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November 14, 1909

ARCHBISHOP GLENNON LAYS
ST. TERESA CORNER STONE.

St. Louis Prelate Puts in Two Busy
Days in Kansas City -- Enjoyed
Every Moment.

Several hundred Knights of Columbus were present at the reception given in honor of Archbishop Glennon at their new hall at Thirty-first and Main streets Friday. After renewing many old friendships the archbishop left for St. Louis at 11 o'clock that night.

"It has been a busy two days," he said last night, "but I have enjoyed every moment of my visit. I only wish that I could remain longer. I thank the Lord for the good that He has enabled me to do in Kansas City."

As the result of the prelate's appeal to the public to aid the work that is being carried on by the House of the Good Shepherd, in his lecture at Convention hall last Thursday night, over $5,000 has been collected, and more has been pledged.

Yesterday morning Archbishop Glennon went to the old St. Teresa's academy at Twelfth and Washington streets and celebrated mass. After visiting Loretto academy he returned to St. Teresa's, where a musicale was given in his honor. In the afternoon he laid the corner stone of the new St. Teresa's academy building at Fifth street and Broadway. It rained hard throughout the whole service but over 300 people stood bare headed in the mud while the archbishop put the stone in place and blessed the building.

In the evening Archbishop Glennon was the guest of honor at a dinner given at the home of Hugh Mathews, 1014 West Thirty-ninth street, and attended by Bishop Hogan, Bishop Lillis, Brother Charles and Father Walsh. The party then attended the Knights of Columbus reception.

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October 30, 1909

FOUR GIRLS HURT IN
A HALLOWE'EN FIRE.

JACK O' LANTERN CANDLE IG-
NITES THEIR COSTUMES.

Fleecy Cotton Used by Esquimaux at
Loretto Academy North Pole
Night Flashes Into
Flame.

Three girls seriously burned and a third slightly is the result of the overturning of a jack o'lantern last night during a Halloween celebration at the academy of the Sisters of Loretto, West Prospect and Thirty-ninth street, which set the costumes of the girls on fire.

The most seriously burned are:

Mimie Tiernan, 3525 Broadway.
Mary Maley, 1200 West Fortieth.
Virginia Owen, 3633 Prospect.

Slightly burned:

Ruth Mahoney, a niece of Alderman C. J. Conin.

It was stated early this morning that three of the girls were possibly fatally burned. There are little hopes of Misses Owen and Tiernan recovering. Miss Maley is reported to be in danger, though not as seriously burned as the other two. All the victims were conscious and suffering greatly. All but Miss Mahoney were burned over their bodies, and on the arms and legs.

The girls were giving a Hallowe'en entertainment in the corridor on the first floor. The stage at the end of the hall was decorated with jack o'lanterns and bunting.



They planned a "North Pole" entertainment, and were dressed as Esquimaux. They wore white trousers, covered with cotton to represent snow. Their waists also were covered with cotton. No boys had been invited.

It was 8:20 o'clock when Maley walked across the stage. She was laughing gaily and chatting with a crowd of girls walking at her side. They were all talking of the beautiful decorations and the novel decorations.

Miss Maley stumbled on a jack o'lantern. From the candle the cotton on her Esquimaux dress was ignited. The flame spread over her entire body. Misses Teirnan, Owen and Mahoney, walking at her side, rushed to their friend's help. There were screams and cries for help. Some of the girls fainted, others grew hysterical.

The flames spread from Miss Maley's costume to the three girls who had rushed to her aid. In a moment the four were a mass of flames. The clothing was burned entirely from Miss Maley's body. The cotton burned as if it were saturated in oil. The three girls, who came to her assistance, were burned from head to foot. The fire spread to the clothing of the four.

It was 8:26 o'clock when the fire department at station No. 19, Westport, received the call. Before the firemen arrived the flames were put out. The fire did not ignite the other decorations nor the building.

INFORMATION DENIED.

Captain Flahive of No. 5 police station, and Officer Wood went to the academy. Considerable persuasion was required to gain an entrance. When the mother superior was asked for the names of the injured this information was denied.

Drs. B. H. Wheeler and Horrigan were summoned. All the cotton bandages in the drug store at Thirty-ninth and Genessee were bought outright. It was necessary later to send to Westport for more medicine and bandages. The physicians remained at the bedsides of the injured girls through the night.

The school authorities refused to make any details of the accident public. To all questions as to names and the extent of the injuries, those in authority replied that there was absolutely nothing to give out.

"We have the story," the reporters told them.

"Well, if you publish anything about this, we will sue your paper for libel."

The girls at the academy had planned for a Hallowe'en dance this evening at Little's hall in Westport but because of the occurrence last night, the party has been cancelled.

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July 26, 1909

STRANGE ADVENTURES
OF TWO SMALL BOYS.

SAW SIGHTS AND FRIGHTENED
THEIR PARENTS.

Johnny and Tommy, 10 and 8 Years
Old, Respectively, Had High
Time While Folks Had
Visions of Kidnaping.

TOMMY BEELS.

Without permission of their respective parents, Johnny Sinclair, 10, and Tommy Beels, 8 years old, took a day off from home and spent the whole of Saturday night and Sunday in wandering about the towns and parks surrounding Kansas City, much to the consternation, grief and anxiety of their families.

When the boys were missed Saturday night it was learned that they had gone with an employe of Electric park. Mont Shirley, 29 years of age, who has a longing for the companionship of small boys, being evidenced by his having led other urchins on several days' tours of the surrounding country on previous occasions.

Johnny Sinclair is the only son of Aaron Sinclair, janitor of the Boston flats, 3808 Main street. Johnny's father gave him a dollar Saturday noon and told him to do what as he wanted with the money.

BOYS WENT TO PARK.

Barefooted and without his coat, Johnny looked up his younger friend, Tommy, youngest son of H. T. Beels, 107 East Thirty-ninth street, and proposed a trip to Electric park. Tommy was willing and thought it best not to go into the house for his hat and coat, for his mother might thwart their schemes. So the boys left the Beels home about 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon.

When 5 o'clock came Mrs. Beels missed her son. Within a few minutes, however, he telephoned his mother that they were at Electric park and were going to take a boat ride with a man whom they had found congenial. Mrs. Beels told the boy to come home immediately.

Tommy had other views in the matter and when Shirley suggested an extensive tour of the city, to include Kansas City, Kas., Lansing, Leavenworth, Forest, Fairmount, Swope and Budd parks and all at his own expense, the boy readily fell in with the plan. Mothers were not interviewed.

Dire thoughts of drowning, kidnaping and disaster beset Mrs. Beels when her boy did not materialize at supper time. Persons in charge of the park were questioned and it was learned that the two boys had gone away from the park with Shirley. None knew where.

SEARCH PARTIES ORGANIZED.

Mrs. Beels, at midnight, went to the Sinclair home and inquired there for her son and learned that Johnny Sinclair was also missing. That was the first idea of Johnny's whereabouts which the Sinclairs had. Search parties were organized and the park secured.

Yesterday morning a young man went to the Sinclair home and told that he had seen the two boys and Shirley at the Union depot and that they were going to St. Joseph and H. L. Ashton, a friend of the Beels family, who is well acquainted with the mayor of that city, called him over long distance 'phone and had the town searched for the runaways. Then came a telegram that the three had been seen early Sunday in Leavenworth.

Meanwhile Mrs. Sinclair and Mrs. Beels were beside themselves with fear and anxiety for their children. They secured the promise of the park authorities to drag the lake in the park this morning, and the search for the missing increased in strength and vigilance each hour.

Shirley's family had been notified of the disappearance, and Charles J. Blevins, Shirley's brother-in-law, hastened to Leavenworth, hot on the trail. He returned empty-handed.

TELL OF JOLLY TIME.

About 11 o'clock last night the boys returned home, dusty, wet and tired. They had a wonderful story to tell of their trip and adventures. They had been through every park in the city, and seen the National cemetery and Soldiers' home at Leavenworth from a car and had a jolly time in general. Saturday night was spent in Kansas City, so Tommy Beels says, and the three went to a rooming house. He did not know the location. Late last night Shirley gave the two boys their carfare and put them on a Rockhill car at Eighth and Walnut streets and left them.

Shirley is said to have a habit of giving young boys a good time at his own expense. Two years ago, it is claimed, he took two boys to Leavenworth and stayed there for three days, after which the boys returned safe and sound.

Shirley works in the park and every Saturday he has been in the habit of spending his week's wages upon some boys whom he might meet. His brother-in-0law, Mr. Blevins, said that Shirley is nothing but a boy himself. When he was 4 years of age, according to relatives, Shirley fell upon his head, and he has remained stunted, mentally, ever since. Shirley longs for the companionship of children, and he is attractive to them since he plays with them and talks with them as though he were 9 rather than 29 years of age.

INTERVIEW CUT SHORT.

Johnny Sinclair, nervous, excited, scared and tired, last night told a clear and fairly consistent story of how Shirley and Tommy Beels and he passed the time between Saturday at 2 p. m. and 11 o'clock last night, when the boys returned home.

In the main details Johnny clung to his story. He fell asleep while being questioned by his father, and that ended the questioning. In substance, he says:

"Shirley invited Tommy and me to go to Swope park, while were were at Electric park, where he was working. We went to Swope park with him and in the evening we went down town and went to several nickel shows.

"Then we went out to Swope park again, but late that night. Shirley wanted to go down town to cash a check. When we got down town the saloons were all closed, and we finally went to bed at a place near Eighth and Main streets.

SAW LEAVENWORTH SIGHTS.

"The next morning we had a nice breakfast of beefsteak and potatoes and coffee, and then we went over to Kansas City, Kas., and there we took a car for Leavenworth. We saw the penitentiary and the Soldiers' Home from the car, and the National cemetery, but we didn't stop there.

We went to Leavenworth and spent the time just running around. That's all we did. I was never there before, and it was fun. We had a dinner of bologna sausage and cheese, and about 8 o'clock we started for home."

Besides the fright which was occasioned the two families of the boys no harm was done, except one of the boys was forced to take a hot bath and swallow a dose of quinine after he reached home. Johnny's original $1, which started the trouble, remains intact. Shirley stood the expense on his pay of $12, which he drew from the park on Saturday afternoon.

Shirley lives one block southeast of the park.

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April 24, 1909

WESTPORT HIGH SCHOOL
IS FORMALLY OPENED.

3,000 PEOPLE LAST NIGHT IN-
SPECT NEW BUILDINGS.

Entire Equipment Represents Out-
lay of Nearly $500,000 -- Elabo-
rate Programme of Speeches
and Music Is Presented.

The formal house warming of the Westport high school at Thirty-ninth and Locust streets took place last night, nearly 3,000 people participating. The building was thrown open for inspection at 8 o'clock. There was no conspicuous array of decorations and festooning of school pennants and class colors, only the building was brilliantly lighted by electricity in each of its four stories. There was enough to see and appreciate in the common equipments of the school.

The patrons of the school began to arrive in automobiles and street cars at 7:30 o'clock. Before the opening time came the better part of the better part of the crowd had arrived and was strolling about the grounds admiring the strictly modern buildings which, on their completion, September 15, had cost close to $500,000.

Two features of the school equipment brought forth more comment, perhaps, than all the others combined. They were the gymnasium, said to be the finest of its kind in the West, and the domestic science department, where pretty girls in neat white aprons stood ready too tell their mothers modern ideas concerning pastry making and undiscernable patchwork.

The domestic science department has over 100 pupils. Not all of them are girls, and it is said the class record in fancy work has several times been broken by the deft fingers of boys also adept on the baseball diamond.

The art department and the chemical and zoological laboratories are also expensively fitted with the latest models and appliances. In the zoological room are thirty compound microscopes. The water color work and free hand drawing of some of the students of the art department created favorable comment among the amateur and professional painters who are patrons of the school and who were among the visitors last night.

At 9 o'clock the crowd was ushered into the auditorium, where an excellent programme was the piece de resistance of the house warming. This part of the school equipment was in perfect accord with the others, expense apparently having been overlooked in making it among the best of its kind anywhere.

The auditorium seats 1,400 people. In times of emergency, like last night, chairs can be placed int eh aisles so that 200 more can easily be accommodated and all hear.

After the "Coronation March" had been played by the high school orchestra, Frank A. Faxon, vice president of the school board, made a few remarks of welcome. Addresses were given by Judge H. H. Hawthorne and Dr. Herman E. Pearse, both of whom were instrumental in procuring the big and modern high school building for Westport.

One of the features of the programme was a bass solo by Reid Hillyard, a pupil of the school. Mr. Hillyard received his musical training at the school.

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April 21, 1909

TREATS BLACK HAND
LETTER AS A JOKE.

J. B. MARKEY HAS NO THOUGHT
OF GIVING UP $10,000.

Note Demanding Money Was Sent
to a Wealthy Farmer From Den-
ver -- Believed to Be the
Work of a Crank.

J. B. Markey, whose children live at 1303 West Thirty-ninth street, but who spends most of the time on his big farm in Harrison county, treats as a joke the "Black Hand" letter sent him from Denver, demanding $10,000 under pain of death.

It was last Friday when Mr. Markey received the letter, postmarked at Denver. At that time he was on his farm near Gilman City, Mo., and the missive had been forwarded to him from Kansas City. Laughingly he handed the letter to his friends and then forgot about it.

Being advised, however, to send the letter to Denver authorities, Mr. Markey did so, and since yesterday morning nothing more had been heard of it. Then it developed that the lives of his children were being weighed against the $10,000.

The letter was poorly written and demanded that the $10,000 be apportioned in designated bills, to be delivered at a certain address on Wellton avenue, in Denver, within thirty days of the date of the letter. No mention was made of the three children. Certain reports, however, have frightened the children, who are ignorant of the exact demands made upon their father.

Yesterday morning W. F. Farren, 3136 Central avenue, a nephew of Mr. Markey, read the letter in a morning paper, and hastened to the Markey home to break the news to the family. Some friends had preceded him and had talked with Miss Markey over the telephone. Though he assured the children that no harm whatever attended them, their fears were not fully dispelled. Last night Miss Markey refused to discuss the matter.

Speaking of the letter, Mr. Farren said:

"It is doubtless the work of some crank who knows that Mr. Markey has some money, and thinks that he can be bluffed into giving it up. Mr. Markey has not the slightest fear of harm resulting form the affair, and treats it only as a joke.

"Mr. Markey has no intention of complying with the demand. He pays less attention to the affair than do his friends."

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December 2, 1908

DRIVEN TO BED TO KEEP WARM.

GAS PRESSURE GOES DOWN,
LEAVING THE CITY COLD.

BLAME IS PLACED ON FIELDS.

"ALL RIGHT IN THE MORNING,"
SAYS THE COMPANY.

Cold Snap Made Plumbers' Fingers
Stiff in the Gas Belt, and They
Couldn't Connect Pipes, Etc.
Gas Lakes Reported Frozen.

During supper hour last evening, and for several hours before and after, the gas supply was poor. There was no other name for it -- poor. In the northeast portion of the city and in the eastern and southern parts there are complaints of almost no gas at all and people had to go to bed to keep warm. The gas lacked both in heat unites and illuminating power, and in most households it was found necessary to turn on the furnaces to their full capacity to get any warmth at all.

One peculiarity noted by many a sh ivering, anxious basement watcher was that the meters seemed to measure just as much imaginary gas while there was little gas or no gas, as they did on nights when there was enough to warm the rooms and make light sufficient to read a paper.

"We're not getting the gas from the fields, that's the trouble,' was the satisfaction consumers got from the gas company. "The sudden change in the temperature caught them unprepared in the fields, and they have been necessarily slow in connecting up additional wells with the pupmps. This will be all attended to in the morning, and there will be no more trouble this winter."

A FAMILIAR TUNE.

Consumers recalled having heard similar statements last winter when the gas supply failed every time the thermometer registered below the freezing point, and they were not prepared for a like excuse for yesterday's shortage of gas in view of the rosy tales carried home by the city officials who recently visited the fields, the solemn assurances of an abundance of the product there and the extra improvements that had been put in for getting it to consumers in Kansas City.

Little by little the gauges at the reducing station, Thirty-ninth and State Line, where the gas from the flow lines from the gas fields connect with the city's distributing mains, showed spells of sinking yesterday, indicating a lack of gas pressure. As the hours wore on and the kitchen ranges and lights were turned on, the symptoms became alarming. Marked depression, slow pulse, difficult respiration, and all indications of a moribund patient alarmed everybody but the doctor. He was accustomed to it, having seen many a household darkened in the full years of his experience. The normal pressure is forty-five pounds at the reducing station. At 7:30 o'clock last night it was twenty-three. It didn't look like the patient would live until morning. It was twenty-three. Just a coincidence. Nothing more. Twenty-three.

In some high altitude there was no gas at all, and there were many complaints.

THEY WANTED TO KNOW.

Every home in Kansas City dependent on gas for heat and illumination was effected, and during the early hours of the evening the office of The Journal was besieged with inquiries as to the cause of the weak supply. Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., also put in some busy hours telling people over the telephone that he couldn't account for the slump, and repeated what the gas company told him abot the supply being frozen over, the lakes of gas being frozen over, or some such thing, in the gas fields.

"It's fierce," said the mayor shortly after 8 o'clock. "In the last two hours I've had fifty complaints over the telephone about shortage of gas. The complaints come from every part of the city, and vary from no gas at all to a scanty supply for illumination and heat. The high points northeast and east seem to be the principal sufferers. I can't understand it. There is plenty of gas in the fields, and plenty of power to deliver it to Kansas City, if it were not for the fact that the gauges at the intake, or reduction station at Thirty-ninth and State Line indicate a meager supply from the gas fields. I would feel disposed to blame today's and tonight's troubles to local conditions, or, to be more explicit, to failure on the part of the distributing company to install proper facilities for the delivery of the gas.

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July 1, 1908

ONE DRIVER ON THE SPEEDWAY.

He Found Course Rough and
Didn't Remain Long.

The speedway, which parallels Gillham road from Thirty-ninth to Forty-third streets, was opened yesterday. Only one speeder took advantage of the drive. He drove up and down the course twice and then left.

"The speedway isn't in good shape yet," said A. D. Nolan, mounted park policeman who was patrolling it yesterday. "It is muddy and rough at the south end and probably will not be in good shape until Saturday It needs harrowing and rolling to set it in good condition.

"I don't expect many drivers on the course before Saturday. Probably we'll have a big Fourth of July crowd, and the real opening will be then."

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April 29, 1908

THOU SHALT NOT
SKATE ON SUNDAY.

JUDGE WALLACE HANDS DOWN
ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT.

He Wants the Rinks Closed -- Sends
Deputies Out to Get Names of
Offenders -- The Philoso-
phy of Kimbrell.

"Thou shalt not upon a Sunday move thy feet with a gliding motion when thou hast roller skates attached to thy shoes!"

This commandment has been handed down by Judge W. H. Wallace to his twelve tried and true grand jurors, passed on to the deputy marshals and was read with a thud yesterday afternoon by County Prosecutor I. B. Kimbrell, who was signing indictments against theater folk, in the form of an indictment against S. Waterman, charged with managing "a place of amusement for pay, otherwise known as the Coliseum roller skating rink at Thirty-ninth and Main streets, Kansas City, Mo."

After reading the missive three times, the prosecutor, who some weeks ago swore off smoking, was so excited that he absent-mindedly lighted a cigar presented to him a week or two since by a voter who had called for free legal advice. When Mr. Kimbrell had coughed the rancid smoke out of his lungs he recovered composure, threw the cigar away and remarked:

"Well, it's not a matter of great importance at this time of year, anyhow, as very soon the boys will be going barefoot and can't wear roller skates. Besides, next Sunday they can go to the baseball game."

The prosecutor picked up his pen and started to sign his name to the indictment. He hesitated. He said:

"I believe I'll talk this over with the grand jury first."

"I wouldn't write anything about it," suggested Charles Riehl, deputy prosecutor, to reporters. "We don't know for sure yet whether the jury will return the indictment against the rink."

Joseph Stewart, veteran bailiff of the criminal court, and Henry Miller, custodian of the criminal court building, were the trusted men, who Sunday went forth and searched the city for roller skating rinks. They were told to report to the prosecutor's office the keepers, ticket sellers and employes of all rinks found. After tramping all day they could locate only one rink, the one at Thirty-ninth and Main streets.

"Waterman was exceedingly kind to us," Miller says. "He offered to have a boy strap skates on our feet and let us use the skates all afternoon free. I was tempted. There were about 200 people in the rink, boys and girls, young men and women and all were laughing and happy. I wanted to jump in and skate, but Joe advised me not to and I didn't.

"We saw many kids skating on the sidewalks and streets over town Sunday, but we hadn't any orders to take their names. They weren't indoors and, so far as we knew, didn't buy or rent their skates on Sunday."

The Sunday skating question will come before the grand jury this afternoon. The usual 140 theater indictments will also be returned by the jury today.

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January 12, 1908

PROTEST AGAINST SPEEDWAY.

South Side Citizens Meet and Draw
Up Fighting Resolutions.

About forty men, residents in the vicinity of Gillham road, met at the Church of United Brethren, Fourtieth and Harrison streets, last night to protest against the action of the park board in ordering an appropriation of part of that boulevard for the proposed speedway. The meeting was called by Benjaman H. Berkshire, 4018 Harrison street, and J. V. Kendall, Twenty-fifth street and Troost avenue.

A motion was made that those present should resort to every effort to prevent what they thought was the ruin of their roadway, and that every man pledge himself to assist in a financial way if it became necessary for them to resort to the courts. When this motion was put, F. J. Chase, 4100 McGee street, who was chairman of the meeting, asked all those who were in favor of it, to stand. Only four remained seated. The motion was announced, carried and those who voted for it put their signatures to the resolution. This resolution was adopted:

Whereas, The Kansas City park board has assumed to set apart a certain
portion of Gillham road for a speedway in defiance of the purposes for which
that roadway was condemned and paid for, and

Whereas, the use of any portion of this parkway for a speedway will be
detrimental to the interests of those whop were assessed for payment of said
parkway, making it dangerous to life and limb and turning that which was
intended for quite enjoyment of the citizens, over to an entirely different
purpose, to the great discomfort of those living in that vicinity, and to the
depreciation of property values,

Therefore be it
Resolved, That we property owners and residents in the district bounded by
Thirty-ninth street on the north, Brush creek on the south, Troost avenue on the
east and Main street on the west, in mass meeting assembled, do respectfully
protest against the appropriation of any portion of Gillham road parkway for
purposes of speedway or for any other use foreign to the purposes for which the
said roadway was condemned, and ask that your board reconsider your recent
action, and withdraw your consent to such use of any portion of said
roadway.

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January 1, 1908

HE RAN COLISEUM
MANY YEARS AGO.

HENRY D. CLARK, THEATRICAL
MANAGER, IS DEAD.

Came Here a Penniless Song and
Dance Man With Eddie Foy,
and Made Half a Mil-
lion Dollars.

Henry D. Clark, famous as the creator of the old Coliseum which he conducted throughout Kansas City's frontier days, died last night at his residence, 3300 Broadway. He had been ill for three weeks and succumbed to acute gastritis and bronchial pneumonia following grip. The phenomenal will power of the man enabled him to rise from his bed against the advice of his physician and family as late as Sunday, when he shaved himself and went about as he wished.

Mr. Clark was one of the youngest soldiers in the civil war. He enlisted in the New York heavy artillery when only 13 years 6 months old, and served throughout the war. New York was his birthplace, but he went in childhood to Wisconsin. Starting in a theatrical career in Chicago after the war, he came to Kansas City to locate in 1877.

He was the most picturesque and amazingly progressive theater manager Kansas City ever had. He came here moneyless, "opened" in a cellar and amassed over a half million dollars. Then he retired. That was ten years ago, after he had discovered that the things he knew about running a frontier place of amusement did not suit the public when taken out of the original setting and sold to them at uptown prices in a regular theater.

But the most Kansas City ever knew of Clark was far back of his retirement. It was thirty years ago when he first appeared here. He was a young man then and had been doing a song and dance with Eddie Foy. His working partner called herself Zoe Clark. She was the more thrifty of the two and decided that Kansas City would be a good place to open a theater. Clark's father lived here then and drove a one-horse job wagon. The elder Clark was not up on theatricals, but he was willing to help his son get into business.

So the old gentleman rented a cellar in Fourth street for Henry and Zoe and bought them a keg of beer. Business was good in the cellar, and Clark built the Coliseum at the corner of Third and Walnut streets with the receipts. The only "legitimate" shows "making" Kansas City in those days played in a hall over the present site of Arnold's drug store at Fifth and Walnut streets.

The Coliseum was a money-making venture too, and Clark soon quit "doing a turn" himself. Zoe started a boarding house to take care of the actors and actresses who played the Coliseum. And then came to Kansas City the embryo of advanced vaudeville. The Coliseum attracted the best variety performers in the West and Eddie Foy. McIntyre and Heath, Murray and Mack and scores of others played long engagements there.

And the best of all these performers were then destined to be plunged into the legitimate sooner or later. Clark realized this and built the old Ninth street theater. It burned and he rebuilt it, but he could never make it a financial success and he leased the property and during the last ten years he called at the theater at 10 o'clock on the morning of the second day of each month, rain or shine, to get the rent. It was the only time he was ever seen about the place.


Surviving Mr. Clark are the widow and five children. They are: H. D. Clark, Jr., and Palmer Clark, druggist and dry goods merchant respectively at Genessee and Thirty-Ninth streets; Miss Hazel Clark, Willie Clark and Mrs. J. B. Shinn of Seattle, Wash.

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April 11, 1907

BY AN EXPLOSION OF GAS.

Baker Is Severely Burned and His
Building Damaged.

After lighting the gas in a bake oven and closing the damper at Bartlett's baker, 1817 West Thirty-ninth street, at 9 o'clock yesterday morning, Robert Ray, a baker, left the room for a time. When he returned shortly he shut off, as he thought, the burner he had just lighted and struck a match to light the burners in the oven. As he did so there was a streak of flame and an explosion. Though the ovens are in the basement, the concussion overturned furniture in the room above and blew out plate glass windows in the front of the building. The neighbors thought they were up against a miniature earthquake.

Ray was taken to the office of Dr. J. H. Ralston, 1800 West Thirty-ninth street, where his face and arms, both badly burned, were treated. He was later removed to his home at 2416 Holmes street.

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