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November 18, 1909

PROPOSE $14,000 HOME FOR
THE CRITTENTON MISSION.

Fireproof Building at Thirtieth and
Woodland Will Be Ready by Next
Summer.

Captain J. H. Waite, at the head of the Florence Crittenton mission and home, located in an old dwelling at 3005 Woodland avenue, made the statement last night that by next summer the institution hopes to be in a new fireproof building. It is to be erected, he said, on the corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue, where they own 156 feet fronting on the latter street.

"The foundation should be laid within the next ninety days," said Captain Waite, "so that work on the super-structure may begin in the spring. We have planned a building to cost between $10,000 and $14,000. As we want to make it absolutely fireproof and of reinforced concrete, we anticipate that the cost will be nearer $14,000. It is a grand institution and has done and is doing the noblest kind of work."

The Florence Crittenton Mission and Home for unfortunate girls was started in this city on February 4, 1896, with an endowment of $3,000 from Charles N. Crittenton, the millionaire philanthropist of New York, who died suddenly in San Francisco Tuesday. It first was situated on the northeast corner of Fourth and Main streets in a large three-story brick building which now has been torn down to make space for a city market.

After being at the original location for a short time it was decided to abandon the downtown mission work and establish a home. The institution then moved to Fifteenth street and Cleveland avenue into rented property. In June, ten years ago, the property at the southeast corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue was purchased for the home.

"A debt hangs over our heads for some time," said Miss Bertha Whitsitt, superintendent of the home yesterday, "but now we have 156 feet frontage on Woodland avenue on which we expect soon to erect our new building.

"Since the beginning of the mission and home," continued Miss Whitsitt, "we have cared for 582 young women, the majority of them with children. Just during the last year we cared for twenty-eight young women and twenty-three children. When totaled the number of days spent in the home by all of them amounts to 4,612, which we record as so many days of charity work."

Captain J. H. Waite, who has been at the head of the home for many years, said that Mr. Crittenton had given the home and mission $3,000 to start on. When the property at 3005 Woodland was purchased the National Florence Crittenton Home at Washington gave about $1,500 toward buying and improving the property.

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August 22, 1909

BAND CONCERTS FOR THIS WEEK.


Sunday, 2:30 p. m., Swope park.
Monday, 8 p. m., Concourse, St. John and Gladstone.
Tuesday, 8 p. m., West Terrace park, Thirteenth and Summit.
Wednesday, 8 p. m., Budd park.
Thursday, 8 p. m., Penn Valley park, Twenty-seventh and Jefferson.
Friday, 8 p. m., Troost park, Thirtieth and Paseo.
Saturday, 8 p. m., the Parade, Fifteenth and the Paseo.

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June 5, 1909

ROSE TAKES MURPHY'S RIG.

Officers in Rosedale Put Abrupt End
to Her Brief Ride.

The hankering after horses of Rose Smith, a woman living at Thirtieth street and Southwest boulevard, who "just loves to drive," yesterday afternoon for the second time caused her arrest.

Rose climbed up on Thomas Murphy's hack, which was standing near Summit street on the Southwest boulevard, and whipping up the horses, drove away toward Rosedale. When Murphy came out of a store he discovered that his hack was gone, but he had no trouble in following. Rose was arrested in Rosedale by the city marshal, who delivered her to the Missouri officers.

"I just loves to drive horses," was the woman's explanation. "I wasn't going to steal them at all -- just out for a little drive."

Rose Smith was arrested in Kansas City, Kas., a month ago for undertaking a trip which differed very little from yesterday's feat. On the former occasion she took a horse and buggy.

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July 11, 1908

WHITE MAN KILLS NEGRO.

May Holliway, Negress, Was Only
Witness, and Doesn't Know Slayer.

Following a quarrel of a week ago, Phil McGill, a negro bottler at the Imperial brewery, and a driver of a beer wagon at the same brewery, met last night and renewed the quarrel, which finally ended in the shooting and killing of McGill. McGill was walking south on the Frisco railroad tracks at 9 o'clock with May Holliway when they met the driver, who is a white man. The negro is said to have told the white man that he did not want any trouble, that it was all over as far as he was concerned

The Holliway girl says the white man replied: "I know that it is over and over right now," and that he then pulled a revolver and shot at McGill. The first time the gun hung fire, and the man pulled the trigger a second time, shooting McGill through the jaw. As McGill fell to the ground the man fired two more shots into his body and then ran. May Holliway was the only witness and is held at No. 3 station. The man who did the shooting is not known to the police and the Holliway negress doe not know his name. McGill was 23 years old and lived near Thirtieth and Summit streets.

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June 25, 1908

DOG ATTACKS LITTLE GIRL.

Florence Myers Bitten on Face While
Playing at Her Home.

Florence, the 3-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Myers, 3015 Cherry street, was bitten by a dog belonging to O. S. Bone of Roanoke, who formerly lived at the Elizabeth flats, Thirtieth and Cherry streets, while at play in the yard in front of her home yesterday afternoon about 2 o'clock. The dog is a black and tan mongrel and was captured at once. It is not believed to be affected by rabies. The little girl was bitten over the left eye, and Drs. J. W. Kyger and Fred Kyger were summoned at once to dress the wound.

After biting the little girl, the dog ran north to Twenty-eighth street, where he attacked another dog. Police were summoned after the dog's capture and requested to kill him, but stated that this could not be done without the owner's consent, unless the dog be affected by rabies.

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March 28, 1908

MOTORMAN KILLED IN WRECK.

Rex Hawkins Loses Control of His Car,
Which Strikes Another.

Rex Hawkins, the motorman on southbound Indiana car No. 643, was killed in a collision which occurred between Thirtieth and Thirty-first street on Indiana avenue at 11:15 o'clock last night. Hawkins lost control of his car as it was descending the hill toward the end of the line and the switchback at Thirty-first street. Indiana car No. 636, which was standing on the east track at the terminus, was telescoped and completely demolished by the southbound car when it jumped the track.

Hawkins was caught in the vestibule of his car, his left leg broken and his body crushed. He was extricated from the wreck and carried into McCann & Bartell's drug store at Thirty-first and Indiana. Dr. H. A. Breyfogle attended the injured motorman, who died a few minutes after being carried into the drug store. Hawkins lived at 2424 Tracy avenue. Isaac Pate and William Lamar, the trainmen on the car that was telescoped, were bruised and shaken up but sustained no dangerous injuries. E. J. Hanson, the conductor on the runaway car, was uninjured. Hawkins's body was taken to Eylar Brothers' undertaking rooms.

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December 19, 1907

ROBBERS ATTACK A WOMAN.

Take Her Money and Leave Her Ly-
ing Unconscious in the Snow.

Alma Day, the 16-year-old daughter of W. L. Day, a barber who lives at Thirtieth street and Cleveland avenue, was assaulted and robbed last night at Thirtieth street and Askew avenue by two men who had followed her from Kansas City, Kas.

Miss Day is employed in the buttering department of Swift's packing house and receives a salary of $6.25 per week. Yesterday was her pay day and she thinks that the two men who assaulted her were aware of the fact. The men took her week's pay, less the 5 cents she had paid in car fair going home.

She says that they got on an Indiana avenue car at the same time she did when she was returning home from work. They sat across the aisle two seats behind her. They followed her from the car at Thirtieth street and Indiana avenue. She walked on down Thirtieth street to Askew, within one block of her home, when the two men grabbed her. She was strangled until she almost lost consciousness. One of the men struck her on the back of her head and in the face. She fell unconscious and lay in the roadside for almost an hour.

Her older sister, Effie, went out to the grocery store, and in doing so had to pass her sister lying in the snow. She did not know that the body was that of a person, but being somewhat frightened at it, walked to the other side of the road. She returned from the store and walked around her sister again in the same manner.

About fifteen minutes later one of the neighbor's boys made the same trip as did Effie Day. He did not notice the body until on his way back home. He immediately ran to the Day home and told Mrs. Day of her daughter's condition, and Alma was carried into her father's house, a block away.

From the tracks in the snow it was thought that the two men ran up Askew for about a quarter of a mile and then they crossed a field and went directly towards Jackson avenue.

The police were notified immediately, but were unable to trace the robbers further than Jackson avenue.

Miss Day's injuries, while not serious, are painful, and she will be unable to leave her bed for some time.

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September 25, 1907

DISLIKES IDEAL LIFE.

Alta Reaves, at 18, Deserts
Her Aunt's Home.
Alta Reaves, Missing 18-year-old.
ALTA REAVES.
Disappearance of Girl 18 Years Old Causing
an Aunt Much Distress.
Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 21, 1907
My Dear Aunt Marcia: By the time you get this I will be clear away from Kansas City. I suppose you will be surprised, but I have been thinking for some time and have come to the conclusion that I simply cannot live up to your ideal of life. I know that I have caused you a great deal of trouble and have decided not to be a cause for more. I thank you very, very much for all that you have done for me and I can probably never repay you for it; but some day I will show you that I do appreciate what you have done for me.

Please don't worry about me, for you have heard that "God helps those who help themselves," and I am not only going to try, but I am going to do it. I don't feel at all afraid of anything.

I hate to leave you, Aunt Bitha, and all the folks, but I have decided that if I am ever going to do anything, now is the time. If you want to do any more for me, just pray for me.

Again thanking you for all your kindness to me I am,

Your loving niece -- ALTA. P. S. -- I would have told you that I was going and where, but I knew that you would not let me go.
When Miss Marcia Jennings, a public stenographer at 302 R. A. Long building, reached her home 608 East Thirtieth street, late Saturday evening she found the foregoing letter awaiting her. It was from her niece, Alta Reaves, and was typewritten on the paper of the Western Pump and Manufacturing Company, Ninth and Wyandotte streets, where she worked until that day. She was 18 years old July 26. She comes of one of the best families in Clay county. Her father died when she was 2 years old and her mother when she was 8. Since that time she has been reared by two aunts, Mrs. C. H. Scott, of Excelsior Springs, Mo., and Miss Marcia Jennings, of this city. Four years ago she came here and since then has been continually with Miss Jennings, who sent her to school and later educated her as a stenographer.


DISAPPEARANCE A MYSTERY.

"I can assign no reason on earth for Alta's leaving in this manner," said Miss Jennings yesterday. "She has only recently attained her majority but has never yet kept company with young men. I am confident, however, that someone is behind this resolve of hers and that she had help in leaving."

About 4:30 Saturday afternoon Miss Alta called up her aunt and asked if she had to get anything for supper. She was told to take home some meat. She made a purchase and arrived at home about 5 o'clock. The meat was found in the ice box. She was last seen about 5:30, when she returned a book to a neighbor, but said nothing about leaving.

"The girl had no suitcase," said the aunt, "but she packed clothing for the trip that I know it would take two to carry. She must have left by the rear entrance, as had she gone any other way she would surely have been seen. She is a very strong-minded girl and may have come to the conclusion that she could do better alone, I feel sure that someone has induced her to run away. Furthermore, I do not believe that she is out of this city. She didn't have money enough to get very far."


THREATENED TO LEAVE BEFORE.

When Miss Jennings returned home on Labor day she found that Miss Alta had packed her trunk and ordered an expressman to remove it to 1023 Campbell street, where she had engaged a room. It was her intention then to live there and take her meals in restaurants down-town. The aunt frustrated her plans and thought that the girl had become reconciled to live with her. She was to have taken a new and better position yesterday.

After finding the girl gone, Miss Jennings called the police and asked their assistance in locating the missing girl. Miss Alta is said to be an exceptionally attractive girl, 18 years old, 5 feet, 3 inches tall and weighing 130 pounds. She is a decided blonde, ans light blue eyes and naturally rosy cheeks. When last seen she wore a white shirtwaist, with a tan skirt, which hangs a little below her shoetops. A large white hat trimmed with cream roses topped off her toilet.

Miss Jennings is greatly worried over the girl's disappearance and her relatives in Clay county are nearly distracted over it. The police are doing all they can to locate the girl.

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