Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

October 12, 1908

OLD-TIME HOTEL CLERK DIES.

Peter P. Nerling Had Been at Blos-
som House Twenty-Five Years.

Peter P. Nerling, 47 years old, known as "Peter" to hundreds of traveling men all over the country, died yesterday afternoon at his home, 1645 Pennsylvania avenue. He was for twenty-five years at the Blossom house, for the past six years as steward, and before that as clerk.

Mr. Nerling was born at Schenectady, N. Y., and at the age of 13 years ran away from home and came to Kansas. After knocking about for some time he joined the regular army and was stationed at a frontier post. Twenty-five years ago he came to this city and entered the employ of the Blossom house as clerk, and remained with the hotel until he became ll three months ago.

A wife and son, Albert C. Nerling, a traveling man, survive. His parents, two brothers and seven sisters live in New York state. Mr. Nerling was a member of the Hotel Men's Association. The funeral will be held at the Cathedral, Eleventh and Walnut streets, tomorrow at 9 o'clock. Father Leo McCormick will officiate. Burial will be in Mount St. Mary's cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

August 23, 1908

LOST BOY'S BODY
IN PAUPER'S GRAVE.

GEORGE PICKLE HAS BEEN DEAD
SINCE JUNE.

Body Was Found in the River a Few
Days After His Disappearance.
Earl Hamilton Viewed It and
Made False Report.

On Saturday, June 20, George Pickle, 16 years old, went from his home, 1429 Summit street, in company with a friend, Earl Hamilton, 30 years old. They said that they were going to view the high water.

The day passed and the boy did not return. The next day Alexander Pickle, father of the lad, asked Hamilton what had become of his son. The latter replied that he had left him at 10 o'clock the morning before and that the boy had probably gone to the harvest fields, as he heard him asking for a ticket for Poe, Kas., at the Union depot ticket window. As George had promised his sister, Mrs. Alma E. Crowder, when she was in the city a few days before, that he would go out to her husband's farm at that place in a few days, this story seemed very probable. However, a few days later a body was discovered in the Missouri river near the mouth of the Blue and taken to the undertaking rooms of Blackburn & Carson in Sheffield for identification. The mother of the lost boy asked Earl Hamilton to go to Sheffield to view the body. He came back and reported that the body was that of a negro in an advanced stage of decomposition. The family did not pursue that clew any farther until last Friday.

Alonzo Ghent and Lum Wilson, city detectives, were assigned to the case. They discovered that Hamilton, a few days after the disappearance of the boy, deposited $120 in $20 bills in a bank, although the same week he had told his landlady that he had not enough money to pay her. George Pickle had a like sum when he disappeared. Hamilton had continued his friendly relations with the pickle family and frequently stopped to talk with the mother and to inquire if the boy had been found. On one of these visits he mentioned to Mrs. Pickle that he had served six months in the army once. She repeated this remark to the detectives, who investigated and found that Hamilton was a deserter from the army, having served a full term of three years and six months of another. They arrested him and sent word to Fort Leavenworth, and in the meanwhile they tried to connect him with the disappearance of the boy.

No charge, save investigation, was ever placed against Hamilton. He was turned over to the county marshal and held as his "guest" in the county jail a few days, then surrendered to the government authorities. A month later he escaped from the federal prison.

But it was not the trained minds of the detectives that determined the fate of the lad. Rather it was the mother's love which prompted her to go over the case again and again and to work up every clew. Her husband, who is a night watchman for the Jones Dry Goods Company, told her that no doubt the boy was safe, but she refused to believe it. Inquiries showed that he had not gone to Poe, Kas., nor was any word ever heard from him.

Last Friday, Mrs. Pickle, in thinking over the mystery, remembered that it was Hamilton that had reported the body at the undertaker's was a negro's. She determined to see if they had not been deceived, so she sent a friend, a Mr. Kinsey, to see the body. He found that the body was very probably that of the boy, and identified several articles as belonging to him. Yesterday the body was exhumed form the pauper's grave, where it had been buried, and positively identified by the father. A gash on the head told how he had come to his death. The police are looking for Hamilton now.

The body of George Pickle will be buried in Mount Washington cemetery today. Earl Hamilton is a cousin of Joseph Hamilton, 1511 Pennsylvania avenue, brother-in-law of the dead boy.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

August 2, 1908

AUSTRIAN NOBLEMAN
LIVED IN OBSCURITY.

Hugo V. Watterich, Who Died on the
Street Friday.

There is a mystery in the life of Hugo V. Watterich 41 years old, who dropped dead at Twenty-sixth and Pennsylvania avenue Friday evening. About thirteen years ago Watterich came to Kansas City and became an artist, doing etching and pencil drawings. He was an Austrian of pleasant manners but of imperfect English, and he was very reticent about his past life. No one, except his wife, whom he married soon after coming to Kansas City, could extract from him any reference to his life before coming to this country.

And yet Watterich was a man of apparently excellent education. When the children in the neighborhood where he lived caught any strange insect or animal they would take it at once to the artist who immediately classified it. His manners, also, betokened that he had moved in society better than that in which he was thrown daily.

About four years ago he was employed by the management of Fairmount park to be swimming instructor there, a position for which his athletic prowess made him competent. He made a capable instructor and seemed to be on the road to prosperity when an accident happened which resulted in the sickness that brought on his death. A man was drowned at the bathing beach one night. As soon as Watterich heard of the accident he set about to find the body. He plunged into the water in his swimming suit and searched for the corpse. Time after time he dived, searching every part of the bottom of the lake where it was likely to be found, but without success. Cold and exhausted, he gave up search at 1 o'clock the next morning. Then he went home in a state of collapse.

From that day he never regained his health. Heart trouble, resulting from overstrain, set in, and he was soon compelled to give up his position at the park. He then became unable to work and his young wife began taking in dressmaking to support them and their small son. In periods, when he felt stronger, Watterich did a little drawing and lettering at his home, 3425 Garfield avenue. Friday night he was walking at Twenty-sixth street and Pennsylvania avenue, when he suffered a hemorrhage and dropped dead. Dr. E. A. Burkhardt was called, and sent the body home in an ambulance.

"Before he died my husband told me many things about his life," said Mrs. Watterich, "but he charged me to keep them a secret. All that I am permitted to tell is that he came of a noble family in Austria and was educated in one of the best universities in Europe. He left his fatherland while he was yet a young man for reasons which he charged me not to reveal. He then spent several years roving over every part of the world, but finally settled in this country. He never told anyone of his past life except me."

Besides the widow a 12-year-old son, Vincent, survives. Funeral services will be held at the residence Thursday morning at 9 o'clock. Burial will be in Union cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , ,

July 30, 1908

SHE WAS SAVING HER GAS.

In Dim Light of Her Store Mrs. M.
Brady Took Confederate Bill.

The fact that the lights in the store of Mrs. M. Brady, 2111 Pennsylvania avenue, were very dim about 8:30 o'clock Tuesday night caused her to lose an even $20. It was then that a woman, bareheaded, as if she had just stepped in from a neighboring dwelling, hurried in and asked her to change a bill. Mrs. Brady accommodated her and some time after, when counting up cash -- in a bright light -- made the startling discovery that the woman whom she had accommodated had buncoed her. The $20 bill was a Confederate.

The police were notified and have a description of the woman.

Labels: ,

July 2, 1908

OVERHEAD FUSE
SET CAR AFIRE.

PANIC AMONG PASSENGERS FOL-
LOWED EXPLOSION.

CORINNE TALIAFERRO HURT.

SEVERAL OTHERS WERE IN-
JURED, BUT ONLY SLIGHTLY.

Trolley Car in Flames Ran Wild
Through Wyandotte Street Un-
til Pedestrian Turned
Off the Current.

When the "overhead" blew out on a Grand Central depot bound car at Twelfth and Wyandotte streets at 9 o'clock last night, half a dozen passengers were momentarily shrouded in flames. Miss Corinne Taliaferro, 1747 Pennsylvania avenue, became hysterical and jumped from the car w hen released by a passenger who had removed her from immediate danger from fire Her back and shoulder were wrenched, and she was so hysterical when taken to emergency hospital that an examination of her injuries could not be attempted.

A. L. Perry, 513 Locust street, who made a brave attempt to save the women passengers who tried to jump from the car, was treated at the emergency hospital, and Edward H. Bly, 5617 East Ninth street, who set the brakes on the car after it had been deserted by the crew, was burned severely. An unidentified woman passenger whose ankle was inured sent for a carriage and was taken home.

E. G. Combs, motorman of the car, No. 713, says he was thrown from the front vestibule by the explosion. The car had just crossed the Twelfth street tracks when the overhead blew out and the motorman left his brakes. Immediately the front of the car was enveloped in flames and the passengers fled to the rear vestibule. The first of the passengers, eager to leave the burning car, which was then under ordinary speed, pushed the conductor into the street and the car was left running wild.

It was then that Perry and Bly, the latter with an ambition to be a motorman, and with his application for a job placed with the Metropolitan Street Railway Company earlier in the day, attempted to rescue the passengers While Bly aided the two women to the rear of the car, Perry braced himself on the steps and refused to allow them to jump from the car.

Mrs. Taliaferro, who had been touched by the flames, stooped low and leaped straight into the street under Perry's outstretched arm. The rest of the passengers crowded upon the young man with such force that he was pushed to the pavement and his right ankle was twisted and his left shoulder bruised. The car, running wild and burning, had passed Eleventh street.

Bly, who could no longer aid the passengers, turned his attention to the brakes. The front vestibule was full of smoke and fire but he stepped in and fumbled for the levers. He brought the car to a stop near Ninth street, just as the insurance patrol company swung into Wyandotte from its Eleventh street station. The flames were soon extinguished The car was pushed to a switch in the North End.

The conductor and motorman, bruised, went to their barn and Bly sought a physician, while Perry went to the emergency hospital. Miss Taliaferro for two hours was too hysterical to receive treatment and was given opiates to quiet her nerves and brace her for examination . In the meantime Jack Bell, a traveling man acquaintance, had reached the emergency hospital and later D. H. D. McQuade was summoned. At midnight Miss Taliaferro was removed to the Wesley hospital, Eleventh and Harrison streets.

D. H. D. McQuade stated last night that the injuries may prove more serious than at first indicated by the examination. He thinks the girl has been injured internally and that several bones have been broken. A further examination will be made today. An opiate was given her last night in order that she might get rest and recover from the nervous shock sustained at the time of the accident.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

December 14, 1907

IN MEMORY OF KING OSCAR.

Swedes Will Hold Service on Sunday,
December 22.

A memorial service for King Oscar of Sweden, who died last Sunday morning will be held at the Swedish Lutheran church, at 1238 Pennsylvania avenue, Sunday, December 22, at 2:30 o'clock. An invitation is extended to all of the Swedes in Kansas City.

Among the speakers will be C. A. Ekstrommer, vice Swedish consul at St. Louis, and the Rev. A. W. Lindquist, pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church. There will be music and the reading of a memorial.

Labels: , , , ,

September 5, 1907

DIED IN CORONER'S PRESENCE.

Roman Berger, Taken Ill on Car,
Moved to O. H. Parker's House.

Roman Berger, 4040 Pennsylvania avenue, a motorman for the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, died yesterday at the home of Deputy Coroner O. H. Parker, where he had been carried after becoming ill on a Westport car at Forty-first and Main streets. Heart disease is given as the cause of death. Berger had been a motorman in the employ of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company for sixteen years, and was 42 years old. A widow and three children survive.

Labels: , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory