Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

October 16, 1909

REED ENTERS RACE
TO SUCCEED WARNER.

FORMER MAYOR ASPIRES TO BE
UNITED STATES SENATOR.

His Candidacy the Result of Con-
ferences Held Here Last Week
Between Local and Out-
side Party Leaders.

Among the Democrats of Kansas City, Jackson county and portions of the state it was given out yesterday that James A. Reed has entered the race for United States senator to succeed Major William Warner.

The close political and personal friends of Mr. Reed last night confirmed the report that he is a candidate and added that his candidacy is the result of several conferences held in this city during the week with representative Democrats of Jackson county and throughout the state.

"All of Mr. Reed's old friends and many new ones were present at these conferences, and they all promised support and encouragement to his cause," said a well known politician.

"Mr. Reed goes into the fight in much better shape than he was in when he sought the governorship against Joseph W. Folk. Then he had a divided Democracy against him in his own county, but now he starts out on his senatorial canvass with every element of Jackson county Democracy at his back. Delegates from throughout the state that came to the conferences and which resulted in Mr. Reed coming out full fledged for senator, stated that the report is being circulated over the state that he has built up a large law practice and does not want to be senator. While it is true that Mr. Reed has a big practice it is of that kind and character that will not suffer by his becoming senator. The out-of-town supporters of Mr. Reed were authorized to make such a statement and to add emphasis among their constituency that Mr. Reed is an aspirant for the high honor."

Mr. Reed was prosecuting attorney of Jackson county when in response to the demands of the Democrats of Jackson county he resigned to accept the nomination for mayor. He was elected by the biggest majority ever given a candidate for that office and two years later again succeeded himself. Were it not that he entered the race for governor he could have had a third nomination for mayor. Two years ago he was solicited to run for congress but declined on account of his law practice.

Labels: , , ,

November 3, 1908

HADLEY CLOSES
THE CAMPAIGN.

UNPRECEDENTED DEMONSTRA-
TION GREETS CANDIDATE.

KERENS AND WARNER SPEAK.

ROWDIES ATTEMPT TO MAR EN-
THUSIASTIC MEETING.

Mr. Hadley Asks Jackson County and
Kansas City to Give Him
the Majority They Did
Four Years Ago.

The most enthusiastic audience Convention hall has housed this year, with estimates varying from 14,000 to 18,000, welcomed Colonel R. C. Kerens, Republican candidate for the United States senatorial nomination; Congressman E. C. Ellis, candidate for re-election; Selden P. Spencer of St. Louis; United States Senator William Warner of Missouri and Herbert S. Hadley, and helped the latter close his campaign for governor of the state.

Despite an apparently organized attempt to break up the meeting, which broke out three times wile the gubernatorial nominee was speaking, the hall was crowded before the first speaker was introduced.

Near-hysteria had the followers of Hadley, Kerens, Ellis and the balance of the Republican ticket, and the applause which greeted Mr. Hadley was deafening for twenty minutes after he was introduced. It was entirely genuine, and it was not possible for the chairman of the meeting to control the house.


MADE A JOYFUL NOISE.

The scene which followed the introduction of Mr. Hadley was wild in the extreme, and for several minutes the speakers' stand in the center of the arena floor by the lowering of the big curtain, was in danger from the crowds pushing toward it from all sides. On the stage, stretching clear across the hall, the vice chairmen of the meeting joined in the demonstration. Beside the immense crowd the audiences of other rallies during the campaign appeared as mere reception committees of the real members of the party in Kansas City.

Disorder which the chairman could not abate took possession of the great crowd when United States Senator William Warner named the nominee for governor. Time after time Mr. Hadley advanced to the edge of the platform in an attempt to be heard, but his voice was drowned by the cheers of his admirers. The newspaper men were routed from their tables and an improvised platform of but a few square feet was arranged in the center of the stage. When Mr. Hadley mounted this stand it was but a signal for further demonstration.


ROUGHNECKS IN EVIDENCE.

It was not until Mr. Hadley had delivered several hundred words of his address that the first attempt to disturb the meeting broke out in the crowded west balcony. There was a second attempt and then a third; and the disturbers were hissed from every corner of the hall. Women in the section where the disturbance occurred were forced to leave their seats and places were provided for them in the boxes below. There was a general shout for the police, but the hissing of Mr. Hadley's admirers served to drive out the disturbers.

Mr. Hadley talked as a Kansas Cityan to his home folks. He made a plea for the entire state ticket and then asked his friends to support Fred Dickey and William Buchholz for the senate, and the nominees for representative in the interest of the candidacy of Colonel Kerens for the United States senate. Senator Warner had previously made a plea for support of Colonel Kerens and the candidate had had a chance to speak in his own behalf, but had modestly confined his remarks to other party issues and his confidence in the success of the ticket in Missouri.


A WORD FOR KIMBRELL.

Mr. Hadley also asked support for I. B. Kimbrell for county prosecutor and called attention to the four candidates for the circuit bench. He mentioned the Democratic attempts to discredit the party with circulars intended to create race prejudice. He read a letter from a Kansas City Democrat who is going to support him because members of his own party had made the mistake of showing him what he considered dirty plans to defeat a clean candidate.

After Mr. Hadley reached the hall several questions were asked him and these he answered from the platform. One request was for a statement if he would enforce the Sunday saloon closing law. It was signed by "several Democrats who wished to know before voting." Mr. Hadley answered that he intended, if elected, to make the Sunday saloon closing laws affecting Kansas City and St. Louis mean just exactly what they state upon the books. He said he did not desire the support of any special interest, nor did he want any special interest to make an unfair fight against him. He offered a square deal to the saloonist who obeys the law and respects the qualifications of his license.

As a closing word of his campaign, Mr. Hadley stated that he would decline to qualify in office if elected, should any taint be charged against his nomination. He said he was nominated by honest votes and wanted no tainted election. He asked that Jackson county and Kansas City give him the 4,000 majority he received four years ago when a candidate for attorney general.

Labels: , , , , ,

October 3, 1908

TAFT TO BE HERE TOMORROW.

Republican Presidential Candidate Will
Spend Sunday in City.

The train bearing William H. Taft from Topeka to Kansas City is expected to arrive tomorrow morning at 7 o'clock where a reception committee consisting of Senator William Warner, Congressman E. C. Ellis and W. S. Dickey will meet the presidential candidate and escort him to the Baltimore hotel.

In the morning Mr. Taft will attend the Beacon Hill Congregational church and will then lunch at the home of W. S. Dickey. In the afternoon he will go to the Independence Avenue M. E. church, where he will address the Y. M. C. A. at 3:30 o'clock. His subject will be "The Foreign Work of the Association."

Monday morning Mr. Taft will be taken over the intercity viaduct to Kansas City, Kas., where he will address the populace from the steps of the public library.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

July 15, 1908

WILL HANDLE SILVER TROWEL.

Judge J. Patterson to Cement Cor-
nerstone of Poor Farm Buildings

Final arrangements for the laying of the cornerstone at the new county poor farm building will be made Friday afternoon,when the committee which has the matter in charge will hold a meeting. J. D. Jackson, superintendent the farm, is chairman.

It has already been decided to observe the day, July 29, with a picnic, which will be in the nature of a county holiday, for all the county offices will be closed. Noel Jackson will be master of ceremonies and J. M. Patterson, presiding judge of the county court, will handle the silver trowel which is to be presented to him. Choice of mementos to be placed in the stone will be made by the Rev. C. W. Moore. The following have been invited to speak at the cornerstone laying:

Senator William Warner, Attorney General H. S. Hadley, Governor Joseph Wingate Folk, Champ Clark, H. M. Beardsley, Judge John F. Phillips, Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., Judge H. L. McCune, the Rev C. W. Moore, the Rev. S. M. Neel, the Rev. George Reynolds, the Rev. William J. Dalton, Rabbi H. H. Mayer and Llewellyn Jones, mayor of Independence.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

June 28, 1908

HE BELIEVES
IN BATTLESHIPS.

Senator Warner Is Cheered by Bat-
tery B When He Voices Sentiment.

"I was foolish enough to vote for four new bttleships and I would vote for sixteen more if I thought they were needed to preserve the peace of this country."

Senator William Warner made this statement last night at the banquet of Battery B of the Third regiment at the Coate house, and the boys of Battery B gave him cheer after cheer. Senator Warner's eminent standing with the militia was further evidenced when he said that he believed in the army and the navy, but peace above all.

"But I would fight for peace," he said, and that pleased the embryonic soldiers more than ever.

The state and the nation is doing right in contibuting to the militia, according to the senator, and he assured the young men that he stood ready and willing to co-operate with them in anything that would obtain for the good of the service.

This was the third annual banquet of Batery B of the Kansas City list artillery. Dr. J. Thomas Pittman was the toastmaster and Senator William Warner one of the guests. Warren E. Comstock paid a poetic tribute to the late Col. R. H. Hunt.

These were the other speakers: The Rev. Herbert E. Waters, invocation; Captain George R. Collins, "The Battery"; Fred A. Boxley, "Power of the New Gun"; W. P. Borland, "The Citizen Soldier"; T. T. Crittenden, Sr., "Civic Benefits From the Guard"; Herbert E. Waters, "An Empire and Its Builder."

Labels: , , , ,

June 25, 1908

FORMER MAYOR HUNT
DIES IN LEAVENWORTH.

HE WAS QUARTERMASTER OF
NATIONAL SOLDIERS' HOME.

In 1879 He Served This City as Mayor
and Began Many Improvements.
His Experiences Here in
the Early Days.

After two weeks' illness from uraemic poisoning, Lieutenant Colonel R. H. Hunt, a former mayor of Kansas City, died at the Soldiers' Home in Leavenworth yesterday morning. Colonel Hunt was 68 years old, and up until his last illness he had been a man of marked vitality.

About one year ago Colonel Hunt was appointed from private life to the post of Quartermaster at the Soldiers' Home, and he was serving in that capacity when he died. Colonel Hunt was a widower and is survived by two nieces. They are Mrs. John Stearns of Kansas City and Miss Mamie Hunt of St. Louis.

Funeral services will be held Friday morning in the chapel at the Soldiers' Home in Leavenworth. The burial in the national cemetery will be attended with regular military honors.

Special cars will be run to the Soldiers' Home tomorrow morning to carry friends to the funeral. The cars will start from Tenth and Main streets at 8 o'clock.

Robert H. Hunt was born in Shannon, Kerry County, Ireland, in 1839, and came to America at the age of 10 with his father. Kansas City was reached even in very early days, and the spirit of individuality which all his long life afterwards made him conspicuous, asserted itself in the father and son, for they left Kansas City for Western Kansas to get where they could not see slaves. The father soon went on about his business, leaving the boy to make a living for himself.

This he first did by carrying the water pail on a section for the construction of the railroad. Twenty years later, he was working 2,000 men himself, one of the big railroad contractors of the West. Between the time of his carrying the dipper and building part of the Rock Island, the Santa Fe and the Missouri Pacific, young Hunt went to a college. He worked his passage through it, and got out in time to go into the war to serve with Rosecranz, Thomas and Grant; to join Ewing and to become chief of staff under General Samuel R. Curtis.

IN LOCAL BATTLES.

Most of his service with the colors was on the border between Missouri and Kansas. Hereabouts, with General Curtis, he directed the artillery movements of the fights of the Little Blue, Big Blue, Westport, Osage, Newtonia and Mine Creek. It was at this last battle that General "Pap" Price was crushed and General Marmaduke was captured.

Colonel Hunt enlisted in a Kansas regiment, but left it during the war and became a staff officer. Afterwards he got back into a Kansas regiment, the Fifteenth cavalry, of which he was Major. The regiment had two colonels, C. R. Jennison and afterwards Colonel Cloud, while George W. Hoyt, afterwards a brigadier, was the lieutenant colonel. Robert H. Hunt was the senior major of the command.

There is a book published on "The Battle of Westport" by Rev. Paul B. Jenkins, formerly of this city, in which no mention whatever, in the slightest word, is made of Colonel Hunt.

"But he was there," said Colonel Van Horn yesterday, "and directed the artillery. I was related by marriage to General Curtis, commanding the Union forces here. He appointed me to his staff and directed me to prepare fortifications for the city. In that way I located and had the rifles ready and the encroachments dug. I saw a handsome young officer riding in and about, coming frequently to general headquarters for orders or with supports, and, struck by his magnificent bearing, asked his name. I was told it was the chief of staff, Colonel Hunt. What began as an acquaintance has lasted until now. As there is no battle in which the artillery is not the objective point, and as Colonel Hunt was commanding the artillery at the Battle of Westport, as I know from my own observations then, I know that he was in the fight; yet Mr. Jenkins made no mention whatever of him in what he declared to be a record of the battle."

The obscuring of Colonel Hunt by the Jenkins book is not unique. Other leaders in the engagement were similarly treated by the local historian.

A PRIEST HIS TUTOR.

The end of the war saw Colonel Hunt located in Kansas City, to engage in contracting. When first young Hunt landed in this country the priest of the parish they settled in took him up and began training him for service on the alter.

The good priest in this way taught him Latin. To the last days of his life Colonel Hunt kept his Latin fresh and, by means of a dictionary he would read Latin books. He regarded it as an accomplishment and was proud of it. But he never boasted of it. Reading Latin, born a Catholic and Republican in politics though an Irishman. Colonel Hunt made the acquaintance of the Rev. William J. Dalton, native of St. Louis, child of Irish parents, a Latin scholar and a clergyman of the church of Rome. The two remained friends to the last.

Father Dalton is a Republican in politics. Father Dalton came to Kansas City just as Colonel Hunt was closing his term as mayor, "but I was here early enough," said Father Dalton yesterday, "to hear the whole town commending him for his tremendous strides. Energy had marked every week of his administration, and today we have substantial evidence of it. With but little to do anything at all with, Mayor Hunt did much. He was at the very forefront of everything, calculating on the future warranting all his energy."

HE STOPPED A HANGING.

"At the very forefront of everything," says Father Dalton, and so it would appear. There walks about town today a little old man with a scar on the back of his neck. He built the retaining wall which keeps Bluff street from sliding into the Missouri river. There was trouble one Saturday afternoon about the pay, and the men undertook to lynch the contractor. They actually got a rope around his neck and started with him to throw him over his own retaining wall.

The city hall then was where it is now, only in a one-story brick that might have been a country feed store. Mayor Hunt got word of the crisis, picked up a pamphlet he had in his scant library, jumped into a saddle that was not his own and soon was in the ob. He literally rode into it and from the back of his horse read the riot act. That constitutional performance made him a summary marshal and there was no lynching. If there had been there would have been a wholesale killing by the force of twelve marshals Kansas City then had, old "Tom" Speer their chief.

During Colonel Hunt's administration Kansas City was the head of the Fenian movement. "No. 1," a mysterious Irish patriot, and Captain "Tom" Phelan, well remembered here and today alive in a home somewhere, were to fight a duel with broadswords over the troubles of Ireland. Colonel John Moore and Colonel John Edwards, both newspapermen, were to act as seconds. The principals went into training in rooms in a store on West Twelfth street. The morning the duel was to have been fought Colonel Hunt personally smashed in the doors of the training rooms and arrested the belligerents. There was an encounter, but he mayor, being a peace officer and a fighter himself, won. There was no duel.

HIS RIOT ACT AGAIN.

The forum of Kansas City in those days was Turner hall, afterwards Kumpf's hall, standing as late as 1886 where Boley's clothing store now stands. A political row there sent Mayor Hunt to that place with his copy of the riot act. He would tolerate no mob law while he was mayor. He always asserted his authority to the utmost.

When the figures are all totaled up it will not be found that Colonel Hunt left much of an estate. He married a Miss Hoyne of Chicago. In the '70s Colonel Hunt was worth so much money that he was able to borrow $50,000 from the late Thomas Corrigan for a period of ten months. He was able to pay it back within two weeks. He might have been worth $200,000 or $500,000. Estimates made yesterday ran from one to the other of these figures. He built a mansion at Independence and Highland. The house is there now, a pastel in dull red of what it once was. The plot has been nibbled down to next to nothing.

BRILLIANCE OF HIS HOME.

Colonel Hunt's father had been a small farmer in Ireland. All of his days in this country had been spent in railroad camps or in the field with troops. When Colonel Hunt opened his mansion on Independence avenue he did so with the brilliance of an hereditary aristocrat. Handsome in person, he had handsome ways. There was a wine cellar where it ought to be, and the drawing room, and from one to the other of the Hunt mansion was complete. Kansas City has never seen brighter scenes than those witnessed while Colonel and Mrs. Hunt kept open house on Independence avenue.

Nobody knows where Colonel Hunt's fortune went. It went like the summer wind that sinks with the sun. There was no speculation, no wheat end to the story, no boom collapse, no expensive household bills. The fortune simply disappeared, though Colonel Hunt always, to his intimates, lately insisted that he held valuable securities which would in a few years put him on his feet. But he did not get on his feet.

Times did not prosper fast enough Colonel Hunt stood in need of a billet and Senator Warner gave it to him. He had him appointed quartermaster at the Soldiers' and Sailors' Home, near Leavenworth, a position he held for about a year. Within a year of three score and ten, Colonel Hunt walked like a youth. Almost six feet in height, no man in his forties and of similar physique walked straighter, faster nor further. His hair and long beard were merely turning gray. He could pass for a man of 55. He lived as he moved, energetically. He liked young people; old people with old stories troubled him. The young people would not take him up because they did not know about the things he knew most of, and the old ones -- his own years -- were too old to take anybody up. So Colonel Hunt was neither here nor there. That was why he had to ask an asylum at the hands of his old military, political, professional and personal friend, Senator Warner.

TOO SLOW FOR HIM.

"It killed him," said Father Dalton. "The life was too dull for him. He wanted to beat sixty times to the minute and he found himself in a clock which had a pendulum going twenty to the minute.

"Where he was accustomed to moving cannon, they set him buying buttons, and able to move troops all up and down the border with the celerity of Forest, they put him to watching veterans crawl across their parade ground. Mops and counting cases of blouses to the tune of a droning beat made Colonel Hunt settle back in a chair that most men look for at sixty, and conserve themselves till riper in years, and so he collapsed. I saw him on Monday, and then he showed he was going away.

"He entered the army at Leavenworth in his young life, left the Fort and the army in his middle age, and went back to Leavenworth and the army to die in his old age. May his soul rest in peace."

And so he is to be buried in Leavenworth, in the military grounds there. Only members of the home may be buried in the military cemetery, excepting by express permission, and that permission is granted sometimes in the instance of officers. Yesterday application was made to Senator Warner, one of the board of managers and it was promptly given. Internment is to be made on Friday, at ten o'clock. Those desiring to attend the funeral will have to leave Kansas City by the 8 o'clock trolley car. President C. F. Holmes has arranged to run a special car at 8:01 Friday for the accommodation of Senator Warner, Surveyor C. W. Clarke, General H. F. Devol, Brevet Brigadier General L. H. Waters and a number of other high officers of the civil war.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

June 21, 1908

TAFT TO CARRY MISSOURI.

C. S. Jobes Back from Chicago Thinks
Republican Candidate Has a Chance.

Kansas City's contingent to the Chicago convention returned yesterday, all of them enthusiastic over the results.

"It was not a great convention from a numerical point of view," said Mr. C. S. Jobes, one of the alternates from this district, "but it was a great one, in the work it did. We all know Mr. Taft and we all know him to fill the specifications for president. Congressman Sherman is fully up to the standard. About Mr. Taft's age, or perhaps a year or two older. Mr. Sherman is an ideal running mate. He is not an orator, but he is a forceful speaker, logical in his deductions, of splendid physique and has great endurance. The men are right and so is the platform. Missouri went into the convention in excellent shape, the delegation being on good terms within itself, and with the enthusiasm the Chicago convention warrants, we will carry the state. There is nothing the Democrats can do to beat us. They could not make a ticket so good that they could get Missouri from Taft and the Taft men."

Senator William Warner, who attended the convention and who was put on the notification committee, will not arrive here till about Wednesday or Thursday. I will be a month before the campaign begins by the start at organizing. Senator Warner will not take an active part in it further than making speeches at large central points, his health being too precarious.

Labels: , ,

April 7, 1908

FILLED CONVENTION HALL.

Beardsley and Warner the Speakers
at Closing Republican Party.

Republicans held the closing general rally of the campaign in Convention hall last night. Speeches were made by Senator William Warner, Mayor Beardsley and R. R. Brewster.

The big hall was crowded to overflowing with men, women and children, many bringing their entire families to hear the speeches of the workers for the Republican administration. Repeated applause from a vicinity within close reach of the platform where the speakers stood followed the attacks on the different corporations, James A. Reed and Mr. Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr. Bitter attacks were made upon the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, and pictures of cities were shown where the street car fare is less than 5 cents, in one of which, at least, the fare was reduced by a public utilities commission.

Another series of pictures of the different Republican candidates for election today and of different improvements in the city made under the Beardsley administration was shown.

Senator William Warner acted as chairman of the meeting and delivered the opening address. The first part of his speech was pertaining to national and state affairs, in which he upheld the policies of President Roosevelt, and added that William H. Taft intends to carry out those policies. He gave a short talk on the railroad corporations as they are conducted today and as they were before President Roosevelt's administration.

NEED OF A COMMISSION.

He soon turned, however, to the election today in Kansas City, and in a brief address commended every candidate and attacked the Metropolitan street railway, Mr. Reed and Mr. Crittenden. One of his principal points was that a utilities commission will give the city a chance to govern corporations, and not the corporations to govern the city. "Corporations should not govern the city and dictate to the people how much they shall pay for their service, or how city affairs shall be operated," said Senator Warner. "I believe in a public utilities commission. The people should control and regulate the electric light plant and the Metropolitan street railway. We do not know whether these corporations and others are conducted properly, we do not know whether they are charging us unreasonable prices for service. A public utilities commission would see the books of these corporations and determine for the citizens if the corporations are meeting the public's interest.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

April 30, 1907

THE PARDON FOR ANDERSON.

Senator Warner Will Take the Case
Up With the Department Today.

WASHINGTON, April 29. -- (Special.) Senator Warner will take up the Charles Anderson pardon matter with the president and attorney general Tuesday.

J. M. Kennedy, secretary to Representative Ellis, has classified the petitions and got them in shape so the attorney general can go through them rapidly. He will take them to the department of justice and will be accompanied by Senator Warner.

"I do not apprehend any trouble geting the pardon," said Senator Warner, "although it may not come for a few days."

Labels: , ,

Special Report -- C. W. ANDERSON


WITH 20,000 NAMES

ANDERSON PETITIONS TO BE
SENT TO PRESIDENT TODAY.
ROOSEVELT HEARS OF CASE.

DISCUSSED IT WITH VISITORS AT
WHITE HOUSE YESTERDAY.

In Washington It Is Believed Pardon
Will Be Granted -- Barnes, the In-
former, Hints Darkly of
Sensations Yet to
Come.

A dispatch from Washington last night said that President Roosevelt has not yet received the application for pardon for Charles W. Anderson. However, he discussed the matter yesterday with people who are interested in the case, and while he will not state in advance what action he will take when the application arrives, it is the opinion of his advisers that he will readily grant a pardon.

An Associated Press dispatch from Washington says an application for the pardon of Anderson has reached Washington, and has been referred to the department of justice for examination into the records and for recommendation.

A petition expected to bear at least 20,000 names of people in Kansas City and vicinity, who sanction the release of Charles Anderson from the United States penitentiary at Leavenworth, will be forwarded to Senator William Warner this evening in turn to be submitted to the president. On the 600 or more petitions that have been circulated, more than 15,000 names had been recorded yesterday, and hundreds of letters were received by the legal committee and by those at whose places of business petitions were placed. These letters were from out-of-town people as well as persons living in the city, and all expressed the same sentiment regarding the man's release. Some were from close friends of Anderson and his family, and spoke of the man's good character, his honesty and devotion to his family, and especially his sobriety. Men who had known Anderson in a business way attested convincingly to his honesty , and neighbors to his family devotion.

All day long at places where there were petitions people went to sign. Along Twelfth street, in the neighborhood where Anderson lived and where he had been in business, his arrest and prospective release was the principal topic of discussion. Up to late in the evening people appeared singly and in groups to sign the petition at Phipps & Durbow's grocery store, at Twelfth and Holmes streets. Some of them came from their homes as far as two miles away, and one man, 72 years old, drove from Independence yesterday afternoon to enter his name upon the list of signers.

On a petition circulated yesterday among the lawyers of the city by James Garner, and attorney in the New York Life building, the names of a hundred or so of Kansas City's leading members of the legal profession were signed. Among all of the attorneys approached on the matter by Mr. Garner, but two refused to sign.

Labels: , , , , , ,

March 26, 1907

JOBS BY CIVIL SERVICE.

Politics Overlooked in Choosing
Men for Consulships

Oh, what a shock for the old guard! W. B. C. Brown, Senator Warner's secretary, is home from Washington with the news that Clarance A. Miller, who not so very long ago was carrying a newspaper route, last week took a civil service examination in Washington for appointment to the consular service, and he stands a good chance of landing. Miller is not known to any of the city or county committeemen, nor even to the precinct captains nor the Missouri Republican Club. Another young man, also unknown to the politicians, Walter Reed by name, took the same examination and is supposed to have passed. There was a class of eleven candidates. Missouri furnished three. These were Miller, Reed, whose home is near Eighteenth and Harrison, and a man named Delchman, of St. Louis.

"It is not what it used to be," said Mr. Brown. "The old custom was for the big fellows to knock down the plums for themselves or their friends. Now the departments are being put into the civil service and thus it happens that obscure but more capable men are getting the places.

"It is as much now as a senator can do to appoint a private secretary to be paid by the government. At least it is easier to do this and no more."

According to Secretary Brown, it is a matter of doubt if Senator Warner will be in Kansas City this summer.

Labels: , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory