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January 13, 1910

SOLDIER DICK AND
GIRL ARE PARTED.

"WAIT 'TIL I'M 21" HE SAYS,
"I'LL BE TRUE," GIVES
CHESSIE.

"Mooning" Around Third
and Main When Arrested
by Policeman.
Parted Sweethearts Chessie Nave and Richard Wiliford.
CHESSIE NAVE AND RICHARD WILIFORD.

Chessie Nave is 16, and Richard Wiliford is 20, but they each felt a great deal older and more responsible than when they arrived in Kansas City yesterday morning on an early train, with a wish and a determination to get married. they didn't feel so old nor so responsible last night. This is the way of it:

Last Tuesday the young people ran away together from Lexington, Mo., where the young man is a student in Wentworth Military academy. The girl is just a girl. they were accompanied on their matrimonial excursion by two friends, Grace Nave, a cousin of Miss Chessie, and Calvin Cook of Bartlesville, also a student in the military academy. The plan of the eloping kittens was to get a marriage license in Kansas City, Kas., where officials dealing in Cupid's paper are generally supposed to be gentle and kind. They missed the direction and went "mooning around the vicinity of Third and Main streets at an early hour yesterday morning. There a policeman found them.

The police had been notified that the young people were headed toward Kansas City with some kind of a prank in veiw, and the policeman saw them and happened to remember. He nailed them.
HIS FATHER ARRIVES.

Joel Wiliford, Woodford, Ok., father of Richard, had also been notified of his son's unceremonious leave in company with a little girl in skirts. The old gentleman hopped a train and got to Kansas City about as soon as the elopers. He dropped into central police station about the time that Richard and Chessie, Grace and Calvin were making a botch of trying to argue the police into the belief that while the resemblance was probably great, it was not absolute.

Papa Wiliford tried moral persuasion on his son. Nothing doing. Son was obdurate. What's the use of trying to make a soldier of a fellow, anyway, if you expect him to give up his girl at a mere parental command Richard said a soldier should never surrender. And he further declared he wouldn't. So into the dungeon cell went he, like any real, spicy, belted and buckled Don Juan of old. His good friend Calvin went along with him, but not from choice.

As for the girls, they saw life as it is from the matron's room Thus stood the matter all day. Richard would not desert the principles of academic soldiering, and Chessie vowed she would be as true as "Beautiful Bessie, the Banana Girl, or, "He Kissed Me Once and I Can't Forget." Then came Nash Ruby, brother-in-law of Chessie. He came From Lexington. He looked real fierce.

HERDED BEFORE CAPTAIN.

Forth from the dungeon cell marched Soldier Richard, and friend Calvin. Down from the matron's melancholy boudoir minced Chessie and Grace. They were herded into the office of Captain Walter Whitsett, where more moral suasion was rubbed on.

Richard, during the afternoon, had agreed with his father upon a compromise, bu which he was to return to school and finish his education. Later he took it all back. And w hen he saw Chessie he said:

"I'm going to marry you, Chessie, even if I never become a great general."

"That's where you're wrong," mildly said Papa Wiliford.

Then Chessie put in her word. But it didn't move anybody at all. Unless it was Nash Ruby, Brother-in-Law Nash. "You'll come along home with me, miss," said he. Chessie subsided. But when it came to parting, Richard uttered his defiance. "I'll be 21 before long," said he, "and then we can marry."

"I'll be true to you," sobbed Chessie.

Brother-in-law Nash led her away to catch a train for Lexington. this morning Richard will go to Woodford, Ok., with pa. Friend Calvin went home last night. That's all, except it is said Chessie made a face at her future father-in-law.

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November 7, 1909

BLED TO DEATH WHILE ALONE.

Tries to Scrawl Note, but Strength
Ebbs Away Too Soon.

An autopsy held yesterday on the body of William O. Thornton, found dead in a pool of blood in a room in the Occidental hotel, 24 East Third street, late Friday night, and who was at first supposed to have been a victim of foul play, showed that death was due to the bursting of an artery in the left leg.

Deputy Coroner Czarlinsky made the investigation, and said that the man had bled to death after the artery, which had been wasted by disease, burst.

How long it required for Thornton to die is not known, but investigation at the rooming house disclosed the fact that the man realized when the artery burst that he was on the precipice of eternity and beyond aid of any kind.

A pencil and a small piece of paper which were found in the room yesterday showed that he had attempted to scrawl a note. Finding his strength was waning too fast with the ebbing of his life blood to accomplish this task, Thornton turned to the squalid cot, for which a few hours before he paid 10 cents for the purpose of sleeping on, and in the grimy darkness of the room he knelt and began to offer a prayer.

The body was found in this kneeling posture. Whether the prayer was completed or whether he died while his mind was trying to form words will never be known.

Thornton has a son living at Greenville, Mo., and a sister at Southwest City, Mo. The son called at the Carroll-Davidson undertaking rooms yesterday and said he would probably take charge of the remains, but has as yet made no definite arrangements for the funeral.

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October 21, 1909

FOR CITY'S TRIBUTE TO SWOPE.

Relatives in Letter to Mayor Thank
Kansas City People.

In a communication addressed to Mayor Crittenden, Mrs. L. O. Swope, sister-in-law of the late Colonel Thomas H. Swope, yesterday formally thanked the citizens of Kansas City for the public funeral tendered him. Mrs. Swope's letter follows:

"I wish to express to you, and to all of the city officials, on behalf of the Swope family, our high appreciation of the most beautiful tribute of honor and affection shown our dead. We feel that not a stone was left unturned to show him honor and gratitude.

"The services at the church were all that could have been. All the singing was sweet, but the solo, "One Sweetly Solemn Thought," was almost a voice from heaven. Once more thanking you for your great kindness, I remain, very sincerely, MRS. L. O. SWOPE. October 15, 1909."

It is said that the last legal transaction performed by Colonel Swope was the signing of a deed to a piece of property to the city on the north side of Fourth street, between Walnut and Main. It is a part of the square bounded by Walnut, Main, Third and Fourth, to be used for market purposes. There is a three-story brick building on the land, and this will be razed together with the four remaining buildings which the city will soon get posession of. there has been a delay in the formal transfer on account of the city having to deal with heirs.

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July 30, 1909

PIONEER BLACKSMITH DIES
LEAVING $150,000 ESTATE.

Henry Nevins Came to Kansas City
in 1869, and Opened Shop
on Third Street.

Henry Nevins, pioneer horseshoer of Kansas City and in the early days a fair prototype of Longfellow's "Village Blacksmith," died at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the family residence, 1032 Olive street. He was 70 years old.

He was born in Tipperary county, Ireland, and came to this country when a young man, spending some years in Canada, where he learned the blacksmith trade and where he married. Later he crossed the line into the United States, settling first in Burlington, Ia., and from there removing to Kansas City in 1869.

He first opened a shop at Third street and Grand avenue and for twenty years Nevins's blacksmith shop was a landmark.

In those early days when railroads were in their infancy and mules and horses were yet the main standby for transportation, the blacksmith was a most important person.

Nevins met the situation with an energy that never seemed to tire, and it is on record that during rush seasons he has been known to stand in the smith forty-eight hours at a stretch, without sleep, eating in the shop meals brought to him by his wife.

Early in his career in Kansas City Mr. Nevins began to put his savings into real estate, and this policy he continued throughout his career. But once in his life did he part with real estate he had purchased, and that was about eight years ago, when he sold to the Armour Packing Company the property at 306 West Eighth street for $10,000, and for which he had paid $900 in early days. For an other property next to the Gillis opera house, which cost him $800 he recently refused an offer of $800 a foot.

Practically all his wealth is in inside Kansas City real estate and a conservative estimate of his estate places the figure at $150,000.

Later he moved his blacksmith shop to 512 Walnut street, and when that property became too valuable for a blacksmith shop he moved once more to 512 Grand avenue, where he continued in business until five years ago, when he retired, owing to advancing age and continued ill health.

He leaves a wife and six children, three sons and three daughters. The children are: John M., James H., William J., Elinore, Catherine Marie and Rose.

The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Aloysius's church, and burial will be at St. Mary's cemetery.

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July 19, 1909

SIX MEN HELD UP
IN A SINGLE NIGHT.

IN EVERY INSTANCE ROBBERS
SECURE MONEY AND ESCAPE.

Five Highwaymen With Revolvers
Get Dollar Apiece From One Vic-
tim -- Diamonds and Watches
Among the Loot.

Six holdups occurred in Kansas City Saturday night and Sunday morning. In every case the robbers succeeded in getting money, and some of the victims gave up their watches.

Frank Serrett, 829 South Valley street, Kansas City, Kas., the first victim to complain to the police, reported that two men held him up in the alley between Main and Walnut on Ninth street. While one of the highwaymen searched his pockets, the other man kept him covered with a pistol A watch and $10 comprised the booty.

At 10 o'clock Saturday night George Mangoe, 115 1/2 Central street, Kansas City, Kas., reported that he had been robbed by two men, and his watch stolen. The robbery occurred at Ninth and Wyoming streets.

It took five men to stop and rob James Bone, 4413 Bell avenue, at about 11 p. m., at Forty-first and Bell avenue, at about 11 p. m., at Forty-first and Bell avenue. According to Bone, all of the robbers were armed with revolvers and held them in sight. He gave up $5 to the brigands.

A watch at $7 were taken from J. W. Brown, 1326 Grand avenue, at Thirteenth and Franklin streets by two men.

H. A. Lucius, 215 West Fourteenth street, reported to the police that he had been robbed or $50 near 2854 Southwest boulevard.

G. W. Shaw, Strong City, Kas., entered police headquarters early Sunday morning and informed the police that he had been robbed in front of a saloon near McGee and Third streets. He reported the loss of an Elk's tooth and two unset diamonds.

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July 12, 1909

3 DEAD AS RESULT
OF BOMB EXPLOSION.

FIREWORKS DISPLAY NEAR A
CHURCH ENDS FATALLY.

Italians of Holy Rosary Congrega-
tion Were Celebrating St. John's
Day -- Two Negroes Are
Instantly Killed.

The upright figure is sketched from a duplicate of the iron pipe which was also to have been fired. The upper figure is a sketch of the piece which killed the woman and the lower figure is a sketch of the piece which was hurled through the house at 511 Campbell street.


Amidst a throng of 700 persons who gathered at Fifth and Campbell streets last night to watch the celebration of St. John's day, a bomb exploded, instantly killing Clarance Harrington, a negro of 511 Lydia avenue, and Anna Fields, a negro woman of 568 Harrison street; and so seriously wounding Tony Grassiffe, an Italian living at 311 East Third street, that he died at 10:45 o'clock.

The bomb was one used in the pyrotechnical display being held under the direction of the Holy Order of St. John, an organization of the Holy Rosary Roman Catholic church, Fifth and Campbell streets. Tony Grassiffe, one of the victims, was the master of ceremonies and for almost an hour he had been lighting bombs, rockets and Roman candles, while the crowd gathered denser in the street.

Grassiffe finally planted the huge cast iron pipe, loaded with dynamite and a bomb, in the center of a low corner lot. He had been warned to completely cover the bomb with dirt, and to plant it deep. Ignorance or carelessness caused him to leave the bomb in its two feet of iron pipe standing uncovered in the lot. He lighted the fuse and before he could gain his feet the explosion occurred.

NEGROES INSTANTLY KILLED.

Grassiffe's left leg at the knee was completely severed by the bursting projectile. A huge piece of the iron was hurled westward and struck the negro woman full on the right side of her face, tearing it away, and leaving only a small portion of the skull. Another, and smaller piece, struck Harrington in the center of his forehead, crushing his skull and tearing part of it away. The two negroes dropped in their tracks, dead. The woman lay across the sidewalk grasping a palm leaf fan in her hand. The man fell close by her side.

Sergeant D. J. Whalen was standing within three feet of the woman when she fell. He was struck in the chest by a piece of mortar, but was uninjured. Officer Lee Clarry was standing still closer to the negro, and escaped without a scratch.

PENETRATES HOUSE WALL.

One piece of the iron pipe was hurled northward with a force which caused it to penetrate the wall of a house, seventy-five feet distant, and continue its course within, plunging through a two-inch door and spending its force against the other wall of the building.

Seated at a window, not three feet from the point where the projectile entered the wall, was Tony Gafucci. He was thrown from his chair, and lay on the floor of his room, momentarily stunned. The house number is 511 Campbell street.

Instantly after the sound of the explosion, the great crowd surged forward to where the dead bodies were lying. The police officers held them back, and themselves ascertained the condition of the negroes. Seeing that both were dead, the officers hastened to aid Grassiffe, whom they heard groaning and crying for help. They picked the injured man up from the hollow and carried him into a nearby drug store.

The police ambulance was hastily called, and Dr. E. D. Twyman accompanied it to the scene of the explosion. As he alighted at the spot where the negroes were lying on the sidewalk, and stooped down to make examinations, the uncontrollable crowd of negroes and Italians surged forward closer still, knocking over the surgeon.

COULDN'T SAVE ITALIAN.

When Dr. Twyman reached Grassiffe he found the injured man to be in a dangerous condition. Nothing could be done to stop the terrible flow of blood from the severed limb. The surgeon ordered a record drive to the emergency hospital, where every effort was made to save the life of the injured man. He was kept alive until 10:45 o'clock, by means of artificial respiration and then died.

By some means Grassiffe's wife gained entrance to the hospital and, gazing upon the form of her husband, became hysterical. It was necessary for Dr. H. T. Morton to administer an opiate to quiet the woman, who was shrieking strange Italian chants at the top of her voice, pausing now and then to cross herself and mutter a hurried prayer.

The coroner was notified of the deaths and ordered the negroes bodies taken to Moore's undertaking establishment, 1033 Independence avenue.

The celebration last night was held in spite of the constant warnings given out by Father Charles Delbecchi, in charge of the Holy Rosary church. He had just left his church, where he had warned once more of the dangers of fireworks.

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May 15, 1909

FOUR ITALIANS SENT
TO THE WORKHOUSE.

BELIEVE THEY ARE BLACK
HAND SOCIETY MEMBERS.

Two Were Fined $1,000 and Two
$500 -- Any Attempt to Secure
Their Release Will Be
Fought.
Four Italian Men Suspected of Being Black Hand Society Members.

Four Italians who were arrested by Detectives J. L. Ghent and "Lum" Wilson in a rooming house at 503 East Third street, and who are suspected by the police of belonging to the Black Hand society, were fined yesterday morning in the municipal court for vagrancy, and in default of payment of the fines were sent to the workhouse. Vincenzo Domenico and Frank Bruno were fined $1,000 each on two charges, while Francesco Amelo and Maro Choapa, the other members of the gang, were fined $500 each.

Ever since Italian business men received threatening letters demanding money a few weeks ago the detectives have been investigating the matter. Domenico and Bruno first excited suspicion, and after watching for several days, the detectives decided to bring them to police headquarters. When searched, both were found to be armed with revolvers. The other two Italians were arrested, and when their room, on Third street, was entered, where all had been living, several revolvers and shotguns were found.

In court yesterday morning, none of the prisoners professed knowledge of the English language. The court failed to establish that any of the men had been the authors of the threatening letters.

The police will fight any attempt to get them out of the workhouse as they regard them as dangerous characters and while it was not proved that they were actually members of the dread Italian society it is thought that they know more than they care to tell.

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March 15, 1909

ENDS DEBAUCH BY SUICIDE.

Man Believed to Be A. W. Butter-
field Strangled Himself to
Death in the Holdover.

While temporarily insane from the excessive use of alcohol, a man, believe to be A. W. Butterfield, committed suicide in the holdover at police headquarters yesterday afternoon by hanging himself with a handkerchief. He was dead when discovered by Philip Welch, the jailor, at 2:30 o'clock, and Dr. W. L. Gist of the emergency hospital said he had been dead about a half hour.

Patrolman L. A. Tillman arrested a man at Third street and Grand avenue at 9 o'clock yesterday morning and at the station had him locked up for safe keeping. The prisoner was drunk and resisted the jailor and Patrolman Bryan Underwood, who searched him at the desk. He was last seen alive by Jailor Welch, who entered the cell at noon to give him his lunch.

The suicide tied a handkerchief around his neck and to the bars of his cell door. With his face turned from the door, Butterfield then allowed the weight of his body to rest upon the handkerchief and slowly strangled to death.

A small gold watch, $1.70 in silver and a pair of gold eye glasses were taken from him. A small button worn by the suicide tended to show that he was a member of the United Brotherhood of Leather Workers of Horse Goods. He was about 40 years old. Coroner B. H. Zwart ordered the body taken to Stewart's undertaking rooms.

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February 3, 1909

DIES OF HUNGER AND COLD.

Body of Aged Man Fouond in De-
serted Room.

Though Union cemetery has many unmarked graves, it practically has none where the deceased is unidentified. But that list will be increased today when the body of an old man is taken from Stewart's undertaking rooms to the cemetery.

When the body was found Monday morning in a deserted room of John Girado's saloon, 501 East Third street, by Patrolman L. A. Tillman, the pockets were empty with the exception of one rusty nail. There was no clue to his identity. The old man had crept in from the alley and opened the rickety rear door by himself. He died of hunger and cold.

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February 2, 1909

WILL GET THE SQUARE NOW.

One North of the City Market Is to
Be Acquired.

Both houses of the council last night authorized the city comptroller to spend $250,000 acquired from the sale of bonds for the purchase of the square bounded by Main, Walnut, Third and Fourth streets. The buildings will be razed and sheds erected for the use of farmers having produce to sell. It was stated that an arrangement had been perfected with the several owners of the property to dismiss court appeals from the verdict of the condemnation jury.

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January 10, 1909

GIRL ASKS $25,000 DAMAGES.

Claims She Was Decoyed Into a Dis-
orderly Resort.

Claiming that she was detained for eighteen day in the resort of Jennie O'Neill, 205 West Third street, Ceicel Grady, 16 years old, brought suit against the woman yesterday. Damages to the amount of $25,000 are asked in the petition which was filed with the clerk of the circuit court. The suit is brought through Mrs. Mollie Woodward, mother of the girl.

Ceicel says she went to Mrs. O'Neill's place at the woman's invitation, as a domestic. When she discovered the real nature of her surroundings she tried to leave, but her clothing was hidden from her by the defendant, it is alleged.

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December 25, 1908

CHRISTMAS IN OLD
K. C. FIFTY YEARS AGO.

DOINGS OF THE DAY AS RECORD-
ED IN THE JOURNAL.

Dropping Down the Vista of Years,
a Decade at a Time, the Festal
Day Is Reviewed - A
Mayor's Charity.

Kansas City is notable for its Christmas weather. The records show that it is ten to one there will be clear skies on Christmas day. In 1858, a half a century ago, the day was a duplicate of today, "though," says the Journal of 1858, known then as the "Western Journal of Commerce," the weather sometimes froze at night and thawed at daytime, and then sometimes it was vice versa."

Kansas City was not much of a town in 1858, for The Journal had some important city news that Christmas morning. It announced that Delaware street had been "filled" from Third "all the way to Commercial street." That morning there was a fight on the hill. The hill was Third and Main. As the city proper lay along the river front, the hill was quite on the outskirts and just the sort of a place for the hoodlums to mix it up.

Others "mixed it up" besides the hoodlum. The Leavenworth Journal took a nasty fling at this place when it said in its current issue:

"The people of Kansas City are so dirty the assessor classifies them as real estate and they have to pay taxes."

The editor of the Kansas City Journal was on his metal in a minute.

"If the assessor of Leavenworth," was said in the Journal of Christmas day, 1858, "has yet waited upon the editor of the Leavenworth Journal, we would like to know what he estimates asses at."

"The curtain at the theater at Independence dropped sine die last night," is a local item. Independence never got over the closing of its theater. It, and Westport, had scoffed at Westport Landing, and laughed outright when it took on the high falutin' name of City of Kansas. But the City of Kansas opened up an opera house of its own and the one at Independence had to turn the lights out, and the janitor with them.

NO DOUBT OF IT.

"We find it difficult," said The Journal that same Christmas morning, "to convince our readers that we are really in receipt of dispatches of the day previous from St. Louis and the East, but we are, and shortly we will be in telegraphic touch with all parts of the United States," and later on in the report has it that wire was expected by every steamboat for the opening of a telegraph office in Kansas City.

Having no telegraph wires, and certainly no trains, the city had to depend upon the overland stages and river boats for the mails. That morning the mails arrived from Salt Lake, after a phenomenally good winter run. They had left Salt Lake November 29. The trip had been without incident, though a large party of Cheyenne Indians had been passed.

Christmas day ten years later, 1868, saw Kansas City quite prosperous. It had eleven trains in and out every day. President Johnson the day before proclaimed full amnesty to all who had taken part in the war of the rebellion, whether they had been indicted or not. "It is supposed to be issued to enable the supreme court to dodge trying Jeff Davis," was the comment of The Journal, and the editor did not like the prospect a bit. He wanted Mr. Davis tried for treason.

THAT GAY NEW BUS.


Showing how the town was growing, one of the most important local stories was of an improvement:

"Cassidy Brothers have a new bus for their Westport line. It is one of the gaudiest institutions of the city."

The fame of that bus lasted until the father of Walton H. and Conway F. Holmes started tram cars, by building a suburban line to couple Kansas City with Westport.

For the first time The Journal made note of the festivities in the churches. The Grand Avenue M. E. church, known as the mother of churches, was reported as having been crowded with members of the Sunday school and congregation to watch the unloading of a Christmas tree. At Westport the Rev. W. W. Duncan had a tree in his church, too.

Besides Christmas trees there were "oceans of egg nog" in town, according to the report that day, and a grand dinner was given at the Sheridan house, "A. C. Dawes, agent of the Hannibal & St. Joseph," being one of the guests, they had "whisky a la smash up," among other things. Ex-Governor Miller attended that dinner and made a speech. At the dinner it was announced that the steamboat Hattie Weller had brought 500 fine hogs up "for the packing houses in the West Bottoms."

D. L. Shouse, father of Manager Louis Shouse of Convention hall, was publicly presented with a gold badge, because of his great services in the Mechanics' bank.

HE WENT TO ST. JOSEPH.

Dr. G. W. Fitzpatrick may have forgotten all about it, but The Journal of thirty years ago yesterday announced his having gone to St. Joseph for the day. In late years, Dr. Fitzpatrick has lived a retired life, but he was quite a figure in local affairs in his day. He always led the parades. An abstemious man himself, he always started his parades from Sixth and Broadway "because," so he used to say, "it is the only point in the city where there is a saloon on each corner."

It was very cold that Christmas. "The hydra gyrum dropped to 8 degrees below zero," so The Journal tells. Trains were from half a day to all day late and the storm was all over the North and Northwest. Great attention was paid by The Journal to the railroad construction work, and an item appearing that morning, Christmas, 1878, is interesting now because it says that the M. K. & T. had agreed to build from Paola to Ottawa if the people would raise$50,000 bonus and grant a free right-of-way.

FIRST MAYOR'S TREE.

George M. Shelley, at present assessor and collector of water rates, was mayor, and as mayor in 1878 he did what Mayor T. T. Crittenden, Jr., is doing today. He distributed gifts to the poor. To ninety-one families in the First ward, fifty-four in the Second, fifty-nine in the Third, twenty-nine in the Fourth, fifty-five in the Fifth and thirty-four in the Sixth his honor gave orders for provision. Three hundred and sixty-seven individuals and firms -- names all printed in The Journal -- donated money or groceries, and by this means the poor were taken care of.

One man, traveling through the city, told Mayor Shelley he was comfortably provided for but for the moment without money. He was anxious to do something for some poor fellow so he turned his $25 overcoat over to the may or, and his honor soon had it on the back of a man who needed it. The generous traveler refused to give his name to Mayor Shelley.

Kansas City, Kas., was Wyandotte in those days, and Christmas was celebrated there evidently, for an item from that place reads:

"The colored Society of the Daughters of Rebecca had a festival in Dunnings's hall yesterday. Two hens got in a fight. A knife was flourished, but no blood was drawn."

OLD TIME PREACHERS.

At Grace Episcopal, Washington Street Tabernacle, the First Congregational and the Grand Avenue M. E. church there were Christmas trees and festivities.

Christmas day, 1888, saw Father Glennon preaching at special services at the Catholic cathedral. Father Lillis officiating at St. Patricks, and the Rev. Cameron Mann in the chancel at Grace church. Since then all these clergymen have been elevated. Dr. Mann and Father Lillis to be bishops, and Father Glennon to be archbishop; Bishop Talbot, that same day, preached at Trinity, of which church his brother, Robert, is the rector. Dr. Robert Talbot would have been a high bishop himself by this time only for the fact that Episcopalians think one bishop in a family is enough.

That Christmas day was a dreary one. It rained most of the time, at night the downpour turning to sleet. Over 100 telegraph poles were broken down, and almost every wire in the city snapped under the weight of the ice.

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December 3, 1908

SIXTY YEARS THEY'VE
JOURNEYED TOGETHER.

COL. R. T. VAN HORN AND WIFE
CELEBRATE ANNIVERSARY.

Men Who Helped Him Lay Founda-
tion of This City 50 Years and
More Ago, Gather to
Wish Them Well.

Feasting upon memories of the many years gone by, scores of "during the war" pioneers of Kansas City enjoyed the gathering at the home of Colonel R. T. Van Horn in honor of his sixtieth wedding anniversary, yesterday afternoon.

The large home at Honeywood, Evanston station, was crowded throughout the day and many groups of gray haired men selected quiet corners to pass the gossip of years, and to count grandchildren. stories of the distant past were recounted as if they happened but yesterday. Everybody was so many years young. Nobody was old.

Colonel Van Horn, 84 years young, was the leader in all the reminiscences.

"Don't you remember, George, that little incident on the steamboat Perry, when my wife paid me such a high compliment? he asked of George L. Andrews, one of the old-timers.

"Of course I do," replied Mr. Andrews, and his eyes twinkled merrily at the recollection. "That was forty years ago. You and I were standing on the deck when John Conover called up and held out a knife to us, saying it was for the best looking man."

"And you tried to take it the first thing," put in the colonel. "But that wouldn't do. So we called my wife up to let her decide the matter, and you got the knife."

Then there was a laugh from all, and one story led to another. Things long forgotten were discussed once more and little stories brought long unrecollected incidents to mind, and the gray heads would nod enthusiastically as familiar names were called.

BUT IT WAS GOLD.

"It was in J. Q. Watkins's little brick bank down on First and Main streets that I saw my first gold brick," said C. N. Brooks. "A tall, thin and hungry looking man brought it up to the bank one day and got off the black and white mule he was and handed the gold over to J. Q. It was real gold, too, and how we fellows did stare. The whole street was lined with people who wanted just a glimpse of that brick."

From the little red brick bank the old men turned their attention to the afternoons spent in the rear part of Mike Dively's grocery store at Third and Main streets, and Mr. Diveley was one of them who brought back the happy memories.

Interest in the afternoon's impromptu entertainment was just at its height when the front door opened and Thomas McNabb entered. With McNabb came visions of the prayer meeting night long ago, in the Baptist church, which was located at Missouri avenue and Walnut street. It was in that little church that McNabb was wont to sing hymns every night, and it was the gathering place of all the young couples at that time.

"One night just after prayer meeting was over," began McNabb after he had gone the rounds of handshaking and congratulations, and had joined the group of old-timers. "I remember that a fire broke out in a little store owned by Alex Holland here. I had just got through singing a solo about meeting again, and Frank Foster, the chief of the fire department -- that hand-cart, volunteer brigade; you remember it boys --had been to church. He leapt up and ran to the old fire house at Second and Walnut streets singing 'God Be With You Till We Meet Again.' And so we all joined in and helped to save Alex a few dollars."

TALES OF OTHER FIRES.

Stories of that one fire brought to the mind other conflagrations in which Mr. Foster, now dead, played a prominent part. Some of the old volunteers were present at the reception yesterday afternoon, and many a hearty laugh was had over some amusing adventures. Frank and Walter Withers figured largely in some of the amusing stories.

And so the afternoon was spent by the old men -- once more as boys. Gray hair and wrinkles were forgotten, and no one noticed an occasional trembling of hands or the thinness of voice which had come over many of those present. It was seldom that so many of the old pioneers could get together that they might live over more of the pleasant days when they were young, and the gathering yesterday was immensely enjoyed.

The Old Men's Club went out to Honeywood, as did some of the McPherson post of the G. A. R. And Colonel Van Horn and his wife were the recipients of scores of hearty congratulations. E. S. Jewett and wife have had the pleasure of attending the twenty-fifth, fiftieth and sixtieth anniversaries of Colonel and Mrs. Van Horn, and they said that never before has such a gathering been held upon such an occasion in Kansas City.

Light refreshments were served at the informal reception, consisting of coffee and sandwiches. Colonel Van Horn and his wife were exuberant in their good, old-fashioned hospitality.

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August 18, 1908

BICYCLE BOBBY BUYS BEER.

As a Result, Charles Mantinette Is
Fined $50 in Police Court.

J. F. Threlkel, a member of the motorcyle squad, was working in plain clothes Sunday because his machine, he says, is out of commission. He was detailed to watch for Sunday violators.

At 113 East Third street he saw something which interested him. Men were constantly coming and going -- and the place was not a boarding house, either. Threlkel went in and succeeded in purchasing a couple of cool bottles of beer. Then Charles Mantinette, who sold the beer, was arrested. In police court yesterday he was fined $50.

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July 12, 1908

BOOZE CLAIMS TWO MORE.

Victims of Whisky Habit Die in
Emergency Hospital.

Two deaths occurred in the emergency hospital last night, and alcohol was the immediate cause of each death. W. Morris, 26 years old, Twenty-fourth and Summit streets, was a patient at St. Margaret's hospital, Kansas City, Kas., and was sent to this city to be placed in the city holdover for safekeeping. Later he was taken to the emergency hospital. It is said he was in the hait of consuming one uart of whisky a day.

H. P. Kemper, 305 Walnut street, was taken from Scott's saloon, Third and Walnut streets, to the emergency hospital. The physicians were not able to make a definite diagnosis of his ailment. Kemper died while having a spasm rought on from acute alcholism or morphia poisoning.

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July 6, 1908

"COCAINE MARY" IS DEAD.

Picturesque North End Character
Falls From Second Story Widow.

Minnie Palmer, who was better known to the residents of the North end as "Cocaine Mary," died at the general hospital at 5:30 o'clock last night from concussion of the brain, received by falling from a second story window to the pavement twenty feet below, shortly after 1 o'clock Sunday morning. She was seen about 1 o'clock sitting on the window ledge, and told a woman who lived in the house that she was trying to get a little fresh air before going to bed. It is thought she went to sleep and lost her her balance.

The woman was found at 5 o'clock Sunday morning by Philip J. Welch, night jailer at police headquarters. He called an ambulance and had her taken to the emergency hospital. Later she was removed to the general hospital, where an operation was performed in an effort to relieve the pressure of bone against the brain. Minnie Palmer lived at the rooming house on the southwest corner of Third and Main street

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May 9, 1908

TWO BARRELS WERE ENOUGH.

Negro Stole Load of Whisky, but Left
Part of It.

Jordan Coleman, a one-legged negro teamster for the Empire Transfer Company, stumped hurriedly into police headquarters about 4 p. m. yesterday and excitedly informed Captain Whitsett that somebody had stolen a wagon load of whisky from him.

"I left my wagon load with seventy cases and three barrels of whisky in the alley between Main and Delaware, Third and Fourth streets," he said. "I wasn't gone but a few minutes when I came back and the team, whisky and all had disappeared. A man said he saw another negro driving the load east on Third street."

About 6 p. m. Coleman's wagon was found standing at Independence avenue and Charlotte street. Two barrels of whisky were missing from the load. The police are looking for the "booze" and also the thief.

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March 22, 1908

HE WENT HUNTING THE CARS.

And Little Leo, Just a Baby, Wan-
dered Into Railroad Yards.

"What are you doing down here?"

"Oh, des tum down on treet tar to see choo-choo tars."

The foregoing dialogue took place shortly after noon yesterday in the yards of the Kansas City Southern Railroad Company between a railroad man and a tiny "Buster Brown" boy 2 1/2 years old.

The little wanderer was taken to police headquarters and turned over to Mrs Joan Moran, matron. When asked where his mother was he indicated that she had gone on a "treet tar." His name could not be understood.

After the baby boy had been at the station a couple of hours a frantic mother, followed by two other boys, appeared at police headquarters looking for a lost boy. She was directed to the matron's rooms The police told her that a boy of her description was there.

"Oh, Leo, Leo, where did you go?" the mother cried as she snatched the little Buster Brown boy to her breast.

"Oh, mamma," he replied gleefully, "I seen all big choo-choo tars an' a man took me away."

The mother, Mrs. Abraham Rubenstein of 1417 Harrison street, said that shortly after noon she was entering the Jones dry goods store with her three boys -- Harry, 7; Marion, 5 1/2, and Leo, 2 1/2 years old. When she reached an elevator she missed Leo, the baby.

The little fellow is believed to have taken a street car to Third and Main streets, from where he walked down into the railroad yards. When found he was in among box cars and engines, but looking with wondering eyes at all that was going on. It was then that a railroad man found him and took him in charge.

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January 8, 1907

MANY OBJECT TO PLAYGROUNDS.

Some Say They're to Be Too Near
Railroad Yards.

Many property owners east of Main Street, north of Independence avenue and west of Highland are contemplating a petition to the board of park commissioners to protest against two sites said to have been chosen as playgrounds. A committee selected for the purpose reported Monday that it would recommend two sites, one bounded by Tracy and Lydia avenues, Second and Third streets, and another bounded by Gilliss, Campbell, Third and Fifth streets. The former is said to have been selected for a playground for negroes.

Many of the residents in the districts adjacent are complaining as they say both sites are too close to the railroad tracks. They claim that boys will be constantly tempted to "hop trains."

Property owners in the space bounded by and Forest avenues, Missouri avenue and Pacific street are the biggest objectors. A petition probably will be started in that neighborhood today.

"Twice this block has been selected by a committee," said a property owner in that block yesterday. "At least that was published and it gave rise to the report that our property was to be condemned for park or playground purposed. Many of us had sales consumated, even to the point of a deposit being made. No one would buy our property with the condemnation proceedings staring them in the face."

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September 10, 1907

NEGROES FLEE FROM SKULL.





Were Called to Tell About a Shooting

Scrape.



In a quarrel at 249 East Third street last night Mattie Hicks, negress, shot Lotta Holden, negress, through the left side. The injured woman was taken to the emergency hospital. Her condition was pronounced critical early this morning. Mattie made her scape.

A little later several witnesses, mostly negroes, were assembled in the "sweat room" at police headquarters. Assistant Prosecutor Hogan was presiding. He stood at a table littered with papers. He commenced the preliminary questioning and in removing the papers from the table uncovered a grinning skull.

"Oh mah soul," screamed a buxom negress. "There's her ghos' now!"

The remaining witnesses echoed her cry and in less than five seconds there was not a negro in the room. They were all rounded up and tremblingly accepted the explanation that the skull was only a portion of the ornamentation of an opium den that had been raided.

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September 6, 1907

THE WATCHES LOOKED GOOD.

But a Bill of Sale Showed They Cost
$1.65 Each.

Sol Roeber, a young man about 18 years of age, who says he just reached Kansas City from Chicago yesterday, was arrested by a North end policeman at Third and Main streets last evening because he had too much jewelry about his person. He was showing a number of fine gold watches, in green plush cases, to bystanders when taken into custody upon suspicion.

When the man was searched at police headquarters eight watches were found in his pockets. In appearance the watches were the kind used by railroad men, which retail at from $50 to $100 each. A further search revealed a bill of sale for the timepieces.

The bill was from a Philadelphia concern and showed that Roeber had paid $1.65 for each of the watches. Upon his assertion that he had just arrived in town and had not yet offered any of the watches for sale he was released. He promised to take out a peddler's license this morning.

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September 3, 1907

KNOCKED HIM SENSELESS.

Jack Gallagher Beats Up Al Hubbard,
a Discharged Barkeeper.

For a half hour last night Al Hubbard, 25 years old lay unconscious in the emergency hospital from a slight concussion of the brain and bruises inflected by "Jack" Gallagher, a former policeman, who conducts several North end saloons. This assault took place in Gallagher's Third street saloon, directly opposite police headquarters. He was arrested, and later released on a cash bond of $100 furnished by himself.

Hubbard up to last Saturday was employed as a barkeeper at Gallagher's Walnut street saloon, but was discharged. It seems Hubbard had some trouble with his wife yesterday, and when he went into Gallagher's Third street saloon last night this circumstance entered into the conversation. It resulted in Hubbard getting a terrible beating.

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July 18, 1907

REFUSED TO PAY TWICE.

For This, Greek Restaurant Man Beat
Negro.

Miles Turner, a negro, wore no hat when he went to police court yesterday to prosecute two Greeks for beating him. His head was bandaged.

"These Greeks have a restaurant at 115 East Third street," said Patrolman Joseph Dolah, who arrested them. "This is a regualr occurrence. A stranger goes in there and pays for his meal. When he is done, another demands pay. If it is refused they take the customer's hat and hold it until he disgorges. I can't tell how many scrapes of this kind I have settled down there by making them give back the man's hat. I have warned them often. It's getting to be a nuisance.

Turner said that when he refused to pay twice for some eggs one of the Greeks secured a club and "swatted" him over the head. They were fined $3 each and warned to stop the practice. Judge Kyle told them he would fine them heavily if such tactics ever were used again.

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June 28, 1907

FIRE UNDER FIREWORKS.

Boys Attempt to Burn Carload
Among Which Men Worked.

A carload of fireworks in the Southwestern News Company's warehouse at Third and Washington streets had a fire built under it yesterday noon by mischievous boys. The corrugated iron structure is built two feet above the ground and the boys splashed a quart of coal oil around on the under side of the floor and touched a match.

Their scampering away caused a teamster to investigate, and the fire was found. It was rapidly eating through the wooden floor before it could be extinguished. Once through the floor, the entire car of explosives would have gone in a flash. Four men were at work among the stuff, filling orders.

The house is on an isolated hill and was built for storing fireworks.

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April 4, 1907

WAS IT A MURDER?

Body of Unknown Man Found at
Third and Main.

George Walls, 18 years old, 506 East Fifth street, was in the saloon of Mike Lasalla, 300 Main street, at 1 o'clock this morning with Joseph Rose, the bartender. Walls stepped outside as Rose was locking up the place. When he reached the sidewalk he heard a brick strike the pavement and break. At the same time, he noticed the body of a man lying just north of the saloon on Third street. He says he saw no one else. The dead man's forehead had been crushed. A pile of bricks was nearby on the street.

The two men reported their find at police headquarters and the body was taken to the emergency hospital. It is evidently that of a laborer, perhaps a miner, for a circular describing miners tools was found in a pocket. There were no means of identification. In the man's pockets, besides this circular, were a cheap watch and a card reading "Oklahoma saloon, southwest corner of Seventeenth and Walnut."

The body is that of a man of about 30 years. He wore a suit of dark clothing that had seen service, blue overalls, blue shirt, both new, and new underwear. He was 5 feet 11 inches in height, weight about 185 pounds.

The coroner took charge of the body.

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January 8, 1907

FINE ROOMING HOUSE KEEPERS.

Sold Liquor in Their Places -- One
Ordered to Close by February 1.

W. Q. Soper, proprietor of a rooming house at 106 East Third street, was fined $100 in police court yesterday. The place was raided by the police Sunday afternon and a jug and fifty flasks of whiskey were found in one of the rooms. Fourteen men and four women, arrested in the place, were released.

Mrs. A. G. Ham, proprietress of a rooming house at 317 East Twelfth street, was fined $25 and the court ordered her to quit business before February 1.

Mrs. Ham said the license for the place had been furnished her by a brewing company. She said that breweries furnished licenses for many of the proprietors of rooming houses.

The case against J. H. Mitchell, proprietor of a saloon at 1304 Grand avenue, was continued until this morning.

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