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October 9, 1909

IS THIS FAINTING BERTHA?

Young Woman Robs a Sympathetic
Kansan at Depot.

A young woman who faints in a crowd, falls in the arms of one of the gallant sex, and then relieves him of his pocketbook for his pains, is operating in Kansas City. The police recall the time when "Fainting Bertha" worked the same ruse, and though it was five or six years ago when she was sent out of the city, they believe she has returned.

William Sheppard, cashier of the National Bank of Olathe, Kas., was the victim Thursday night in the Union depot. He was standing near one of the ticket windows when he noticed that a young woman standing near showed signs of illness. She began to sway and would have fallen to the floor had not the chivalrous cashier caught her in h is strong arms. He carried her to the fresh air out on Union avenue, when she revived, thanked him, and disappeared up the street.

When Sheppard went inside he found that he had lost $50 in currency, a draft for $210, and three railway tickets to Olathe. He reported the matter to police.

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August 2, 1909

MACADAM FOR PART
OF SANTA FE TRAIL.

WILL BE BETWEEN KANSAS
CITY AND OLATHE.

Board of Highway Commissioners of
Johnson County, Kas., Propose
to Expend $100,000 on
Improvement.

The Santa Fe trail, over half a century old, is soon to come into its own for the distance between Kansas City and Olathe, at least. Yesterday afternoon the board of highway commissioners of Johnson county, Kas., and some of the prominent citizens of Olathe, toured the road, which it is proposed to macadamize at a cost of about $100,000. A meeting of the highway commissioners will be held this morning at which the final steps toward deciding on this work will be taken.

The plan that will be presented for the approval of the board today is for a macadamized strip sixteen feet wide and a foot thick. The petition for the road was circulated by John W. Breyfogle under the law which was fathered by Senator George H. Hodges.

In the party yesterday were Senator George H. Hodges, Roy Murray, engineer; John W. Breyfogle, W. W. Fry and Harry King, a commissioner, in Senator Hodge's machine. In the other machine, owned by Will Lemon, were Robert Baker, chairman of the commissioners; B. F. Culley and J. M. Leonard.

The party took dinner at the Hotel Baltimore and discussed the road informally. All were enthusiastic for the road. Senator Hodge's machine sustained a badly punctured tire and he and his party returned to Olathe by way of the electric line.

The road will connect with Hudson avenue in the southwestern section of Kansas City. The town of Lenexa, Kas., has promised to assist and will macadamize the street which the road will touch in and out of that town. Olathe will macadamize to the road which under law cannot be built inside an incorporated city or town.

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June 22, 1909

MAJOR J. M. HADLEY IS DEAD.

Father of Missouri Governor Long
a Prominent Citizen of John-
son County, Kas.

DE SOTO, KAS., June 21. -- Major John M. Hadley, father of Governor H. S. Hadley of Missouri, died here at 2:35 o'clock this afternoon from the effects of a stroke of apoplexy which he suffered June 9. For several days he had lain in an unconscious condition, and the end came quietly. His son and daughter, Mrs. J. W. Lyman, came yesterday and were with their father to last night.

The funeral services, conducted by Rev. W. J. Mitchell, pastor of the M. E. church at this place, an old soldier and personal friend, will be held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Snyder at 1:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, after which the body will be taken to Olathe and interment made in the family lot.

The active pallbearers here will be Dr. W. M. Marcks, B. S. Taylor, C. S. Becroft, Zimri Gardner, C. K. Dow and B. F. Snyder. At Olathe they will be chosen from the Masonic lodge.

The G. A. R. and the Masonic orders, both of which Major Hadley was an active member, will have charge of the services at Olathe. The honorary pallbearers at Olathe will be Colonel Conover of Kansas City, Major I. O. Pickering, Colonel J. T. Burris, J. T. Little of Olathe, Frank R. Obb and William Pellet of Olathe, all of whom have been personal friends.

The governor reached Kansas City from the capital on a special train Sunday, after receiving word of the critical condition of his father. He was met at the station by a motor car, and made the remainder of the trip to De Soto overland, arriving at the bedside of his father at 1:30 Sunday afternoon.

The elder Hadley was one of the most prominent citizens of De Soto, president of the De Soto State Bank., and connected with many of the institutions of Johnson county, of which he was a pioneer resident.

Major Hadley located at Shawnee Mission in 1855. In October, 1861, he enlisted in the Eighth Kansas Infantry, being rapidly promoted to the rank of second lieutenant, in which capacity he served for fifteen months.

He was later made lieutenant and then captain of the Ninth Kansas Cavalry, and in May, 1865, was promoted to the rank of major, which title clung to him until death. At the close of the war Major Hadley was elected sheriff of Johnson county and served until 1870, when he was made clerk of the district court. He was also head of the extensive flouring mills at De Soto. In 1877 Major Hadley represented his district in the state assembly as senator, being re-elected in 1879.

He was one of the largest land owners in Johnson county. Mrs. Hadley died in 1875.

EXECUTIVE OFFICES CLOSED.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., June 21. -- Acting Governor Humphreys said tonight that as a mark of respect to the governor whose father, Major John M. Hadley, died at De Soto, Kas., this afternoon, the governor's office and those departments in the state house grounds which come under the appointment of the governor would be closed tomorrow. This, he said, was as far as he would go, and that he was governed by the governor's wish in the matter, having talked with him by telephone.

No formal proclamation will be issued, however, as Major Hadley was not a resident of the state.

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May 30, 1909

ADAM GOD SAYS HE
IS NOT A LUNATIC.

APPARENTLY PLEASED WITH
25-YEAR SENTENCE.

Load Lifted From Riot Leader's
Mind and He Speaks of Kind-
ness of Police -- Verdict
Was Unexpected.

Adam God is satisfied with the verdict of the jury which yesterday found him guilty of murder in the second degree, and fixed his punishment at twenty-five years in the penitentiary.

James Sharp, which is the fanatic's real name, was busy in the jail during the afternoon writing a miniature sermon about himself. He showed visitors one of the sheets which he had written and then remarked:

"That doesn't look like the writing of a crazy man, does it?" Then he laughed.

"In my blind walks," says Sharp in his statement, "I have been like a crazy man, but there is nothing crazy about m e. No crazy man could write with the understanding I have. I will always pray for my enemies, for they have been the making of me."

A great load seems to have been lifted off the prisoner's mind by the sentence. He speaks repeatedly and often of the kindness with which he has been treated.

"The police, bringing me back from Olathe, could have killed me," said he. "They did not even abuse me. I have had the best treatment all the time. Even the prosecuting attorney is my friend."

Twenty-five years is practically a life sentence for Sharp. It was testified during the trial that Sharp is 48 years old. From other sources is the information he is 52. With the one-fourth allowance for good behavior, the lapse of years yet seems to preclude the possibility of his ever leaving prison walls alive, unless pardoned by a governor. Since his confinement in the county jail Sharp has lost eighteen pounds. That has been in six months.

A second degree murder verdict on the part of the jury was unexpected. On the first ballot three of the jurors voted for capital punishment, three for acquittal on the grounds of insanity, one for manslaughter and the balance for second degree with varying terms of imprisonment. It took nearly nineteen hours to reach an agreement. Sharp had little comment to make when the jury reported at 10 o'clock.

It is not likely that the case of Mrs. Melissa Sharp, wife of the fanatic, will be called for trial until September.

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May 25, 1909

"MY NECK, NOT YOURS
BEING TRIED" -- SHARP.

PROSECUTOR INTERRUPTED BE-
CAUSE HE OBJECTED.

Fanatic Causes Attorneys Trouble by
Persistent Outbreaks -- State
rests -- Defense's Plea In-
sanity and Self-Defense.

"Self-defense and insanity will be the defense," said A. E. Martin of Martin & Bailey, counsel for James Sharp or Adam God, when court adjourned yesterday. The state finished its case in the afternoon and this morning will be begun the taking of testimony on behalf of the defendant. It is likely that the case will be given to the jury by Wednesday night, if not earlier. Sharp is being tried before Judge Ralph S. Latshaw in the criminal court for the killing of Michael Mullane, a patrolman.

Sharp was much in evidence yesterday. There were times when he boldly took charge of his own case, ignoring his attorneys and accusing them of not following his instructions.

Once, during the afternoon session, when the court refused to admit evidence of the shooting at the river front, Sharp spoke quickly to Virgil Conkling, the prosecutor, who had made the objection:

"MY NECK BEING TRIED."

"This evidence has to do with the dirty work on the other side. They show up all the dirty work on me, and don't show up anything on the other side. Let's have a little justice in the house of God. This is my neck being tried, not yours, Mr. Conkling."

"In that case," said the prosecutor quietly, "I will withdraw my objection.

The answer of the witness, however, showed he did not have the information desired by the defense.

Earlier in the day Sharp had remarked that "things were not going as they should." In the morning he took his attorneys to task for objecting to the testimony of a witness. Sharp insisted that the man was telling the truth.

Throughout its presentation of the case the state has persistently combated the plea of insanity. It has attempted to show that Sharp at all times was possessed of a keen mind; that he dropped all claims of being God, or Adam, or David, or any other Biblical character, and that his mind was reflecting on the consequence of the riot in which five persons lost their lives.

The appearance of Sharp at this time and the acute manner in which he follows the words of every witness would seem to place him out of the insanity class, at least so far as the present is concerned. As to whether he knew right from wrong at the time of the shooting is another matter and one to be determined by the evidence of the defense.

Sharp himself expects to take the stand and when he does an exposition of his religious teachings may be expected. From remarks he has made in the courtroom and from the manner in which he has interrupted witnesses it may be surmised he intends to tell that the police provoked the riot and that he shot to protect himself. Sharp has longed for days to tell his side, in fact, from the first moment of the trial.

SHARP IS TO TESTIFY.

Today will open with the statement of A. E. Martin, his chief counsel. Then there will be witnesses and depositions from persons who knew Sharp and his band. Besides these will be Sharp himself. The state may submit some evidence in rebuttal before the case is argued and given to the jury.

It was while Goerge W. Robinson, owner of the barber shop at 952 Mullberry street, was on the stand that Sharp jumped up and said, addressing Judge Latshaw:

"Your honor, they are swearing my neck away. My lawyers let these witnesses say what they will. They don't object enough."

Then Sharp advanced to near the witness stand. A. E. Martin, one of his attorneys, objected to Sharp's interference, but the latter said sharply:

"Don't cross-examine him . He's telling the truth."

Eugene P. Barrett, a farmer near Olathe, who participated in the capture of sharp, was put on the stand after quiet had been restored. Barrett was watering his team by the roadside the morning Sharp came along. They exchanged greetings, said Barrett, and when there was noise of a horse coming down the road Sharp crawled through a fence.

"We object," said Mr. Martin. "There's no evidence here there was a horse."

"Yes, there was," said Sharp, getting up. "He's telling the truth. I heard a horse and went into a field until the horse was past."

Sharp was told to sit down and Barrett resumed his story. Said he:

"I next saw Sharp about 3:30 o'clock this afternoon, December 10. Mr. Bair and myself were in a searching party made up after word had been received from Kansas City about the riot. We made inquiry and found overshoe tracks leading to a straw stack about fifty yards from the road. This was about a mile from where I had seen Sharp go through the fence that morning. He was in a small stack of oat straw, in a hole the cattle had eaten, and there was straw in front of him. It was impossible for me to see him until I got within fifteen feet.

CLAIMED HE WAS PARALYZED.

"Sharp got up and said: 'I've been taking a snooze.' 'That's a good place to snooze," I answered.

" 'What are you doing? Hunting for rabbits?' he asked, and I said, "Yes, I thought I might kick out a few rabbits.'

"By that time Bair had come up on motion from me and Bair told Sharp to throw up his hands. He refused at first on the plea he was paralyzed, but finally put them up. Bair and myself searched him and found a bloody knife, $105 in bills, about$6 or $8 in silver and some small change tied up in a bloody sack in an overcoat pocket. We took him to the road and there turned him over to Sheriff Steed of Johnson county. Then we went home.

Sharp whispered to his attorneys and the witness was not cross-examined.

Joseph Beaver, a farmer who lives ten miles northwest of Olathe, told of giving Sharp a night's lodging at the request of William Thiry, his brother-in-law. He said Sharp told him and Mr. Beaver's mother he was a peddler, and that his partner had left him because he had become paralyzed. He added his wife had deserted him three years ago and taken the children with her. Sharp said he had been reared in Georgia.

"That night," said Beaver, "Adam slept on the lounge. The next morning I fed him, and told him it was time to move, and he went away. He told me his name was Thomas or Thompson."

Throughout his testimony, Mr. Beaver referred to Sharp as Adam. He was asked no questions in cross-examination.

When Sheriff John S. Steed of Johnson county, Kas., took the stand, Sharp nodded at him and smiled. The sheriff returned the salutation. It was to Sheriff Steed that Bair and Barrett turned over their prisoner as soon as they had reached the public road. Steed took Sharp into his buggy and drove with him to Olathe, where he was put in jail.

BLAMED SALVATION ARMY.

"From that time until the officers took him to Kansas City, Sharp talked almost all the time, and I can remember only part of what he said," related the sheriff. "When I saw the knife that had been taken from him, I remarked that the ferrule on one end was gone.

" 'They shot that off,' said Sharp. 'It looks like it had been through a battle. I cut a policeman in the face with that knife.'

"I asked him if he knew what he had done, and told him the result of the riot. He said:

" 'My God, brother, is that so? It wasn't me that was to blame' it was the Salvation Army. They have been nagging me everywhere I went because I had a different religion from theirs. An officer came out of the police station and shook hands with me. Then came a tall, long-faced fellow, who pulled a revolver and told me to drop my pistol. I commenced shooting then. I suppose I'll be hanged for this. But I want to make a statement first. I want to write a letter to my followers and tell them how I have been misleading them. Then I am ready to die.'

"Sharp told me he deserved hanging or being put to death."

Sharp broke in and asked:

"Told you I deserved hanging? No, no."

The sheriff resumed his story:
"Sharp told me he didn't know whether he hit anybody. He said he shot to hit and meant to fight to the death. He said he had his beard cut off so he could not be recognized. Mr. Leonard, an Olathe newspaper man, talked to Sharp and asked him:

DENIED HE WAS CRAZY.

" 'What defense will you make? Will you plead insanity?'

"Sharp said: 'No, I'm not crazy. I have no defense to make. I am guilty and ready to pay the penalty.' "

Further, Sheriff Steed related what Sharp told him about the meteor that started him to preaching.

"He said a meteor had fallen on his farm, a flaming star, and that he had given up his old life and had been preaching since.

"About the guns, he told me that he had bought them and told his followers to shoot anybody that interfered with his business."

Robert M. Bair, a farmer who lives near Holliday, Kas., corroborated the details of the capture, as previously told by Barrett. The latter was at that time employed by Bair.

" 'That's awful! What have I done? I don't care now for myself, but I am sorry for the women and children I got into this,' " the witness said Sharp told him.

"I asked if his religion taught him to murder, and he said: 'It teaches me to shoot anyone that interferes with my business of preaching.' Then he cried a little. He told me he was mistaken about his belief that bullets couldn't hit him."

James Martin, 10 Delaware street, negro watchman for a boat club on the Missouri river, talked to Sharp on the river front a few days before the shooting. The defendant, said Martin, told him he was Christ and loved everybody, and talked religion to him frequently. Sharp's boat was at anchor near the club house in question for a week prior to the shooting, and its occupants were well-behaved, said the witness.

"Did you see the shooting of the little girl on the river front?" asked Mr. Martin, on cross-examination

Judge Latsaw sustained Mr. Conkling's objection to this question, and it was then Sharp spoke up loudly, saying there had been dirty work on the other side, and that it was his neck being tried.

"No, I didn't see the little girl killed," proceeded the witness and he was excused.

WHEN FAITH LEFT HIM.

Soon after Sharp had been taken to Olathe by Sheriff Steed, John M. Leonard, editor of the Olathe Register, interviewed him. Leonard related verbatim the conversation he had with Sharp, at least that part of it he was able to remember.

"I asked him about his faith," said Leonard, "and he told me I could not understand it. Then I asked him why not.

" 'Ordinary people can't understand it,' said he. 'Only people of God.'

" 'How did the fight start?' "The police tried to drive me off the street.'

" 'Why?' 'The Salvation Army was jealous of my collections.'

" 'Did you see any of the Salvation Army around?' 'No, but they tried this plan on me elsewhere.'

" 'Where was your faith that enabled you to dodge the crowd and get away?' 'I think it was.'

" 'Why did you get your beard clipped?' 'I wanted to get away.'

" 'Where is your partner, Pratt? Didn't he get away?' 'No, he was lying on the walk the last I saw him. I suppose he was shot.'

SAID HE DESERVED HANGING.

"I then picked up his hat, and remarking on the bullet hole, said:

" 'They were getting close to your head.'

" 'Don't talk like that,' said he. 'If the bullet had gone through my head it would have ended a good deal of worry for me.'

" 'Do you know what they will do with you when you get back to Kansas City?'

" 'I suppose they will hang me or take my life. I deserve it.'

" 'Are you going to try the insanity dodge?'

" 'No.' "

The witness did not remember the answer given by Sharp when asked why he had given a wrong name to the farmer who had fed him, but he said he did not deny having done so.

It was at the close of Mr. Leonard's testimony that the state rested and court adjourned for the day.

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May 23, 1909

THE WILL OF GOD IF
I AM HANGED: SHARP

LEADER OF RELIGIOUS FANATICS
DODGES RESPONSIBILITY.

Conflicting Testimony as to Who
Started the City Hall Riot
Brings Protest From
the Defendant.

SHARP TRIAL'S SECOND DAY: Defense still fails to indicate any trace of an insanity plea and continues to question along self-defense lines.
Sharp interrupts and contradicts Captain Whitsett, while latter testifies.
Patrick Clark, captain of police, tells of his fight, barehanded, with Sharp, who had both revolver and knife.
Testimony as to fight on river admitted only sparingly by Judge Latshaw.
Sharp gives out statement to effect that evidence which gets at the cause of the riot is being excluded. Also ridicules introduction of his overcoat as evidence, as not proving anything.

"If they sentence me to hang it will be the will of God."

With these words James Sharp was led back to his cell in the county jail after the second day of his trial on the charge of killing Michael Mullane, a patrolman, in the city hall riot. It was the first time during yesterday that he had mentioned religious matters.

The day closed with the evidence of the state two-thirds finished and with no more traces of an insanity defense than were shown on Friday. A. E. Martin, of counsel for Sharp, stated that he had not announced any defense and that his purpose would be to break down the testimony of the state's witnesses. All of his cross-questioning, however, as told in The Journal yesterday, was directed towards showing that the band of fanatics under Sharp's leadership did not provoke the riot, but that it was started by officers. Self-defense is the logical name for such a theory of the case. The state is expected to finish its testimony by Monday evening.

Police officers gave the greater part of the testimony yesterday. Of them, Captian Walter Whitsett was on the stand the longest time. Whitsett gave his age as 41, his service in the police department as twenty years and his residence as 2631 Gillham road. On the afternoon of the riot he was at his desk in the city hall as captain commanding the headquarters precinct.

CHILDREN WERE SHOOTING.

"I heard the shooting," testified Whitsett, "took my revolver out of my desk and ran to the street. I met Captain Clark, who had been wounded, on the stairs. When I got to the middle of the street I saw Mullane standing with a club in one hand and a revolver in the other. There was a man in front of him with a revolver. The women of the band also were near at the time. There was a man with a long beard standing on the opposite corner firing in the direction of Mullane."

"Who was this man?" asked Prosecutor Conkling.

"That's him right there," said the witness, indicating Sharp.

"What happened then?"

"I fired three or four shots at him and his revolver fell out of his hand. Two or three children came up behind and began to shoot at me. When I got back on the street, after going into the station for another revolver, I saw Mullane staggering toward headquarters and helped him in. Later we searched for Sharp but could not find him. We immediately sent his description to every officer in the city and notified the surrounding towns.

"On the evening of December 10 we got word from Olathe that Sharp was under arrest there. I went there that evening with Inspector Charles Ryan."

Court adjourned at noon with Whitsett still on the stand. In the afternoon he resumed his story of the trip to Olathe. He found Sharp there in the office of Sheriff Steed. Sharp's beard and hair had been cut and he was wounded in both hands. There was a hole through his hat.

"I talked to Sharp in the presence of Mr. Steed, Inspector Ryan and Hugh Moore, a newspaper man Sharp told us--"

Mr. Martin for the defense here objected to Whitsett's telling of Sharp's statement.

"If a written statement was taken that is the best evidence," said Martin.

The statement was shown to Captain Whitsett and identified by him. Weapons used in the city hall riot then were introduced in evidence. First there was Sharp's .45 caliber Colt revolver, the handle scarred by a shot. Sharp told Whitsett the weapon was shot out of his hand. Then there was a .45 caliber colt which Louis Pratt had carried.

"I was told by Sharp that Pratt had bought his weapon in Kansas City," said Whitsett, but Sharp spoke out sharply in court to the witness:

"I didn't say that. Why do you want to tell such stuff as that?"

"I don't know. He might have bought it up the river," responded Whitsett.

EXHIBITED THE WEAPONS.

Then was shown the 38-caliber Colt, which Sharp said his wife brought in her bosom from the houseboat. Lena Pratt's 32-caliber pistol was then exhibited and identified, and the knife, with its four-inch blade.

"What was the purpose of all these weapons, as Sharp told it to you?" asked Mr. Conkling.

"He said it was to resist any officer who might interfere with his preaching. He said he also had two rifles and a shotgun and another revolver, the latter used by Lulu Pratt."

The overcoat worn by Sharp the day of the riot was then shown to the jury, as were the remnants of Sharp's beard.

"Don't see why they want to show the coat," said Sharp to W. S. Gabriel, assistant prosecutor. It doesn't prove anything."

On cross-examination, Captain Whitsett was asked about happenings at the river, following the street fight, but the state objected successfully to most of the questions. Just after an objection had been sustained, Sharp spoke up and said:

"Your honor, can I have a word? This man wants to tell what happened there, and he is cut off. Now ---"

"Make your objection through your attorneys, Mr. Sharp," answered Judge Latshaw.

BARBER TESTIFIES.

Inspector Charles Ryan followed Captain Whitsett on the stand. He recounted substantially the same details of the shooting and the trip to Olathe.

George Robinson, 2905 Wyandotte street, a barber at 952 Mulberry street, was the next witness, and told how Sharp came into his shop sat in the chair of Chester Ramsey and had his hair and whiskers cut off.

"He didn't take his hands out of his pockets. He said: 'My hands were frosted up North, where I've been fishing. I want this job done in a hurry. I want to meet a friend and have to get on a train.'

"When the job was done, Ramsey took a purse out of Sharp's pocket and took 40 cents out of it. Then Sharp went away."

The defense objected to the testimony of Robinson on the plea that the state had given no notification that he would be called as a witness. The objection was overruled. Robinson was not cross-examined, but will be recalled by the defense to give further testimony.

Then came William Thiry, a farmer who lives near Monticello, Kas. "On the evening of December 9 Sharp came to my house," said Thiry. "My son opened the door and then I went out on the porch. Sharp was standing there. He said, 'Brother, I want to tell you my circumstances. Wait till I sit down,' and he sat down on the edge of the porch. 'I'm paralyzed, brother,' he resumed. 'I lay down over there on a strawstack and tried to die, but the laws of nature were against me.'

"He kept his hands in his overcoat pockets and asked for food and a night's lodging. 'I am no ordinary bum,' said he. 'I have money to pay for my keep over night.' I consulted with my wife and we decided we could not keep him, but we took him and fed him. I telephoned Mr. Beaver, my brother-in-law, who lives a quarter of a mile from me and Mr. Beaver said he could keep him. While I was telephoning, Sharp came into the ho use and listened to the conversation.

"At supper he spoke of being a peddler and that his partner had turned him down because he was paralyzed in his hands. He said he wanted to get back to town to a good hospital. It was 8 o'clock when he left my house. I fed him myself. He didn't take his hands from his pockets."

"I am willing to acknowledge anything this man says," remarked Sharp. "He treated me alright while I was there."

The defense fought the introduction of this testimony on the same theory it had advanced in the case of Robinson. It objected further to Thiry's relating some of the conversation. Mr. Conkling insisted it was relevant as combating a defense of insanity, if such was to be the defense.

"We have never announced what our defense would be," said Martin.

"You have done so repeatedly in open court while applying for continuances in this case," said Mr. Conkling.

Court was adjourned after the defense had secured permission to bring a number of witnesses from Lebanon, Mo.

OTHER WITNESSES.

In the course of the morning session Captain Clark, who lost an eye in the riot, gave his testimony. He lives at 538 Tracy avenue, and has been on the police force for twenty-one years. He was sergeant in immediate charge of headquarters station the afternoon of the riot. Testimony was also taken from Howard B. McAfee, business manager of Park college at Parkville, Mo., who was making a purchase on the Fourth street side of the city market when he heard children singing on Main street and went toward the gathering. He saw Dalbow come from the station and shake hands with Sharp. Then someone behind Sharp fired. He saw Mullane trying to get away from the women, who seemed to be pursuing him. then he saw Sharp and Clark in their encounter. He helped Clark into the station and when he looked again Sharp was gone.

Preceding Mr. McAfee, there testified Job H. Lyon, a traveling evangelist. Just before the riot he had a talk in the Workingman's Mission with Pratt. Sharp and Creighton, the last named in charge of the place. Being warned against antagonizing the police, Lyon said Sharp waved his hand and said: "I am God. If any policeman attempts to interfere with me, I'll kill him."

The witness said Sharp made similar statements while brandishing his revolver in the direction of the city hall. Pratt and Sharp, said Lyon, pointed revolvers at Dalbow when he approached. Sharp, said the witness, fired the first shot.

After Sharp had been brought to jail here, Lyon, who often holds Sunday meetings for the prisoners, accused the fanatic of falsehood in regard to the story he told the Mulberry street barber. He asked Sharp to attend the jail services and Sharp said he himself was god, and, of course, would not come. Then Lyon told him that God did not prevaricate and Sharp refused to have anything more to do with the evangelist.

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March 28, 1909

BRIDE OF 16 SEEKS
TO ANNUL MARRIAGE .

Nellie Walker, Who Eloped Last
Wednesday, Says Boy Husband
Can't Support Her.

Nellie Walker, 16 years old, who went to Olathe on the Strang line last Wednesday with Frederick R. Walker, 18, and was married, brought suit in the circuit court yesterday to annul the marriage. The elopers were arrested the evening they returned from Olathe and given into the custody of their parents. Walker is the son of James Walker of 2405 Locust street, and Mrs. Michael Kellcher of 2053 Holmes street is the mother of the girl. She brings the su it for the daughter.

The wife alleges, in her petition, that she was less than lgal age when the marriage license was secured and that she had the consent of neither father nor mother. She adds that her husband is unable to support her.

The story of two weeks of married life is told in the petition of Daisy Tryon against L. Jay Tryon. She alleges that her husband pouted.

Other divorce suits filed were the following:

Laura Belle against Elija P. Sharp.
R. N against Myrtle B. Kennedy.
Christina against Henry Douser.
Mary against Luther Howard.
Nellie M. against Thomas B. Johnson.
Walter R. against Alice L. Gillaspie.
Pearl against Harry McHutt.
Gertrude against John H.Parshall

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January 7, 1909

WILL "CUT UP" THE REWARD.

Each of Three Capturers of "Adam
God" Will Receive $33.33.

The row over who should get the reward for the capture of James Sharp, alias "Adam God," was settled by the police board yesterday, when it was decided to cut the $100 into three parts. The fanatic was caught by R. M. Bair, a farmer near Olathe, Kas., and his hired man, E. P. Barrett. But Sheriff J. S. Stead was in the vicinity looking for the fugitive, so these three men will each get $33.33 each, as near as James E. Vincil, secretary of the board, is able to cut it.

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December 26, 1908

GAVE PRESENTS
TO 5,700 CHILDREN.

MAYOR'S CHRISTMAS TREE WAS
A TREMENDOUS SUCCESS.

LATE COMERS
GOT NOTHING.

BUT THEY WILL GET THEIR
SHARE OF GIFTS TODAY.

Little Ones Came From Suburban
Places and Swelled the Throng
Beyond Expectation -- More
Toys Have Been Bought.


Was it a success, the first Mayor's Christmas tree in Kansas City? It was, even more than a success, and if the committee had counted on delegates from Kansas City, Kas., Armourdale, Argentine, Rosedale, Olathe, Kas., Independence, Holden and Pleasant Hill, Mo., and a few from Chicago, Ill., all would have gone off swimmingly. As it was there were more present than presents.

The women sacked and separated 5,000 bags for boys and girls, and 2,500 sacks lay on tables on each side of the hall. Besides those, about 700 Christmas bags had been prepared specially for children in hospitals and those who were ill at home and could not come to Convention hall. It was the intention to deliver them by wagons late yesterday afternoon.

In one short hour every sack was gone, including the ones prepared for the hospitals, and many children were still in line. Over 700 tickets were given to them to come to the hall at 2 o'clock this afternoon when an effort will be made to supply them. Captain J. F. Pelletier of the purchasing committee bought toys, candies and nuts last night and a committee of tired women will be at the hall at 8 o'clock this morning to prepare them. It is estimated that fully 1,000 children who were last in line failed to get a Christmas sack.


CAME HOURS TOO SOON.

It was stated that he doors to the main floor would be opened at 1 p. m. and that the distribution would begin at 2 o'clock. But the children began gathering at 10 o'clock, and as the wind was raw, they were admitted to the balconies of the hall.

Shortly after 1 o'clock some one gave the word "Ready" and the girls and boys rushed from the balconies and jammed into one living mass before the entrance to the arena. The wee ones were being smothered and, in order to save lives, the crowd had to be admitted to the floor.

On the right side was a big placard reading "BOYS" and on the left another reading "GIRLS." Instead of mingling about the hall and looking at the trees and watching the antics of the five Santa Clauses under the two great evergreens, the boys massed before the chute leading to their side and the girls did likewise on the other side.

Patrolmen William M. Meyers, Elvin Gray, T. L. Savidge, George H. Moseley and Thomas McNally, who were rigged in full regalia as the five Saints Nick did all they could to detract the attention of the children, but they had their eyes on those Christmas bags, and the lumbering antics didn't even win a grin.

There was nothing to do but start the ball, and start it they did. The first boy to get his goodies was George Cook, 11 years old, of 115 North Prospect avenue. A committeeman placed the imprint of a little Christmas tree on the back of George's left hand with a rubber stamp and indelible ink. He grabbed his sack, sailed through the chute and squatted immediately outside the door to see what he had. He was soon followed by a mob of other boys, just as curious, and soon the doorway had to be cleared by a policeman as there was a boy to every square foot.


SHE HAD A DOUBLE LOAD.

At the head of the girls' line stood Ester Cronkhite, 11 years old, 1700 Fremont avenue. In her arms she carried her 2-year-old sister, Alice. Both were given appropriate sacks and, heavily laden, little Ester labored on. The children were given street car tickets home. One ticket entitled tow to a ride.

Most attention was paid to the boys, as it was believed that they -- the little scamps --- would do some duplicating. Soon after it was seen that their hands were being stamped several boys appeared in line with gloves on. And so did some of the girls. When the jam on the boys' side got beyond control Detective Thomas Hayde mounted a box and, in stentorian tones commanded, "Here, you kids, quit that pushing. Don't you see you're smothering these kids here in the front? Stand back there. Quit that."

"Hully chee," said one boy, "dere's de chief. Skedoo back kids and beehave er we won't git nuttin."

From that announcement there was a line formed out of the boys and there was little crowding. "De chief's here," went down the line. "See 'im hollerin' on de box dere." That settled it with them.

SHOVED POLICE ASIDE.

On the girls side there was nothing short of chaos. About nine stalwart coppers -- out of thirty detailed at the hall -- under Captain John Branham, could no t keep them in line. They actually shoved the police to one side. "O'm demmed, eh? Oi aint timpted tuh give 'em the loight schlap," said one policeman, who had been shoved about ten feet by the little girls, "but 'twudn't do, all being gerrels, ye know."

While the bulk of the eagle eyes were on the boys to see that they played no tricks and did no repeating, the girls did a rushing business on that very line. At the head of the line were bags for little girls, and the big ones got theirs further on. Many of the "mediums," which could pass for both, got both. One was seen to get a sack, hold it under her cloaK with one hand, while with the other hand she gratefully received another.

Still others would get their sack and immediately pass it over the chute to a waiting companion on the outside while she passed on and got a second present from another woman. Many of the sharp boys whose hands had been stamped and who could not get back in line were seen to do this same thing.

"GIMME 'NOTHER, MISTER."

"Gimme 'nother for my little brother what's sick at home an' can't come. Gimme one fer my sister with th' mumps. Gimme one fer my little cousin what has fits an' can't come. Gimme 'nother one fer my half little brother what's visitin' an' won't be home 'till New Years. Gimme 'nother, please, fer a kid what lives by me an' sprained his leg so he can't git his shoes on any more this year."

The foregoing excuses were given by the boys and girls in line, and there were possibly a hundred others. No one could refuse them, as many cried to make the play strong.

Many little ones got lost from brothers and sisters, and the five Santa Clauses were kept busy carrying them about hunting for relatives and companions with whom they had come. All were crying. R. S. Crohn found a little fellow's brother for him three times, and when he got lost again turned him over to Santa Claus. Finally a room was set apart for the lost ones and by the time the festivities were over all lost children had been restored.


THE MAYOR WAS LATE.

Mayor Thomas T. Crtittenden, Jr. , mistaken in the time he should have been there, arrived at Convention hall with Franklin Hudson, just as the last of the bags had been given out to the children. There was to have been an entertainment, with a speech by the mayor, but that had to be left out. Devaney's orchestra furnished music while the children were waiting.

"It's the happiest day of my life," said the mayor. "I wouldn't have missed the little I have seen for anything. We will know better how to proceed next year, however, and will begin earlier. Another thing we will know is just how many children will be here and just what sort of presents to put up for them. Other cities may profit by our example next y ear and relieve us of such an unfortunate incident as took place today. We have more money, however, will buy more toys, more nuts, candy and fruit, and will be ready for the leftovers Saturday at 2 p. m."

"It was more than what we bargained for," said Franklin Hudson, chairman of the executive committee. "We were counting on our own children only -- but what's the difference, they are all children anyway."

"I don't care if they came here from Europe," said Captain J. F. Pelletier. "We were not looking for 1,500 outsiders, but as they weere here we are glad of it. I wish all the kids on earth had been here. At one time I thought at least half of them were here.

Another large bundle of Santa Claus letters were received at the hall yesterday, some of them being handed in by the children who came. They will be classified by districts and an effort made as far as possible to give each child just hwat it asked for. It may take several days yet, but the committee says: "We are not going to do this thing by halves."

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December 11, 1908

SAYS HIS BELIEF WAS WRONG.

But Sharp Doesn't Want to Be Hung
Before He Can Set His
Followers Right.

"Oh, it's terrible, terrible," James Sharp repeated over and over between questions asked of him by the police officers on the way to the city. Inspector Charles Ryan asked Sharp to tell why h e had attempted to overpower the police. "Well, brother, it was the Lord's will. The Spirit led me," he answered.

"Are you in the habit of carrying guns when you are preaching?"

"Ever since we fought the police in Canada, we have had guns. You know, we have been persecuted all over the country, and we decided that we would not stand for it any more. I believed it was the spirit moving me or a revelation. When the Humane officer came in he brought it out of me, and I thought I was doing right. Then the spirit led me to take the followers of the faith and go and preach. An officer came out and I was arguing with him. He was about convinced that we were right. If that tall young man had not pointed that pistol at me, there would not have been anyone killed. You know, it is the spirit that moves you, the flesh can't do anything."

"Honestly, captain, I believed that we were doing right and that it was God's will. When the bullets commenced to hit me then I had a revelation. The Lord was either not with us or was on a vacation. Now I know my faith was wrong, that I was mistaken. I am glad to be back and want to stand for anything that God wills. If I was in the wrong, then I should be punished for it.

"I SUPPOSE I'LL HANG."

"Do you know what is going to happen to you for killing those officers, Sharp?" he was asked.

"No, but I suppose they will hang me or send me to the penitentiary for life. The people must feel pretty hard against me, and I don't believe you will get me to jail if they see me, but it is God's will.

"I would like to see my wife and tell her to give up the fiath, for she won't believe I want her to unless I tell her. Then I want to live long enought to write a letter to my followers explaining my failure and asking them to live right and be law-abiding people. If the police put them in jail they should go peaceably. It is hard on those poor innocent police officers who were drawn into that terrible fight, without knowing what it was about.

HIS FAITH IS GONE.

"I had a nice farm in Oklahoma and was doing well when I believed I was called. Now I have no money, my children have left me and I have murdered innocent men. I can hardly believe I have any faith. I don't even believe in the Bible now."

Sharp said he taught his followers that he was Adam, who was David, or Jesus Christ. "But I guess the Lord is against me," he said.

Before leaving Olathe Sharp presented to Sheriff J. S. Steed with the knife he carried, bu the Kansas City officers brought it with them. They will use it as evidence against Sharp in the trial for attempting to kill Sergeant Patrick Clark. The handle of the knife had been broken by a bullet hitting it while he was fighting in the middle of the street.

Sharp was shot twice and his clothing was struck three times by bullets. He received a flesh wound along the edge of the palm of the left hand and the three fingers on his right hand were badly cut by a ball. A hole was mde through the brim of his stiff hat and a ball passed through the lapel of his overcoat. Another bullet went t hrough the right leg of his trousers. Sharp said he did not know he wsa shot until he walked away from the fight.

THINKS HE IS CRAZY.

Just before reaching police headquarters Sharp told the police that when he got his religion at first people said he was crazy, and added: "They must have been right or I have two or three follies in my head I will have to get out."

Leaving the street car the religious fanatic asked the officers to proteect him and not let a mob hang him before he can write an open letter to his followers. He said he did not care what they did with him then. "I want to make restitution," Sharp said. "If those officers were poor and had families I want them to have my money and divide it between them."

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December 11, 1908

'ADAM' SHARP IS
TAKEN IN KANSAS.

JOHNSON COUNTY SHERIFF CAP-
TURES RELIGIOUS FANATIC.

IS WOUNDED IN BOTH HANDS.

BROUGHT TO KANSAS CITY AND
LOCKED IN HOLDOVER.

Offers No Resistance and Declares
He's Glad That His Fight Is
Over -- Abjures His "Faith."
City Hall Guarded.
James Sharp, Leader of Religious Fanatics
JAMES SHARP,
Religious Fanatic Who Styles Himself "Adam God."

After fifty hours' search by the local police and officers of nearby towns, James Sharp, who styles himself "Adam" and "King David," was captured three miles south of Zarah, Johnson county, Kas., yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. It was James Sharp who started a riot at Fourth and Main streets Tuesday afternoon, resulting in the death of Patrolmen A. O. Dalbow and Michael Mullane; bystander A. J. Selsor; and Louis Pratt, one of the religious band, and his 14-year-old daughter, Lulu.

News of Sharp's arrest reached police yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock and Chief of Police Daniel Ahern sent Captain Walter Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan to Olathe, Kas., after the prisoner.

A farmer named W. C. Brown living eight miles northwest of Olathe telephoned to J. S. Steed, sheriff of Johnson county, about 11 o'clock yesterday morning that a man resembling the description of the fanatic, James Sharp, had been seen in that neighborhood Wednesday night and yesterday morning. He said that the suspect had spent the night at the home of Joseph Beaver, a farmer living about two miles from him. Beaver, he said, was in Olathe and the sheriff could talk to him and get a good description of the man.

Sheriff Steed found Beaver and after having him describe the stranger who had stayed at his home decide that the man was Sharp and drove to the Brown farm, leaving Olathe about 1 o'clock yesterday. When he reached the Brown farm he deputized a young man who worked on a nearby farm, and the two men started a search for the mysterious stranger.

ASLEEP IN STRAW STACK.

A large wood pasture was first gone over, and then the officers separated and searched the ravines for several miles. A straw stack in the middle of an old wheat field was seen by the sheriff's deputy and, going around it, he found a man sleeping under the straw.

When Sheriff Steed reached the straw stack the man was called and told to come out. As he rolled from under the stack the men noticed he kept his hands in his pockets, and when they made him take them out they saw that he was wounded in both hands. After being searched by the sheriff, Sharp was placed in a buggy without being handcuffed and driven to Olathe.

Sharp told his captors that he was praying and contemplating while he was in the haystack as to what he should do. Weary with the long tramp from Kansas City and exhausted for the want of food, Sharp welcomed arrest and surrendered without any show of making a fight.

He was taken into the office of the county jail and his wounds, which had not been treated, were washed and bandaged by Sheriff Steed. He was then given a supper, which he devoured with eagerness.

ANXIOUS TO GO BACK.

While he was eating his meal the police officers from Kansas City arrived. Sharp greeted them and said he was anxious to go back with them. After finishing eating he told of his trip from Kansas City to the place of his capture.

"I shot five times at the police and when I had emptied my revolver I went into the saloon there on the corner and gave my pistol to the bartender. I told him that I was through, that I was not sure of the Lord, and asked him to take me to a policeman.. The man seemed to be frightened and did not move. I then tried to load the gun, but my two hands were wounded, so I could not do it. The cylinder would not turn. I was going to put the barrel in my mouth and blow off the top of my head."

Sharp said he then walked outside and stood in the crowd and watched the police and citizens gathering around Pratt across the street. Continuing Sharp said, "God then directed my steps south on Main street to Fifth street, and west up Fifth street. I went on down Fifth street to the bottoms. When I reached a barber shop I went in and had my hair clipped. I told the barber that my hands were frozen. Leaving the shop the Lord's will seemed to take me farther away from the shooting scene and I walked and walked.

"I WAS LOSING FAITH."

"I was losing faith in my religion because things had not come about as the revelation made it out. I continued walking all that night. In the morning I slept in the woods. That evening I went to a house and asked for something to eat and a place to sleep. The people gave me my supper, but said they did not have any place to put me for the night. They directed me to a house about 300 yards distant, to a cousin's. I stayed there all night and had my breakfast there.

"I could not use my hands and the man fed me. They asked me what was wrong with my hands, and I told them that I was paralyzed. I told them I was a peddler and that my partner had left me. I was afraid they would suspect that I was wanted in Kansas City and left as early in the morning as possible.

"After leaving that house, which was the Beaver farm, I went to that straw stack and hid. At first my only intention was to get away, to escape. Then I began to fear that I had done wrong and was debating whether I should go to some farmer and pay him to take me to a town and give me up. I had money to pay the man for my trouble.

"When the officer arrested me it seemed like I was going to heaven. I was so worried and had lost such a quantity of blood. I told the sheriff that I was glad he had me and the j ail would not be a bad place for me."

HAD PLENTY OF MONEY.

When the officers searched Sharp he had a number of cartridges in his pocket and a large knife, which he carried in his left hand and cut Sergeant Patrick Clark in the eye with. A large roll of bills containing $105 and a purse with $4.92 in it was also found in his pockets.

A large crowd of persons gathered in the jail yard at Olathe, and attempted to get into the room where the prisoner was. Everybody in the city wanted to see the man that caused so much grief by inciting his followers to murder and riot.

Captain Whitsett and Inspector Charles Ryan left Olathe and Sharp at 9 o'clock last night over the Frisco railroad, and arrived in Kansas City at 10 o'clock. The officers with their prisoner left the train at Rosedale and took a street car to Fourth and Wyandotte streets. They were afraid that friends of the dead and wounded officers who might have heard of Sharp's capture would attempt a demonstration against the prisoner. When the officers and prisoner got off the car he was placed between the two and hurried to police headquarters, where a large force of policemen and detectives were inside the station and also guarded the doors.

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October 23, 1908

ROBBED A MOVING TRAIN.

Desperadoes Bound Conductor and
Brakeman in Frisco Caboose.

E. G. Butcher and William Smith, conductor and brakeman, respectively on one of the Frisco system's fright trains, while reposing in the caboose of their train between Olathe and Rosedale, Kas., at 8 o'clock last night suddenly were told to throw up their hands by two men, both of whom pointed revolvers. The men lost no time complying with the command, after which they were tied to benches and relieved of watches and other valuables by a boy who accompanied the desperados. All three made their escape at Rosedale.

Neither Butcher nor Smith had time to realize what had taken place before they found themselves securely fastened to benches with stout ropes which evidently had been taken along for the purpose. The older members of the trio stood aside, each covering his man with a revolver, while the boy, whose age was about 14 years, went through the trainmen's pockets, taking everything of value that could be found.

It was not until after the train began to slow up at Rosedale that the robbers jumped off, immediately after which the imprisoned men began efforts to get out of their uncomfortable positions. The authorities at Rosedale and Olathe were notified, but at an early morning hour no trace had been found of the men.

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October 14, 1908

DISASTROUS FIRE IN
BONNER SPRINGS.

THREE BUSINESS BLOCKS BURN,
LOSS $125,000.

Origin of Fire is Not Know -- Rest of
City Is Saved by Inhabitants
Carrying Water From
the River.

The frantic honking of an automobile driven by 17-year-old Robert Waters, accompanied by his shouts of "fire" awakened the people of Bonner Springs to an appreciation of the fact that flames were eating away the business section of that city early yesterday morning.

The blaze, due, it is thought, to spontaneous combustion in the rear of the Kelley & Pettit drug store on Oak street, was first noticed by Isaac Milstead, a laborer. Backed by a mighty northern wind that carried a rain of sparks to the roofs of neighboring buildings, it spread rapidly and soon two entire business blocks were involved.

It was at this moment that the Waters boy heard the cries of Milstead and alarmed the town. In twenty minutes perhaps a thousand men, women, and children, in the absence of any fire-fighting facilities, were carrying buckets of water from the Kaw river to Oak street.

Many of the impromptu fire fighters were only partially dressed, and the morning air was sharp. The first attempt to get outside aid was made at 4:45 o'clock, a half hour after the blaze was noticed. Then the workmen of the Bonner Portland Cement Company's plant, situated four miles from the city on the electric line, were notified to board special street cars furnished for them and come with all haste.

ASKED CITY FOR HELP.

The idea was then to blow up some of the houses ahead of the fire or tear them down so as to keep it within the section it had already claimed. An attempt to blow up the Kuhn building, near Second street, was given over, as the flames beat the workmen there, so Kansas City, Kas., was telephoned for fire apparatus and all the companies it could spare.

Meanwhile men and women had organized a system in their maneuvers. The banks of the Kaw are steep at this point. Certain men were detailed to be dippers at the margin, while others handed the laden buckets to each other until they could be grasped and carried away. It was a lively scene and the energy displayed had a decided effect.

When, after repeated delays, No. 1 fire company from Kansas City, Kas, arrived on a special train, heroic treatment had done its work and only a smouldering three blocks of business houses were left on which to play the hose.

The loss in yesterday's fire is variously estimated by the local insurance agents. The best authorities place it at between $100,000 and $125,000. The insurance amounted to a little over $61,000 in all eleven companies.

SOME OF THE BUILDINGS LOST.

The buildings lost in the fire were: B. L. Swofford's dry goods store, loss $15,000, insurance $6,500; Waters & Frisbee building, loss $7,000, insurance $4,000; Walwer & Kirby stock, loss $300; Farmers' State bank, loss $300.

Dr. E. P. Skaggs, dentist: loss, $1,500; insurance, $500.
Knights of Pythias lodge: loss $200.
L. G. Frisbie, frame building: loss $2,000.
Hall & Fletcher, meat market: loss $1,500.
Edwin Page, pool hall: loss $1,000; insurance $200.
John Klem, frame building: loss $900.
Opera House block, Brant Adams, Olathe, Kas., owner: loss on building, $6,000, on contents not known.
Baxter & Kay Grocery Company, loss $2,000; insurance $1,500.
Mrs. Lia Dunn, restaurant: loss $700.
Kelley & Pruitt, hardware and drugs: loss $7,500; insurance $3,500.

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June 13, 1908

CARRIED HIM HALF A MILE.

Wounded Lad Taken to Place of
Safety by Herculean Comrade.

Sheriff J. S. Steed of Johnson county, Kas., brought to this city last night for treatment O. C. Oberman, 18 years old, who had been shot at Corliss, Kas., yesterday morning. With him is Mike Stanislauski, 23 years old.

The youths left Topeka yesterday, and when they reached Corliss, Kas., it was raining. They were on foot and, as the depot there was unoccupied, they raised a window and entered.

"We had been in there but a few minutes," said Oberman, "when a young man whom I later learned was the son of a local merchant, came to the depot and ordered us out. He drew a revolver and struck me over the forehead. With the blood streaming down my face we made haste to get out. We had not gone ten feet, when he began to shoot at us, and the bullet went through my right knee."

Oberman said that Stanislauski carried him over a half mile through water up to his knees to where the ground was dry. Stanislauski was afraid to leave Oberman in the town. While Stanislauski was seeking aid a work train came along and the crew picked up the wounded boy and took him to Wilder, Kas., a station beyond where he had left Oberman.

While sitting on the station platform there debating what he would do Stanislauski said a constable came in a buggy two hours later and drove him to De Soto.

Sheriff Steed says he received word from the Santa Fe Company at Topeka to take the two men into custody. When he heard the story, however, he arrested the man who did the shooting and lodged him in jail in Olathe, Kas., the county seat. The sheriff said the man gave the name of Paul.

Oberman was taken to emergency hospital last night, where he was treated by Dr. J. Park Neal. Dr. Neal said that the wound was a serious one, as it involved the knee joint. This morning he will be removed to St. Joseph's hospital. He has an uncle in Detroit, Mich., who will be notified.

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May 13, 1908

HAD LIVED HERE 58 YEARS.

Francis Phillips, a Jackson County
Pioneer, Is Dead.

A citizen of Jackson county since 1850, Francis Phillips, father of Captain Thomas Phillips, license inspector, died yesterday at the home of the latter, aged 90 years.

Mr. Phillips was a native of Monahan county, Ireland, and came direct from there to Independence. On a farm one mile north of that city he lived for forty-five years and eighteen years ago came to Kansas City to reside with his son. Three other children survive him: Mrs. E. J. Cannon and Mrs. George Brangin of this city, and Frank Phillips, living near Olathe, Kas., who was formerly a member of the Missouri legislature.

The burial is to be in Independence cemetery tomorrow forenoon, after services at the home, 3540 Central street, at 8:30 o'clock, and at St. Aloysius church, Eleventh street and Prospect avenue, at 9:30 o'clock.

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