Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

August 12, 1909

BOY, MATCH, OIL, FIRE.

One of John D.'s Tank Wagons Suf-
fered From the Combination.

A mischievous boy, a lighted match and a Standard Oil tank wagon combined in a very plausible fire yesterday afternoon.

The tank wagon was standing out in front of a grocery store at Thirty-third and McGee streets when a boy passed, lighted a match and threw it into the bucket box in the rear of the wagon. Then he ran, then the fire started and the wagon went up in smoke. Simple case of cause and effect.

Labels: , , ,

April 11, 1909

WERE THROWN FROM CART.

Young Girls Escape Injury When
Frightened Pony Ran Away.

While driving a pony cart on Thirty-third street, near Highland avenue, Jeanette McNatha, 14 years of age, and her companion, Helen Hershberger, 16 years of age, were thrown from the cart, the result of a runaway.

While passing Highland avenue the pony became frightened at an automobile and ran west on Thirty-third street for two blocks. Both girls were thrown from the cart by its coming in contact with a tree. Neither was injured. Miss McNatha lives at 1010 East Thirty-third street, and her companion at 1002 East Thirty-third street.

Labels: , , , , ,

November 16, 1908

DRUNKEN MAN IS STRANGLED.

Henry Bernard Found Dead in an
Unfinished Building Near Thirty-
Third and Oak Streets.

Boys playing in a building in the course of construction at 3312 Oak street about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon found the body of a man lying in a corner of the building, the head wedged against a wall and the neck pressed against a joist. Death had come apparently from strangulation induced by the position of the man's head. A crowd collected and the body was identified as that of Henry Bernard, 50 years old, a stonemason living at 3228 Summit street.

By the man's side was found a pint bottle with dregs of whisky in it. Bernard had been released from the Walnut street police station yesterday morning at 6 o'clock. The question arises, where did he get the whisky?

Bernard had been locked up for safekeeping. When he was released he had nothing of the sort about him. About noon he appeared at the house of William Gepford, a building contractor, his employer, and received from him $10 which was due him for work done last week. Several times in the next few hours he was seen loafing around the drug store of R. S. McCurdy, at Twenty-third and Oak streets, and was talking to Ray Wells, 3120 Campbell street, and others. About 2 o'clock he appeared to be in an unsettled state of mind and was seen to walk towards the new building of which only the side walls and part of the floors are finished. It is thought that he lay down in a stupor and was strangled by the beam pressing against his throat.

Nominally, the saloons were closed yesterday. Besides, there are no saloons in the neighborhood of Thirty-third and Oak streets. Bernard was not seen to leave the neighborhood from the time he received the money from his employer until the time he was found dead. R. S. McCurdy, the druggist who keeps the drug store at Thirty-third and Oak streets, and the only one in the vicinity, said last night that he had sold whisky to Bernard on prescription, but denied that he had sold any to him that day. He added that neither he nor either of his clerks, Louis Woods and D. Self, had seen Bernard in the store that day.

Bernard leaves a wife and nine children. The body was removed to Lindday's undertaking rooms in Westport and the coroner was notified. He will hold an autopsy this morning at 9 o'clock in the undertaking rooms.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

October 24, 1908

STADIUM RINK OPENS TONIGHT.

One of the Finest Skating Floors in
the Entire West.


The Stadium, one of the most perfectly appointed skating rinks in the West, will open its doors to the public tonight at Thirty-third and Troost. A balcony covering 500 feet has been provided for the accommodation of spectators. The Stadium boasts of a new impropved floor, measuring 300 feet, which is hte only one in the city having corners and ends raised. The auditorium will be brilliantly lighted. Music will be furnished by the White Star band of ten pieces, lately returned from a tour through England.

Labels: , , , ,

September 21, 1908

WAS AMONG FIRST OF
WESTPORT SETTLERS.

DEATH OF "JUDGE" JAMES HUN-
TER, THE PIONEER.

"Judge" James Hunter, a settler in Westport since 1826 and one of the most familiar figures of the old town, died at the Harris house in Westport, where he had lived for twenty-five years, at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, at the age of 88 years old.

Born eighty-three years ago in Russellville, Ky., James Hunter, at the age of 1 year, came with his father, the Rev. James M. Hunter of the then Cumberland Presbyterian church, to where Westport now is, in 1826. There was but one house in the place, a cabin owned by Frederick Chouteau, which was hotel, general store, and, in fact, the whole settlement under one roof. Rev. Hunter started another store, where he had saddlery, general merchandise and notions, now the corner of Southwest boulevard and Penn street. At this time Kansas City was not in existence. Young Hunter later started in the saddlery business. He also became the owner of a tract of about eighty acres between Twenty-eighth, Thirty-third, Main and Holmes streets. this he afterwards disposed of very cheaply. At the age of 30 years he married Miss Eleanor Stevens of Cass county, Mo., but she lived only a year. They had no children.

About 1854 the great movement across the plains was at its highest point, and James Hunter and his younger brother, Thomas, went into the freighting business. Their long caravans of prairie schooners, drawn by oxen, toiled slowly across the dry plains from Westport to Santa Fe, hauling every sort of necessity for the settlers in the gold fields. The profit was brought back in the form of gold dust, and debts were paid with the dust in Westport, as well as in San Francisco. Both of the brothers made their headquarters in Santa Fe, but they were constantly on the move, and Westport saw them several times a year.

When the civil war broke out they had not time to mix in the quarrels of the North and South -- they were interested in the development of the Western country. They continued to run their business right through the war. Their name became known everywhere along the great trail, and they waxed wealthy.

The inception of the railway proved the ruin of their freight business. In 1871 James Hunter gave up the trade and moved from Santa Fe back to Westport, where he had lived ever since. He became a notary public and in 1886 was elected police judge of the town. Twenty-five years ago he registered at the Harris house, then the leading hotel in Westport, and retained a room there until his death.

Two brothers and a sister survive, Dr. D. W. Hunter of Dallas, Tex.; Thomas H. Hunter of 4013 Central street and Mrs. E. H. Huffaker of El Paso, Tex.

The funeral services will be at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning from the residence of Thomas H. Hunter. Burial will be in Union cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

February 18, 1908

TWO MEN SHOT
AT HOTEL COSBY.

J. P. HAYES AND J. F. O'DONNELL
MAY DIE OF WOUNDS.

WERE SHOT BY
J. D. CROSBY.

PROPRIETOR MIXED IN A ROW
AND USED GUN.

Wounded Men Had Gone Back to Ho-
tel to Apologize for a Row Ear-
lier in the Evening -- Shot
From Behind.

As a result of a quarrel in the Cosby hotel, West Ninth street and Baltimore avenue, at 8 o'clock last night, James P. Hayes, agent of the Traders' Dispatch, and John F. O'Donnell, cigar manufacturer, are in a dangerous condition in St. Joseph's hospital from bullet wounds in their bodis, and J. D. Cosby, owner of the hotel, who shot the men, is in the city jail and will probably answer to a charge of murder, in case the men may die. Hayes cannot recover, according to the attending physician, but O'Donnell's chances are even.

While Cosby is making an appeal to the police that he shot O'Donnell and Hayes in self-defense, the evidence shows that both men where shot in the back as they were retreating from the hotel. Cosby was not assaulted in any way or een mixed up in the quarrel until he grabbed a revolver and began shooting. The police arrested Cosby and his brothe, Wiliam Cosby; his clerk, William Murray, and a negro porter, Moses Butcher. They will be held until police make a thorough investigation.

The shooting was the result of a quarrel between Hayes, O'Donnell and William Murray, because the former two asked to see a friend of the name of A. Drake from Salt Lake City, U., who was staying at the hotel. Hayes and O'Donnell went to the hotel about 8 o'clock and inquired for Drake and H. L. Davis, who was registered from Hutchinson, Kas. Murray informed them that their friends had left. Hayes then made a remark which led Murray, the clerk, to believe Hayes was doubting his word and Murray struck him in the face. A fist fight followed in which Hayes, O'Donnell, Murray, and Cosby, brother of the proprietor, were implicated. Hayes used a bell and a bottle to defend himself with and Murray's head was badly cut as a result.
WENT BACK TO THE HOTEL.
Hayes and O'Donnell managed to get out of the hotel and went to the Senate saloon, where they talked with several men about the fight. They stated that the clerk was in the wrong and that they ol defended themselves until they could get out of the place. Hayes then proposed to O'Donnell that they go back to the hotel and apologize for the wrong they had done and try to make the matter right with the proprietor They then went to the hotel and as they reached the top of the stairs J. D. Cosby called upon Clerk Murray, his brother and others to keep Hayes and O'Donnell in the place until he could summon the police and have them arrested.

Hayes and O'Donnell tried to escape from the hotel and Murray and Williaim Cosby again attacked them. While the men were engaged in a fight J. D. Cosby, the proprietor, came from behind the counter with a revolver in his hand and shot Hayes twice through the back as he was running down the stairs. J. D. Cosby was not assaulted and had no hand in the row except to do the shooting, according to statements of Hayes and O'Donnell and others who were there at the time of the shooting.

Hayes and O'Donnell fell when they were shot and the former lay in an unconscious condition at the top of the stairs, while O'Donnell managed to crawl into a nearby saloon and ask for help. Some one at the hotel telephoned for the police and Hayes and O'Donnell were taken immediately to St. Joseph's hospital They were in a critical condition and at midnight last night it was stated that Hayes could not survive. There were two bullet holes in his back near the right shoulder blade. The bullets had not ben located. He was in a semi-conscious condition up to midnight and was unable to recogize relatives and friends who were permitted to see him. There was one bullet in O'Donnell's shoulder which passed through his body, coming out just above the heart. It was found in his clothing and it was stated by physicians at the hospital last night that O'Donnell may recover.
FOUR MEN UNDER ARREST.
Detectives R. E. Truman, J. W. Farrell, Joseph Halvey and James Ratery last night arrested J. D. Cosby, William Cosby, Moses Butcher, colored, and William Murray, together with a few guests at the hotel. The men whose names are mentioned will be held for investigation.

Asistant Prosecuting Attorney Riehl took a statement from J D. Cosby last night regarding the shooting, in which Cosby claimed self-defense. His story of the shooting is as follows:

"These two men, whom I do not now, came to the hotel and started a row with Murray and my brother (meaning William Cosby). They injured Murray and then went down out of the hotel. Later they came back, and I thought that they intended to start another row. I ordered the men in the hotel not to let these two men out of the place, as I wished to call the police and have them arrested. Then they started another row with Murray and my brother. I took a revolver I had in my hand and went to assist my brother. I grabbed hold of one and he struck at me. Then I shot him. I then shot the other man when he tried to strike me with something he had his hand. I did it in self-defense and to help my brother and Murray."

Cosby made another statement in which he said that he did not know that he had shot more than one man, but held to the story of self-defense.

The statements of all the other eye witnesses to the tragedy discredit that of Cosby. Willilam Cosby, his brother, said Cosby shot Hayes in the back when the latter was wrestling with Murray and then leaned over the railing of the stairway and shot O'Donnel as the later was descending the stairway. He also stated that he asked his brother not to shoot, but he would not listen. J. J. Carter of Garden City, Kas., and R. C. Rawlings of Chanute, Kas., made statements to the police which were about the same as that of William Cosby.

DYING MAN'S WIFE OVERCOME.

Mrs. Hayes, wife of the wound man who will probably die, called at the hosptial about 11 o'clock last night to see her husband. She was almost prostrated with grief when told of the affair and was overcome when she saw the condition of her husband. A sister and friends of Hayes also called to see him. Hayes has a baby daughter and lives at 2904 East Thirty-third street. He is about 30 years old. He is the agent for the Traders' Dispatch with offices in the board of trade.

O'Donnell is unmarried and lived at the Century hotel. He is proprietor of the J. F. O'Donnell Cigar Comany at 1801 Grand avenue. He is about 32 years of age.

It is claimed that this is not the first time that Crosby has been in shooting srapes of this kind. He is claimed to have had trouble with Joe Zigler, a saloon keeper near the Cosby hotel, in which he used a revolver but did not do any shooting.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

February 12, 1908

CARS COLLIDE ON PROSPECT.

Two Motormen Are Injured in Early
Morning Accident.

Car 158 on the Prospect line dashed into the car ahead of it at Thirty-third street and Prospect avenue last night just after 1 o'clock. Something was wrong with the motor of the fist car and the trolley was off while repairs were being made. Both cars were headed south on a down grade.

The rear car was not seen in time to be flagged, and in spite of every effort of the rear motorman, James Turney, to stop his car, there was a crash that entirely demolished the front vestibule of the car, knocking out both front and rear motors and breaking one of Turner's ankles.

On the front car the rear vestibule was crushed in and W. C. Forest, the motorman, suffered a broken thumb.

Both men had their injuries attended by Dr. A. W. Davis at his home, 3306 Prospect. Few passengers were on the cars and none was hurt.

Labels: , , ,

January 20, 1908

LOSS OF LOVE
CAUSES SUICIDE.

EARL LEMMON SHOOTS HIM-
SELF IN THE HEAD.

GIRL BREAKS ENGAGEMENT.

"Do Not Trifle With a Man as If He
Were a Dog," the Last
Words by Lem-
mon.
Earl Lemmon.
EARL LEMMON.

Because Nellie Hickey, 2521 Myrtle avenue, had broken her engagement to marry him, Earl Lemmon, 24 years old, killed himself in his room at Twenty-sixth and Mersington streets yesterday afternoon. Less than two hours after he had bed Miss Hickey a cheerful adieu, his body was found lying across a bed in his room, a 38 caliber pistol lying beside it and a wound in the head revealing the course of the bullet. Upon a table near by the coroner found the following letter:

To All of My Friends. Please forgive me for what I am about to do. I have suffered as no one knows in the last four or five months, but cannot stand it any longer. You will find my plicey at Mrs. Hanifin's. One deed to a lot at Thirty-third and Brighton, a deed to two lots on Leeds road in that box also. If hell is any worse than what I have went through with, I am willing to welcome it.Mr. Cook, you will find a few bills unpaid. If my brothers care for me, they owe me enough to pay all my bills. Give my watch to Mr. Cook and my ring to Nellie. You don't konw what I went through with for you, and you shall never know. But be square next time. Do not trifle with a man as if he was a dog, because they bite back. I must stop now. God bless you. Love and best wishes to Nellie. (Signed) EARL.
(P. S.) God forgive me for this. Goodby all. What money I had I lost some six or seven months ago in a freind-turn-you-down-style.


TWENTY KISSES FOR NELLIE.

Beside this letter was found a souvenir postcard with the photograph of a girl upon it. Upon this card, scrawled in the dead man's handwriting, were the words: "Twenty kisses; goodby, Nellie. Be a good girl."

Young Lemmon was employed by Clayton E. Cook of the Home Produce Company at 2446 Cleveland. He roomed in the home of Clarence Stumpff, a fellow employe, in a cottage near Twenty-sixth and Mersington streets. During the eighteen months he had been in the employ of Mr. Cook he was said to have been a sober, industrious, hard working young man. He had managed to save a little money which he had invested in real estate.

Early yesterday morning he called at the home of Miss Hickey. About n oon he returned to his room and ended his life.

Miss Hickey is the daughter of Lawrence Hickey, a Missouri Pacific switchman. She was very much distressed at the news. When she was seen at her home several hours after the suicide, her eyes were swollen with weeping.


JEALOUS OF THE GIRL.
Miss Nellie Hickey, Lost Love of Earl Lemmon.
MISS NELLIE HICKEY.
For the Loss of Whose Love Earl Lemmon Ended His Life.

"Earl and I have been sweethearts from childhood," she said. "We have been betrothed for several years. But he was insanely jealous of me, and several months ago I broke off the engagement on that account. At that time he threatened to kill himself, but I never thought he would do it. He seemed very much grieved because I had received attentions from other young men, but I didn't think ghe took it so much to heart. This morning he called upon me and we chatted pleasantly. When he started home, he called out, 'Goodby Nell,' very cheerfully. There was nothing in his manner that indicated he was thinking of killing himself.

The story was corroborated by Mr. and Mrs. Hickey. Both said there had never been any parental objections to the affair between their daughter and Lemmon, and that ever since the engagement was broken off the young man had been on terms of close friendship with the family.

Lemmon has a brother, bert Lemmon, who lives at the home of a Mrs. Hanifin at 3315 East Twenty-second street. He has four other brothers, a foster sister, who lives in Armourdale, and his father, who lives in California.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory