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January 31, 1910

HOW JUSTICE ROSS
MADE HIS FORTUNE.

DONOR OF MONEY TO MA-
HONEY CHILDREN WAS
ONCE A LAMPLIGHTER.

Formed Partnership With
John Mahoney Twenty-
Five Years Ago.

Justice Michael Ross, of Kansas City, who in the Wyandotte county, Kansas, probate court Saturday gave the children of his dead partner, John Maloney, $50,000, was born in Cincinnati, O., December 19, 1859. His father, Alexander Ross, came to Kansas City in 1866 to aid in the erection of the first gas plant the city had. In June a year later, the family followed him, coming from St. Louis by boat.

"The Missouri was full of boats in those days," said Justice Ross last night, "and was the principal means of navigation between here and St. Louis. Kansas City had a real wharf and it was a busy one."

Two brothers, William J. and James Ross, and a younger sister constituted the children at that time. James was drowned while swimming in the Missouri river in 1872.

"We attended a little frame public school down in the East Bottoms just opposite what was known as Mensing Island," said Justice Ross. "Later we went to Washington school which still stands at Independence avenue and Cherry street. A ward school education was as high as one could go in those days unless he went away, and that was all we received."

After the erection of the gas plant Justice Ross and his brother William secured positions as lamp lighters. It required them to get up at all hours of the night, according to the condition of the weather and the fullness of the moon, both to light and turn out the street lamps. After doing this work at night Justice Ross worked all day on an ice wagon for J. E. Sales. Later on he worked in the old Davis brick yard, which stood about where the Zenith mill now stands in the East Bottoms.

Justice Ross always had in view the day when he would go into business for himself -- be his own boss. With his savings and some help from his mother he started a little grocery and general store on the levee at First and Campbell streets in 1874. After a time his brother, William, was taken into partnership, but remained but a few years. The latter for several terms was a member of the city council.

BOUGHT OTHER STORES.

As the city began to grow away from the river, Justice Ross saw better opportunities and opened a grocery store at 1401-3 East Fifth street, at Lydia avenue, and later another at 1100-2 East Fifth street, at Troost avenue. These two stores were money makers and enabled him later to branch out along other lines.

In September, 1888, Justice Ross was married to Miss Bessie Egan. All of their children, seven boys and four girls, are living, the oldest daughter being away at school near Cincinnati, and the oldest boy at St. Mary's, Kas. Six of the nine children at home attend the Woodland school.

"I knew John Mahoney from the day he came here with the C. & A. railroad," Justice Ross said. "He was doing small jobs of grading in those days and his mother went with him over the country. They used to trade with us at the little store on the levee and when in town Mahoney and his mother stopped at our home."

It was almost twenty-five years ago that Mahoney and Ross went into partnership and the latter has been a silent partner ever since, Mahoney seeing to most of the details and looking after the work. Justice Ross also had other interests, such as tree planting, and planted the trees around the finest residences and along many of the prettiest boulevards. In speaking of some of the work done by himself and Mr. Mahoney, the justice said:

"We built all of the Southwest boulevard, also Fifteenth street, doing the grading work. Roanoke boulevard is another piece of our work, as was the ill-fated Cliff drive, where poor John and his wife met such a tragic fate. We did lots of work on the country roads in Jackson county and built almost all of the roads in Wyandotte county, besides many of the brick-paved streets.

LARGE CONTRACT WORK.

"We also did much work away from here, such as government work on the levee at New Orleans, county roads in Southern Indiana and railroad grading in Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Colorado. Mahoney was a man who made friends wherever he went. I just received a letter from Indiana asking if he and McGuire were the same men who were there asking for all particulars."

As Justice Ross's business ventures thrived he found it impossible to give the time required to his two grocery stores, and a few years ago he disposed of them. Previous to that, however, he had established the Missouri Carriage and Wagon works at 308-10 Broadway, which he still operates.

For many years he has been buying property and erecting modern flats thereon. He does not build flats to sell, but he keeps them for what they bring in. When Admiral boulevard was cut through at Virginia avenue, Justice Ross owned a big row of old flats immediately in the right of way. They are brick and their moving back was the biggest job of that kind ever done in this city. He made them modern and is erecting more flats near them.

The prettiest and most costly structure erected by Justice Ross is a flat building at Benton boulevard and St. John avenue, on a promontory overlooking the entire city. He owns forty or more pieces of improved property in the city.

In the fall of 1898 Michael Ross ran for justice of the peace on the Democratic ticket and was elected. Since then he has held the office for three terms, twelve years, winning each time with ease. He said last night, however, that he would not seek the office again. He intends to build a big home in the southern part of the city and he and Mrs. Ross will devote their time to their children. He now lives at 626 Troost avenue.

"John Mahoney almost decided to go to Jacksonville, Fla., with our party," said the Justice. "The ground was frozen and he could not work. But he was such a home-loving man he hated to leave his family, even for a day. I had a premonition when I left that something would happen. When I got the wire the first thing I thought of was his automobile. We did not get the particulars, however, until we got a paper at Memphis, and did not get full particulars and learn that McGuire was killed and the others hurt until we got The Journal at Paola, Kas.

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January 30, 1910

USE OF AEROPLANE IN WAR.

Taft Will Be Asked to Urge Devel-
opment of Craft.

ST. LOUIS, Jan. 29. -- Congress is to be petitioned, according to a resolution passed at a conference of the aero clubs here today to determine the value of aerial craft in warfare.

A committee from the aero clubs is to call on President Taft and ask him to undertake steps to insure the development of aerial craft.

The conference, which was presided over by Cortlandt F. Bishop, president of the Aero Club of America, represented clubs from thirteen cities and states. Mr. Bishop represents by proxy the aero clubs of New England, California and Colorado. Dayton, O., Kansas City, Peoria, Ill., Rochester, N. Y., Indianapolis, Des Moines, Baltimore and Washington had representatives here.

Applications for the international aviation and balloon races were announced from Kansas City, Peoria, Indianapolis and Philadelphia. Baltimore and Washington entered a joint application for College Park, Md.

The place for holding the international aviation and balloon contests will be decided on by the Aero Club of America within thirty days.

Kansas City delegates tonight told of the advantages of their city for the meet, particularly because the winds in the fall blow east and Kansas City is centrally located.

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January 29, 1910

HE ONCE BUILT HOUSES HERE.

But Now George O. Purdy Is Chief
of Police in East St. Louis.

George O. Purdy, chief of police of East St. Louis, Ill., for the past eight years, whose department has the record of capturing a greater percentage of malefactors than any other police department in the country, arrived at the Savoy hotel last night. It was Chief Purdy who adopted the system of putting practically all of his policemen in plain clothes and sending them out in the shape of a dragnet whenever a crime was committed, and he has advocated this plan at every meeting of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, of which he is a member of the executive committee representing Illinois.

Twenty-three years ago Chief Purdy was a Kansas City contractor. He laid the foundation and the first story of the old Missouri, Kansas and Texas Trust Company building, the first of the Stilwell propositions in this section.

"Kansas City is destined to be the coming inland city," said Chief of Police Purdy last night. "It may take a few years, but she has the advantages and just look at the territory that is dependent on this city for supplies. A score or more years ago the wildest dreamer of the then boom days of this city could not have predicted the advances it has made. It is wonderful. There is a hustle and a bustle about this city that does not exist in other cities in this country and although I am across the river from St. Louis I will say that unless St. Louis gets a move on itself and that in a hurry, Kansas City will soon leave it behind."

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January 24, 1910

PENSION FOR POLICE.

Kansas City, St. Joseph and St.
Louis Department Officials
In Conference Here.

Police officials from St. Louis and St. Joseph were in conference with Captains John J. Casey and John J. Ennis of the Kansas City department at police headquarters yesterday afternoon to formulate plans for the passage of a police pension fund bill through the state legislature.

The meeting was held in the private office of Commissioner Ralph B. Middlebrook, the commissioner himself being present. No definite line of action was decided upon. The rough draft of the bill already formulated requests that all cities in the state of Missouri with a population of 100,000 be allowed to set apart a percentage of their yearly income for the maintenance of a pension fund for the support of police officers, who, by reason of illness or injuries, may be incapacitated. Commissioner Middlebrook stated that he thought that it was a humane idea and worthy of success.

The visiting officers are Inspector Major Richardson McDonald, Lieutenant T. J. Donegan and Sergeant James Healey of St. Louis, and Chief of Police Charles Haskell, Sergeant Martin Shea and Patrolman Joseph O'Brien from St. Joseph. Another meeting will be held this morning.

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January 22, 1910

REEDER PICTURE MOVED.

For Half a Century It Has Hung at
Coates House.

For the first time in several years the life-size oil painting of Andrew H. Reeder, the first governor of the territory of Kansas, which has graced the walls of the Coates house for half a century, was removed from its place in the lobby yesterday so that steamfitters could get at a defective pipe. The painting will be cleaned and re-hung in its old place.

The removal of the picture yesterday resulted in a flood of questions at Clerks Mong and Preston. Each told the story of the picture at least a score of times during the day and evening. The painting was made at the direction of Colonel Kersey Coates, the founder of the Coates house, from a photograph. The painting pictures Governor Reeder in flight.

It was back in 1856 that Governor Reeder had much trouble with the pro-slavery men and was forced to hide in Kansas City. He was a close friend of Colonel Kersey Coates, and Colonel Coates successfully hid the governor for two weeks at the Gillis house and other places about the city, finally furnishing him with a disguise in which he was able to escape as a deck passenger on the Missouri river steamer, the A. B. Chambers. When he arrived at St. Louis he had a photograph taken and sent it to Colonel Coates.

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January 22, 1910

KANSAS CITY FIVE
SHATTERS RECORD.

The Brunswick-Balke Team
Hangs Up Score of 2,209 in
St. Louis Tourney.

ST. LOUIS, Jan 22. -- The Brunswick-Balke five from Kansas City hung up a new Middle West bowling record tonight in the tournament here, when they shot 2,909, breaking last year's record of 2,831, held by the Nichols team, also of Kansas City.

J. Yerkes and W. H. Lockwood of St. Louis made the high mark of the tournament in the two-men events this afternoon with 1,223. The 633 score of Fred Schultheis of St. Louis is in the singles, the opening day, still stands.

Today was largely given over to visiting teams from Omaha, Kansas City, Topeka, St. Joseph, Columbus, Neb., and Doe Run, Mo. These teams also will bowl tomorrow. The fight for the 1912 tournament lies between Kansas City and Omaha. It is believed the latter contingent will land it, as it has the backing of the St. Joseph bowlers.

Results of the first set of five-men teams tonight follows:

Felix & Son, Kansas City, 2,597.
Gordon & Koppel, Kansas City, 2,699.
Brunswick-Balke, Kansas City, 2,909.
Kid Nichols, Kansas City, 2,663.
Muelbach, Kansas City, 2,701.
Grayols-Grand, St. Louis, 2561.
St. Louis H. & R. Co., St. Louis, 2,458.
Keen Kutter, St. Louis, 2,352.

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January 16, 1910

ANOTHER SWOPE HEIR
FALLS ILL.

Stewart Fleming May Have
Contracted Typhoid
in St. Louis.

COLUMBIA, TENN. -- Jan 15. -- Stewart S. Fleming, one of the heirs of the late Thomas Swope of Kansas City, and an executor of the Swope will, is critically ill of typhoid fever at his home here. Mr. Fleming became ill shortly after arriving home from a recent visit to St. Louis.

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January 15, 1910

INDEPENDENCE "HOUSE OF
DEATH" CLOSED TO VISITORS.

Swope Home in Independence
Guarded Day and Night by
Special Officer.
The Home in Independence Where Occurred the Deaths of Several Members of the Swope Family.
The Swope Home in Independence.

The Swope home, a magnificent three-story brick structure on South Pleasant avenue in Independence, is regarded as the abode of death by nearly every resident of that rural city.

The sudden death of J. Moss Hunton, closely followed by that of Thomas H. Swope, the millionaire benefactor and that of his nephew, Chrisman Swope, awoke suspicion that all was not well and that the Swopes were a marked family among even the most easy-going of the inhabitants. Men and women passing to or from their homes during church hours of a Sunday evening gazed fearfully up at the now tomb-like building with its darkened windows and barred doors. If they ahd been asked ubruptly why they did this they would have stammered out the answer that they did not know. It was all so mysterious that one after another of the same family should be stricken with a fatal illness of different kinds, but uniformly ending in convulsions.

Where there are suspicions there are those to invent tales of various sorts or to uncover significant incidents from the charmed house of the past. Some of the stories were undoubtedly founded on fact. Many were as wild and incredible as any ever bandied about the boar's-head dinners of King Arthur's court or the tales taken as evidence in the days of Salem witchcraft.

Some of the followers of Joseph Smith, the Independence seer and prophet, it is said, believed that sometime in the life of the philanthropist he had offended his God and that a curse was now being visited on his household. There would be no end, they said, until the last vestige of the family was swept away.

Another rumor that always had credence was that someone skilled in the use of subtle poisons was profiting by his knowledge.

WATER FREE OF GERMS?

Soon after the death of Chrisman Swope, it was announced by physicians of the family, that a city chemist of Kansas City had been summoned and that he had declared the presence of typhoid germs in the water used by the Swopes. In the same statement was added that the well formerly used by the family had "played out" and that another long out of commission was furnishing the supply. The water, it was said last night, was analyzed and said to be free from typhiod bacilli, notwithstanding the report.

"There is evidence that Mrs. Logan O. Swope believed the house unsanitary. About the time the well story was given out, she sent word to John Welch, a plumber, to come to the place and overhaul everything. This was done. Not a pipe but was inspected, not a hydrant or sewer outlet but was dested and disinfected. They were, according to the plumber, in ship-shape. No trace of disease laden decomposed matter was found.

HOUSEHOLD TERRORIZED.

All this time solicious neighbors were making inquiries of Mrs. Swope and others closely conneted with the family, touching the cause of the unusual spread of typhoid in the home. They seemed at their wits end to account for the disease.

Thus it was given out that the milk used in the kitchen was tainted; that the water was stagnant; that there was a quantity of decaying sewage in the pipes and that a servant girl, recently hired, who had had typhoid, had thrown her infected clothing in the milk house adjacent to the kitchen. No one knew what to believe.

Just when Mrs. Swope or her lawyers awoke to the real peril is not known definitely It is supposed to have been less than a month ago, when the doors of the palatial home were shut finally upon all visitors and a private detective employed to watch that no one should step within.

This detective is William C. Rice, former chief of police at Fairmount Park. A reporter who knockked at the big outer folding doors last night was met by him and warned off the place.

"I am here to see that no one shall see Mrs. Swope," said he. "There is no hope of getting an interview. She is indisposed and would not talk for publication. It is impossible."

The bland officer said this with a degree of finality. Without another word he stepped backward into the lobby. the heavy doors swung to. A bolt dropped in place. While the disappointed interrogator was yet on the porch a distant click like that made by an electric switch, was heard. The great house was as dark as a tomb.

SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES.

The story of several deaths in the Swope family, as told by some of their intimate friends last night, points to many susicious circumstances.

The family from the oldest member to the youngest was described as about of one disposition, kind, generous and impulsive. Thomas H. Swope would travel many a mile to help a friend.

Logan O. Swope, brother of Thomas H., died about ten years ago leaving a large inheritance in property around Independence. Naturally the burden of hte care of htis estate would devolve on the shoulders of Thomas, who already was loaded with business cares of his own. the year following Logan's death, Thomas sent for a cousin, J. Moss Hunton, then in Kentucky.

Hunton was a good manager anda man of high social standing in St. Louis, where his father, Judge James Hunton, is conisdered an authority on corporation law. Hunton came to Independence nine years ago and assumed the management of Mrs. Logan O. Swope's estate. He was acting as her major domo at the time of his death.

BECAME CONFIDANTS.

The Swopes, with the exception of Thomas Swope, a son of Logan, who owns a farm three miles northeast of the city, resided in the home on South Pleasant avenue. Hunton also lived there and as time went on Thomas H. Swope and he became inseparable companions and confidantes. Not a charity did the philanhopist indulge in but was previously laid before Hunton and met with his approval. The people of Independence came to love one as the other and Hunton acquired the unique reputation of being the only man in the city who would give a cigar or a box of candy to collectors presenting him with his month's end bills.

"I am Colonel Swope's bodyguard," Hunton told a friend on one occasion. "there is no danger of his ocming to grief when I am about. I guess things would go different if I shou ld die."

On the evening of Friday, October 1, the night of Hunton's death, he came home from a trip to the business district in good humor.

Suddenly, a few minutes after supper, he complained of feeling mortally sick and threw himself on a lounge in the sitting room, calling Mrs. Swope to his side. they had always been the greatest of friends.

"Maggie," said Hunton, "I believe this is the end." He then closed his eyes and the fatal convulsions came. Two hours later he was dead.

The death of Homas H. Swope came quite as suddenly two days from that of his confidant and friend, at about 8 o'clock the following Sunday morning. The abrupt taking away of all that was dear to Mrs. Logan O. Swope, except her children, was a great strain on her nerves and for several weeks she was on the point of a break down. She was advised to go to Chicago to recuperate. She followed the instructions and went in company with two of her personal friends, Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Thomas.

HURRIES TO DEATH BED.

While she was in Chicago word was sent to her that her eldest son, Chrisma, 31 years old, and a daughter, Margaret, were very sick of typhoid fever. She hurried back and arrived at the home four days before the death of Chrisman.

The home to which Mrs. Swope returned wsa one of hte blackest sorrow and apprehension. Margaret and Chrisman were both at death's door. One of hte servants was sick and MIss Cora Dickson, Margaret's governess who had thrown over her position as teacher of the third and fourth grades in the Columbian ward school to attend to her mistress, was down with the fatal malady.

In mortal dread of impending trouble as deep and poignant as any that had occurred heretofre, the widow cabled at once another daughter, Stella Swope, taking music lessons in Paris, to come home as quickly as steamship and train could carry her. Before she arrived in America, however, Chrisman was dead from a convulsion which turned the trend of his sickness to the worse at the climax.

Perhaps Mrs. Swope at this time believed as did some of her neighbors, that there was something supernatural in the calamities which had come to her in such close succession. anyway she sent a distant relative by marriage to meet Stella at New York and escort her home. Stella contracted typhoid fever on the train or home, it is alleged, and when she arrived was ready for the sick bed.
ADDED TO MYSTERY.

When the body of Thomas H. Swope was taken from its resting place in the vault in Forest Hill cemetery to the morgue of the H. J. Ott undertaking establishment in Independence it was about as much of a mystery as the more important details of this remarkable case. The physicians who examined the body, the lawyers at whose insistance the body was exhumed and the undertaker and coroner would not talk yesterday.

It is known that the body was at the Independence morgue, however, at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, for it was at this time that a special coroner's jury was called to the Ott undertaking rooms to formally identify the body.

After they had been filed through the rooms and gazed at the face of the dead benefactor they were dismissed on call. The jurors were T. J. Walker, A. J. Bundschu, S. T. Pendleton, S. H. Woodson, Bernard Zick, Jr., and William Martin.

"We were asked merely to identify the body and our opinion as to how Colonel Swope came by his death was not asked," said T. J. Walker, one of the jurors, afterwrds. "We probably will not be called again until the contents of the stomach have been examined by the Chicago specialists.

Henry Ott of the undertaking firm would not give out a statement last night. He said he has been instructed to tell nothing and he intended to do as he was told.

Dr. B. H. Zwart, county coroner, said that Dr. Frank Hall asked his permission of the autopsy on the body of Colonel Swope, which was granted. the autopsy, he said, was performed by Dr. Heptoek of Chicago and Dr. Hall. A jury ws provisionally impaneled and viewed the body. This jury will be reimpaneled, according to Dr. Zward, providing an inquest is held.

"If there is a request for an inquest, I will order one," he said. "If after a reasonable time nothing further is done in the matter, I will then have to investigate and find why no request is being made for an inquest. It will be my duty to learn why the autopsy was made."

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January 10, 1910

HYDE PARK M. E. CHURCH
A REBUILT RESIDENCE.

Upper Floors Refurnished for
Parsonage -- Congregation Formal-
ly Takes Possession.

The congregation of the Hyde Park M. E. church yesterday formally took possession of their new house of worship at Valentine road and Broadway. This is probably the first instance in the history of religion of the transforming of an old residence into a church. For years the property was known as the Allen residence and a year ago it was bought for $20,000 by the congregation. At an additional expense of $5,000 the first floor was made over into an auditorium beautifully decorated and fitted out with comfortable pews and an attractive pulpit. The upper floors were re-decorated and refurnished for the parsonage and the basement arranged for sociables and a meeting place for the different church organizations. Three-fifths of the cost has been paid with out assistance from the public, and in bringing about this satisfactory condition the congregation has received generous support from George N. Neff, J. W. Vernon, Fred B. Houston and William S. Kirke.

Prior to yesterday the church society to the number of 100 have been conducting services in a store room at Thirty-seventh and Main streets and have had as their pastor for a year the Rev. Dr. Napthall Luccock, who resigned a $5,000 a year pastorate in St. Louis to come to Hyde Park to help it grow at a salary of $1,800 a year.

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January 1, 1910

DREAMS OF HIS MISSING SON.

Stone Mason Believes This Story
Will Bring Back Show Boy.

After six years of fruitless effort on the part of Guss Solomon, a stone mason living at 805 East Eighth street, to find his son, who disappeared from their home in St. Louis during the world's fair, visions of the lost boy have appeared to him in dreams the last four nights, and it is his belief that the boy will be returned to him through this story:

"We were living in St. Louis during the fair," said Mr. Solomon, "and my boy, then 11 years old, was employed in the picture show in the entrance of the Broken Heart saloon on Broadway. Near the close of the fair he came to me one day and asked permission to leave the next day with a show which had been playing at the fair grounds. I told him that he better stay with his mother and me and took him up to town and bought him a new suit of clothes.

Around 8 o'clock that morning he went out to play with some of the boys in the neighborhood, and I never heard of him since. The show he desired to leave with went East that same night, but I was unable to trace it. I wrote to the chief of police in all the large Eastern cities, but they were unable to find any clew. The boy, if still alive, would be about 16 years old. He was rather tall and slim for his age was light complexioned.

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December 3, 1909

YEARS OF EXPERIENCE
IN CONSULAR SERVICE.

LEON GOMEZ NOW COMES TO
KANSAS CITY.

In 24 Years He Has Found no City
That Suits Him Better and
He Would Like to Stay.
Acting Mexican Consular Leon Gomez.
LEON GOMEZ.

Leon Gomez, until recently stationed at Cagilari, Island of Sardinia, is the acting Mexican consul to this city, filling the office of M. E. Diebold, now at St. Louis. Mr. Gomez is commissioned as consul to St. Louis, but he said yesterday that in his twenty-four years of consular service he had found no city that suited him quite so well as Kansas City and that he hopes to be recommissioned here.

"A city of beautiful boulevards and avenues," he said. "What drives in the summer time! Not in Old Mexico or France or Italy is better to be found. If I can so arrange I will spend a few years here so as to give my family a rest. It will be good for them and me. We of the consular service are nomads, senor."

Personally, Mr. Gomez is of striking appearance. He is about 55 years old, short and well built. His iron gray hair is roached straight back from his forehead. The nose is Roman, the chin and cheekbones equally prominent.

In full dress uniform with his left breast covered with badges of high orders, his pictures (face views) might pass for that of General Diaz. This effect is considerable heightened by the heavy, drooping gray mustache and the absence of the chin whiskers which adorned his features up until a few weeks ago.

WOULD FILL A BOOK.

In keeping with his distinguished appearance is the new consul's experience in government affairs. Unlike the great president, who speaks none but his own tongue, Mr. Gomez is fluent in English, French and Italian, as well as Spanish.

A complete record of this Mexican's travels and experiences would fill a book. He was first appointed as consul to San Diego, Cal., from Guadalajara. After seven y ears there he was changed to Tuscon, A. T., for seven months, then to Panama for three years, back to California for three years, to Texas for a short time, to Belize or British Honduras for fourteen years, to Italy for a year and now to this point awaiting a post in St. Louis.

Mr. Gomez's diplomacy and education has made him a favorite wherever he has been stationed and his knowledge of languages, customs and laws of foreign countries seems to have kept him in good standing with the Diaz government. In 1894 he won a place in the international history as secretary of the international commission which established forever and beyond possible dispute of the boundary line between Mexico and the United States by planting a line of stone monuments from El Paso to the California coast.

On the subject of travel the new consul is an interesting talker, his knowledge of the countries where he has beeen stationed by his government being minute, even in statistics.

CONSIDERS IT UNWISE.

"Every people has its virtues," he says. "By the same token ever people has its faults that are peculiar and found nowhere else under the sun. If a man is to judge a country let him go to it and live five years, speak its language, follow its customs, obey its laws, eat, sleep and think with its inhabitants.

"The United States bids fair to be the greatest nation in the world because it is cosmopolitan. The most enterprising and energetic of all nations naturally migrate here because it is new and promising. Mexico -----"

But Mr. Gomez does not talk much about Mexico; it is more diplomatic not to draw comparisons. There are views which Mr. Gomez undoubtedly could express about his own country beside all others on the sphere, but he does not consider it wise apparently, saying instead:

"Mexico is a great country, too. Growing just like everything and destined sometime to be a power with the rest. It is great in territory, population and in national heart. It is rich in natural resources and its capitol has walks and drives rivaling those of Kansas City itself!"

It is commonly asserted that the fashionable parades of the City of Mexico are equal to those of Paris and the most beautiful on the continent, but Mr. Gomez would rather be excused from saying so in the United States.

"Always, everywhere, I say to the young man: 'Go to Mexico to live.' The people are warm in their hospitality toward strangers and there is money to be made. It is a big country. The laws are congenial and friendly to foreigners. The girls are -- ah, beautiful, senor. It is a most agreeable place in which to live and bring up a family. I say all this to them because it is true and because Mexico can stand a population as cosmopolitan as that of the United States."

With Mr. Gomez when he came here to Kansas City were his wife and three children, who have followed him about the map into all sorts of climates and among widely different kinds of people. They say they have enjoyed themselves everywhere they have been but like California the best.

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November 20, 1909

NEGRO THEATER MANAGER
LOOKED FOR NO PROTEST.

Louis Woods Says His Company In-
vested $5,000 in Contracts for
Rebuilding Synagogue.

Louis Woods of 722 Charlotte street, owner of the Kansas City Son, a negro weekly paper, a negro who leased the Jewish Synagogue at Eleventh and Oak streets to open a theater for negroes, said last night that he was surprised at the opposition the proposed theater has received.

"For years I have been giving this matter much needed thought," he said. "I have seen white play houses in Kansas City prosper and added to every year. I noticed another thing -- that few negroes attend a white theater unless a negro troupe happened to be there. Then the first and second balconies are packed with negroes who pay nearly as much as those on the lower floor. It struck me that as all negro shows that come to Kansas City are liberally patronized by negroes, they might as do as well by a theater managed by a person of their own color.

"I talked with Sam Conkey, advance man for the Cole and Johnson show, with Bob Motts, proprietor of the Pekin, a negro theater in Chicago, and with Sir Green, supreme chancellor commander of the negro Knights of Pythias who just has completed a $100,000 negro theater in New Orleans. We combined on the project. It was our intention to have a chain of negro play houses over the country. We have been looking at a proposition in St. Louis.

"We had no idea that there would be any objection to our going by ourselves. White people usually want the negro to keep to himself, but just as soon as he attempts to do so, they object. We had no idea that we would meet the color objection with this theater.

"The theater was to be an investment. We examined the lease and found it without restrictions as to color. The building and the location were so well adapted to our needs that we put money into the business. We have let several contracts and have spent about $5,000.

"Had we known that our going there would have been offensive, it would have caused us to look for another location. So far as I am concerned I do not wish to raise any strife. I was born and reared in Missouri and expect to live and die here."

When it was known a negro theater was to be near them business men on East Eleventh street got up a petition remonstrating against the lease. It was signed by nearly every business firm near the theater.

A. P. Nichols, a real estate agent, has charge of the synagogue property for the owner who lives in Omaha. The principal objectors are D. O. Smart and the North-Mehornay Furniture Company. Mr. Smart has under erection a five-story building west of the proposed negro theater. There are many retail firms along East Eleventh street, members of all of which are opposing the lease to a negro theater.

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November 19, 1909

MOTHER CORNELIA DIES.

Assistant to Superioress at House of
Good Shepherd Passes Away.

Mother Cornelia, assistant to Mother Elizabeth, superioress of the House of Good Shepherd, died yesterday at the home, Twentieth street and Cleveland avenue.

Mother Cornelia had been ill for months, but continued with her work at the House of Good Shepherd until last Thursday. Mother Cornelia was Cornelia Thompkins of St. Louis. The family is one of the most wealthy and widely known in St. Louis. A sister, Mrs. Philip Scanlon, died several weeks ago in St. Louis.

The body of Mother Cornelia will be taken in a special car to St. Louis this morning by her parents, who are in Kansas City. In taking up her work among the inmates of the House of Good Shepherd, whose lives the sisters try to correct, Mother Cornelia gave up her family and prospects for a life of personal help and self-abnegation.

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November 15, 1909

A PRIEST WITHOUT AUTHORITY.

Giovanni Marchello Under the Ban
of the Bishop of This Diocese.

Giovanni Marchello, formerly an Italian priest stationed at Mazzara, Italy, and who was suspended by his bishop, M. Audino, on account of his roving disposition, has been in Kansas City off and on for the past three months trying to raise money with which to build a church. Marchello came to Kansas City from St. Louis. Marchello is denounced by the Kansas City Catholic bishop in the following letter:

"It is my duty to warn the Catholic people of the diocese of Kansas City that a certain Italian priest named Giovanni Marchello, now in Kansas City, does not belong to the diocese of Kansas City and has no permission or jurisdiction from me to celebrate mass or administer the sacraments. X JOHN J. HOGAN, Bishop of Kansas City."

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November 14, 1909

ARCHBISHOP GLENNON LAYS
ST. TERESA CORNER STONE.

St. Louis Prelate Puts in Two Busy
Days in Kansas City -- Enjoyed
Every Moment.

Several hundred Knights of Columbus were present at the reception given in honor of Archbishop Glennon at their new hall at Thirty-first and Main streets Friday. After renewing many old friendships the archbishop left for St. Louis at 11 o'clock that night.

"It has been a busy two days," he said last night, "but I have enjoyed every moment of my visit. I only wish that I could remain longer. I thank the Lord for the good that He has enabled me to do in Kansas City."

As the result of the prelate's appeal to the public to aid the work that is being carried on by the House of the Good Shepherd, in his lecture at Convention hall last Thursday night, over $5,000 has been collected, and more has been pledged.

Yesterday morning Archbishop Glennon went to the old St. Teresa's academy at Twelfth and Washington streets and celebrated mass. After visiting Loretto academy he returned to St. Teresa's, where a musicale was given in his honor. In the afternoon he laid the corner stone of the new St. Teresa's academy building at Fifth street and Broadway. It rained hard throughout the whole service but over 300 people stood bare headed in the mud while the archbishop put the stone in place and blessed the building.

In the evening Archbishop Glennon was the guest of honor at a dinner given at the home of Hugh Mathews, 1014 West Thirty-ninth street, and attended by Bishop Hogan, Bishop Lillis, Brother Charles and Father Walsh. The party then attended the Knights of Columbus reception.

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November 4, 1909

$1,000 FOR MISSOURI SONG.

Verses and Music, to Be Dedicated
to State, Will Be Decided Upon
by Governor and Committee.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., Nov. 3. -- Governor Hadley wants a song dedicated to the state of Missouri that will be noted far and wide for its soul stirring melody, as well as its force of poetry descriptive of the past history of Missouri and the good things that are in store for the state.

During his trip down the Mississippi river with President Taft and party, he listened to songs dedicated to other states and became so impressed therewith that he induced Cyrus P. Walbridge, David R. Francis, Charles Huttig, James H. Smith and Harry B. Hawes, of St. Louis, to put up $50 each. The parties on the steamboat Alton, Gray Eagle and Wells each chipped in and raised $250.

This makes $1,000, which will be paid to the person or persons composing verses and music that will meet with the approval of the governor and a special committee composed of the following:

David R. Francis, Captain Henry King, managing editor of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat; Henry N. Cary, general manager of the St. Louis Republic, Walter S. Dickey, of Kansas City, and Hal Gaylord, of The Kansas City Journal.

Only Missourians who can compose a beautiful song melody, with words telling of the past glories of Missouri and her future prospects need apply. In a few days the governor will write to the members of the committee, telling them his ideas in general terms regarding the kind of song that should be dedicated to this state.

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October 31, 1909

TWO DEAD AS RESULT
OF FIRE AT LORETTO.

MISS MIMIE TIERNAN SUCCUM-
BED YESTERDAY MORNING.

She Had a Presentiment That Some-
thing Would Happen Before
the Programme Was
Finished.
Miss Mary Maley, Victim of Lorretto Fire.
MISS MARY MALEY.

Of the five young women injured in the fire at the Loretto academy on Friday night, two are dead and Miss Mary Maley has but a slight chance of recovery. Miss Ruth Mahoney and Miss Agnes Campion, the latter of Omaha, were but slightly burned and will recover.

Miss Mimie Tiernan, the 16-year-old daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth F. Tiernan of 3525 Broadway, one of the victims, died at 7:30 o'clock yesterday morning. Miss Tiernan had a strong presentiment that something was going to happen before the evening had passed. To several of her friends she kept repeating: "Girls, I don't feel right. I am sure that something awful will happen before we get through with the programme."

Miss Tiernan was a daughter of the late Peter H. Tiernan, president of the Tiernan-Havens Printing Company, now known as the Tiernan-Dart Printing Company, in which Mrs. Tiernan holds a large interest. Mr. Tiernan was for many years president of the upper house of the council.

Miss Tiernan is survived by a brother, Peter H. Tiernan, who is taking a course in engineering at Rolla, Mo. He was advised of his sister's death and arrived in the city last evening. Another brother, Curtis and two elder sisters, Josephine and Marie Isabella, are traveling in Europe. funeral services will be held in the academy at 9:30 o'clock this morning after which the body will be sent to St. Louis for burial.

Mrs. Tiernan, who was slightly burned in an automobile accident about a month ago, had rented her apartment at 3525 Broadway and had intended to go to her ranch near Joplin, Mo., in a few months.

Miss Virginia Owens, the second victim of the fire, never fully recovered consciousness. Miss Owens was the daughter of Joseph J. Owens, a real estate dealer of 404 South Spring street, Independence. Miss Owens willingly sacrificed her life in order to save the lives of those in danger as she was in the rear hall of the academy when the fire started and rushed forward and tried to extinguish the flames which enveloped the other girls. In this manner she was burned.

The burial of Miss Owens will take place Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock. The funeral will be from St. Mary's Catholic church, of which the deceased was a communicant. Miss Owens was the youngest child and for the past two years had been attending the Lorreto academy in Kansas City. Mrs. Owens, mother of the girl, was informed yesterday morning of the accident and told of the death of her daughter.

While Mrs. Owens was aware that her daughter had been burned, the fatal ending was not made known to her until yesterday morning, owing to her ill health. the shock of the news prostrated her, and for this reason the funeral of the unfortunate girl was placed for Tuesday, in the hope that the bereaved mother might be able to attend.

Mr. Owens, the father of the girl, is a retired capitalist, and was with her shortly after the accident took place, but kept from his wife the possible consequence of the accident.

Miss Mary Maley is in a serious condition, but at a late hour last night she was reported by Dr. J. A. Horigan, who is attending her, as much improved and there is a fair chance of her recovery. She was badly burned below the waist and probably will be injured for life. Miss Maley is the daughter of S. A. Maley, a contractor of 1200 West Fortieth street. She is still at the academy, as the physicians did not think it advisable to move her.

In the evening before the fatal fire the Sisters were complimenting themselves on the healthiness and fine conditions of the academy. Many of them are confined to their rooms as a result of the shock of the disaster.

The statement that Miss Ruth Mahoney, who was taking a part in the performance, had been seriously burned is a mistake. She escaped without injury. Miss Mahoney is a sister of Mrs. Phillips, wife of Captain Thomas Phillips. Mrs. Phillips was in the audience and when she realized the dangerous predicament of her sister she ran forward, removed her from the way of harm and ruined two coats in whipping out the flames that enveloped the stage.

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October 31, 1909

SHIELDS AT 12th AND GRAND.

Well Known Photographer Has Dis-
play in New Studio.

C. Harrison Shields, who is well known as one of Kansas City's leading photographers, having conducted a studio at Eighth and Grand avenue for almost seven years, but now located in the Rookery building at Twelfth and Grand avenue, is displaying a collection of water colors, Vandykes, and sepia portraits. Part of this collection is his own production and some of the work of contemporary artists, friends of Mr. Shields. The occasion of the display is the recent opening of the new Shields studio.

Prior to his residence in Kansas City the name of Shields was associated with high class photography in St. Louis, where Mr. Shields engaged in the business for fourteen years.

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October 25, 1909

OFF FOR TAFT RIVER TRIP.

Deep Waterways Cheered as Party of
Kansas City Men Leave for Alton
and St. Louis.

More than a half hundred prominent Kansas City men, comprising the delegation that is to go down the river on the steamboat Gray Eagle in the presidential party, departed last night over the Chicago & Alton railroad on a special train consisting of five sleepers and a baggage car for Alton, Ill., where they will arrive this morning.

Decorators who were sent to Alton in advance, reported last evening to Secretary Cledening of the Commercial Club that the boat will be one of the handsomest in appearance in the big fleet.

It was a merry party which met at the Union depot last evening and as the train pulled out cheer after cheer was heard for the deep waterways convention which will be held in New Orleans Saturday of this week and Monday and Tuesday of next week.

The delegates expect that President Taft will breakfast with them on their boat Tuesday morning either at Cape Girardeau, which will be the first stop after the fleet leaves St. Louis, or between the Cape and Cairo.

The Kansas Cityans will arrive in Alton this morning in time to board the Grey Eagle and be landed at the levee in St. Louis at 9 a. m. They will go to the Coliseum, where President Taft will speak at 11 a. m. The trip down the river will begin at 5 p. m.

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October 24, 1909

FOR TAFT BOAT TRIP
DOWN MISSISSIPPI.

KANSAS CITY DELEGATION
WILL LEAVE TONIGHT.

Will Travel to Alton on Four Spe-
cial Cars -- Decorations for the
"Gray Eagle" Sent
Ahead.

Imbued with the "Kansas City Spirit" and a determination to impress upon the big waterways convention at New Orleans the need of improving the Missouri river, the Kansas City delegation will leave for Alton, Ill., at 9 o'clock tonight on four special Pullman cars by way of the Chicago & Alton railway. Decorators were sent to Alton Friday night and by the time the Kansas City delegation arrives tomorrow morning the Gray Eagle, the boat on which the Kansas City delegation will ride, will be one of the gayest in the fleet. At least that was the declaration last night of E. M. Clendening, secretary of the Commercial Club, who has made all of the arrangements for the trip.

Yesterday it seemed very unlikely that President Taft would be able to accept the invitation of the Kansas City delegation to ride at least part of the way down the river on the Gray Eagle. More than a dozen telegrams were exchanged with the management of President Taft's itinerary, but late last night Secretary Clendening was informed that it would be practically impossible. He still hopes that the president will find time to visit the Kansas City boat and take breakfast on the steamer Tuesday morning.

LEAVE ST. LOUIS MONDAY.

The "Gray Eagle" will reach St. Louis at 9 o'clock Monday morning. President Taft will speak in the Coliseum at 11 o'clock. The party will embark at 4 o'clock in the afternoon for the great trip down the river. The fleet arrives at Cape Girardeau at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning, Cairo, Ill., at noon, and Hickman, Ky., at 4 o'clock. Memphis, Tenn., and Helena, Ark., will be the principal stops on Wednesday. Vicksburg will be the only stop of importance on Thursday with Natchez and Baton Rouge on Friday.

The fleet will arrive in New Orleans early Saturday morning and until the following Tuesday night there will be a continuous round of convention work and receptions in the southern city. Grand opera, addresses by the governors of the different states, inspection of the city, and attendance at the convention will take up about all of the time of the Kansas City delegation. The party will leave New Orleans at 6:20 o'clock Tuesday night.

Besides Secretary Clendening, members of the delegation of seventy include Jerome Twitchell, J. H. Neff, Hon. Edgar C. Ellis, C. S. Jobes, H. F. Lang, W. B. C. Brown, C. D. Carlisle, W. G. Mellier and Hon. W. P. Borland.

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October 21, 1909

WOMAN FOILS A PLOT
TO LOOT BIG ESTATE.

TIPS OFF IOWA WOMAN'S $300,-
000 CONSPIRACY.

Jealousy Reveals and Thwarts Far
Reaching Intrigue to Get Pos-
session of Late Adolph Hunte-
manns Fortune.

"Hell hath no terror like a woman scorned." But for a jilted Chicago woman, the plot to obtain possession of the $300,000 estate of Adolph Huntemann, who died here in March, 1907, supposedly without heirs, might not have been uncovered.

Through a tip obtained from this woman, Grant I. Rosenzweig, attorney for the estate, worked up evidence which, when presented Tuesday to Mrs. Minnie A. Shepherd and her attorneys in Burlington, Ia., caused the woman to confess that she had concocted one of the cleverest frauds of the age.

Mr. Rosenzweig returned yesterday with the woman's affidavit, in which she admitted the fraud, and relinquished all claims to the estate. This he filed with the probate court.

IOWA WOMAN'S CLAIM.

Last March the court was ready to distribute the estate to the nieces and nephews of Huntemann in Germany, their identity having been established by birth, marriage and death records there.

Just one day before Judge J. G. Guinotte was to make the order Mrs. Minnie A Shepherd appeared and filed suits against the seven different pieces of property constituting the estate.

This stopped the distribution, and Mr. Rosenzweig was ordered by the court to take Mrs. Shepherd's deposition. The story of the attempted fraud, how it was planned, and how thwarted can better be told in Mr. Rosenzweig's own words.

"In her first deposition," he said, "Mrs. Shepherd claimed to be the daughter of Pauline Lipps, who was the daughter of Mary and Adolph Huntemann. While she alleged that Pauline was illegitimate, she claimed that a common law marriage later was contracted, making Pauline a legitimate child under the laws of Missouri. If this had been true Mrs. Shepherd would have been the sole heir, to the exclusion of all the German family.

"She claimed that on account of having been an abandoned child she could furnish few facts, but said she had certain letters written by Adolph Huntemann in which he recognized her as his grandchild, a fragment of a will in his handwriting in which she was so recognized, an old Bible inscribed in his hand to her as his grandchild and a number of similar documents.

HOODWINKED HER LAWYERS.

At this point in the deposition Mrs. Shepherd named women in St. Louis, Chicago and elsewhere who, she said, had known Huntemann intimately and had been eye witnesses to certain events showing relationship of father and daughter between Huntemann and her mother.

"Judge Guinotte always is watchful of anything that looks out of place concerning estates in his court," said the narrator, "and with his approval I began a quiet investigation. I made investigations in Chicago, Des Moines, Burlington, Davenport and St. Louis and discovered a plot that had a branch in each one of these places involving women of lower classes and men of desperate character, a woman teacher and a man now in an Illinois penitentiary."

It appears that Mrs. Shepherd had employed attorneys of good standing, Holsteen & Hill in Burlington, and Boyle and Howell here. Her first step was to deceive them by pretending to advertise in the papers for the missing witnesses.

Her plot was so well arranged that each of the confederates answered the advertisements, wrote to the attorneys, giving her family history, and giving her the best of character. Each gave her a straight line of descent from Huntemann.

JILTED WOMAN'S TIP.

Everything was going well when Mrs. Shepherd made a secret trip to Chicago about the time a brother-in-law whom she and her husband had refused aid, was incarcerated in the Illinois penitentiary.

Just following this a woman in Chicago who had been jilted by one of the men in the case, gave the tip that certain information might be obtained in Davenport, Ia.

Following that up, affidavits were secured showing that Mrs. Shepherd was not an only child, but had five brothers and sisters living; that her mother has a twin sister and a brother living. It was found that her story was false, and that her grandmother, Mary, had been honorably married and was buried in Wilton, Ill.

"In addition," said Mr. Rosenzweig, "thirty or forty letters were secured which had been written by Mrs. Shepherd to her confederates giving dates, names and places which confederates were to confirm. Also letters which confederates were to copy in English and German and a fragment of the alleged will where the handwriting was to be identified.

"Confederates had obeyed her instructions, and identified all these fraudulent papers as genuine. An old Bible had been secured from a secondhand store and all names inserted in dim ink. All documents were yellow with age. I also had proof that Mrs. Shepherd's mother had died in 1903 and not in the early 80's."

After getting all of this together, Mr. Rosenzweig decided that the time had come to present it to Mrs. Shepherd and her attorneys in Burlington. He arrived there Tuesday and first laid the evidence before the lawyers who were reluctant to admit that their client could have hatched up such a clever plot.

"I went out and brought her to their office," continued Mr. Rosenzweig, "and there ensued a meeting which lasted six hours before the woman gave in. A woman of more brazen boldness and falsehood, backed by clever cunning I never expect to see. She denied authorship of the letters notwithstanding her attorneys had some of hers with which they were compared and she said that relatives who had made affidavits were unknown to her.

TRIES TO BRAZEN IT OUT.

"She looked us straight in the eye, and almost convinced her attorneys that a mistake had been made. She asked for a day in which to think the matter over, but I asked her if her story would be believed against the contrary evidence of five brothers and sisters, two uncles and aunts, her stepfather, some of her confederates and all of her letters and documents plotting the fraud which I possessed.

"At this point she asked for a private conference with her attorneys and shortly they returned saying she admitted it all. Her statement in writing was taken before a notary in which she admitted that she was not descended from and bore no kinship or relationship in now way whatever to Huntemann.

SUCCESSFUL BEFORE.

"After seeing articles in the newspapers that Huntemann had left a $300,000 estate and no known heirs the plot was hatched with assistance of others. She thought she might as well be an heir as anyone else. What inspired her most was the fact that she had been successful six years before in a similar undertaking, she said. An Australian had died leaving an estate of $1,000. By means of affidavits and other documents she said she established the fact that she was an only child of the Australian."

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October 7, 1909

DR. COOK WILL DISCOVER
KANSAS CITY TODAY.

En Route from St. Louis for Lecture
at Convention Hall.
Dr. Frederick A. Cook.
MONTGOMERY, MO., Oct. 7. -- Dr. Frederick A. Cook, now on the Wabash train on his way to Kansas City, sends this message: "Say to the people of Kansas City that I appreciate their attitude and fair treatment of the polar problem."

Kansas City will be told all about the North Pole tonight in Convention hall by Dr. Frederick A. Cook, the first man to reach the top of the earth. Dr. Cook will arrive at 7:30 o'clock this morning in a private car over the Wabash. He comes from St. Louis, where he lectured last night.

The Kansas City welcome will consist of automobile rides and banquets. He will be met at the Baltimore hotel this morning by city officials and their wives. They will all shake hands and get acquainted. Dr. Cook is accompanied by his wife and two daughters. The women in the party have been detailed to show them a good time. The officials will devote their time to the hero.

The Cooks will be taken for an automobile ride. The course will follow the boulevard system through the city, and the visitors will be shown the city parks. The ride will end at the Country Club.

Here the women in the party will be left behind. Mrs. Cook and her daughters will be entertained by committees of Kansas City women. The directors and their guests will be driven to the Evanston Club. Here the men will get better acquainted with their noted guest.

While in St. Louis more than 10,000 persons packed the Coliseum as Dr. Cook narrated the horrors and tortures of his dash to the North Pole to his breathless audience.

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October 6, 1909

WHY SWOPE NEVER MARRIED.

John C. Gage Talks of the Younger
Days of Kansas City's Benefactor.

When John C. Gage came to Kansas City in 1859 Colonel Swope had been here two years. From about 1862 to 1866 they had offices together in Colonel Swope's building on the east side of Main street between Third and Fourth streets. The building, with others in the block, has recently been torn down to make room for a city market.

"Although Colonel Swope was a lawyer and a graduate of Yale," said Mr. Gage yesterday, "he never practiced law. Even as a young man he was often depressed in spirits and used to go for days at a time and never speak to his nearest friends. When it was over, however, he was the most affable of men. He suffered greatly from indigestion and stomach trouble as a young man, and we used to attribute his depression to illness.

"Many persons have wondered why Tom Swope never married. I always attributed it to his physical infirmity at a time of life when men most consider matrimony. He was very restless and irritable at times and he knew it.

"Tom Swope was the most farsighted man I ever knew. He seemed determined to get rich when a young man, and showed great ability in picking his investments, not all of which were in this city, by any means. He had investments in St. Louis, Chicago, Kentucky, Tennessee and in the mountains. He made few that did not bring him great gain.

"Many persons thought the habit he had of talking to himself came with old age. As a young man I have heard him talk to himself time and again. He had a habit, which he carried to his old age, of arguing with himself after he had made an investment. At such times he was very severe in his critical arraignment of himself."

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October 2, 1909

JAMES MOSS HUNTON DEAD.

Cousin of Thomas H. Swope Is
Stricken With Paralysis.

While sitting at the dinner table last night at the home of his cousin, Mrs. Logan O. Swope, South Seventh street, Independence, James Moss Hunton was stricken with paralysis and died a few minutes later. He was 62 years old and for many years had made his home with Mrs. Swope and his cousin, Thomas H. Swope.

Mr. Hunton was secretary and director of the Chrisman-Sawyer bank. He was well known in Jackson county and exceedingly popular. He was born in New Orleans and was the son of Judge Logan Hunton, who lived in St. Louis for many years. His mother was a Miss Mary Moss before her marriage.

For many years Mr. Hunton was engaged in the real estate business in St. Louis and for a time lived in Philadelphia. In 1896 he moved to Independence. Mrs. Elizabeth A. Moore, dean of Stephens college, Columbia, Mo., and Mrs. Mary McCune of St. Louis are sisters. The funeral arrangements will not be made until they reach the city.

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October 2, 1909

CALVIN SMITH, MISSOURI
PIONEER, IS DEAD AT 96.

Came to the State With His Father
in 1816 -- Gave Smithville
Its Name.
Calvin Smith, Whose Father Gave Smithville Its Name, Dead at 96.
CALVIN SMITH.

Calvin Smith, who was born December 19, 1813, who perhaps was the oldest living Jackson county pioneer in the point of residence, died at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon at his home, 2495 Harrison street.

Besides a widow, Mr. Smith is survived by six children, Henry, James and Evaston Smith, and Mrs. J. S. Setord, Mrs. Anna Goodenough Smith and Mrs. G. McCleary. Henry and James are lawyer practicing in this city. Burial will be Sunday afternoon in Valley Falls, Kas., under direction of the Masons.

Mr. Smith was born at Humphrey Smith's Mills on Buffalo Creek, New York. His father was a farmer. When tales of the rich French province of Missouri were first wafted East he was quick to catch their inspiration and migrate. In his memoirs written for the benefit of relatives a few years ago, Mr. Smith tells the story of the trip.

"On February 29, 1815," he said, "my father prepared for a trip to the West. He had $4,000 in gold which he put in a belt and buckled it around his waist. In an old style two-wheeled ox cart, drawn by a yoke of oxen, he put his famly and started for Missouri. We went to Olean, a point on the Allegheny river. With his wife and four children he embarked there on a canoe At Pittsburgh, Pa., father had to attach the canoe to a flat bottom boat going to New Orleans.

TO MISSOURI BY BOAT.

"At Louisville, Ky., we met three or four families who were going to the new territory of Missouri. Father chipped in with them and bought a keep boat and we floated down the Ohio river to its mouth.

At the moth of the Ohio river we turned into the Mississippi and the boat was propelled up that river by men who walked along the shore and drew the boat after them, while a man on the boat with a long pole kept it from running ashore.

In time we reached St. Louis, 190 miles from the mouth of the Ohio river. We stopped there two or three weeks. Then we all boarded the keel boat again for another move.

IN CLAY COUNTY IN 1822.

"Eighteen miles brought us to the Missouri river and we went up that river 300 miles to a place called Cole's fort, now Boonville, Mo. We reached there on the first day of July, 1816, just four months to a day from the time we left New York.

"On the 14th day of July my sister, Missouri, was born and about five weeks later, August, 1816, father and his family crossed the Missouri river and settled eight miles east of Old Franklin, Howard co unty. We moved several times, but stayed in that county until 1819. We then moved to Carroll county, Mo. This was during the 'Missouri question,' whether the new incoming state should be a slave state or a free state. The missouri compromise in 1822 settled in favor of a slave state.

"In 1822 father took another move to Clay county, Mo., and settled at a place now called Smithville, in the northwest part of the county. It was then a wilderness, being ten miles to the nearest neighbor."

Mr. Smith came to Kansas City in 1882. Two years later his wife died adn he married a second time in 1889. The second wife, who was Miss Fannie Burton of Kansas City, is living.

During the civil war Mr. Smith sided with the North.

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September 28, 1909

JOB FOR THE KAUTZ BOY.

Meanwhile Probation Officer In-
vestigates His Story.

Dr. E. L. Mathias, probation officer, has written to St. Louis, Mo., and Coffeyville, Kas., to investigate the tale related by Theodore Kautz, 14 years old, who fell into the hands of the police Sunday.

Kautz sticks to his story that he ran away from the Christian Orphan's home, 2949 Euclid avenue, St. Louis, and came here in search of his insane mother, who, he says, was left here six years ago when he and his brother, Arthur, two years older, were taken on to the orphanage. He also insists that his mother's insanity was caused by the fact that a nurse girl, left at home alone, placed his 3-months-old sister, Violet, in the stove oven.

Kautz is an unusually bright boy, and well behaved. Yesterday afternoon a call was received at the Detention home that a boy was wanted at the Frisco freight offices to act as office boy at $15 a month. George M. Holt, who looks after that end of the work, took young Kautz to the factory inspector, got him a permit, and escorted him to the freight office.

He will board at the Boys' hotel, 710 Woodland avenue.

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September 26, 1909

POLICE TO ISSUE NEWSPAPER.

It Will Contain Only Matters the
Officers Should Know.

Beginning with the first of next month the printing plant will be in operation for the police department. Two bulletins with all the news of police interest will be issued each day. Instead of the policeman being compelled to listen to a description of a crook fugitive, which he is liable to forget in a few minutes, he will have a printed description of the man in his pocket.

The new bulletin will copy the St. Louis and Chicago plan with the added advantage of being printed twice each day. In the morning the record of all arrests, crimes, robberies and miscellaneous matters of interest to the officers will be printed. In the evening all similar events that have happened during the day will be printed.

The big complaint against the police department in the past has been the slowness with which the department acts. The bulletin will expedite matters at least twelve hours. An officer can consult this list for a complete description of all crooks that have been wanted for the past thirty days.

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August 28, 1909

DOWN THE RIVER WITH TAFT.

Steamboat Chester Will Carry Kan-
sas Cityans to New Orleans.

At a meeting held yesterday afternoon the directors of the Commercial Club enthusiastically accepted the invitation from St. Louis to send a steamboat representing Kansas City with the flotilla which will escort President Taft down the Mississippi river from St. Louis to the big waterways convention at New Orleans in October. Secretary E. M. Clendening was instructed to send notification of Kansas City's acceptance and to ask that the Kansas City boat be assigned a good place in the formation of the down-river fleet.

The steamboat Chester will carry the Kansas Cityans to New Orleans. It is the intention to begin the trip at the home dock, make stops at the towns down the Missouri river as far as Jefferson City and join the flotilla at St. Louis. This scheme, it is thought, is preferable to making the start at St. Louis and besides it will afford the Kansas Cityans an excellent opportunity to campaign for river improvement at Lexington, Glasgow, Boonville, Jefferson City and the other towns down the Missouri between here and the state capital.

The Chester has capacity for sixty passengers, and from the way applications for berths are coming in it is probable that they will be engaged long before the trip is to be taken. A band will be on board the boat, which will be gaily decorated. H. G. Wilson, transportation commissioner of the Commercial Club, will be in charge of the arrangements.

The boat will probably leave Kansas City on the afternoon of October 21, will reach St. Louis October 25 and will arrive at New Orleans October 31. It will be used as a floating hotel for the Kansas Cityans while at St. Louis and New Orleans.

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August 26, 1909

MAYOR CRITTENDEN, SPEAKER.

Addresses the League of American
Municipalities at Montreal.

MONTREAL, August 25. -- With 700 delegates from all parts of the United States and Canada in attendance, the convention of the league of American Municipalities opened here today. Mayor Silas Cook of East St. Louis, Ill., in his opening address, advocated greater publicity of municipal work in order to do away with abuses. John McVickar, the secretary and treasurer, scored Ambassador Bryce for the stand which he took in his book, "The American Commonwealth," saying that because of the bad name given office holders in that book every citizen entering the service of a municipality took his reputation in his hands.

Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., mayor of Kansas City, and Dr. W. H. Atherton of Montreal, delivered addresses on municipal subjects.

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August 25, 1909

PLAY BALL FOR HOME
TOWN, SAYS BECKLEY.

Ball Player Who Has Observed Trac-
tion Lines Throughout Land
Picks Kansas City
for Home.
Famous Baseball Player Jake Beckley.
JAKE BECKLEY.

Jake Beckley, the idol of local baseball fans and one of the most popular men in the profession, has bought a home.

"I bought it here," said the great ball player, "because here is where I want to live. I have had no home for so long that I lived under my hat. 'Buses mostly were my homes, and never in the same town more than a week. Now I can see where I want to light, and it is right here in Kansas City. They say there are other places better. I want to say after being in all that everybody else has been in and more than only myself and the natives have been in, Kansas City has them all skinned. I am narrowing down the years till we catch up with St. Louis. It is a great town."

"They say it is not, Jake, and that its street cars are on the bum," said a fan who, one of a party of half a dozen, had been listening to the player talk shop.

HAS BOUGHT HOME HERE.

"It is not on the bum, and the town is not. Here is where I have fixed to live. I tell you that I have bought a little home here. I have been all over this continent, from the snow up in Canada to where it was hotter than this in Mexico, and right here is where I camp. I do not like to say how big I think Kansas City will be when I get ready to quit it, for I expect to live to be an old man. I am feeling pretty good now, thank you."

Mr. Beckley was then asked how he happened to pick out Kansas City.

"I picked out Kansas City because I have been in the other towns," said Jake. "I was in New York and got lost as soon as I got off Broadway. They have one street there and if you get of of it you are in the residence district. The natives never go on it and the tourist and the grafters never leave it. There is a procession of street cars along it and everybody there thinks they are wonderful. If a man has to stand up, and I never got to sit down, he pats himself on the head and says he is in a big, hustling city. If he has to stand up at home he growls and says the street car system must be on the bum.

"I go out to the ball park in the 'bus. I always watch the street cars. When I see everybody has a seat and nobody is riding on the footrail or the fender, I know we will be playing to the benches that afternoon. When I see them scrapping with the conductor to get on the roof, 'it's a full house for us, I say Jake, my boy,' and sure enough there is good business. I size up a town from the depot and the hotel lobby first, and then from the street cars."

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August 24, 1909

WITH 5,000 NEGRO DELEGATES.

SUPREME LODGE WILL OPEN
THIS MORNING.

Every State in Union Wil Be Rep-
resented on Roll Call -- Recep-
tion at Second Bap-
tist Church.

With a delegation of 5,000 negro men and women from every state in the Union, the supreme lodge of negro Knights of Pythias opens this morning in Ivanhoe hall, Nineteenth street and Tracy avenue, and continues until Friday night. It is the largest gathering of its kind ever held in Kansas City. Among the delegates are doctors, lawyers, bankers, merchants, clerks, porters, barbers, teachers, editors, farmers and every other profession, trade and business followed by negroes.

A reception was held last night at the Second Baptist church, Tenth and Charlotte streets. Grand Chancellor A. W. Lloyd of St. Louis presided and music was furnished by the choir of the Second Baptist church.

Nelson C. Crews, chairman of the local committee, made an address of welcome.

A solo by Miss Ennis Collins followed.

Welcome to the state was extended by Professor W. W. Yates, who represented Governor Hadley. His address was short and cordial. A selection by the Calanthian choir then followed.

S. W. Green of New Orleans, supreme chancellor, responded to this address.

S. C. Woodson represented Mayor Crittenden in an address of welcome.

There was a solo by Wiliam J. Tompkins and a selection by the choir, "The Heavens Are Telling." Other addresses were made by Prof. J. R. Jefferson of West Virginia; Dr. J. E. Perry, E. D. Green, of Chicago; Dr. W. P. Curtiss, St. Louis; Dr. J. A. Ward, Indianapolis; Mrs. Janie C. Combs and A. J. Hazelwood.

The Supreme Court of Calanthe will be presided over by John W. Strauther of Greenville, Miss. The session will be held at the Hodcarrier's hall. In this meeting every phase of the negro's home life will be discussed. Strauther is one of the most noted men of his race in the country.

At 2 o'clock this afternoon a band concert will be given at Cap Carrouthers by the Bixton, Ia., band, and dress parade at 5:30 p. m. by the entire uniform ranks.

Rev. B. Hillman of Terra Haute, Ind., made the opening prayer last night.

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