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January 31, 1910
IN WHITE PLAGUE FIGHT.

Men's Brotherhood to Learn How to
Escape Tuberculosis.

A meeting in behalf of the suppression of tuberculosis will be conducted tonight by the Men's Brotherhood of the Linwood Boulevard M. E. Church at the church, Linwood and Olive. Dr. M. T. Woods of Independence will tell how to escape tuberculosis; Dr. Seesco Stewart, dean of the Kansas City Veterinary college, will describe tuberculosis in the lower animals and how it affects public health. Dr. A. T. Kinsley will present stereoptican views.

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November 20, 1909

MARRIED HALF A CENTURY.

Golden Wedding Jubilee for Mr.
and Mrs. James H. Prather.

As fortunate a fifty years of married life as has ever been celebrated is that of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Prather of Clay county, who will observe the anniversary Monday afternoon and night, first at their home, three miles north of Harlem, and then at the home of their eldest daughter, Mrs. W. J. Campbell at 2618 Olive street.

During the half century since this pair became man and wife they became parents of six children, grandparents of fourteen children and great-grandparents of two children, and there has not been a divorce, a death or any great trouble in the family.

James Prather, who is now 70 years old, is living in a stately farm house on the site of a log cabin in which he was born. His father, Barrett Prather, acquired the 120 acres comprising the farm, in 1832, when it was valued at $1.25 an acre. Clay county real estate has gone booming since that date and $700 an acre is an average value now.

Mrs. Prather, who was Miss Margaret Emma Bradhurst, comes of a prominent Clay county family and was born but a few miles away from the Prather acres. She is 69 years old. Mr. and Mrs. Prather are possessed of sound bodily health and minds. Neither has experienced much sickness since their marriage. The names of the children are: Edward V. Prather, John B. Prather, Mrs. W. J. Campbell, Mrs. Oscar Westheffer, Mrs. George Barnes and Mrs. Rev. W. J. Parvin. All the children are married and every one of the descendants live within 100 miles of the farm and will be at the anniversary.

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October 31, 1909

RAZING A LANDMARK
MADE FAMOUS BY
WASHINGTON IRVING.

Oldest Building on Fifth Street
Meets Its End.
The Old Brevoort Hotel, West Fifth Street, Kansas City.
THE OLD BREVOORT HOTEL IN WEST FIFTH STREET.

With the razing of the old Breevort hotel at 118 West Fifth street, to make way for a modern building which will be erected shortly, the oldest structure on Fifth street will have been a memory. Long before the '60s the hotel was known as an old building, and no one seems to know the exact date of its erection or its builder.

Standing on an eminence directly opposite Kansas City's first Methodist church, the "Cannon house" as it was called then, was one of Kansas City's most elite boarding houses. The owners of the building rarely rented the rooms to transients, but were content with making it a fashionable boarding house. The rates after the war were $1 and up. In the '70s the building became known as the "Morgan house" and fifteen years ago it was christened the "Breevort."

When Fifth street was graded in the '60s to its present level, the cellar of the Breevort house was on a level with the street. The proprietor immediately arched up the windows, painted the cellar walls and had a three-story building. A week ago, before the structure was being torn down, the old cellar walls were clearly discernible and indicated that at one time Kansas City's hills were much steeper than at present.

"The hotel was an old building when I was a boy," said Dr. W. L. Campbell of 504 Olive street, one of the recognized authorities on early Kansas City history. "I don't think there is anyone living who knows the exact time that it was built or the builder. There used to be a report that Washington Irving stayed there when he made a visit to Kansas City, but I think that the report is generally discredited."

Fred Seewald, who runs a grocery store at 317 West Fifth street, is confident that the building must have been about 60 years old.

"It was by far the oldest building on Fifth street," he said.

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October 8, 1909

ONE WAY TO "DUCK" SAMPLES.

Concrete Walk Caves in and Pre-
cipitates Distributor Into Cellar.

While Mrs. Edith Sampson was sweeping the front porch at 510 Olive street yesterday morning about 9 o'clock, she saw a distributor of samples approaching. Intent on her task, she gave the broom two or three more vigorous turns, then looked up again expecting to be handed a sample. no man was in sight.

She looked further and found a hole in the front walk where the man should have been standing. Closer inspection revealed the sample man himself at the bottom of the hole, well covered with pulverized concrete.

Several of the hexagonal blocks of which the walk is made up, had given way beneath his weight and precipitated him into the cellar which projects under the walk.

The man made his exit by way of the cellar steps, not badly hurt.

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August 22, 1909

GRANDMA CAMPBELL'S
FAMILY OF CHILDREN.

EIGHTY-SEVEN LIVING DE-
SCENDANTS -- SHE IS 84.

Anniversary of Her Birth Was Cele-
brated Yesterday -- Two Sons
Are Ministers -- Five Weigh
Over 200 Pounds Each.
Four of the Five Generations in Milbra R. Campbell's Family.

Six children, twenty-eight grandchildren, fifty-two great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.

The foregoing are the living descendants of Mrs. Milbra R. Campbell, whose eighty-fourth birth anniversary was celebrated yesterday at the home of her son, George W. Campbell, 728 Wabash avenue. All the five sons who attended are over six feet tall and weigh more than 200 pounds each. They are Rev. John A. Campbell of Chillicothe, Tex., Rev. W. T. Campbell of Pueblo, Col., both ministers in the Baptist church, James H., George W. and David Campbell, all engaged in the live stock commission business in this city. Mrs. E. J. Henry, the only daughter, 1221 Bales avenue, was detained at home on account of illness.

At 1 o'clock a dinner was served to the immediate relatives attending the anniversary. During the afternoon an informal reception was held for relatives and friends. A photographer took pictures of "Grandma" Campbell, as she is familiarly known, and her five stalwart sons. After that group pictures of those present, representing many generations, were taken.

FIVE GENERATIONS.

The accompanying photograph represents but four generations of the Campbell family. There are now five. This picture was taken eleven years ago and shows Mrs. Campbell, her only daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth J. Henry, her son, Charles D. Henry and the latter's daughter, Miss Dorothy J. Henry, now in her sixteenth year.

The Rev. W. T. Campbell, who is here with his four children from Pueblo, Col., where he is pastor of the First Baptist church, is not a stranger in Kansas City. He held several pastorates in this city and organized what is now known as the Olive street Baptist church. He will occupy the pulpit there this morning and tonight. Rev. Mr. Campbell was also a pastor of a church in Independence, Mo., for four years.

The ancestors of this sturdy family, in which there has been no deaths since 1864, came from Scotland and the North of Ireland. In 1836 the father and mother immigrated from Tennessee and settled among the early pioneers in Northwestern Arkansas.

IN PRICE'S RAID.

The father, who was born in 1826, served in the United States army during the Mexican war of 1847. When volunteers were being called for to stay the failing fortunes of the Confederacy he volunteered to the governor of Arkansas in 1861 and was made captain of Company D, Fourteenth Arkansas infantry. After being engaged in many battles he surrendered with his company at Fort Hudson, July 8, 1863, and was made a prisoner of war. He died shortly afterward of a disease contracted in the army.

J. H. Campbell, the oldest brother, and John A. Campbell, now a minister, enlisted in the Confederate army later on and were with General Price in most of his big fights, and with Price's raid into Missouri. John was severely wounded in the battle of the Little Blue and captured, spending the rest of the war time in a military prison at Indianapolis, Ind. J. H. Campbell served with Price until the surrender at Shreveport, La., June 9, 1865. Both brothers were in the same company.

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August 4, 1909

ALLEGED KIDNAPER
CAUGHT; BOY FOUND.

HARRY JACOBS WAS WITH
UNCLE, CLARENCE CRAFT.

Stepfather Locates Stolen Child,
Dressed in Girl's Clothing, on
Train -- Craft to Be
Prosecuted.

The alleged kidnaper of little 4-year-old Harry Jacobs, who was coaxed from the home of T. H. Jacobs, his "grandpa," 1508 Olive street, about 1 o'clock Monday afternoon, was so unsuccessful in covering up his tracks that the child was gone from home but seventeen hours. He was returned to his mother about 8 o'clock yesterday morning. As soon as Mrs. Jacobs heard a description of the suspected kidnaper she thought of her brother, Clarence M. Craft of St. Joseph, Mo. Little Harry had lived three years with Mrs. Frank M. Baker, mother of Mrs. Jacobs and Craft.

FOUND CHILD ON TRAIN.

After the search in this city had been in vain, Harry Jacobs, the stolen boy's step-father, decided to leave for St. Joseph Monday evening. He wired for detectives to meet him at the train there at 11 p. m., intending to go to the home of the baby's grandmother, Mrs. Baker.

Soon after the train had left Leavenworth, Kas., Jacobs, suspecting that the kidnaper might have gone to that city by the electric line, started to walk through the train. In the coach immediately ahead of the one in which he had been sitting Jacobs saw Craft, Frank M. Baker, Craft's step-father, and the baby. Little Harry was dressed as a girl.

Jacobs approached and asked what was meant by spiriting the child away. He says Craft replied that it was none of his business as he was not the boy's father. As the train slowed up at the Union depot in St. Joseph, Jacobs says Craft attempted to escape with the child by running around the baggage room. He was caught and turned over to Detectives Parrott and Gordon of the St. Joseph police force.

CRAFT IS LOCKED UP.

"I saw that Craft was placed safely behind the bars," said Jacobs yesterday afternoon. "At the packing house I learned that Baker had been at work there at 1 o'clock Monday afternoon so he was released. He had gone to Leavenworth to meet Craft."

Jacobs asked that Craft be held. Yesterday he went before the prosecutor here and swore to a complaint charging kidnaping. Justice John B. Young issued the warrant which was turned over to Chief of Police Frank Snow with instructions to send a man to St. Joseph after the alleged kidnaper. Mrs. Jacobs, who was greatly alarmed over the absence of her child, says she will prosecute her brother.

In an attempt to learn where little Harry's clothes had been changed the boy was taken out yesterday morning by his step-father. He led the way through the alley in the rear of the house at 1508 Olive street, from whence he was taken, to Fifteenth street. When they reached the fountain at Fifteenth street and the Paseo, which little Harry calls "the flopping water," he stopped. He said that he was taken into a house near there which had a broken porch. His clothes were taken off and girl's apparel substituted.

BOY'S CLOTHES THROWN AWAY.

After leaving the place, t he little boy said, his overalls, waist, etc. of which he had been divested, were wrapped in a piece of paper and thrown over a fence. The house could not be located. The child said several people were present when the shift was made. Candy and the promise of a long ride on the choo choo cars," is what lured the boy away from home.

Jacobs and the stolen boy's mother have not been married long. Mrs. Jacobs was first married in St. Joseph several years ago to Harry Burke from whom she was later divorced. For three years she left her child with her mother, who later married Frank M. Baker, a packing house carpenter. The grandmother and Baker became greatly attached to the child and did not want to give him up when the mother remarried. Jacobs is a cook.

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August 3, 1909

MOTHER FAINTS WHEN
CHILD IS KIDNAPED.

4-YEAR-OLD LURED AWAY
BY STICK OF CANDY.

Police of St. Joseph Think
They've Found Him.
Four-Year-Old Harry Jacobs, Kidnaped.
HARRY JACOBS.

Lured by a stick of candy, Harry Jacobs, 4 years old, was kidnaped yesterday afternoon from in front of his stepfather's parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Jacobs, 1508 Olive street. The kidnaper, who worked for two hours before accomplishing his end, meets a description of the boy's uncle.

Half crazed at the the loss of her boy, from whom she had been separated for over three years, Mrs. Jacobs collapsed at the Union depot yesterday afternoon while searching for him. Dr. M. W. Pichard, who attended her, said her condition was serious. No trace of the child was found.

At 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon the missing child was seen at the Union depot by a waiting passenger. In the mean time a dozen relatives, assisted by the police, scoured the city for the little fellow all afternoon and evening, but up to a late hour last night had found no trace of him.

Almost four years ago Della Craft of St. Joseph, Mo., was married to Harry Burke of that place. They were divorced a few months later. Mrs. Burke would not live at home, and she could not find employment where she could keep her boy with her, so she arranged with her mother to care for him. She says that she paid her mother $10 a month to care for the child.

BECOMES ATTACHED TO BOY.

Three months ago at Horton, Kas., Mrs. Burke married Harry Jacobs, a cook. Before the ceremony he promised her that she could have the boy live with her.

In the meantime Mrs. Jacob's mother married Frank Baker, who became greatly attached to the boy and did not want to give him up. The child was finally given to his mother and her husband, and they departed for Eastern Kansas. They came to Kansas City about two weeks ago.

For the first few days they stopped at the home of Jacob's parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Jacobs, 1508 Olive street. They then found apartments at 1613 Park Avenue.

Little Harry Jacobs developed a fondness for his new "grandma" and spent much of his time at her house, only a short distance from his home. Yesterday morning a man who, the mother declares, was her brother, appeared in the neighborhood of the Olive street address. A tinner was doing work on an adjoining house. The stranger asked the boy if he could not help him and the tinner gave him a dime for assistance in carrying tools and tin to the roof.

CHILD IS LURED AWAY.

A few minutes after 1 o'clock Mrs. Jacobs received the news that her son had been kidnaped She was told that a man who answers the description of her brother had lured the child away with a stick of candy. The child, she was told, recognized the man and willingly accompanied him.

Mrs. Jacobs ran to her step-mother's home. Neighbors hurried to her aid. Jacobs was summoned from his work and he called for his father. The quartette, accompanied by neighbors, hastened to the Union depot. There Mrs. Jacobs was told by a waiting traveler that a boy answering the description of her son accompanied by a man who she says she believes to be her brother and a woman whom she thinks is her mother, had been seen in the station just a short while before.

At that Mrs. Jacobs became hysterical and collapsed. She was carried to the invalids' room in the depot, where Dr. M. W. Pickard was summoned to attend to her. In the meantime friends had organized searching parties and the police of both Kansas City and St. Joseph were notified.

BELIEVES BOY IS IN ST. JOE.

ST. JOSEPH, MO., Aug. 2. -- The police of South St. Joseph investigated this end of the kidnaping story of Harry Jacobs in Kansas City today, and believe the kidnaped boy is now at the home of Frank Baker, 225 West Valley street, South St. Joseph. The police say they have no official request from Kansas City to make an arrest.

Frank Baker is a carpenter, who has been employed by Swift & Co. at the packing plant for several years. The police claim not to know Clarence Craft, said to be a brother of the kidnaped child's mother.

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July 30, 1909

PIONEER BLACKSMITH DIES
LEAVING $150,000 ESTATE.

Henry Nevins Came to Kansas City
in 1869, and Opened Shop
on Third Street.

Henry Nevins, pioneer horseshoer of Kansas City and in the early days a fair prototype of Longfellow's "Village Blacksmith," died at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the family residence, 1032 Olive street. He was 70 years old.

He was born in Tipperary county, Ireland, and came to this country when a young man, spending some years in Canada, where he learned the blacksmith trade and where he married. Later he crossed the line into the United States, settling first in Burlington, Ia., and from there removing to Kansas City in 1869.

He first opened a shop at Third street and Grand avenue and for twenty years Nevins's blacksmith shop was a landmark.

In those early days when railroads were in their infancy and mules and horses were yet the main standby for transportation, the blacksmith was a most important person.

Nevins met the situation with an energy that never seemed to tire, and it is on record that during rush seasons he has been known to stand in the smith forty-eight hours at a stretch, without sleep, eating in the shop meals brought to him by his wife.

Early in his career in Kansas City Mr. Nevins began to put his savings into real estate, and this policy he continued throughout his career. But once in his life did he part with real estate he had purchased, and that was about eight years ago, when he sold to the Armour Packing Company the property at 306 West Eighth street for $10,000, and for which he had paid $900 in early days. For an other property next to the Gillis opera house, which cost him $800 he recently refused an offer of $800 a foot.

Practically all his wealth is in inside Kansas City real estate and a conservative estimate of his estate places the figure at $150,000.

Later he moved his blacksmith shop to 512 Walnut street, and when that property became too valuable for a blacksmith shop he moved once more to 512 Grand avenue, where he continued in business until five years ago, when he retired, owing to advancing age and continued ill health.

He leaves a wife and six children, three sons and three daughters. The children are: John M., James H., William J., Elinore, Catherine Marie and Rose.

The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Aloysius's church, and burial will be at St. Mary's cemetery.

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July 9, 1909

SAVED FROM DEATH
BY GIRL'S QUICK WIT.

ELECTRICIAN GRABBED JUST IN
TIME BY MARY JOHNSON.

Was Suspended From Guy Rope Over
Flood Waters of Missouri With
High Tension Current
Paralyzing Body.

Suspended over the waters of the Missouri river from a guy rope on the discharge pope of the new pump in the East Bottoms, while a high tension current coursed through his body, paralyzing him and burning his flesh, A. J. Winnie, an electrician, was saved from death yesterday afternoon by Miss Mary Johnson, who, at the risk of her own life, grabbed his body and broke the short circuit. She was severely shocked as was her brother, Dan Johnson, but between them they rescued the lineman without serious injury to either.

The accident occurred in the early part of the afternoon. Miss Johnson is a daughter of A. D. Johnson of 334 Olive street, the contractor who built the pumping station, and she has been greatly interested in seeing the big centrifugal pump work. With a friend, Mrs. J. Dixon, she visited the pumping house yesterday afternoon. Her brother, Dan, was awaiting them and rowed them to the pump house, which stands some distance in what is now part of the Missouri river. The pump had been turned over to the city Wednesday night but Mr. Johnson remained there to render any assistance that might be needed by J. Nepher, the city inspector, and A. J. Winnie, the electrician who was given charge of the plant.

CLIMBS ON DISCHARGE PIPE.

A test of the pump was favorably commented on by the women and when the big motor was stopped, Winnie worked at the incandescent lights about the room. The pump house is ten feet above the present height of the river and it was planned to place clusters of electric lights on river and shore sides of the building. These would be over openings in the building eight feet in width. To place the lamps on the river side, Winnie found it necessary to get on the roof. To reach that place he clambered out on the big discharge pipe and then with his left arm over the steel guy rope he threw his right arm over the conduit which centered the big opening in the pump house.

Miss Johnson was about to compliment him on his agility, when his body suddenly became rigid, his face took on a look of agony and smoke curled up from his right hand and arm. Miss Johnson had studied electricity. She realized that Winnie had formed a connection with a high tension current, and that it was shocking him to death, having completely paralyzed him so that he could not help himself.

Without a thought for her own safety, she leaned forward and grasped him about the body. Her brother Dan, who was standing a few feet away, grabbed at her at the same time and the current passed through the trio. The force of the hold which Miss Johnson took a Winnie was sufficient to break his grasp of the charged conduit, and he swung helpless from the guy rope.

HEROINE IS MODEST.

The shock which Miss Johnson and her brother received stunned them, but they quickly recovered and, taking hold of Winnie, helped him into the pumphouse.

Winnie was badly burned. It took some time before he recovered sufficiently to realize how he had been saved. The skin was burned from his right hand, and his left arm was seared in several places where the current had passed through his body to the guy rope from which he was suspended. Miss Johnson applied oils to his burns and Winnie announced after thanking her that he would remain on the "job" until his time was up in the evening.

It was not until an hour after the incident that Mr. Johnson or his sister realized how close to death Winnie had been or the risk Miss Johnson had taken when she grasped his swinging body.

Miss Johnson modestly disclaimed any special credit for her part in saving Winnie from death.

"I knew enough about electricity to realize that he was grounded, and the first thing I thought of was to break the connection. To do this I made a grab at him, but did not think that I would get the shock that I did. Brother Dan grabbed me at the same time, or perhaps I would have fallen in the river. As it was, we both received severe shocks, but they did not injure us."

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June 10, 1909

CLAIM HE HYPNOTIZED
ATHENAEUM WOMEN.

SIX MEMBERS CAUSE ARREST OF
AFFABLE BOOK AGENT.

A. W. Johnson Alleged to Have In-
duced Them to Give Up Money
and I. O. U.'s Totaling $120.
Held by Justice.

Six members of the Athenaeum Club went to the prosecutor's office yesterday and on behalf of themselves and three others declared that A. W. Johnson, a book agent, had hypnotized them into giving up money and I. O. U.'s totaling $120.75.

The women who complained to M. M. Bogie, assistant prosecuting attorney, were the following: Mrs. Anna S. Welch, wife of a physician; Mrs. E. T. Phillips, wife of a physician, residence the Lorraine; Mrs. Paul B. Chaney, 3446 Campbell street; Mrs. George S. Millard, 4331 Harrison street; Mrs. W. W. Anderson, 2705 Linwood avenue; Dr. Eliza Mitchell, 1008 Locust street.

Besides these, the following complained of Johnson, but did not appear yesterday: Mrs. Willard Q. Church, 3325 Wyandotte street; Mrs. Wilbur Bell, 200 Olive street, and Mrs. S. S. Moorehead, 3329 Forest avenue.

The women confronted Johnson in Mr. Bogie's office. It was declared that he had exercised hypnotic power. Said Mrs. M. H. Devault, 3411 Wabash avenue, prominent in the Athenaeum:

"This man sold a set of books called 'The Authors' Digest' to these members of the Athenaeum on representation that I had purchased the volumes and had recommended them. They bought largely on this recommendation."

"Yes, and we were hypnotized," said the women.

In addition to the books, Johnson sold a membership in the "American University Association." This, the women say he told them, would enable them to buy books, and especially medical works, at less than the usual price. After correspondence it was found that the lower prices could not be secured.

From all but one woman named, except Mrs. Devault, Johnson secured $5.75 and an order for $115. From Mrs. Millard he got $20 in money.

Johnson, a well dressed, affable young man, was arraigned before Justice Theodore Remley on a charge of obtaining money under false pretenses. He pleaded not guilty and was released on a bond of $500. He said he had an office in the Century building.

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April 27, 1909

WED, HE SAID, WHILE
IN HYPNOTIC TRANCE.

FOR THAT REASON CATTLEMAN
SUED FOR DIVORCE.

Charles E. Brooks Says Woman
Rubbed His Head Until He Was
Unconscious and Then
Got a License.

Hypnotism was responsible for his marriage, declared Charles E. Brooks, a cattleman, who yesterday secured a divorce from Estella Brooks by default in the circuit court. Judge Porterfield heard the case.

Brooks, who is about 55, while his former wife is 30, said in his testimony:

"I met Mrs. Estelle Neville February 6, 1908. She answered my advertisement for a housekeeper. She called me up and asked me to take her to lunch down town. During lunch she borrowed $30 from me. She said she could buy a $60 coat for $30 at a sale that day. The same evening she paid me back the money.

"At that time she was running a millinery store on Twelfth street. I went there on Saturday night, two days after I had met her. I was suffering from the effects of a street car accident. She asked me if I did not want her to rub peroxide on my forehead. I said no, but she got on her knees and began to rub my forehead. She continued to rub my head and asked me to marry her. She kept on rubbing my head until I did not know what was going on.

GOT LICENSE AT MIDNIGHT.

"Then she called up the recorder -- it was midnight -- and had a license issued. We went to a minister's and were married. On Sunday -- the next day -- I awoke in a hotel on West Twelfth street. I was in bed and she was sitting beside the bed. We went to her millinery store and stayed about an hour. After that I went to my daughter's home. I have never been back to Mrs. Brooks's home since.

In answer to questions by Judge Porterfield, Brooks said:

"She told me she was a hypnotist. She had several books on the subject."

This was Brooks's second attempt to get a divorce. Earlier in the year he brought proceedings to annul the marriage. He was brought into the court of Judge Goodrich, February 1, on a stretcher and taken to a hospital immediately afterwards. Judge Goodrich refused to hear the case, telling Brooks that he should sue for a divorce, as the things complained of had happened before the marriage. Mrs. Brooks filed an answer denying the charges.

The records of the recorder show that the Rev. Frank S. Arnold of 5143 Olive street performed the ceremony.

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September 13, 1908

TOOK POTASH AND A CIGARETTE.

But Neither Harmed Harry Jacobs,
Cook, With a Poison Record.

An ambulance call was received at the Walnut street police station last night about 10:30, on a report that a man had tried to commit suicide by poisoning himself. When the ambulance arrived the patient, Harry Jacobs, a cook, living at 1508 Olive street, was found on the front porch smoking a cigarette. He did not deny that he had taken potash, but seemed to have completely recovered.

"You ought to remember me," he said to the surgeon, Dr. Warren T.Thornton, "you pumped a dose of carbolic acid out of me a month ago."

He did not give any reason for the attempt.

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July 2, 1908

GENERAL H. S. HALL IS DEAD.

He Was Awarded a Medal for Bra-
very During Civil War.

H. S. Hall, brigadier general and veteran of the civil war, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Charles M. Kemper, 2914 Tracy avenue, yesterday morning. He was born in New York and entered the Union army as a private in 1861. He participated in many engagements and lost his right arm while leading his regiment at the battle of Petersburg. He was awarded a medal for bravery on the field by congress and raised to the rank of general on his retirement in 1866.

When the was was over General Hall moved to Missouri and settled in Carroll county, where he lived until 1888, when he removed to Lawrence, Kas. He came to this city four years ago. A widow and four children survive. The children are Mrs. C. M. Kemper Mrs. Dana Templin, 121 Olive street; J. G Hall, a teacher in the state agricultural school of North Carolina, and C. S. Hall, who lives at Lawrence, Kas. Burial will be in Lawrence tomorrow.

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June 5, 1908

MASON'S MURDER
CHARGED TO WIX.

PAWNED DEAD MAN'S WATCHES
AND DIAMONDS.

MASON WAS IN WIX'S BARN.

ACCUSED MAN ALSO SUSPECTED
OF FANNING MURDER.

Was Once Before the Prosecutor to
Explain His Sudden Wealth
Shortly After Fanning
Was Slain.

At 11 o'clock last night Clark Wix was formally charged with the murder of John ("Dutch") Mason, the horse trader who disappeared from here January 26 last. Mrs. Lizzie Mason, the murdered man's widow, and Maud Wilson, with whom he had lived, both went to Camden, Mo., yesterday and identified the body.

It was after hearing statements made by the women, after they had identified property pawned by Wix, that John W. Hogan, assistant prosecutor, concluded to charge Wix with murder in the first degree. The information was drawn and sworn to by Mrs. Lizzie Mason. Then it was filed with Justice Michael Ross and a warrant issued on which Wix will be arrested this morning. His statement is to be taken at police headquarters this morning. His arraignment will be later.

The body of Mason arrived in the city yesterday afternoon and was sent to the morgue of Freeman and Marshall, 3015 Main street. There is a large hole in Mason's skull on the right side at the base, and another behind the left ear. A deep fracture connects both holes. It is the opinion of Detectives Charles Halderman and James Fox, who have developed he case, that the murder was committed with a hammer. A search will be made for the weapon.

In looking over his pawn slips Fred Bailey, secretary to the inspector, found where Clark Wix had pawned two watches and, as Mason had a watch when he disappeared, Detective Ralph Trueman was sent to Silverman's pawn shop, 1215 Grand avenue, after the property. He came back with a man's hunting case watch and a woman's watch with a diamond in the back. He also got a diamond ring and an Elk ring from the same shop.

IT WAS HER WATCH.

Both Mrs. Mason and Maud Wilson quickly identified the man's watch as having been Mason's. They were not told of the other watch, and Mrs. Mason was asked if she ever possessed a watch.

"Yes," she said, "a small watch with a diamond in the back of the case." When shown the other watch which had been in pawn in Wix's name both women identified it immediately as Mrs. Mason's, and the Wilson woman said that Mason had the watch with him when he left that fatal Sunday, January 26.

According to the pawn sheets Wix pawned Mason's watch on February 10 and not until May 6 was Mrs. Mason's watch pledged. The police think that the diamonds in the Elk ring and other ring originally were part of Mason's horseshoe pin in which were fifteen stones, three large ones at the top and six smaller ones on each side.

John Hogan spent most of the night taking statements in the Wix case. Miss Wilson in her statement said that on April 26 last, her birthday, Clark Wix made her a present of a diamond ring. At the same time he had a stone set into a stud for himself. L. L. Goldman of 1307 Grand avenue, who set the two stones for Wix, also made a statement. Both persons said that the jewels were of almost the exact size of the three large stones in Mason's horseshoe pin. Miss Wilson said that when Wix gave h er the ring he said: "Now, if my wife ever finds out that I gave you this ring you must tell her that you bought it from me."

The third stone thought to have come from Mason's pin is believed now to be in an Elk charm worn my Wix when he was arrested.

CALLED FROM WIX'S BARN.

W. A. Marshall, a liveryman, said in his statement that on the Sunday Mason disappeared he called up from Wix's transfer barn, 1406 Walnut street, and said: "I'll be over with Wix to see you in a little while about buying that horse." But, though that was about 1 p. m., Mason never came.

James Conely and John Lewis, horseshoers at Fourteenth and Walnut streets, stated that they often saw John Mason about Wix's barn, which was directly across the street from them.

It was the intention to question Wix last night, but that had to be abandoned until today. Wix has not yet been informed that he is charged with murder. When arrested he asked no explanation, though it was 1 o'clock Wednesday morning, and since he has been held in the matron's room at headquarters he has taken no apparent interest in why he was locked up and no one allowed to see him.

QUESTIONED IN FANNING MURDER.

It developed yesterday that two months ago, on information furnished Detectives "Lum" Wilson and J. L. Ghent, Wix was taken before Prosecutor Kimbrell to be questioned in regard to the murder of Thomas W. Fanning, the aged recluse who was brutally killed with a hammer in his home, 1818 Olive street, December 31, 1906.

He was known to have hauled Mrs. Fanning to the general hospital, and it was reported that he said later: "Somebody is going to have to kill that old guy, Fanning, living all alone out there with all that coin." It was shortly after the Fanning murder that Wix went into business for himself, but in his statement at that time he said that his uncle, Clark Wix, postmaster of Butler, Mo., had furnished him the money. That matter will be reopened now.

Police Judge Harry G Kyle was yesterday retained by relatives to defend Clark Wix. Kyle comes from the same county, Bates, in which the Wix family live. All sorts of influence was brought to bear yesterday to get to see and talk to the prisoner, but Captain Walter Whitsett would not permit it.

THREATENED HABEAS CORPUS.

Thomas W. Wix, a farmer from near Yates Center, Kas., arrived yesterday and it was he and Clark Wix, the uncle from Butler, who retained Judge Kyle. Rush C. Lake, assistant attorney general, went to the station and, according to Captain Whitsett, threatened to sue out a writ of habeas corpus if not allowed to see Wix. He was told that such action would mean in immediate charge of murder and there it ceased. Then other lawyers tried the same tactics and failed.

In June, 1906, Clark Wix was married to Miss Harriet Way, a nurse at the general hospital, who had served barely one of her two years.. At that time Wix was driving an ambulance for the Carroll-Davidson Undertaking Company, which handled all the city dead from the hospital, and it was his frequent trips there that brought him in contact with his wife.

Miss Way lived near Shelbina, Mo., and it was reported soon after her marriage that her family came near ostracising her for what she had done. In about a year, however, Wix had diamonds of all kinds and frequently gave his wife gems until she was the envy of her nurse friends at the hospital. Mrs. Wix was not informed last night that her husband had been charged with murder.

When Clark Wix was examined by County Prosecutor I. B. Kimrell and City Detectives Lum Wilson and J. L. Ghent, shortly after the murder of Thomas Fanning in his home at 1818 Olive street, on New Year's eve, 1906, Wix was not plainly told what charge might be placed against him. No person, outside of Chief of Police John Hayes, Wix's wife, the detectives and the prosecutor knew that Wix was under arrest. None of Wix's political friends knew of it or made any effort to secure his release. In recalling the questioning of Wix at that time Mr. Kimbrell said last evening:

"We asked Wix how he came by diamonds he was wearing and how he found the wherewithal to purchase his teams and wagons. He showed us that the original story about his owning many large diamonds was an exaggeration and that he possessed only two small ones, and he proved that he held title to only three teams and a wagon or two. He told us the size of his salary and how much he had been saving out of it each week. We corroborated his explanation by his wife and the neighbors. We never told him he was held for the Fanning murder. We discovered that we had no case against him and dropped the matter without letting his name be connected with the murder."

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June 4, 1908

DIAMONDS MAY CAUSE
ARREST OF MURDERER.

POLICE CLAIM TO KNOW WHO IS
WEARING MASON'S SPARKLERS.

Have Been Unable to Learn Anything
Form Clark Wix and Refuse
to Tell Who Else
They Suspect.

Diamonds, obtained and worn under unusual circumstances have given the police, so they think, a clue which will speedily lead to the solution of the mystery of John Mason's death. On Sunday, January 26, Mason, a young horse trader, disappeared from the house at 1403 Main street, where he roomed. At the time of his disappearance he was supposed to have had on his person $585 cash, a large gold watch, a ring set in a large diamond and a horseshoe scarf pin containing 18 diamonds. The body, stripped of its wealth, was found Sunday on a sand bar near Camden, Mo.

Several weeks after his disappearance detectives, who were working on the case, learned that one of his acquaintances had tried to borrow money from him, and that Mason refused to let him have it. This man is said to be a prominent business man of Kansas City and the police refused to give out his name until something more definite is known about him. This man, according to the detectives, is wearing a ring, the setting of which corresponds identically with the ring worn by Mason on the day he was lost trace of, and the man's bank account suddenly jumped up $900. It is intimated that this man will be arrested on a formal charge today.

Besides this one ring there were other ones, all diamonds, which figured largely, it is said, in the arrest of Clark Wix, a liveryman. Wix is supposed to know something of the disappearance of Mason.

The time limit for Wix's imprisonment for investigation ends this morning when a definite charge will be placed against him today or he will be released.

That Mason, for the body found at Camden was undoubtedly that of Mason,m was murdered, seems to go beyond question. . The wound on the back of his head just behind his ear, was made by some blunt instrument, presumably a hammer. On his write wrist the flesh has become decomposed, and in that place only it is broken. This leads the detectives to believe that there was a struggle when the murder was committed and that Mason was struck severely on the wrist or the skin was bruised and torn by twisting.

Phil Kirk of the Kirk detective agency says that he does not believe that Mason's body was in the water over two or three weeks. The body was well preserved, which would be impossible if it had been in the water since January 26. It is Kirk's belief that Mason's murderers committed the deed in the center of the business district and then carried the body to the river front in a hack. It would seem, according to his idea, that the murderers, for he has no doubt that there was more than one, buried him in a shallow grave in the sand on the river front. The high water of the past two weeks has served to do away with the old water line and much of the sand bank has been washed away. It was with the rise of the river that the body came to the surface. If it had been in the river long it would have floated further down stream than Camden.

The police officers are trying to connect the murder of Mason with the murder of Thomas Fanning, a wealthy stone mason who was killed in his home at 1818 Olive street in January, 1907. Just what this connection is Police Captain Walter Whitsett has not yet divulged to the public.

Early this morning two detectives, an undertaker and Mrs. John Mason left for Camden, where they will view the body and look further into the circumstance of its being found. The body will be brought to Kansas City today for burial.

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February 25, 1908

CONSTABLE SETS
PRISONERS FREE

POLICE MELODRAMA IN WHICH
CASEY IS COMEDIAN.

TWO CONFIDENCE MEN ESCAPE.

THROUGH CONSTABLE'S MED-
DLING, AFTER ONE IS SHOT.

Two confidence men, who had fleeced J. W. Burrows, and Oklahoma ranchman, out of $1,000, were captured last night after an exciting chase, in which several shots were fired, and then, after being in the safe custody of two officers, made their escape at Eighth and Delaware streets through the alleged interference of Roy Casey, a constable of Justice Remley's court.

Both confidence men were arrested by Detective Lyngar, who captured the smaller of the swindlers as he was emerging from a Leavenworth car at the Junction. The larger of the confidence men jumped through the car window and fled down Delaware street. Lyngar, dragging the smaller prisoner with him, gave chase and finally fired at the escaping prisoner. The bullet entered the right arm and the man fell exhausted near the rear of the American Bank building.

Lyngar, determined to catch his man, turned the uninjured prisoner over to Patrolman Regan, and then grabbed the second man. The officers and prisoners then started for the call box at Eighth and Delaware streets and it is here, witnessees say, that Casey interfered.

STOPS THE POLICEMAN.

Casey, in company with David S. Russell and C. E. Reckert of the city engineer's office, pushed through the crowd that had gathered and stopped Lyngar. Casey's explanation is that he did not know Lyngar was an officer and thought that he was going to shoot Patrolman Regan, who was marching in front with the injured prisoner. O. P. Rush of 3015 Olive street and L. R. Ronwell of 1902 East Thirty-first street witnessed the affair and told the police that they heard Lyngar tell Casey that he was an officer.

At any rate an arguent ensued. Patrolman Regan, who was holding his prisoner by the collar of his overcoat, turned around to ascertain what the trouble was. In an instant the inured prisoner slipped out of his overcoat and dived into the crowd. Regan pursued him, firing three shots at the criminal as he ran west on Eighth street. None of the bullets seem to have taken effect.

These shots created fresh excitement and Lyngar, furious with Casey's interruption, loosened his hold on the other man. In an instant the prisoner had jerked away from the officer and was lost in the crowd.

RAPPED CASEY'S HEAD.

The only satisfaction Regan and Lyngar got was in arresting Casey. Regan rapped him twice over the head and Lynar took the constable to the Central station, where he was released on $26 bail. Casey had been attending the Republican convention.

The inured thief not alone lost his overcoat, but in plunging through the crowd lost his hat and undercoat as well. He was traced as far as Second and Wyandotte streets, where he purchased a new hat and coat. Then he ran toward the Kansas City Southern yards.

STOLE $1,000 FROM BURROWS.

Upon the complaint of J. W. Burrows, Oklahoma ranchman, that he had been swindled out of $1,000 by the two confidence men, Detectives Lyngar and Lewis were assigned to the case. Lewis was called away, so Lyngar accompanied by Burrows, made the investigation alone. At the Junction, Burrows espied the two men inside a Leavenworth car at about 9 o'clock. Lyngar went after them. The larger of the men, finding the front entrance of the car shut off, jumped through a window. The smaller attempted to brush by Lyngar, but the detective grabbed him It was following this that the chase began, which ended in Casey's intererence and the escape of the men.

The coat lost by the injured prisoner contained a book which indicates that he lives in the vicinity of the Union stock yards in Chicago.

About 1 o'clock this morning police officers found the coat of the smaller of the two confidence men, from which he also slipped when he escaped from the officer's grasp. It was in Brannon's saloon, on Delaware street, near Eighth.

When the smaller "con" man squirmed out of the garment it fell in the crowd, which parted to allow him to pass. It is not known who took it to the saloon. It is the theory of the police that the $1,000 stolen from the ranchman was in the pocket of the little man's coat when he was captured. It wasn't there when the coat was found.

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February 24, 1908

SEARCH SEWERS
FOR JOHN FAYHEY

BELIEVING HIS BODY IS PROB-
ABLY HIDDEN THERE.

THE QUEST IS FRUITLESS

PARTY WALKS MILE THROUGH
A MAIN SEWER.

Wife of Missing Man Believes His Is
Still Alive -- She Thinks He
Has Been Injured and
Will Return.

Every manhole, every telephone cable conduit, every underground passageway, even the Walnut street sewer; every possible hiding place into which a body could be stowed, in the neighborhood of Twelfth and Main streets, was gone through yesterday by friends of John Fayhey, who disappeared from the knowledge of his fellow men three weeks ago. No trace of the body was found by the searchers. The search underground was as futile as the body hunt of previous Sundys through the outskirts of the city and in the trenches made by men in the water works department. Fayhey was last seen at 1 o'clock on the morning of February 1, with a party of drunken men, at the corner of Twelfth and Main streets. He was a foreman in the city water works department.

Jerry Ryan, engineer at the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company's plant at Twentieth and Walnut streets, was in charge of yesterday's explorations. Jerry is a brother of Police Sergeant Al Ryan and of Mrs. Fayhey. Others in the party were Patrick O'Conner and Tom Bryan, city firemen, and City Detectives Raftery and Halvey. Jerry Ryan, geared in hip rubber boots, entered every opening on Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Main and Walnut streets in the neighborhood of the spot where Fayhey was last seen. No trace of the body was found.

Then Ryan and O'Conner entered the Walnut street sewer at Thirteenth street and explored it south to where it empties into O. K. creek at Twenty-Second street. Ryan, who led the way, was provided with a safety lamp.

This lamp was carried to guard against sewer gas. It is a device imported from the coal mining district, and is valuable in that whenever it is carried into a cloud of sewer gas it is extinguished. O'Conner, who followed with a lantern, was enabled to tell, by watching Ryan and the safety light, where there was sewer gas ahead and to avoid walking into it with his lantern. Only one body of gas was met, but if the lantern had been carried into this an explosion would have resulted which probably would have killed both men. The detectivs and firemen walked along Walnut street and opened the manhole covers ahead of the two men who were walking in the sewer.

No trace of Fayhey's body or any other body was found in the sewer. Jerry Ryan said, when he came out:

"No body could lodge in that sewer. The water, although in no place over knee deep, runs with a very swift current, and would carry any body out into O K. creek. It was not necessary to explore the entire length of the sewer but I did that to make certain that Fayhey's body was not there."

When John Fayhey's wife was told last night at her home ot 1605 Olive street that the search through the sewer and the conduits had been fruitless, she only reiterated her former belief that her husband was still alive.

"I know his is not dead" she said. "I firmly believe that he has been hurt and will come home when he is able."

Police Seargeant Al Ryan, Mrs. Fayhey's brother, holds a different theory. He says:

"There is no doubt that Fayhey was killed, and that his body is concealed somewhere. We have searched Kansas City from center to circuference, above ground and under, but without result. We have telegraphed a description of Fayhey to every town down the river as far as St. Louis. I think that the men who made way with Fayhey were drunk and did not mean to kill him. I know, however, that they had an automobile with them and when they saw what they had done, they put the body into the car and took it away. Probably they threw it in the Missouri river.

"I know that Fayhey had no money to speak of on his person the night he disappeared and I believe that the men who were with him killed him in a drunken brawl without any reasonable motive. I expect that someone who knows all about the killing will come in one of these days and tell the story."

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February 8, 1908

SUING ON PLUMBERS'S BOND.

City Wants Martin & Keck to Make
Good a Judgment.

Suit for $1,246.50 against Martin & Keck, plumbers, and their bondsmen, the National Security Company, was brought in the circuit court yesterday by Kansas City. The plumbing firm, it is alleged, left an excavation in front of house number 2824 Olive street unguarded on January 8, 1906, so that Maud G. Norris drove a buggy into it, overturning the buggy and breaking her arm. She sued the city and last June got a verdict for $750 damages.

The city wants the plumbing company to pay this judgment and the incidental costs, because the company is under $1,500 bond, through the National Security Company, to the city to put the dirt back in excavations it digs in the streets or to barricade the excavations.

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February 6, 1908

JOHN FAYHE STILL MISSING.

Water Works Employe Last Seen in
Saloon Friday Night.

The disappearance of John Fayhe, for twenty-years an employe of the water works department, still remains a mystery. He is an expert hydrant man, and last Friday evening, after placing a new hydrant at Twelfth and Main streets, went into a nearby saloon with his men and drank some whisky. He had been known to take an occasional drink but was never seen intoxicated. It was near midnight when he left the saloon and that was the last seen of him.

Fayhe has a wife and four grown children at 1605 Olive street, none of whom can account for his disappearance. He is a brother-in-law of Sergeant Al Ryan of the police force. The missing man is described as 50 years old, 5 feet 11 inches tall, adn weighs 260 pounds. He is round shouldered, heavy set, has a gray mustache and gray hair clipped close. When he left he wore his working clothes, a black overcoat and cap, with blue overalls.

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February 4, 1907

DR. EUBANK'S HORSE STOLEN.

Twice in Two Years He Is the Mark
of a Thief.

Dr. A. E. Eubank, formerly police surgeon, was the victim of a horsethief last night while attending a meeting of the church board of the Olive Street Baptist church, Ninth and Olive streets. He had left the horse and buggy in front of the church, fastened to a weight. When he went to drive home he found only the weight and strap. The thief had unsnapped it.

The horse was a light sorrel, with a white left hind foot and a white star in forehead. The animal was valued at $150, and the buggy, a black stanhope, at $100.

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September 13, 1907

VALUABLE DOGS POISONED.

Wholesale Destruction of Canines in
Northeast Part of Town.

Poisoners have been killing dogs by the wholesale in the district centering about 500 Olive street the past two days. More than thirty canines, some of them valuable, have died from what appears to be arsenic poisoning. Within one block on Minnie street three dogs were found dead yesterday morning, one of them being an imported butt terrier belonging to Frank J. Lyngr, a policeman, living at 2116 Minnie.

Most of the animals killed were valueless street curs, but a few were dogs of pedigree and breeding. One Scotch collie valued at $125 was among the victims.

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August 26, 1907

CAME FROM AFAR TO WEDDING.

Morris Goldasky Journeys From
Africa to Sister's Marriage.

A. J. Bergman and Miss Alice Goldasky, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Soloman Goldasky, of Elmdale station, were married last night at the home of the bride's sister, Mrs. Bernard Millman, 220 East Fifth street. Rabbi Lieberman officiated. A brother of the bride, Morris Goldasky, a mining expert of South Africa, who had not been home in years, came in time to attend the ceremony. His homecoming was somewhat of a surprise, as he had expressed no intentions of doing so when he wrote to his sister last, and when he appeared on the scene of the wedding no one present suspected that he was any closer to Kansas City than Cape Town. Another brother, Herman Goldasky, of Denver, was also present. Mr. and Mrs. Bergman will be at home at 2113 Olive street after September 1.

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June 30, 1907

GOT REVOLVER IN A FIT.

Arnold Hartness Shoots Up Home
Before Restrained.

Whie in an epilectic fit last night, Arnold Hartness, 303 Olive street, got possession of a revolver and began shooting. He did no damage beyond putting a few holes in the ceiling of his room. He was soon restrained by his mother and the neighbors. One of the first outsiders to reach him was Policeman Daly, who lives next door. He was attracted by the shooting. Hartness fought savagely with Daly and was still fighting when taken to the Emergency hospital.

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January 7, 1907

WOMAN KNOWS IT.

TELLS POLICE SHE CAN
SOLVE FANNING MURDER MYSTERY.

READ IT IN THE CARDS.

BUT SLEUTHS WILL JOG ALONG WITHOUT HER AID.
Clues Seem to Have Given Out and Force is More
in the Dark Than Ever -- Two Men "Sweated," but Developed Nothing.
City Detective Thomas Hayde, who is trying to solve the Fanning murder mystery, yesterday received the following letter from a woman who evidently takes a deep interest in aiding the detective department out of the dumps:
"Dear Mr. Hayde: I cut the murdered man's picture out of the paper and
took the Jack of Clubs out of a deck of cards. Then I placed Mr.
Fanning and the Jack of Clubs under my pillow and dreamed for three
nights. In the third night the murdered man, with all the cuts in his
head, appeared before me. He told me everything. Now if you want to
know the name of the man who killed Thomas Fanning just call on me."
"Are you going to call on the woman?" Hayde was asked.

"Not much," he said firmly.

A week has passed and the murderer of Thomas Fanning is still at large. Seven days ago yesterday the bruised and lifeless remains of Fanning were found in his home, 1818 Olive street by a nephew who called to pay him a Sunday afternoon visit. The police seem totally helpless in the emergency. They have followed many clues, but not one of them has brought forth any substantial results.

So far only two men have been sweated by Chief Hayes and Prosecutor Kimbrell. One of them, a close friend of Fanning, who visited his home almost daily, could not be connected in any way with the murder. The other one had an airtight alibi. He was able to show where he, as a watchman in an institution, had registered his name each hour during the day the old man is supposed to have been killed. The police have settled upon the theory, from Fanning being dressed and other suggestive features, that the murder was committed in the daytime, most likely Saturday, December 29.

Chief Hayes said yesterday that he had seen investigated the story about the man seen on the Holmes street car at 6 o'clock last Sunday morning with the bag of money, who said he was a Metropolitan employe bring the receipts in from the car barn at Eighteenth and Olive streets and that he was told it was no unusual custom. But the chief's statement does not agree with those of Metropolitan officials who say money is never carried in that way. The conductor said the man appeared nervous because the bag of money attracted attention and explained that he was taking it to Metropolitan headquarters. The conductor said he doubted the man's story, as he knew that all cash was transported in the daytime in locked boxes and under the watchful eyes of armed guards. The man, he said, alighted at Fifteenth and Walnut and stood for a moment as if undecided which way to go. Then he walked east on Fifteenth toward Metropolitan headquarters.

When the man at the car barn at Eighteenth and Olive streets was called up last night and asked if it was the custom to send money down at 6 in the morning in a bag with only one man, he would not answer.

Night Superintendent Kelly at Metropolitan headquarters, said:
"So far as I know money is transported from the various car barns to Fifteenth and Grand about 8 or 9 o'clock each morning. The division superintendent and one trusted man generally accompanies it. It is generally in an iron box. I have known it to be taken down on cars, but it is always in the box and two men accompany it. I never heard of one man being sent alone."

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