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September 6, 1909

THINK BOY FOLLOWED CIRCUS.

T. B. Baldwin Reports Disappear-
ance of 7-Year-Old Son.

T. B. Baldwin, 2115 East Thirty-fifth street, reported to the police yesterday that his 7-year-old son had disappeared from home. They boy's parents believe he has run away and followed the circus which was in town yesterday.

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February 10, 1909

SCHOOL LIMITS EXTENDED.

Board Takes In New Territory in
Southeast Part of City.

Notice has been served on the county clerk by the board of education that the school limits have been extended to take in a territory in the southeastern part of the city. The land taken in lies between Prospect and Agnes avenues, from Thirty-fifth to Ninety-ninth streets, and between Agnes and Cleveland avenues, from Thirty-fifth to Thirty-seventh streets.

The property in question is now subject to taxation for city school purposes. The school board has the right to extend the limits after being authorized to do so by a vote of the residents of the district in question.

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February 4, 1909

CAUSE OF BOY'S DEATH
TO BE INVESTIGATED.

PARENTS CHARGE NEGLIGENCE
AND WILL FIX BLAME.

Father Says Consent for the Vaccin-
ation of Floyd Tinsley Was
Never Given to School
Authorities.
Floyd Tinsley, Died After Receiving Vaccination in School
FLOYD M. TINSLEY.

"Thorough investigation of all the facts surrounding the death of Floyd M. Tinsley, the 12-year-old son of W. G. Tinsley, 2323 Prospect avenue, which resulted from an infected vaccination wound, will be made by the boy's parents as soon as possible, and every effort will be made to place the blame for any negligence that may have caused the child's death.
"Somebody has got to answer for the boy's death," said Mr. Tinsley last night. "Somebody is responsible for it, and I'm going to find out who it is."

The vaccination, which took place in the Irving school three weeks ago Tuesday was, it is said, performed contrary to the wishes of the parents. Mr. Tinsley wished to deny the statement of an afternoon paper, which said that he had written to the school's authorities asking that the child be vaccinated.

"It's a lie," said he; "no note was ever written by me to the school about the vaccination. I would not have had it done. I have always been opposed to vaccination, and when Floyd was vaccinated it was without my knowledge."

MOTHER DRESSED THE WOUND.

"Three weeks ago three of the five Tinsley children were vaccinated at the Irving school by Dr. Hasbrouck De Lamater, whose office is at Thirty-fifth street and Brooklyn avenue. A few days after the vaccination Floyd's arm began to trouble him. A pasteboard guard had been placed over the vaccination wound and the boy given instructions not to remove it. Over a week ago the wound became so foul and so much refuse matter collected around it that the boy's mother thought it best to take off the cap and dress the wound with antiseptic. This she did, using powdered burnt alum as a healing medicine, and bandaging the wound with medicated cotton and clean, white cloth three times each day.

Sunday afternoon Floyd was so much worse that he was kept in bed. Late Sunday afternoon the family physician, B. F. Watson, who lives at Howard and Prospect avenues, was called in. He examined they boy and, according to his own statement and that of the boy's parents, administered calomel and salts. The mother told him of the condition of the boy's arm and, according to Mrs. Tinsley, Dr. Watson washed it out with hot water and boric acid. Dr. Watson denies the washing of the wound.

"It was late, and the light in the room was insufficient," stated," stated the doctor last night. "I really didn't know what was the matter with the boy, but no thought of possible infection occurred to me. It was not until I returned to the house Monday morning that I saw the boy had lockjaw, and then I arranged to have him taken to the hospital. It was with my recommendation that the parents allowed Floyd to be taken to the general hospital.

DOCTOR WAS MISQUOTED.

"I was misquoted in the afternoon paper Wednesday. It credits me with saying that infection set up in the wound after it had been dressed by the boy's parents. I did not say that, nor do I pretend to know when infection set in. If the wound became infected before it was dressed by the parents, before the pasteboard guard was removed, then the boy's death was not due to negligence of the parents."

Floyd was taken to the general hospital Monday night, over twelve hours after lockjaw had set in. There he was operated on by Dr. J. Park Neal, who was unable to save his life. Dr. Neal stated last night that everything known to medical science had been tried to save the boy, but that the infection was of too long standing.

Mr. and Mrs. Tinsley have four surviving children: Myrtle, aged 13; William, aged 9; Hazel, aged 7, and Lester, aged 4. Hazel and Myrtle were vaccinated at the same time Floyd was, and Myrtle's arm is now causing much trouble. A physician has been called to treat her in hopes that she may be saved from her brother's fate. Mr. Tinsley and his wife said last night that neither of them knew their children were to be vaccinated. They were emphatic in their stand that none of the rest should be submitted to a similar operation. Floyd Tinsley was in the fourth grade at school and under the supervision of Miss Edna Miller, his teacher, and Miss Gertrude Green, the principal of the Irving school.

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June 18, 1908

MAN FROM DEADWOOD
WAS AN EASY MARK.

Went for Ride With a Stranger, Who
Borrowed His Money and Also
His Purse to Hold It.

John Martin, a young farmer who arrived here yesterday from Deadwood, S. D., bound for Voland, Kas., is the easiest picking a confidence man ever had. He was not only "trimmed to a finish" by a "con" man yesterday, but was left at Thirty-fifth street and Troost avenue with a broken buggy belonging to E. Landis, 415 Wyandotte street. After "holding the bag" from 4 until 8 o'clock waiting for his new found friend to appear in another rig, John walked clear to police headquarters and led the horse.

Martin is 33 years old. When he arrived here he had $11.70 and a ticket to his Kansas home. While wandering about in the North End, he met a man who told him he was a horse trader, with a valuable string of ponies and he hired Martin to work for him. The man gave martin the lovable name of "Darling Smith," but said that he used the name of Milligan, after his stepfather.

After hiring Martin, "Darling's first move was to take his railroad ticket and leave it. John did not know where -- "but I was to get the money on it next week," he said. Just before noon Smith borrowed $5 of Martin's $11.70. After lunch they met by appointment and Smith had a rig in which he invited Martin for a ride, saying that it was "one of many." They drove to Electric park and on the way Smith informed Martin that he would have to use another $5 bill until tomorrow. That left Martin $1.70. In the park they took in all the concessions and John Martin was introduced to wonders he never believed existed -- the merry-go-round, shoot-the-chutes, the tickler, scenic railway and all.

Before they had proceeded far, in fact, just after they had had their pictures taken with "Darling Smith" on a burro and Martin by his side, Smith touched Martin for $1 more, leaving him with 70 cents.

"After he'd done that," said John Martin at police headquarters last night, "He borrowed my pocketbook with the 70 cents in it, saying he wanted to use it to carry his change. He was afraid he'd lose it, he said."

That last touch left John Martin of Deadwood, bound for Voland, completely strapped.

"And," Martin said, "I had a quart of good whisky, which I bought in Deadwood to take home to Pa -- paid $1.25 for it, too -- and when that feller Smith found I had it he said we'd better drink it. We did, or rather, he did, as he got the most of it."

On the way home from the park Smith was giving Martin an exhibition of fancy driving with one of his "trained" horses. He collided with a large wagon and smashed the right front wheel. Martin was left to watch the rig, while Smith returned to the city to get another vehicle. It was not until he had held the bag or rather the nag four hours that Martin began to wake up and take notice. He put the buggy by the roadside and started to town, asking all whom he met if they knew "Darling Smith."

The police have a good description of Mr. Smith and are looking for him. Mr. Landis, whose rig the "con" man had, took pity on Martin last night, and took him to his barn where he was given a bunk for the night. Landis said he might give Martin a job "until he gets on his feet and becomes a little wiser."

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June 5, 1908

RAN HIMSELF TO DEATH.

Sport of Cruel Boys Led to Tragedy
in a Cat's Life.

A little black cat which A. G. Lackey, 421 West Thirty-fifth street, owned is dead. This will perhaps be good news for the gang of hoodlums that tied a can to the tail of "Blackie" and laughed to see him run. After the cat got out of range he kept on running, judging from his appearance, and he got as far as his home several times.

"He would not let any of us go near him," said Mr. Lackey. "Unlike a dog, which, similarly treated, runs home for help, a poor cat seems to lose faith in all human beings after being put to torture. So my poor old pet simply ran himself to death trying to get away from that, to him, terrible instrument that was trying to beat him to death. 'Blackie' came home at last to stay, and he died the next day. I have only one regret to add to the one about his death -- I wish the whole army of boys who think it sport to impose on a cat or a dog could have seen the dismay expressed in the eyes of that unfortunate cat as he dragged itself to my feet to lie there and die. They would be friends of dumb beasts the balance of their lives.

"Poor old 'Blackie,' he never hurt a boy in all his little useful life, and yet boys killed him."

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May 22, 1908

TOOK MORE THAN A TOOTHFUL.

Schoolboy Disregarded Mother's Di-
rections in Use of Carbolic Acid.

Lloyd Thomas, 11 years old, 2035 East Thirty-fifth street, was told by his mother to put some carbolic acid in the cavity of an aching tooth. That was about 8:30 a. m Tuesday. Lloyd had never used that drug before and knew nothing of its potency.

Lloyd, instead of trying to put a drop into the cavity, turned up the bottle and filled his mouth with the acid. It burned so that he swallowed it. Presently he became unconscious and the family became alarmed. Dr. W. A. Shelton, who lives lose by at 3435 Brooklyn avenue, was summoned and gave the boy a powerful antidote, not before his throat and esophagus had been badly burned by the acid, however. Yesterday the boy was better, but is not yet out of danger. He is the son of Robert Thomas, a real estate man. Lloyd is a school boy.

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August 26, 1907

BACK TO THE GIANTS.

MABEL HITE SENDS MIKE
DONLIN EAST TO REFORM.
CUT OUT OF WIFE'S SONG.

TWO VERSES MISSING FROM
"I'M MARRIED NOW."
Grease Paint and Gay Costume Hide
Aching Heart of Kansas City
Actress -- Penitent Ball
Player Is Put on
Probation.
Mabel Hite, Famous Actress from Kansas City
MABEL HITE.
Pretty Kansas City Actress Who
Has
Put Her Husband, Mike Donlin, of the
New York Giants, on Probation.

CHICAGO, Aug. 25 (Special). -- Grease paints and uncouth costume can hide a breaking heart from the laughing audience on the other side of the footlights, but when Mabel Hite yesterday afternoon sought the only refuge she had, a 4x5 dressing box -- it couldn't be called even by courtesy a room -- large tears stole down a woebegone, little face.

She wiped them off with the corner of a Turkish towel, taking a bit of the rouge with it and hoped Mike would get better.

For the pretty little Kansas City girl sent Mike Donlin, the ball player, who is her husband, down to New York, buying his ticket and giving him the price of a Russian bath, which boiled out the remnants of the various liquids that had developed four days' spree, with an assault on a cabdriver and a cell in the police station for trimmings.

Donlin has promised to cut out booze in the future and sign with the New York Giants and if he's good for the next six months he can come back -- otherwise a divorce.

WORRIED SO CAN'T SLEEP.

I can't stand it any longer," said the little comedienne -- she's a child in figure and manner. "Now you don't think it's such a dreadful thing for a woman's husband to get drunk and in the newspapers, do you? But it means so much when you love a man and he'd promised not to do it. And every time it happens it's so much worse and it worries me so I can't sleep and I have to go out before that audience and act like a fool and make them laugh, and sing my songs and dance, and my heart is breaking. For he's good to me, except when he forgets himself."

A little while before she'd been singing "For I'm Married Now," and the appreciate ones on the other side of the footlights who'd called her back six or seven times, didn't know how hard -- how extremely hard -- it was to carry a smiling face through the trying ordeal.

TWO FAMILIAR VERSES OUT.

But she'd cut out two verses, and old players who remembered them and had heard about Mike knew the reason.

I'd like to go with you to lunchin'
But I've got a hunchin
That I'd get a punchin'
And I just hate to wear a veil
For I'm married now.

That was one of the verses that was eliminated from her song in "A Knight for a Day" at Whitney's. The other was:

Tell Mike a lie
I'd best not try.
I may be fly --
But no fly gets by him.

And the villain -- he admitted he was all that and was most penitent -- was in the office of the playhouse. He had slunk past the policeman who has been on guard for the last three days, fearing a possible outbreak by the ball player and was waiting to send a message of extreme contrition -- a message that Mabel wouldn't receive in person.

CALLAHAN CHIEF PEACEMAKER.

There were plenty of peacemakers, but nothing but a six months' probation will answer for Mike. James Callahan, his friend and manager of the Logan Squares, who had straightened matters up with the police, told how the husband and wife had slept in his house, at Thirty-fifth street and Indiana avenue, last Thursday night, unknown to each other.

After the cab episode, and after Callahan had got the soused one out of a police cell, he took him home. Mabel, who lives a block away, went to Callahan's house in great trouble.

A little earlier Thursday night Donlin went to the theater and demanded to see his wife. His breath was thick and he talked loud. Jouhny Slavin took him down to the corner and argued him into a cab, and that was why the scrubwoman's part in the show that night -- Donlin's role -- was performed by an understudy.

Donlin met Mabel Hite a year and a half ago in New York, and they were married soon afterward. He never saw her act before the marriage. She was in vaudeville or something similar. Off the stage she's girlish and pretty. Donlin met her at a dinner party.

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