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November 11, 1909

NEW CLAIMANT FOR
HUNTEMANN ESTATE.

ANNA GESINE HEUER SAYS SHE
IS FIRST COUSIN.

Follows Over Two Hundred Claim-
ants for Eccentric Recluse's For-
tune -- Will Come From
Germany to Fight.

Another heir to the Adolph Huntemann estate, claiming to be the first cousin of the eccentric old bachelor who died nearly three years ago, leaving an estate valued at $250,000, appeared yesterday when Anna Gesine Heuer of Bremen, Germany, filed suit in the circuit court to have herself declared the sole heir.

If the German woman can establish her relationship with the late Adolph Huntemann, she will inherit the entire estate. Over two hundred claimants have applied for shares. Of these all have been cut out except eight distant cousins.

The suit is brought against R. S. Crohn, former public administrator, and the only one who now has charge of the estate. The petition says that all the debts against the estate have been paid and that it is now ready for distribution. The personal property is estimated to be worth $76,000, and the real estate, $175,000.

Anna Heuer is 44 years of age and married. She has never been to America. If the court refuses to accept her deposition at the trial of this case, she will come here to fight for the estate.

For years Anna Heuer has been writing to German friends who have settled in Kansas City. In the exchange of letters one of her former friends mentioned the Huntemann matter and told of the fight now being made among the heirs to secure possession of the estate. Anna Heuer investigated her family tree and decided that she was a first cousin.

Among the recent claimants to the Huntemann estate was Mrs. Minnie A. Shepard of Burlington, Ia., who secured affidavits from confederates in Chicago, St. Louis and other cities showing her to be an illegitimate child of the deceased.

Fraud was suspected, and Grant I. Rosenzweig, attorney for the estate, went to Burlington to investigate. Few discrepancies were found. The "tip" came from a woman who had been jilted by one of Mrs. Shepard's confederates. Affidavits were received from relatives to prove that Mrs. Shepard's mother was married, and that the Iowa woman's claims were fraud. When confronted by this evidence October 19, Mrs. Shepard admitted that her affidavits and claims were false.

Huntemann, who was a bachelor, died March 8, 1907, at his home, 4025 McGee street. He had been a recluse, and the amount of his wealth was not known until after he died. He came to this country from Germany in 1860, and settled in Kansas City two years later, without a dollar, and amassed a fortune by investments in Kansas City real estate.

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December 26, 1908

GAVE PRESENTS
TO 5,700 CHILDREN.

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS TREE WAS
A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS.

LATE COMERS
GOT NOTHING.

BUT THEY WILL GET THEIR
SHARE OF GIFTS TODAY.

Little Ones Came From Suburban
Places and Swelled the Throng
Beyond Expectation -- More
Toys Have Been Bought.


Was it a success, the first Mayor's Christmas tree in Kansas City? It was, even more than a success, and if the committee had counted on delegates from Kansas City, Kas., Armourdale, Argentine, Rosedale, Olathe, Kas., Independence, Holden and Pleasant Hill, Mo., and a few from Chicago, Ill., all would have gone off swimmingly. As it was there were more present than presents.

The women sacked and separated 5,000 bags for boys and girls, and 2,500 sacks lay on tables on each side of the hall. Besides those, about 700 Christmas bags had been prepared specially for children in hospitals and those who were ill at home and could not come to Convention hall. It was the intention to deliver them by wagons late yesterday afternoon.

In one short hour every sack was gone, including the ones prepared for the hospitals, and many children were still in line. Over 700 tickets were given to them to come to the hall at 2 o'clock this afternoon when an effort will be made to supply them. Captain J. F. Pelletier of the purchasing committee bought toys, candies and nuts last night and a committee of tired women will be at the hall at 8 o'clock this morning to prepare them. It is estimated that fully 1,000 children who were last in line failed to get a Christmas sack.


CAME HOURS TOO SOON.

It was stated that he doors to the main floor would be opened at 1 p. m. and that the distribution would begin at 2 o'clock. But the children began gathering at 10 o'clock, and as the wind was raw, they were admitted to the balconies of the hall.

Shortly after 1 o'clock some one gave the word "Ready" and the girls and boys rushed from the balconies and jammed into one living mass before the entrance to the arena. The wee ones were being smothered and, in order to save lives, the crowd had to be admitted to the floor.

On the right side was a big placard reading "BOYS" and on the left another reading "GIRLS." Instead of mingling about the hall and looking at the trees and watching the antics of the five Santa Clauses under the two great evergreens, the boys massed before the chute leading to their side and the girls did likewise on the other side.

Patrolmen William M. Meyers, Elvin Gray, T. L. Savidge, George H. Moseley and Thomas McNally, who were rigged in full regalia as the five Saints Nick did all they could to detract the attention of the children, but they had their eyes on those Christmas bags, and the lumbering antics didn't even win a grin.

There was nothing to do but start the ball, and start it they did. The first boy to get his goodies was George Cook, 11 years old, of 115 North Prospect avenue. A committeeman placed the imprint of a little Christmas tree on the back of George's left hand with a rubber stamp and indelible ink. He grabbed his sack, sailed through the chute and squatted immediately outside the door to see what he had. He was soon followed by a mob of other boys, just as curious, and soon the doorway had to be cleared by a policeman as there was a boy to every square foot.


SHE HAD A DOUBLE LOAD.

At the head of the girls' line stood Ester Cronkhite, 11 years old, 1700 Fremont avenue. In her arms she carried her 2-year-old sister, Alice. Both were given appropriate sacks and, heavily laden, little Ester labored on. The children were given street car tickets home. One ticket entitled tow to a ride.

Most attention was paid to the boys, as it was believed that they -- the little scamps --- would do some duplicating. Soon after it was seen that their hands were being stamped several boys appeared in line with gloves on. And so did some of the girls. When the jam on the boys' side got beyond control Detective Thomas Hayde mounted a box and, in stentorian tones commanded, "Here, you kids, quit that pushing. Don't you see you're smothering these kids here in the front? Stand back there. Quit that."

"Hully chee," said one boy, "dere's de chief. Skedoo back kids and beehave er we won't git nuttin."

From that announcement there was a line formed out of the boys and there was little crowding. "De chief's here," went down the line. "See 'im hollerin' on de box dere." That settled it with them.

SHOVED POLICE ASIDE.

On the girls side there was nothing short of chaos. About nine stalwart coppers -- out of thirty detailed at the hall -- under Captain John Branham, could no t keep them in line. They actually shoved the police to one side. "O'm demmed, eh? Oi aint timpted tuh give 'em the loight schlap," said one policeman, who had been shoved about ten feet by the little girls, "but 'twudn't do, all being gerrels, ye know."

While the bulk of the eagle eyes were on the boys to see that they played no tricks and did no repeating, the girls did a rushing business on that very line. At the head of the line were bags for little girls, and the big ones got theirs further on. Many of the "mediums," which could pass for both, got both. One was seen to get a sack, hold it under her cloaK with one hand, while with the other hand she gratefully received another.

Still others would get their sack and immediately pass it over the chute to a waiting companion on the outside while she passed on and got a second present from another woman. Many of the sharp boys whose hands had been stamped and who could not get back in line were seen to do this same thing.

"GIMME 'NOTHER, MISTER."

"Gimme 'nother for my little brother what's sick at home an' can't come. Gimme one fer my sister with th' mumps. Gimme one fer my little cousin what has fits an' can't come. Gimme 'nother one fer my half little brother what's visitin' an' won't be home 'till New Years. Gimme 'nother, please, fer a kid what lives by me an' sprained his leg so he can't git his shoes on any more this year."

The foregoing excuses were given by the boys and girls in line, and there were possibly a hundred others. No one could refuse them, as many cried to make the play strong.

Many little ones got lost from brothers and sisters, and the five Santa Clauses were kept busy carrying them about hunting for relatives and companions with whom they had come. All were crying. R. S. Crohn found a little fellow's brother for him three times, and when he got lost again turned him over to Santa Claus. Finally a room was set apart for the lost ones and by the time the festivities were over all lost children had been restored.


THE MAYOR WAS LATE.

Mayor Thomas T. Crtittenden, Jr. , mistaken in the time he should have been there, arrived at Convention hall with Franklin Hudson, just as the last of the bags had been given out to the children. There was to have been an entertainment, with a speech by the mayor, but that had to be left out. Devaney's orchestra furnished music while the children were waiting.

"It's the happiest day of my life," said the mayor. "I wouldn't have missed the little I have seen for anything. We will know better how to proceed next year, however, and will begin earlier. Another thing we will know is just how many children will be here and just what sort of presents to put up for them. Other cities may profit by our example next y ear and relieve us of such an unfortunate incident as took place today. We have more money, however, will buy more toys, more nuts, candy and fruit, and will be ready for the leftovers Saturday at 2 p. m."

"It was more than what we bargained for," said Franklin Hudson, chairman of the executive committee. "We were counting on our own children only -- but what's the difference, they are all children anyway."

"I don't care if they came here from Europe," said Captain J. F. Pelletier. "We were not looking for 1,500 outsiders, but as they weere here we are glad of it. I wish all the kids on earth had been here. At one time I thought at least half of them were here.

Another large bundle of Santa Claus letters were received at the hall yesterday, some of them being handed in by the children who came. They will be classified by districts and an effort made as far as possible to give each child just hwat it asked for. It may take several days yet, but the committee says: "We are not going to do this thing by halves."

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Aprill 12, 1907

FAILED TO SIGN WILL.

And the Grand Avenue Methodist
Church Gets None of His Money.

Through the death of Christian E. Schoellkopf, a wealthy bachelor of Kansas City, the fund of the state university will be enriched $18,954.92. Yesterday John P. Gilday, who was appointed by Public Administrator R. S. Crohn to appraise the property left by Schoellkopf, to determine a just inheritance tax on his estate, reported to the probate court that Schoellkopf's realty holdings amounted to $308,15.11, while his personal property, exclusive of certain United States bonds and other valuable papers, were estimated to be worth $31,035.65.

Mr. Schoellkoopf, at the time of his death, which occurred in a little town in Kansas, where he had gone to look after property interests owned by him, left only two heirs, a brother, Henry Schoellkopf, and a nephew, Henry Schoellkopf, Jr., both residing in Chicago. He had written a will, but according to evidence introduced, he failed to sign it.

The deceased was a warm friend to the Grand Avenue Methodist church during his lifetime, and was one of its liberal financial supporters. It was understood by many of his close bachelor friends that in his will he had planned to bequeath the church something handsome. But it developed that no signed will could be found and the estate was taken in charge by the public administrator, Mr. Crohn, and is to be divided between the two heirs.

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March 18, 1907

MANY WANT HIS MONEY.

Claimants to Huntemann's Estate
Coming With a Rush.

Another cavalcade of alleged heirs of Adolph Huntemann swooped down on Public Administrator Crohn, by letter yesterday. They hail from Texas, Wisconsin, Cincinnati and St. Louis. One woman wrote that she was sure she was related to Huntemann and added: "Won't you please furnish the evidence for me." Administrator Crohn said she failed to state where the "evidence" could be found. Mr. Huntemann died March 12, at his handsome residence, 4025 McGee street, and left an estate worth $400,000. So far as known he had no heirs.

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January 14, 1907

ROB CROHN'S HOME.

BURGLARS GET AWAY WITH ADMINISTRATOR'S JEWELS.
IN ALL WORTH OVER $1000.

OPERATE WHILE FAMILY IS ABSENT AT THEATER.
Gained and Entrance by Prying Open a Window in the Dining Room.
Maid Asleep on an Upper Floor Was Not Disturbed.

When R. S. Crohn, public administrator, 100 East Twenty-ninth street, returned home from the theater with his wife and two daughters about 11:30 o'clock Saturday night he found the bolt on the front door had been set in such manner as to make it impossible to open the door excepting from the inside. He tried his night latch key in the door, but it would not open. For several minutes he fumbled about the door trying to effect an entrance. He then became convinced that some intruder had entered the house, as the bolt could only be set from the inside.

Mr. Crohn started toward the rear of the house, and on reaching the side yard saw a window into the dining room wide open. Without saying a word to his wife or daughters he climbed into the open window and went to the telephone and informed police headquarters. Then he made a search through the house, but found no one within, though there were indications on every hand of burglars having been present. After opening the front door and admitting his wife and daughters a more thorough search of the house was made.

In the dining room a pile of silverware lay on the table evidently prepared for removal. A dresser drawer in Mr. Crohn's room stood open, and a tin box in which considerable jewelry, especially heirlooms, and a collection of rare old coins was kept, was missing. The real value of the contents of the box to the family is inestimatable, but the market value is more than $1,000.

A hand shopping bag belonging to the eldest daughter, and containing $15 was taken from her room, and though there were several pieces of jewelry in the room they were not molested. In the second drawer of the dresser from which the tin box of jewelry was taken was some money, but the burglars evidently were frightened away before continuing their search of this drawer.

It is believed that the burglars were at work when Mr. Crohn was fumbling with the latch on the front door in trying to open it. Footprints in the sod below the window through which entrance to the house was had, showed distinctly the marks of two different pairs of shoes. Marks on the window showed that it had been pried open with a "jimmie."
The burglars had not been in the house a great while before Mr. Crohn's return home, as the maid who had been out during the evening, returned about an hour before, and when she entered the house, she went through the dining room, and at that time the window was closed. The made went directly to her room on the second floor and retired. She was asleep when Mr. Crohn and his family returned.

Detectives Lum Wilson and Alonzo Ghent were assigned to work on the case, but last night no arrests had been made.

Mr. Crohn has offered a reward of $250 for the return of the stolen articles.

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