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January 3, 1910

POLICE WATCH POOL HALLS.

Breed "Boy Bandits." Chief's Orders
Say -- Proprietor Arrested.

As the result of the general orders issued to the police force at roll call last night by Chief Snow, a close supervision is being kept on all pool halls in Kansas City. Officer Patrick Dalton last night visited a pool hall at Fifteenth street and Indiana avenue conducted by Henry Schillerbein, and, charging that he found several boys under the age of 18 playing pool, arrested Schillerbein, who was taken to the Flora avenue police station and afterward released on bond.

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December 27, 1909

WHO KNOWS MRS. ALICE CONN?

Relatives Wire That Her Mother Is
Dead in Wichita.

"Try and locate Mrs. Alice Conn, wife of Fred Conn. Mother is dead. EDNA K. YOUNG."

This telegram was received last evening from Wichita, Kas., by Chief of Police Frank Snow. But Mrs. Alice Conn is nowhere to be found, either in the directories of the two Kansas Citys or in Argentine. Consequently Chief Snow has asked the papers of the city to assist in the matter and help find the daughter.

If any one knows where Mrs. Alice Conn, or a Fred Conn, live they may confer a great favor on both the young woman and also on the relatives in Wichita.

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December 3, 1909

CALLED ON THE POLICE TO
ARBITRATE LOVE AFFAIR.

John Kenyon of McLouth, Kas.,
Wasn't Sure of His Ground, So
Asked Advice.

Meets an Unromantic Police Sergeant.

The intervention of the police spoiled a runaway marriage yesterday. John Kenyon, a farmer of McLouth, Kas., 84 years old, walked into police headquarters yesterday morning and, producing a letter from his fiancee, Mrs. Ada Cross of Frankfort, Ind., sought the advice of Chief of Police Frank Snow as to his matrimonial affairs. The chief refused to arbitrate and advised John to return to the farm.

Kenyon left headquarters, but a few hours later returned and this time called on the desk sergeant to referee. The sergeant, a big unromantic man, thought that Kenyon was a fit charge for the police matron and after depositing his valuables, some $20 in cash and a bank book showing a healthy balance, in the office safe, Kenyon was escorted upstairs.

Kenyon went to bed, but was not permitted to rest long in peace. Mrs. Ada Cross, in company with several real estate dealers, soon appeared on the scene. They wished to pay the old man a visit and informed Captain Whitsett that Kenyon was negotiation for the purpose of a rooming house on Twelfth street opposite the Hotel Washington. The captain then took a hand in the administration of the old man's finances. Mrs. Cross, on being questioned, admitted that she was engaged to be married to Kenyon and that he had promised to indorse her note for $2,500 for the purchase of the property. She stated that if it had not been for the intervention of Walter Kenyon, the old man's son, who made a trip from McLouth for the purpose of breaking up the marriage, the couple would have appeared before a justice of the peace Sunday.

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September 30, 1909

DYING YOUTH WANTS MOTHER.

Asks Kansas City Police to Locate
Mrs. Mattie Newberry.

A Nebraska youth on his deathbed in Ashland believes that his mother and brother live in Kansas City, and that he may see them before he dies, he induced one of his neighbors to write the following letter to the Kansas City police department, asking that his mother be found:

"Chief of Police, Kansas City, Mo.

"Dear Sir -- Will you please try to locate Mrs. Mattie Newberry in your city. Her son is dying here, and wants to see his mother before he passes away. Milton Newberry, the other son, also lives in Kansas City, but we do not know the address. Thanking you for any kindness that you may show, I am very truly yours, MRS. L. G. PETERSON. Ashland, Neb."

Though Chief Snow gets many letters of similar nature every day, and his time is generally occupied, the took a personal interest in the matter. A woman by the name of Mattie Newberry had lived at 2421 Locust street, but the patorlman who investigated found that she had moved away three weeks ago. None of the neighbors could tell her present location.

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September 28, 1909

SHOT A NEIGHBOR, THEN
ACTED GOOD SAMARITAN.

German Woman Gardner Attempted
to Frighten Victor Marten With
Gun That Wasn't Loaded.
Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, Who Shot Gardener.
MRS. MARY WILSDORF.

After emptying the contents of a shotgun into the left thigh of Victor Marten, a gardener, Mrs. Mary Wilsdorf, 46 years old, wife of a gardener at Seventy-seventh street and Walrond avenue, yesterday afternoon got on a Marlborough street car and came to the city and gave herself up to Chief of Police Frank F. Snow.

Before leaving her home she gave the wounded man a glass of water and left him lying on the ground near her house in charge of her husband, Carl Wilsdorf, who was later arrested by Mounted Patrolman E. B. Chiles.

Mrs. Wildorf and Marten are neighbors, each owning a ten acre tract of land.

From the facts elicited from the woman through Dr. George Ringle, surgeon at the Emergency hospital, who acted as interpreter for the police, the shooting followed a quarrel, about Marten's horses getting into the truck garden of the Wilsdorf's.

She said the horses frequently trampled the vegetables. One of them wandered over from the Marten field yesterday to the Wildorf land and was locked up in the barn.

When Marten went to the Wilsdorf house to get his horse he was asked to pay a small amount of money for alleged damages. A dispute arose and Mrs. Wilsdorf said that Marten held aloft a potato digger and threatened to kill her.

She said she then ran into the house and got her husband's shotgun, and returned to the yard. When within five feet of Marten the gun was discharged and the contents of one barrel entered the left thigh of Marten. He fell to the ground and asked for a drink of water which was given to him by Mrs. Wilsdorf.

Her husband told her she had better go to town and give herself up to the police, which advice she took. when she first entered police headquarters she was a little excited, and, not being able to speak good English, was misunderstood. The patrolman she met believed her to say a man shot her in the leg, so he directed her to the Emergency hospital. At the hospital Dr. Ringle took her in charge, and, learning that she was the person who did the shooting, took her back to the police station. She was turned over to Chief Snow.

Mrs. Wilsdorf informed the police that the man was still lying in the yard at her home and needed medical attention. Dr. George Todd, 4638 Troost avenue, attended to the man's injuries. Dr. Todd called an ambulance from Freeman & Marshall's and had the man taken to the University hospital.

The woman told Captain Whitsett that she had never before handled a shotgun and did not know exactly how to use it. The one she got in the house was broken at the breech and as she was running with it toward Marten she was trying to replace it. Suddenly the gun snapped into place and was discharged. She said she really did not think it was loaded, but was only trying to scare Marten. She was locked up in the matron's room.

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August 31, 1909

DEATH OF LIEUTENANT RYAN.

Women Ask Hadley to Make Him
Confederate Home Superintendent.

After passing several restless hours after an operation, Lieutenant M. E. Ryan died at St. Joseph's hosptial at 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. His wife and children were at his bedside when he died. According to physicians who attended him, he might have lived had he not felt it his duty to be at the station every night.

Funeral arrangements have not been made as yet but it is likely that the greatest number of police that ever took part will accompany the body to the grave. Chief Snow will attend to the matter in person.

"He was one of the bravest and most courageous officers I ever knew," said Captain Walter Whitsett's tribute to him last night. "He never shirked a duty that he undertook and could always be depended upon. The police department has suffered a big loss in his death."

Lieutenant Ryan is survived by a father, a widow and four children. M. E. Ryan, the father, l ives at Eighty street and Tracy avenue. The widow with Mary, 16 years old; Jeremiah, 12; Monica, 9, and Joseph, 6, lives 3711 Woodland avenue.

It was announced last night that the funeral services wo uld be held on a Thursday but no definite arrangements had been made.

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August 28, 1909

PREACH FOR PRICE OF DRINK.

Street "Missionaries" in Court, One
Being Fined $10.

Preaching on the streets in the North End to secure the price of drinks, has fallen under the ban of municipal court. Yesterday morning two street preachers were on trial for blockading the streets. Chief Frank Snow testified that the men preached until they had a small collection, then closed the ceremonies and hunted the nearest saloon. An hour later the performance would be repeated. One fo the "missionaries" was fined $10.

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August 4, 1909

ALLEGED KIDNAPER
CAUGHT; BOY FOUND.

HARRY JACOBS WAS WITH
UNCLE, CLARENCE CRAFT.

Stepfather Locates Stolen Child,
Dressed in Girl's Clothing, on
Train -- Craft to Be
Prosecuted.

The alleged kidnaper of little 4-year-old Harry Jacobs, who was coaxed from the home of T. H. Jacobs, his "grandpa," 1508 Olive street, about 1 o'clock Monday afternoon, was so unsuccessful in covering up his tracks that the child was gone from home but seventeen hours. He was returned to his mother about 8 o'clock yesterday morning. As soon as Mrs. Jacobs heard a description of the suspected kidnaper she thought of her brother, Clarence M. Craft of St. Joseph, Mo. Little Harry had lived three years with Mrs. Frank M. Baker, mother of Mrs. Jacobs and Craft.

FOUND CHILD ON TRAIN.

After the search in this city had been in vain, Harry Jacobs, the stolen boy's step-father, decided to leave for St. Joseph Monday evening. He wired for detectives to meet him at the train there at 11 p. m., intending to go to the home of the baby's grandmother, Mrs. Baker.

Soon after the train had left Leavenworth, Kas., Jacobs, suspecting that the kidnaper might have gone to that city by the electric line, started to walk through the train. In the coach immediately ahead of the one in which he had been sitting Jacobs saw Craft, Frank M. Baker, Craft's step-father, and the baby. Little Harry was dressed as a girl.

Jacobs approached and asked what was meant by spiriting the child away. He says Craft replied that it was none of his business as he was not the boy's father. As the train slowed up at the Union depot in St. Joseph, Jacobs says Craft attempted to escape with the child by running around the baggage room. He was caught and turned over to Detectives Parrott and Gordon of the St. Joseph police force.

CRAFT IS LOCKED UP.

"I saw that Craft was placed safely behind the bars," said Jacobs yesterday afternoon. "At the packing house I learned that Baker had been at work there at 1 o'clock Monday afternoon so he was released. He had gone to Leavenworth to meet Craft."

Jacobs asked that Craft be held. Yesterday he went before the prosecutor here and swore to a complaint charging kidnaping. Justice John B. Young issued the warrant which was turned over to Chief of Police Frank Snow with instructions to send a man to St. Joseph after the alleged kidnaper. Mrs. Jacobs, who was greatly alarmed over the absence of her child, says she will prosecute her brother.

In an attempt to learn where little Harry's clothes had been changed the boy was taken out yesterday morning by his step-father. He led the way through the alley in the rear of the house at 1508 Olive street, from whence he was taken, to Fifteenth street. When they reached the fountain at Fifteenth street and the Paseo, which little Harry calls "the flopping water," he stopped. He said that he was taken into a house near there which had a broken porch. His clothes were taken off and girl's apparel substituted.

BOY'S CLOTHES THROWN AWAY.

After leaving the place, t he little boy said, his overalls, waist, etc. of which he had been divested, were wrapped in a piece of paper and thrown over a fence. The house could not be located. The child said several people were present when the shift was made. Candy and the promise of a long ride on the choo choo cars," is what lured the boy away from home.

Jacobs and the stolen boy's mother have not been married long. Mrs. Jacobs was first married in St. Joseph several years ago to Harry Burke from whom she was later divorced. For three years she left her child with her mother, who later married Frank M. Baker, a packing house carpenter. The grandmother and Baker became greatly attached to the child and did not want to give him up when the mother remarried. Jacobs is a cook.

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August 1, 1909

WEEDS MUST BE CUT DOWN.

Throwing Dry Grass and Weeds Into
Alleys is Forbidden.

Owners of vacant lots are receiving notices from the police department ordering that weeds on the lots be cut down. Patrolman Dennis Keenan has been detailed to locate the lots reported by the patrolmen where weeds should be cut and send out the notices.

An additional order was issued by Chief Snow yesterday to the effect that property owners were not to throw dry grass and weeds into the alleys. The order was issued because fire is too easily started by carelessness where grass has become dried. Owners should burn the weeds on their lots and obviate any chance of fire.

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July 30, 1909

SEEKS HEIRS TO AN ESTATE.

Fulkerson, Formerly of Kansas City,
Dies in Arkansas.

Heirs for an estate estimated at $10,000 to $90,000 are sought in a letter to Chief of Police Frank Snow from Little Rock, Ark., in which is told the death of Z. K. Fulkerson on June 10, who left an estate.

Fulkerson was proprietor of the "K. C. Restaurant" in Little Rock, and is believed to have gone there from Kansas City. He often mentioned having a brother in Kansas City, and as he left no will, the administrator of the estate, J. L. Eastin, 1719 State street, Little Rock, would like to obtain news of the heirs.

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July 4, 1909

WANTS A SANE FOURTH
IF BOYS ARE WILLING.

POLICE HAVE STRINGENT OR-
DERS FROM CHIEF SNOW.

Health Commissioner Wheeler Has
Placed Supply of Tetanus Anti-
Toxin With Hospitals --
Quiet in Most Districts.

This year there is to be an extraordinary effort made to have a same Fourth, and also Fifth of July in Kansas City. Chief of Police Frank F. Snow issued orders yesterday that he wanted as many men on duty during the "busy" parts of both days as possible. If the people do not want to act in a sane manner while celebrating a policeman may be on hand to make them. The chief called for the arrests of all parties caught putting explosives on the street car tracks, and wanted officers to take special care to see that "no fireworks of any kind are exploded near any hospital or near where there are sick people."

Dr. W. S. Wheeler, health commissioner, has taken steps to keep down, as far as possible, mortality resulting from gunshot or firecracker wounds. Tetanus often follows such wounds, especially in the hands, and death is frequently the result. At the general hospital, the emergency hospital and the Walnut street police station, Dr. Wheeler has placed a supply of tetanus anti-toxin with instructions to use it immediately in every case where it is suspected the injury may develop lockjaw.

"It has been shown," said Dr. Wheeler last night, "that where the anti-toxin is used promptly it acts as a preventive. It has also been used with good results in many cases where the disease had already begun to develop."

Dr. Isadore Anderson, in charge of the dispensary at the Post-Graduate hospital on Independence avenue, secured a supply of the anti-toxin from Dr. Wheeler and will use it in all cases where its use may be indicated. This dispensary being a free one, has many injured persons.

Chief of Police Frank F. Snow issued stringent orders recently indicating the class of firecrackers and fireworks which would be permitted. Firearms of any character, whether loaded with blank or bullet cartridges, are prohibited.

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June 17, 1909

ATTEMPTS MURDER TO
CONCEAL RECORD OF
POLICE PROBE.

THUG STRIKES DOWN MISS A. LEE
OWEN IN HER OFFICE IN
DWIGHT BUILDING.

WON'T STOP
INVESTIGATION.

MAYOR OFFERS A REWARD.

Young Woman Was Alone in Her
Office When Murderous Assailant
Tried to Crush Her Skull With a
Black Jack -- Commissioner Marks
Orders Men Who May Be Attacked
to Shoot to Kill -- Governor Had-
ley May Offer Reward Today.
Girl Struck Down by Unknown Assailants.
UNKNOWN THUG STRIKES DOWN POLICE BOARD'S GIRL STENOGRAPHER; STEALS RECORD OF INVESTIGATION.

Struck on the left temple with a "black jack" by an unknown thug, Miss Anna Lee Owen, a public stenographer who has been taking the evidence in the investigation held by the police commissioners, was knocked unconscious while at work in her office, 605 Dwight building, last night and a part of her stenographic notes stolen. She was taken to the University hospital immediately after being found by Hugh E. Martin. She is said to be in critical condition. Her skull probably is fractured.

Mayor Crittenden personally offers a reward of $100 for the arrest of her assailant.

The attack upon Miss Owen was made some time between 6:30 and 7:15 o'clock, while she was alone in her office. She regained consciousness before being removed to the hospital, but was not able to furnish a description of her assailant.


STRUCK FROM BEHIND.

Miss Owen's office is separated from the hall by a reception room. When Mr. Martin left the office at 6:30, she was at work on the notes. The hall door was closed and also the door leading from the reception room into her office. Mr. Martin returned to his office at 7:15. Opening the door into Miss Owen's office, he found her huddled on the floor. Believing she had fainted from overwork, he lifted her head and was startled by her groaning as if injured.

Liquor which was kept in another office in the suite was secured by Martin and he rubbed the young woman's head with it. She partially revived and exclaimed, "Mother, they have taken my notes." Dr. Eugene Carbaugh was summoned to attend Miss Owen, and Commissioner Thomas R. Marks was notified. He informed the police and then took personal charge of the case.

Cowardly Assault by a Brutal Thug With a Black Jack.
A BLACK JACK, SUCH AS WAS PROBABLY USED IN THE COWARDLY ASSAULT ON MISS OWEN.

Inspector of Detectives Edward P. Boyle carried Miss Owen down stairs in the elevator and placing her in an automobile assisted Dr. Carbaugh in supporting her during the drive to the hospital.

From what little Miss Owen could tell last night she was working over her typewriter when she heard a step behind her chair. Knowing that the men who had offices in the suite had gone home, she looked up to see who it was. She had not heard the outer doors opened. Just as she secured a glance of the figure of a man, she was struck down.

IMPORTANT EVIDENCE GONE.

The stenographic notes and transcripts which she had made during the trials and investigations before the police commissioners were always carefully guarded by Miss Owen, who was afraid an attempt would be made to steal them. The notes were securely locked up in the office vault each night. When an investigation was made after she regained consciousness it was found that a large part of her notes were missing.

Just what notes were secured is not known. It was said that the evidence given late yesterday afternoon in the trial of the case against the conduct of the saloon conducted by James Redmond, 1205 Walnut street, were not secured. But it is believed that a large part of the testimony in the other investigations was lost.

ENTIRE FORCE AT WORK.

Through the inability of Miss Owen to assist the police by furnishing a description of her assailant, and also the failure of the police to elicit any information from the elevator operators was impossible to secure a clue to work on. No one could be found last night who had seen or noticed any stranger loitering in the halls or around the office in the Dwight building.

When Commissioner Marks arrived he ordered that the police make every possible effort to capture the thug, and until midnight he was actively engaged in directing the police in their work. The police were not notified of the assault until 8 o'clock, and inspector Boyle dispatched e very officer in the headquarters at the time to the scene. He and Captain Whitsett followed and were closeted with the commissioner for some time. Every detective in the city was called in and placed at work upon the case. The the substations were notified, and in all over 150 police officers were engaged in searching the city.

GIRL AND MARKS SHADOWED.

After the assault last night Commissioner Marks informed the police that he had been followed and shadowed by two men since he began his activity in the police shakeup. Not only has Mr. Marks been trailed, but Miss Owen has been dogged by two men to and from her work in the city. She was not positive of this surveillance, according to Mr. Marks, until Tuesday evening after the adjournment of the police board.

Intuitively feeling that she was being followed, Miss Owen boarded a Twelfth street car and transferred to a Northeast car. Arriving at Budd park she left the car and entered the park. All of this time the suspected man was in close proximity. At the park he disappeared for a time but was on hand when she again got on a car to ride into the city. She went to the Dwight building after leaving the car and while on the sixth floor saw the man in the hall. She then went to the office of Mr. Marks and informed him of what she had done.

GIRL FREQUENTLY ANNOYED.

Telling her to hold a handkerchief to her mouth if she saw the man on the street, Mr. Marks went down and walked around. He found a man on the street who appeared to fit the description of the man who had bothered Miss Owen, but she denied he was the one. The police were not notified at any time previous to the assault that either Miss Owen or the commissioner were being shadowed.

On another occasion it is said Miss Owen was frightened by men who followed her about the streets and went to the Coates house for the night, instead of returning to her home. While there, it was said, she received a telephone message from some man who refused to give his name. The purport of the telephone message was that there was a man in an adjoining room who intended her harm.

The mother of Miss Owen, who visited her daughter at the University hospital last night in answer to questions, said that her daughter had never mentioned to anyone at home that she was annoyed by anyone or that she had ever been followed.

On orders received from Mr. Marks, the hospital authorities refused to allow anyone to see Miss Owen. Strict orders were issued to not allow anyone but the nurse, her physicians and mother to visit the young woman. A special nurse was secured for her and the police commissioner's orders included a special diet for Miss Owen.

Several hours after the assault Dr. A. H. Cordler was called in consultation and the patient was pronounced to be in a very critical condition.

BY AN IMPORTED THUG.

The Dwight building was thoroughly searched by the police. Every street car in the city, and especially those leading into the suburbs, was being ridden by a police officer all night long. The outgoing trains were watched, although the police believed that the man would endeavor to leave the city by street car.

Inspector Boyle said last night that it was his opinion that the attack upon Miss Owen, and the theft of the stenographic notes, was done by an imported thug. If it was accomplished by home talent the inspector expressed the opinion that it was done on the spur of the moment to cover, if possible, damaging testimony given during the recent investigation. If the thug was imported for the purpose, St. Louis is probably the city, Inspector Boyle said, and his belief is also that of Captain Whitsett and Chief of Police Frank Snow.

Two men who have already figured in the police investigation and the saloon trials were ordered arrested and locked up of investigation. The theory of the police is that while these two men did not do the work they could give valuable information as to who did. But the men had not been found at 1 o'clock this morning. Captain Whitsett said he believed that the man would be arrested before twenty-four hours had passed. Acting Chief Snow said the man would be in custody by morning and inspector Boyle was positive he could not escape arrest.

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June 4, 1909

ENGHNELL ASKS FOR GUNS.

Released Member of Adam God's
Band Says He Needs Money.

To get money to buy clothes and something to eat, Willialm Enghnell, one of the Adam God band of fanatics, applied at police headquarters yesterday for the weapons which were taken from him at the time of the riot last December. since he was released by the prosecuting attorney he has been told he ought to recover the guns.

Chief Frank F. Snow and Captain Walter Whitsett gave him no satisfaction. They stated that enough trouble had been caused by the revolvers.

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June 3, 1909

5,000 SEE THE MEYER
MEMORIAL UNVEILING.

MANY TRIBUTES TO THE FIRST
PRESIDENT OF THE PARK BOARD.

Addresses by Leon Smith, Henry D.
Ashley and Mayor Crittenden.
Cord Releasing Flag Pulled
by Phillip Meyer.

At the unveiling yesterday afternoon of the bronze and marble memorial in honor of August R. Meyer, first president of the park board, at the Paseo and Tenth street, a drowed of 5,000 persons witnessed the ceremonies. Members of the Meyer statue comittee, Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Leon Smith, president of the Commercial Club, and business associates and friends of the man whose memory was to be honored, rode to the scene of the memorial services in carriages. Chief of Police Frank Snow headed the processoin with a detachment of mounted police, followed by Hiner's band and Company K, of the Third regiment, national guards. Colonel Cusil Lechtman, attended by the majors and captains of the regimennt, rode in advance of the guards.

Before the arrival of the parade the crowd had gathered in front of the statue and locked traffic on Tenth street. Many women and children were in the crowd, and when the mounted police turned west on Tenth street from the Paseo the pushing back of those in the middle of hte street crushed the smaller children, and women begged the police to help them out of the jam.

A raised platform had been erected on each side of the statue, which his located on the Paseo grounds just north of and facing Tenth street. The committee occupied the platform and Mrs. Meyer accompanied by her children and friends sat in an au tomobile in front of the statue. Following a selection by the band Leon Smith made an address in which he told of the services rendered by Mr. Meyer in whose honor the shaft was erected.

FATHER OF PARK SYSTEM.

The subject of the bronze portrait in relief which adorns the marble statue was the father of the park system in Kansas City. He was not only president of the first park board, but was also president of the Commercial Club, which was instrumental in securing the statue. A few days after the death of Mr. Meyer, December 1, 1905, the Commercial Club met and instituted a popular subscription for a monument to the memory of one of Kansas City's foremost men. The amount to be raised was placed at $25,000. Daniel Chester French, the great American sculptor of New York was selected to do the relief. It is the fist monument ever unveiled by this city.

Henry D. Ashley, an old friend of Mr. Meyer's, spoke for three-quarters of an hour in eulogy of the man, whom he declared had done more for the beauty of Kansas City than any other one man. He said that his friend was not only interested in beautifying Kansas City, but was prominent in every public enterprise and civic improvement. Following Mr. Ashley an address was made by Mayor Crittenden. He said, in part:

TRIBUTE BY MAYOR.

"The biting frost of death does not kill the fruit of patriotism. It bears on everlastingly. Thee handiwork of Washington is still our daily benefit, and the richest asset of Lincoln's life will pay dividends from generation to generation. While our distinguished townsman August R. Meyer, sleeps, grateful multitudes are daily reaping harvests of bloom and bower and flower and fountain, children of his busy brain. In life he gave abundantly the best he had -- his talents; in death we give him freely the best we have -- our gratitude.

"This great citizen, forerunning his time, saw wisely that the modern city must not confine itself merely to commerce, but must beautify as well; that it must not only have stores and banks and lawns, where the rich and the poor could enjoy the health giving sunlight and pure fresh air."

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April 8, 1909

NEW POLICE BOARD
TO CLEAN UP TOWN.

MAKES FRANK SNOW ACTING
CHIEF, ED BOYLE INSPECTOR.

Flahive Given Pick of Force and
Told to Drive Out District 4's
Tough Gang and Ignore
the Politicians.
The New Police Board.
THE POLICE BOARD AS IT IS NOW COMPOSED.
T. R. MARKS, MAYOR CRITTENDEN, R. B. MIDDLEBROOK.

Captain Frank F. Snow, property clerk at police headquarters, was appointed acting chief of police, and Edward P. Boyle, a detective, was appointed acting inspector of detectives yesterday by the new board of police commissioners.

Captain Thomas P. Flahive of district No. 4 was given his pick of the force, and told to drive out the gang of crooks and undesirables in his district, despite the interference of any politician. Democrat or Republican, and clean up a certain disreputable element that has infested that part of the city for so long a time.

Chief Daniel Ahern was placed in charge of the new district, No. 10, and Inspector Charles Ryan was told that he would be taken care of.

Thomas R. Marks and R. B. Middlebrook, the first Republican police commissioners Kansas City has ever had, being in the majority on the board did not wait for the presence of Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., to start the ball rolling. By appointment they met in the office of Daniel Ahern, chief of police, shortly after noon. Then they sent for Charles Ryan, inspector of detectives.

RYAN IN THE RANKS.

Telling the two officials that they would be cared for in some manner, the commissioners asked for their resignations. In a few minutes, they had them in writing.

Captain Snow and Ed. P. Boyle were sent for and told that Snow was to be made acting chief of police and Boyle acting inspector of detectives.

Later, when the board met with the mayor in the chair, Commissioner Middlebrook presented Ahern's resignation and moved its acceptance. Snow was then formally made acting chief. The same form was gone through in regard to the acceptance of Ryan's resignation and the temporary appointment of Detective Boyle to his place.

The next order of business was to take care of the deposed officers. Ahern was appointed captain of the new police district, to be known as No. 10. Ryan was made a detective, and assigned to duty under Acting Inspector Boyle, his former subordinate.

AHERN IS APPRECIATIVE.

Captain Ahern showed great appreciation when the board cared for him in the manner in which it did.

"I did not expect to remain," said the former chief. "My position belonged to the new commissioners, and they had a right to it. I certainly appreciate the magnificent manner in which I have been cared for, and will show it by doing my full duty and carrying out to the letter every order of the board."

Former Inspector Ryan had little to say except that he would line up with the men he used to boss with such severity, and do the best he could. It was intimated that Ryan may resign from the force later, but that could not be confirmed.

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April 8, 1909

ROUNDUP OF VAMPIRES
IN POLICE DISTRICT 4

TWENTY-SIX WELL DRESSED
VAGRANTS IN DRAGNET.

"Undesirables," Who for So Long
Have Defied Police, Find Their
Protectors Without Power
to Aid Them Longer.

Acting under express orders from the new board of police commissioners, Captain Thomas P. Flahive's men began yesterday to round up a gang of well dressed vagrants who for years have fattened in district No. 4 on the shame of 500 fallen women.

By midnight twenty-six male vampires were under arrest, and scores of other human vampires had fled from the scene of their long connection with the white slave traffic.

These hold degenerates, who aforetime flaunted their misdeeds in the faces of the patrolmen, and dared them to act, found yesterday that their pulls had vanished and that all crooks look alike to the police.

WOMEN GIVE BOND FOR MEN.

Also caught in the same net, which seined Kansas City from Twelfth to Nineteenth streets and from Locust to Wyandotte streets, were three of the women who supported these same well dressed vagrants.

So quickly did news of the crusade spread among the parasites that the officers who constituted the dragnet had to work quickly and silently. Four of those caught were found with suitcases packed, ready to leave the city. Captain Flahive believes that an exodus of vagrants has taken place. Twenty-four does not complete the count of those men known to the police, those men who live from the wages of unfortunate women. But in spite of the close search last night no more vagrants could be found.

Strangely enough the women seemed not to appreciate the work done by the police in delivering them from bondage, or perhaps it was fear. At any rate it was the woman, in most cases, who paid the $26 cash bond which liberated the arrested vagrant. All yesterday the telephone in the Walnut street police station was busy, and at the other end of the line was a woman who wanted to know if the particular vagrant whom she supported was arrested. Upon being in formed that such a person was under arrest, the woman, or her messenger, speedily appeared at the station with the necessary $26 in cash, and the vagrant was released on condition of his appearance in police court this morning.

Once liberated, all trace of the vagrant was lost and the district south of Twelfth street was as clean a district on the streets as any portion of the city.

IN THE RED LIGHT DISTRICT.

One other order given to the police captain by the board was to keep the scarlet woman off the streets at night. This order was obeyed to the letter last night, and the only three who fared forth were promptly arrested. Formerly it would have been impossible to have walked any block of that district after dark without being accosted. Usually he would have been met by groups of women, but it was different last night.

In No. 4 district, it is claimed, there are eighty-nine of the class of rooming houses referred to by the police commissioners in their orders to Captain Flahive yesterday and who are paying a monthly fine to the city. There are also hotels and rooming houses by the score which pay no fine and have been overlooked by the police entirely.

In order that Captain Flahive may make sure work of his cleaning up of the district, the commissioners have given him the pick of the men on the department, and have given him permission to use extra men. This morning the captain will confer with Chief Frank Snow and pick the men who are to fill the places in the cleanup.

At present the district over which Captain Flahive has control is lacking policemen. Several officers are forced to patrol more than one beat, which is a handicap when it comes to competent police protection.

Concerning the work, Captain Flahive said last night:

"I am going to clean this district. Within two weeks there will be no more well dressed vagrants loitering around the saloons and rooming houses. This order from the commissioners is one for which I have long waited."

"Why hasn't this cleanup taken place before?" the captain was asked. Surely other commissioners knew that these conditions existed here."

NOTORIOUS MEN CAUGHT.

"I have never been ordered to do so before," he replied. "But I do not wish to say anything about that. It is all dead, and I am going to carry out my orders now to the letter. This work is not a spurt, but it will be kept up, and this district will not know the well dressed vagrant after we have finished with them."

Among those vagrants who have been caught by the police are notorious men of the district, ringleaders in every kind of offense against decency. Many have been arrested before, but nothing ever came of the arrests. So bold did these vagrants become that they flaunted their misdeeds in the faces of the patrolmen, and then dared them to exercise the right of an officer.

The same tactics were tried yesterday, but without success. This time the patrolmen did not fear the loss of their stars for doing their duty.

The officers who made the arrests of vagrants yesterday are Sergeant Henry Goode and Patrolmen Mike Gleason and George Brooks.

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April 6, 1909

EXIT JONES AND GALLAGHER.

Retiring Commissioners Draw Two
Months' Salary and Say Goodby
to Associates.

A sort of farewell service took place yesterday afternoon at city hall, when Elliott H. Jones and A. E. Gallagher, the retiring board of police commissioners, paid their last visit to police headquarters in an official capacity. Incidentally, it marked the first time in the memory of the oldest policeman that a Democratic board retired in favor of Republicans.

The two men first visited James Vincil, the secretary of the board, who probably will say adieu to his quarters within the next month. Both men drew their salaries which they had allowed to accumulate during the last two months and left office smiling.

"I'll have to loook into the room where we have had so many sessions," said Mr. Gallagher, and the two men paused at the door of the room where the weekly meeting takes place. Mr. Jones did not seem particularly sorry that the last meeting was over.

"Well, goodby, Mr. Vincil," said both men, as they left the secretary's office. "Good luck to you."

The retiring commissiones then paid a visit to Captain Whitsett, Chief Ahern and Captain Frank Snow. They conversed a few minutes at each place and wished all good luck.

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April 4, 1909

PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT.

Sergeant Halligan Rewarded for
Twenty-Seven Years' Service.

Sergeant Michael Halligan of No. 4 police station, for twenty-seven years a popular officer of the force, has been appointed to fill the vacancy made by the resignation of Lieutenant H. W. Hammil from that station last Wednesday. The latter is now a special detective at the Baltimore hotel. The appointment was made Wednesday by the police board, but Mr. Halligan did not receive the good news until yesterday when two of his friends from the city hall passed him in a buggy and called out:

"Congratulations, lieutenant!"

Later the official notice was received at the station and it was up to the newly-made lieutenant to buy cigars for everyone from Captain Thomas Flahive down to the reporters of the afternoon papers.

Lieutenant Halligan was born in County Wexford, Ireland, fifty years ago. He came to Kansas City in 1881 and became a member of the police force the year following. Since the day he was entered on the roll of patrolmen, walking beats out of Central station, he has not missed a day and there are no charges of inefficiency marked against him. Next to Captain Frank Snow and Chief Daniel Ahern he is the oldest officer in point of years of service in the department.

Patrolman J. M. Bottoms from No. 5 station has been named to fill the sergeantcy left vacant by the promotion of Lieutenant Halligan.

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August 18, 1908

MOB ONCE HANGED AN
INNOCENT NEGRO HERE.

Was Suspected of Having Shot a Po-
liceman -- Chief Ahern and Cap-
tain Snow Were Present.

Policemen old in the city service recall but one negro lynching in recent Kansas City history. There has been mob violence threatened here, but only once was a man's life taken by citizens. A mob hanged a negro of the name of Harrington April 3, 1882, and the police still insist that the man was wrongly accused of murder.

Old-time policemen who figured in the affair were Daniel Ahern, now chief of police; Frank Snow, now captain of police in charge of police court property; Con. O'Hare, Patrick Jones, and five others. The monument erected by the people as a tribute to policemen who fell in discharge of duty -- on the west side of city hall -- bears Jones's name and the date of his death. His name is the second on the long list. He was the victim of a negro's bullets in St. Louis avenue, and another negro was lynched for the crime.

Patrolman Jones lived in the West Bottoms. On the night of his death he had been relieved from duty and had started home to supper. As he turned into St. Louis avenue he met Tony Grant, a negro of bad reputation, carrying a sack.

Jones at once suspected the negro of theft and asked him what he had in the sack. The negro declined to tell and the patrolman placed him under arrest. The sack contained a firkin of butter which the negro had stolen from a grocery. As Jones leaned over to examine the contents of the sack he was shot and killed. The bullet came from behind the policeman and no one saw the shot fired. Tony Grant, believed to be the guilty negro, fled.

Here's where Harrington came into the limelight. Sitting in front of John Monohan's boarding house at Ninth and Hickory streets, he heard the shots and ran toward the body of the policeman. Police a few minutes later arrested him on complaint of white citizens who had also been attracted by the pistol shot..

Harrington, the police maintain, was innocent, but he was hanged an hour later from the Fifth street car bridge. Daniel Ahern, then a patrolman at the West Bottoms station, was assigned with a squad of six officers to take Harrington to police headquarters and started on foot around the bluff to the North End.

A crowd of excited citizens followed the negro and his police escort and soon the officers saw they had made a mistake in starting with the prisoner. It was too late to turn back and they entered the bridge. At the same time a crowd from the North End entered the bridge from the north and the police found themselves, with the negro prisoner, hemmed in. They pleaded with the mob, but were thrust aside. A noose was slipped over Harrington's head and he was thrown over the bridge rail.

Captain Frank Snow and Con O'Hare ran through the crowd and jumped off the end of the bridge, intending to cut down the negro and possibly save him.

As Snow leaned toward the rope a man on the bridge above leaned low over the rail and sent a bullet into the top of Harrington's head. The mob dispersed and the police remember the incident as the only illegal hanging in the history of Kansas City. Tony Grant was never captured and most of those who had a hand in the affair, with the exception of Ahern and Snow, are dead.

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July 17, 1908

JACK GALLAGHER
IN THE WORKHOUSE.

TO REMAIN ONE YEAR UNLESS
HE PAYS $1,000 FINE.

Chief of Police Daniel Ahern's Luna-
cy Commission Quickly Decides
That Gallagher's Troubles
Are Temper and Booze.

Before a lunacy commission consisting of four physicians Jack Gallagher, notorious circumventor of justice, was yesterday adjudged sane. It took the commission only an hour and a half to hear all of the testimony and to make its physical and mental examinations; then they went into executive session and within five minutes had returned its verdict, which reads:

"We submitted Jack Gallagher to a personal, mental and physical examination, and heard the testimony of witnesses, and from the evidence of such mental and physical testimony and examinations offered, we find that Jack Gallagher is sane, and responsible for his actions."

After the commission, consisting of Dr. J. O. Hanawalt, Dr. St. Elmo Saunders, Dr. O. L. McKillip and Dr. J. S. Snider, had been informed of its duties and the result its decision would have upon the cases which were then being held in suspension by the police court, it called Jack Gallagher as the first witness.

Gallagher walked into the room accompanied by an officer. The slugger' demeanor was somewhat tame compared with his previous actions. As Dr. Hanawalt began to question the prisoner he dropped his eyes and nervously moved his hands and feet. The preliminary questions relative to age and residence were all answered in a quiet manner.

IN SALOON BUSINESS THREE YEARS.

"In what business were you engaged as a boy," was the first question.

"I did not go to school further than the fourth grade. Then I worked like any other kid."

"When did you first enter the saloon business?"

"Three years ago, in Kansas City."

"What is your general condition of your health?"

"Good."

"Did you ever have any serious illness?"

"No, just kid's diseases. Dr. Snider always treated me."

"Do you ever have any trouble articulating?"

Gallagher did not understand the word, and after it was repeated to him three times he replied:

"I didn't get past the fourth grade in school and I don't know what that big word means."

When its meaning was explained he answered in the negative.

"How tall are you and what do you weigh?"

"I am 6 feet one inch and a fraction and weigh about 170 pounds."

"Did you ever weigh more than that?"

"Yes, several years ago I weighed 190 pounds

"What caused you to lose weight?"

"Worry over my business, and I have had to do a lot of that."

Then followed the physical and mental tests given by the physicians. During the physical examination Gallagher called attention to a small bruise on his left ankle, which he charges was made by a blow from Albert King's cane. Gallagher told the physicians that he had never been troubled with his eyes, having passed an examination for the United States army and also for the police department.

"Is your memory good?" questioned Dr. St. Elmo Saunders.

"Yes," and after some hesitancy he added, "There have been times when I have overlooked my mail for a day or two, but they were mostly bills."

"Do you remember all of the events which happened yesterday?"

"If you mean the events which led up to me being arrested and my appearance in the police court, yes."

"Tell me the facts which led up to your going to Mr. King's rooms."

"I don't care to answer that question."

"But you remember them well?"

"Yes."
75 GLASSES A DAY.

J. F. Richardson, representing Mr. King, then questioned the witness.

"Do you drink intoxicating liquor?"

"Yes."

"Do you ever get drunk?"

"Yes. I have drank whisky ever since I was 20 years old."

"Did you take any whisky on the night before you went to Mr. King's rooms; and if so, how much had you drunk?"

"I drink every day from sixty to seventy-five glasses of whisky; Tuesdays as well as any other day. I was under the influence of whisky when I was arrested."

"Were you responsible for your actions in King's room?"

"I think I was, but I won't answer any more questions like that."

Colonel J. C. Greenman, Humane officer, said that they must have witnesses to help them in their decision as to whether or not Gallagher was insane. Then Dr. Saunders questioned Dr. Snider relative to the medical attention which he had given Gallagher. Dr. Snider replied that Gallagher had never been seriously ill, and that in his opinion he is sane and always had been.

"You have never seen him act insane before?"

"No, never. When he is drunk, as he frequently is, he is always able to take care of himself."

"Is he a good business man?"

"From what I know of him I would say yest."

Tom Gallagher, brother of the prisoner, was called to the stand.

"Would you believe from your brother's conversation Tuesday night that he was drunk?"

"HE'S SANE," SAYS TOM.

"Yes, I think he was, but he knew what he was doing."

"Do you think your brother is sane or insane?"

"Sane."

These questions satisfying both parties to the investigation, Tom Gallagher was dismissed and Miss Mayme Lefler, Mr. King's nurse, who was with him at the time Gallagher attempted to assault him Wednesday morning, was called to the stand.

Miss Lefler went over the story of the assault in a very concise manner, stating at the close that she believed Gallagher to be sane. Miss Lefler, in getting her training as a nurse, had to spend a certain part of her time in the insane ward at the general hospital, and from her knowledge of insanity she pronounced Gallagher as being sane, but a man of violent temper. She stated that Gallagher seemed to have been drinking before he entered Mr. King's room Wednesday morning.

Mrs. Etta Condon, proprietor of the hotel at which Mr King is staying, was called to the stand and told the same story as did Miss Lefler. "Do you think he was insane?" she was asked.

"No, not a bit of it."

"Would you know an insane person if you saw one?"

"I think I would, but Gallagher seemed to be more drunk than anything else. And he has a violent temper."

QUARRELSOME WHEN DRUNK.

J. J. Spillane, a street inspector and a particular friend of Gallagher's had been present throughout the hearing and at Tom Gallagher's request he was called to the witness stand.

Spillane told of his acquaintance with Gallagher, which dated back twenty years. He said that he did not believe that Gallagher was insane, or that he ever was insane.

"Is he quarrelsome when under the influence of liquor?"

"Not any more than any other man is; he would always stick up for himself."

Captain Frank Snow of police headquarters was called to testify. He had known Gallagher for ten or fifteen years. During that time, according to the testimony, Gallagher's conduct had been of a very erratic nature. He had engaged in several controversies at various times.

"Do you think that Jack is insane?"

"No, indeed. Jack would not have any trouble if he would let the booze alone. Every man, or almost every man, who has owned a saloon on East Fourth street, has gone crazy, and Jack will go the same way if he keeps up his present pace."

"So you think drink was responsible for all his trouble?"

"Yes, I do."

W. K. Latcham, the arresting officer for the second offense committed by Gallagher Wednesday morning against Albert King; Gus Metzinger, patrolman in charge of No. 4 police station, and who released Gallagher on $11 bond, and Dr. E. L. Gist all testified that it was their belief that Gallagher was sane. The testimony was becoming long drawn out and immaterial. The case for insanity was lost within the first five minutes of examination and the commission decided to put an end to the needless investigation.

After taking the testimony of John McCarthy, one of Gallagher's bartenders, the investigation adjourned and the commissioners met in secret session. They remained in session long enough to cast one vote and dictate their decision to the stenographer.

GOES TO THE WORKHOUSE.

Gallagher was sent to the workhouse in the daily crowd which is sent from the police court. His fine is $1,000 or one year in the workhouse. If he does not pay his fine he must remain for one year unless pardoned by the mayor.

The lunacy commission proceeding was instigated by Chief of Police Daniel Ahern, who conferred with Judge Theodore Remley of the police court and Colonel J. C. Greenman of the Humane office. It was the opinion of the three that Gallagher was too dangerous a man to walk the streets of Kansas City. It was the fear that he would be able to pay his fine and get out of the workhouse a free man, that led Chief Ahern to take such steps in having the lunacy commission appointed, he says.

"It means," said the chief, "that Gallagher goes to the workhouse His time limit for appeal is over and he will have to serve out his time or pay his fine. He is a dangerous man and should be kept in custody. I believe the fellow is insane."

It was suggested to acting Police Judge Remley by Cliff Langsdale, city attorney, that the time for appeal bond in Gallagher's case had elapsed. Judge Remley said that he would not countenance an appeal bond at any rate. He said that it would be necessary for Gallagher to go to courts above his jurisdiction before he could keep himself from the workhouse any longer.

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July 16, 1908

CUNNING SHOWN
BY GALLAGHER

SLUGGER WILL TRY TO HAVE
HIMSELF DECLARED INSANE.

THUS ESCAPE HIS MIS-DEEDS

CREATES A SCENE IN THE ROOM
OF ALBERT KING.

Arrested and Released on Ridiculous
Bond of $11 -- Fined $1,000
in Police Court on Two
Charges.

An attempt is to be made by the friends of Jack Gallagher to have him declared insane.

The object is to prevent justice from taking its course.

The first suggestion for a lunacy commission was made by Jack Gallagher himself.

His saloon license gone, under a double fine of $500, and with a penitentiary sentence staring him in the face, Gallagher's only hope is in an "easy" lunacy commission that will free him of all responsibility for his brutal, wanton and wicked acts.

A depravity seldom equalled, unbridled license and bad whiskey is what's the matter with Jack Gallagher. His mentality, even though of a low order, is capable of recognizing right from wrong. Gallagher, according to the statements of eye witness, was too drunk when taken to Central police station yesterday morning that the officers in charge hesitated about arraigning him in court.

The lunacy commission judge is the last desperate stand of this desperado and his friends.

Gallagher was locked in a cell in the police matron's room last night.

INSANE? NO, BAD WHISKY.

When the city attorney, Cliff Langsdale, called the case of the city against Jack Gallagher, arrested yesterday morning on two charges of disturbing the peace, it was said Gallagher was too drunk to appear. Newspaper men attending police court insisted that he be brought out before the court and arraigned on the charges. Sergeant Frank Snow informed the court that Gallagher was "pretty drunk," but Judge Remley finally ordered him brought out of the holdover so he could judge for himself.

Gallagher's demeanor before the court was that of the bully. While he showed signs of heavy drinking he was sufficiently sober to know what he was talking about and the police judge decided he was sober enough to stand trial.

After Gallagher had been fined $500 on two charges he asked his brother, Thomas Gallagher, to apply for a lunacy commission to inquire into his sanity. Thomas Gallagher immediately sought the chief of police, Daniel Ahern, and asked that the $1,000 fine be stayed until he could have his brother tried for insanity. Chief Ahern readily granted the request, giving Gallagher a stay for twenty-four hours. Judge Remley consented to the stay granted by the chief of police. Jack Gallagher was then turned oer to Colonel J. C. Greenman who has charge of all insanity cases for the police department. Gallagher was taken from the common holdover and placed in a cell in the matron's room. The police stated that he had been put in the matron's room because it was rumored that Gallagher's friends had passed cigars and whisky into the jail to him when he was held for investigation when he assaulted Albert King on Wednesday, a week ago.

Gallagher's friends called on the chief of police during the morning and afternoon, but the chief refused to say what their mission was. Jack Spillane, a street inspector, was in evidence at police headquarters and in the chief's office all of yesterday afternoon. He refused to say what he wanted, except that he was a friend of Gallagher's.

SLUGGER'S FRIENDS BUSY.

Thomas Gallagher insisted on an early meeting of the lunacy commission and desired to name the members who were to be called in to act. He was informed by Colonel Greenman that the law required a certificate of two reputable physicians to determine whether a man was insane or sane. He also told Tom Gallagher that he intended to go further than the law required, that he intended to appoint four physicians so the public would be satisfied with any verdict that the board should return.

A physician, who said he had been Jack Gallagher's family doctor for the last five years, appeared at police headquarters and said he wanted to be called as a witness to testify that Jack Gallagher had been insane for nearly five years. He was one of the physicians that Thomas Gallagher asked Colonel Greenman to appoint as a member oft he lunacy board.

Willis King, a brother of the reporter assaulted by Jack Gallagher, called on Colonel Greenman yesterday afternoon and asked that he be notified so he could have witnesses summoned to appear before the commission. Colonel Greenman set the time for the commission to meet at 10 o'clock today.

"BAD MAN," SAYS AHERN.

Chief of Police Daniel Ahern said yesterday afternoon that he considers Jack Gallagher a "bad" man and that he does not want him at large. He said he will hold him pending a report of the self-solicited lunacy commission, a member of which Gallagher requested to be allowed to name.

"When Gallagher was brought in here the second time today I made up my mind that he is dangerous and should not be allowed his liberty again, said the chief. "Why, he might attack you, or me. I wouldn't allow a bully like that to strike me, but I know I am just as liable to a cowardly assault from a man of that kind as a newspaper reporter or any other person.

"Gallagher was fined in police court. His fines were heavy, but if he were went to the workhouse I thought Jack's friends might pay his fine, and I decided to prevent it.

"It was my plain duty to send him to the workhouse, though. What could I do under the circumstance of a fine and no cash forthcoming. When Jack's friends suggested he is crazy I was a way to keep him under restraint.

"It does not matter to me whether he is crazy from the effects of bad whisky or from other causes. I simply had to keep him under restraint, and I thought the lunacy commission plan was the best way out. I straightway turned the prisoner over to Colonel Greenman, the humane officer."

MUST KEEP THE PEACE.

At the request of Albert King, Jack Gallagher will be placed under a heavy police bond by the prosecuting attorney. After being placed under a bond, if Gallagher cannot raise funds to meet it, he will remain in jail for thirty days, after which time he is at liberty and will forfeit the bond if he disturbs the peace of the complainant.

Besides this, a warrant charging Gallagher with burglary is in the hands of the authorities. The charge of burglary is brought under a statute which defines burglary as the forcible entry into the dwelling house of another in the night time with intent to commit a felony therein.

Gallagher's actions in the home of Mr. King yesterday morning bring him under the rule of the statute and the warrant for his arrest on the charge of burglary is the result.

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