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June 22, 1909

MAJOR J. M. HADLEY IS DEAD.

Father of Missouri Governor Long
a Prominent Citizen of John-
son County, Kas.

DE SOTO, KAS., June 21. -- Major John M. Hadley, father of Governor H. S. Hadley of Missouri, died here at 2:35 o'clock this afternoon from the effects of a stroke of apoplexy which he suffered June 9. For several days he had lain in an unconscious condition, and the end came quietly. His son and daughter, Mrs. J. W. Lyman, came yesterday and were with their father to last night.

The funeral services, conducted by Rev. W. J. Mitchell, pastor of the M. E. church at this place, an old soldier and personal friend, will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Snyder at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, after which the body will be taken to Olathe and interment made in the family lot.

The active pallbearers here will be Dr. W. M. Marcks, B. S. Taylor, C. S. Becroft, Zimri Gardner, C. K. Dow and B. F. Snyder. At Olathe they will be chosen from the Masonic lodge.

The G. A. R. and the Masonic orders, both of which Major Hadley was an active member, will have charge of the services at Olathe. The honorary pallbearers at Olathe will be Colonel Conover of Kansas City, Major I. O. Pickering, Colonel J. T. Burris, J. T. Little of Olathe, Frank R. Obb and William Pellet of Olathe, all of whom have been personal friends.

The governor reached Kansas City from the capital on a special train Sunday, after receiving word of the critical condition of his father. He was met at the station by a motor car, and made the remainder of the trip to De Soto overland, arriving at the bedside of his father at 1:30 Sunday afternoon.

The elder Hadley was one of the most prominent citizens of De Soto, president of the De Soto State Bank., and connected with many of the institutions of Johnson county, of which he was a pioneer resident.

Major Hadley located at Shawnee Mission in 1855. In October, 1861, he enlisted in the Eighth Kansas Infantry, being rapidly promoted to the rank of second lieutenant, in which capacity he served for fifteen months.

He was later made lieutenant and then captain of the Ninth Kansas Cavalry, and in May, 1865, was promoted to the rank of major, which title clung to him until death. At the close of the war Major Hadley was elected sheriff of Johnson county and served until 1870, when he was made clerk of the district court. He was also head of the extensive flouring mills at De Soto. In 1877 Major Hadley represented his district in the state assembly as senator, being re-elected in 1879.

He was one of the largest land owners in Johnson county. Mrs. Hadley died in 1875.

EXECUTIVE OFFICES CLOSED.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., June 21. -- Acting Governor Humphreys said tonight that as a mark of respect to the governor whose father, Major John M. Hadley, died at De Soto, Kas., this afternoon, the governor's office and those departments in the state house grounds which come under the appointment of the governor would be closed tomorrow. This, he said, was as far as he would go, and that he was governed by the governor's wish in the matter, having talked with him by telephone.

No formal proclamation will be issued, however, as Major Hadley was not a resident of the state.

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May 18, 1909

SHAWNEE BANK ROBBED
WHILE PEOPLE LOOK ON.

Citizens Awed as Safe Is Blown at
Early Hour Monday Morning
and $1,300 Secured.

While the entire pupulation of Shawnee watched the performance, two yeggs marched out of the village early Monday morning with about $1,300 belonging to the Shawnee State Savings bank. The robbers were able to loot the bank after shattering the safe with three charges of nitro-glycerin. It is supposed that the men came to Kansas City.

When the first explosion shook the little town, everyone was awakened. According to those present, most of the inhabitants dressed and started toward the bank. Another explosion kept them at a respectful distance, and when the two men finally did emerge from the door, after firing another charge, no one had the nerve to molest them. The men carried the money away in a sack.

Shawnee is six miles southwest of Rosedale, in Johnson county, Kas.

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March 2, 1909

AGED COUPLE KILLED
BY ESCAPING GAS.

FOUND IN THEIR HOME 36
HOURS AFTER DEATH.

Bodies of A. H. Tuttle, Civil War
Veteran, and His Wife, Discovered
in Residence -- Grate and
Heater Burning.

Last night, when Captain Jack Burns of fire company No. 18 entered the house of A. H. Tuttle, 2617 East Twenty-fifth street, and found an aged man and his wife both dead, Tuttle lying on his side on the floor and his wife sitting in a chair in the front room of the house. A gas grate and an overhead gas heater in the room were burning.

The first intimation of a tragedy was discovered by A. M. Weed, a solicitor for the Wells-Fargo Express Company. Captain Tuttle, as he was familiarly called, has been an employe of the express company for the past twenty-five years. When he failed to appear at the depot yesterday morning, for the first time in years, it was thought he was ill. Mr. Weed called at the house about 2:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon and failing to get a response to repeated ringing of the door bell, walked around the house. He questioned a little girl playing in the yard as to whether Tuttle lived the4re, and if she had seen either of them that day. The girl replied that she had not seen either of them since Sunday morning. Weed found the milk on the back porch and the morning papers on the front porch.

FILLED WITH GAS FUMES.

Mr. Weed returned to the office and reported to H. B. Jeffereies, assistant agent, that he suspected something wrong. Mr. Jefferies visited the house at 6 o'clock and after investigating saw the blue flame of the gas heater, which is attached to the gas jet, through a side window. He went to the front porch and putting his hand on the large plate glass window found it to be hot. He called W. W. Hunt, who lives at 2619 East Twenty-fifth street, and after a consultation sent a boy to No. 18 fire station for a ladder. Captain Burns and one of his men responded and entered the house through an upstairs window.

"As soon as I opened the window I could smell the gas fumes and the still more horrible odor of decaying human flesh," said Captain Burns. "It was necessary to light matches to see in the ho use as most of the curtains were drawn. The heat was intense. Coming down the stairs the heat was more noticeable and gas fumes made breathing difficult. In the parlor, off the reception hall, we found the old couple; Captain Tuttle lying on the floor and Mrs. Tuttle sitting in her Morris chair in front of the burning grate, her head over on her breast as if in sleep."

DEAD THIRTY-SIX HOURS.

Mr. Jefferies and Mr. Hunt went into the house and opened the doors and windows. Coroner's physician, Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, was called and declared that the death had occurred thirty-six hours earlier. He said that asphyxiation from inhaling carbon monoxide was the cause of death. Carbon monoxide is the fumes from imperfect combustion of natural gas, and is similar to that given off my burning anthracite coal.

Before noon Sunday morning Mrs. Tuttle went to a neighbor, Mrs. Jackson, at 2515 East Twenty-fifth street, and borrowed a cupful of sugar, saying she was going to make a custard pie. This was the last time she was seen alive. Other neighbors had seen the couple earlier in the day.

From the appearance of the house, those acquainted with Captain and Mrs. Tuttle declared that they had evidently just gotten up from the breakfast table. The breakfast dishes had been washed and were on the dining table, covered with a cloth. Captain Tuttle's razor, shaving brush, mug and strop were lying on the kitchen table.

W. L. Cowing, 2506 Montgall, said that Mr. and Mrs. Tuttle were to have gone with him to Shawnee Sunday afternoon to look over some land. "I saw them yesterday morning," said Mr. Cowing last night, "and they both declared they would go. When I came to the house in the afternoon I got no response to my ringing of the doorbell and concluded they had gone ahead of me."

Rev. R. P. Witherspoon, 1601 Belmot avenue, brother of Mrs. Tuttle, was called form the Gypsy Smith meeting and arrived at the house after 9 o'clock. He was shocked at the news. He said that he had never known a happier or more devoted couple.

"My sister and her husband have led an ideal life," he said, "and had it not been for neighbors and friends this thing might have gone unnoticed for days. They loved each other and everyone around them, and were loved by them in turn."

CIVIL WAR VETERAN.

Captain Tuttle served in the Sixteenth Ohio regiment of infantry in the civil war. Shortly after the war he became a director in the Missouri penitentiary at Jefferson City, where he remained several years. He afterwards went to Warrensburg, Mo., and engaged in business. Twenty-five years ago he joined the messenger service of the Wells Fargo Express Company and remained with them until his death.

Promotions came one after another, until he became money deliverer and one of the most trusted employes of the company. His superiors and associates declare that his word was as good as a bond. It is said that the company has offered several times to retire him on a pension, but that he has steadily refused, saying that he must be around and doing something or he couldn't feel right. He drew $36 a month as pension from the government.

Three sons survive the couple. They are Lloyd Tuttle, a salesman for the Ferguson-McKinney Dry Goods Company in St. Louis; Charles P. Tuttle of Coalinga, Cal., and Harry Tuttle of St. Paul, Minn. Mr. Tuttle has a brother living in Creston, O., and Mrs. Tuttle has a sister, Mrs. T. J. Claggett, Marshall, Mo., and two brothers, Charles Witherspoon, Mansfield, Tex., and the Rev. R. P. Witherspoon of this city.

The bodies were taken to Carroll-Davidson's undertaking rooms on Grand avenue. News of the deaths has been telegraphed to the sons and the funeral arrangements will await their arrival in this city.

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