivered, and this seemed true, for the judges, clerks and workers sat around idle.

Assertions of fraud were made during the early hours, and some arrests resulted It was charged that men had tendered money for votes, and that voters had accepted money. The early arrests of these offenders put a stop to any more such work so far as was observable, although at several times during the day Alderman Pendergast openly charged that Republicans were paying $3 a piece for negro votes in the First ward. Watchers sent into the ward by the Civic League said they had seen no vote-buying.

BUSINESS MEN REVOLT.

Up to noon the Republican headquarters felt sure of victory and the Democrats felt uneasy The first alarm was felt at 1111 Grand when the Republican precinct workers telephoned in that the noon hour vote of business men was against the Republican ticket. The excuse offered was that retail merchants were in a revolt against an evening newspaper.

The Democrats had not counted on this vote at all. As soon as they saw they were getting it they sent their runners into the stores after the clerks. With oodles of money to pay for carriages and automobiles to hurry them to their home wards, the Democrats found the store proprietors willing to let the men off to vote. It was a fully fledged rebellion in the Republican party.

As early as 4 o'clock it was announced at Democratic headquarters that the Democratic ticket was in the ascendancy. News came that Walter Dickey, Republican state chairman, had joined Mayor Beardsley in the Ninth ward, and with it came the news that negroes were beginning to vote the Republican ticket there. Dickey was understood to have wagered, for friends, about $18,000. One negro said he had been offered $8 for his vote. High as this was, $8 apiece for votes to save heavy bets would not be out of the way. There was Democratic money seen in the ward immediately. Twenty-four negroes voted the Democratic ticket straight at Fifteenth and Tracy. This looked like commercialism, but the retort was that the Republicans were at the same game. Governor Folk was hurried to the ward to see Democratic tickets voted by negroes. He expressed surprise.

There were only three fights reported at either headquarters, and both headquarters said they had heard of very little challenging. This presaged clear tally sheets, an early count and all judges signing.

ENTER CRITTENDEN, EXIT BEARDSLEY.

At 7 o'clock the mayor arrived at 1111 Grand, thinking he had squeezed through, but by 8 o'clock he admitted to a Journal man that "it looks blue." An hour later he conceded his defeat. This was while he sat in headquarters with a crowd taxing the capacity of the big hall.

Crittenden was sent for. He was not able to get to the Democratic headquarters until about 10 o'clock, just as Mayor Beardsley was leaving his own headquarters, a defeated man.

CROWDS FILL THE CITY.

The rival city chairmen, the rival candidates for mayor, the commissioners and governor Folk all admitted that there had been a reasonably fair election, marked by the absence of repeating and ruffianism. The most sensational spectacle at night was of Republicans going in squads to the Democratic headquarters to share in the demonstrations of victory. Full importance was given at the Republican headquarters to the weight the defeat will have on the Republican chances this fall, unless there is a new alignment and new issues found... while the Democrats claimed to see ahead far enough to make James A. Reed United States senator. Reed arrived at his headquarters about 10 o'clock. He was called on for a speech and made one from his automobile. He congratulated the entire party upon its success as an organization as a whole, but credited the enormous majority, by comparison, to the opposition of an evening newspaper. When afterwards Mr. Reed went past Eleventh and Grand on his triumphal tour, his car was halted and once more he was compelled to make a speech. He repeated what he had said at Democratic headquarters. From there he went to The Journal office, arriving just as two Democratic bands and processions met, one from Democratic headquarters, traveling from the west, and another form the Sixth ward, headed by the Italian band, coming from the east. The meeting was unexpected and most dramatic. From The Journal the crowd went back to Democratic headquarters and at midnight it was roving about the city.

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