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January 27, 1910

FATHER'S FEARS UNFOUNDED.

Italian's Effort to See Girl Starts
Black Hand Story.

Fearing that he was about to become a victim of a Black Hand plot, Petro Marsala, a wealthy Italian living at 410 Oak street, appealed to the police for protection yesterday. Detectives immediately investigated the case and reoprted that Marsala's apprehensions were for the most part unfounded.

Petro has a 13-year-old daughter whose name is Dora. She recently had an ardent suitor, Sam Valenta, who proposed marriage to her. The father promptly interposed an objection and ordered Sam to desist his attentions. Volenta's feelings were hurt and it is said that he wrote imploring letters to Dora and finally formed the habit of frequenting the Marsala premises in an effort to see the girl.

Then Marsala seemed to take alarm. He had heard that Valenta had relatives who were said to be members of the Black Hand society. Neighbors told him they had heard rumors to the effect that Sam and some accomplices plotted to kidnap Dora. No arrests have been made.

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January 1, 1910

VOLUNTEERS GIVE A TREAT.

Needy Folk Fill Oak Street Hall On
New Year's Eve.

The large hall at 1416 Oak street, occupied by the Volunteers of America, was crowded to its utmost capacity last night when Major R. A. Davis, who recently took charge of the institution, opened the New Year's eve services with prayer and song.

Between 200 and 300 men, women and children of the poorer classes enjoyed the entertainment of songs and New Year's recitations. A large tree, around which were piled the treats of the evening, stood at one end of the hall.

Each one present was given a bag containing oranges, candy, nuts and cakes.

"We will serve coffee and rolls after services Sunday night," said Major Davis.

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November 23, 1909

SETBACK FOR NEGRO THEATER.

Permit Denied Promoters Who In-
tended Remodeling Synagogue.

A permit was denied yesterday to the promoters of a proposed negro theater at Eleventh and Oak streets. It was the intention to remodel the old Jewish synagogue. Matt Shinnick, in charge in the absence of John T. Neill, superintendent of buildings, said no plans were submitted.

One of the main objections to the remodeling of the old synagogue is the stairway entrance from the street. The steps are only ten inches wide, and the incline is steep.

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November 20, 1909

NEGRO THEATER MANAGER
LOOKED FOR NO PROTEST.

Louis Woods Says His Company In-
vested $5,000 in Contracts for
Rebuilding Synagogue.

Louis Woods of 722 Charlotte street, owner of the Kansas City Son, a negro weekly paper, a negro who leased the Jewish Synagogue at Eleventh and Oak streets to open a theater for negroes, said last night that he was surprised at the opposition the proposed theater has received.

"For years I have been giving this matter much needed thought," he said. "I have seen white play houses in Kansas City prosper and added to every year. I noticed another thing -- that few negroes attend a white theater unless a negro troupe happened to be there. Then the first and second balconies are packed with negroes who pay nearly as much as those on the lower floor. It struck me that as all negro shows that come to Kansas City are liberally patronized by negroes, they might as do as well by a theater managed by a person of their own color.

"I talked with Sam Conkey, advance man for the Cole and Johnson show, with Bob Motts, proprietor of the Pekin, a negro theater in Chicago, and with Sir Green, supreme chancellor commander of the negro Knights of Pythias who just has completed a $100,000 negro theater in New Orleans. We combined on the project. It was our intention to have a chain of negro play houses over the country. We have been looking at a proposition in St. Louis.

"We had no idea that there would be any objection to our going by ourselves. White people usually want the negro to keep to himself, but just as soon as he attempts to do so, they object. We had no idea that we would meet the color objection with this theater.

"The theater was to be an investment. We examined the lease and found it without restrictions as to color. The building and the location were so well adapted to our needs that we put money into the business. We have let several contracts and have spent about $5,000.

"Had we known that our going there would have been offensive, it would have caused us to look for another location. So far as I am concerned I do not wish to raise any strife. I was born and reared in Missouri and expect to live and die here."

When it was known a negro theater was to be near them business men on East Eleventh street got up a petition remonstrating against the lease. It was signed by nearly every business firm near the theater.

A. P. Nichols, a real estate agent, has charge of the synagogue property for the owner who lives in Omaha. The principal objectors are D. O. Smart and the North-Mehornay Furniture Company. Mr. Smart has under erection a five-story building west of the proposed negro theater. There are many retail firms along East Eleventh street, members of all of which are opposing the lease to a negro theater.

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October 23, 1909

Y. M. C. A. FORMALLY OPENED.

Moving Pictures Show Asso-
ciation's Work Around
The World.

In the chapel, festooned with flags, a small audience, composed mostly of chief contributors to the building fund, formally opened the new Y. M. C. A. building, Tenth and Oak streets, last night. the speeches, interspersed with songs, were led by Henry M. Beardsley, president of the association.

Beardsley said, in introduction, that the new building is a credit to the city it represents, he said, an expenditure of about $377,000. After next month there will be no indebtedness. The building committee at present is only $2,000 behind the appropriation and this amount will be raised at a carnival to be held one week beginning November 16. His remarks were cheered.

John Barrett, long connected with association work in foreign countries, spoke lightly of conversations he has had with diplomats, presidents or magnates. With the versatility of a moving picture machine, Barrett called up mental views of Japan, Africa, Asia Minor, Argentina and Mexico. He compared statements of a viceroy of Manchuria with that of the president of a Central American republic or of a may or of a little town in Iowa.

In ever country, Barrett said, the association is leading the vanguard of civilizing influences.

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October 9, 1909

FREDERICK GEHRING DIES.

Editor of Staats Zeitung Passes
Away at 68 Years.

Frederick Gehring, editor of the Missouri Staats Zeitung, the offices of which are located at 304 West Tenth street, died at 7 o'clock yesterday morning at the German hospital. Mr. Gehring was 68 years old, having been born in Griessen, Germany, March 4, 1841. One relative, a son, Carl, employed by the Moore Transfer Company, survives.

The funeral services will be conducted from the home, 3152 Oak street, at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Burial in Mount Washington cemetery.

Mr. Gehring was secretary of the German-American Citizens' Association and a member of the Turner society. In both of these organizations his long residence in the city, his position as editor of the only German weekly paper in the country and his evident honest and ability as a worker for the good of the community gave him prestige.

Coming from Germany when he was 12 years old, Mr. Gehring's parents took him to Lafayette, Ind., where he grew to manhood. When the civil war broke out he enlisted in the Fifteenth Indiana Volunteer infantry June 14, 1861. He was mustered out of the service in June, 1864, carrying a scar from a minie ball wound with him into private life.

After marrying Miss Catherine May of Indanapolis, immediately after the close of the war, Mr. Gehring moved to Springfield, Ill., where he started the German Free Press. He was twice elected to the city council in Springfield, and from 1876 to 1877 was a member of the legislature.

Mr. Gehring came to Kansas City twenty-five years ago and established the Staats Zeitung, or State News, in 1894. His wife died last December.

A special meeting of the Turner Society will be called at 8 o'clock this evening to arrange for the funeral.

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October 1, 1909

OUT OF THE OLD BUILDING.

Y. M. C. A. Members Make the Move
Into Their New Building a
Memorable Occasion.

The Y. M. C. A. building at 810 Wyandotte street -- if a building may have a memory -- never will forget last night. It was the noisiest night the building had ever experienced in the thirteen years it has been occupied by the association. The organization deserted it last night and about 1,000 of the younger members celebrated the occasion by a parade to the new building of the association at Tenth and Oak streets.

Before they left, using bar bells, they tapped and rattled the floors and tables in the building and turned on and off the electric lights, romped up and down the stairs and did other stunts that occur to youthful cut-ups. Then they went out on Wyandotte street, fell into eight platoons, each of which represented one of the teams competing for the most new members, and marched thought the business streets giving a yell half-human and half-coyote that left none of the auditors along the streets in doubt as to the identity of the marchers or the fact that they were celebrating.

When the marchers reached the new building, they raced up unlighted stairs and produced noises that made the former sounds excruciatingly jealous, providing again that noises get jealous. Incidentally, the association members advertised the fact that it was looking for new members. Up to last night 610 new members had been secured. The competition to gain 1,500 new members ends tomorrow night. Those in charge say that they will have them.

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September 19, 1909

ANONYMOUS LETTER CAUSES
CHAUFFEUR'S FATAL INJURY.

L. L. Moore, Found Unconscious on
Pavement Friday Night, Dies
at General Hospital.

An anonymous letter was the cause of the fight which resulted in the death of L. L. Moore yesterday afternoon at the General hospital where he had been taken unconscious on the day previous. Moore was a chauffeur and had fought with Benjamin Lamon, another chauffeur at Fifteenth street and Troost avenue. It developed that his injuries were due to his fall on the pavement.

Lamon is employed by Charles S. Keith of the Central Coal and Coke company. He became angry when Mr. Kieth showed him a letter written by an unknown person which accused Lamon of "joy riding" in Keith's motor car. Suspicion pointed to Moore who was desirous of obtaining a position with Mr. Keith and had written an application for position as chauffeur. The handwriting in both cases were similar.

When Lamon accused Moore as the author of the letter at the Missouri Valley Automobile Company, 1112-14 East Fifteenth street, Friday night, Moore refused to make any explanation or denial. A fight followed, and when Moore fell to the sidewalk he struck his head on the curbing, resulting in concussion of the brain, according to surgeons at the General hospital.

Lamon was arrested early morning, and yesterday afternoon was arraigned in Justice Miller's court for second degree murder. He pleaded not guilty. He was released on a $2,000 bond furnished by Mr. Keith. Lamon lives at 1525 Oak street and is married. Moore formerly lived at Maryville, Mo., and had only been in the city a few weeks. He worked for Mrs. Amy Cruise of 1209 Commerce building.

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August 8, 1909

MARRIAGE LICENSE TOO HIGH.

John McGinnis Complains That $2
Fee Is Excessive.

John W. McGinnis, 1617 Oak street, told the marriage license clerk yesterday that the charge of $2 for a license was excessive. He said he believed that in view of this fact the minister who married him to Mrs. Susan J. Stratton of 2009 East Eighteenth street, should charge only 50 cents.

McGinnis is an old soldier and says he has been married three times before this venture. He is 69 years of age and his bride 71.

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June 20, 1909

PICKPOCKETS WERE BUSY.

List of Friday Night's Victims Re-
ported to Police.

Petty thieves and pickpockets were unusually busy Friday night and many robberies were reported to the police. In most cases, cash was taken. This list follows:

E. M. Dallas, 1026 Union avenue, lost diamond stud valued at $100 on Minnesota avenue car.

R. J. Nye's saloon, 1934 Grand avenue, cash register opened and $50 taken.

Miss Olive McCoy, 1035 Penn street, had pocketbook containing $30 stolen from her desk in the Great Western Life Insurance office.

Paul Witworth, 1111 East Eighth street, $40 taken from dresser drawer.

Samuel Levin, 1008 East Thirty-first street; dye works entered and $200 worth of clothes taken.

George Hayes, 1818 Oak street reported that he was slugged and robbed of $21 at Eighteenth and mcGee streets.

Floyd Swenson, 1810 Benton boulevard, reported that his residence was entered and money and jewelry aggregating $150 was taken.

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June 14, 1909

CONFISCATE 22 CASES OF
BEER AT GALLAGHER'S.

POLICE ARREST 22 IN NORTH
END SUNDAY RAID.

Eight Women Beside Mrs. Gallagher,
Who, With Husband, Is Charged
With Selling Liquor With-
out a License.

Charged with selling liquor without a license, Jack Gallagher, ex-patrolman and former North End saloonkeeper, was arrested and locked up in the holdover at Central police station yesterday in default of $500 cash bond. He was arrested in a raid made by Captain Walter Whitsett on the Star hotel, Oak street and Independence avenue, at 11:30 o'clock yesterday morning.

Since Gallagher's saloon licenses were taken away from him by the board of police commissioners after he assaulted Albert King, a reporter for The Journal, he has been conducting a rooming house in the Star hotel.

Yesterday the lid in the North End was on extremely tight. Gallagher had twenty-two cases of bottled beer in a room in the hotel.

One of the numerous enemies Gallagher had made by his bullying attitude went to police headquarters about 11:00 and reported to Captain Whitsett that Gallagher was violating the excise laws. Calling Sergeant Edward McNamara and ten patrolmen, Captain Whitsett headed the squad in making the raid. Arriving at the Star hotel building, the police found the door leading to the rear stairway locked and barred. Entrance to the hotel was made by the front door.

TWENTY-NINE AND 22 CASES.

The captain and sergeant led the patrolmen in a rush up the stairway. Scattering out the patrolmen searched every room for evidence. Men and women, the police claim, were found drinking beer in several rooms. While searching the house the police discovered one room which was locked. Gallagher said he did not have the key. The prisoners were sent to the station in a patrol wagon which made three trips to take the twenty-nine persons placed under arrest.

When the locked room was entered twenty-two cases of bottled beer were found and sent to headquarters where they are held as evidence. Among the persons arrested were eight women besides Jack Gallagher's wife, who at midnight was released on a cash bond of $500.

All of those arrested said they lived at the hotel. Mrs. Gallagher denied that all of the women lived there, but said only two or three of them were roomers.

When the raid was made, Gallagher threatened to place charges against the police. Their jobs were to be had, according to him, and he told them he would get them. Until he was locked in the holdover Gallagher continued his swaggering tactics. He refused to discuss his arrest.

BEER FOR OWN USE.

Gallagher's wife informed the police that they had a government license, which expired in July. She denied that the police found anyone drinking beer, or that any beer had been sold. Before she was aware that the police had confiscated the beer, she said no evidence had been secured. When asked what they were doing with so many cases in the hotel, she said it was for their private use. Mrs. Gallagher said the police and newspapers were endeavoring to bankrupt them, but that they had plenty left. The habitues were released on $11 bond.

Jack Gallagher has had a varied experience in the North End, having been at various times a policeman, ward politician and saloonkeeper. Following numerous arrests for disturbing the peace, he was finally compelled to serve a term in the workhouse for an assault upon a newspaper man.

The officers participating in the raid under Captain Walter Whitsett were Sergeant Edward McNamara and Patrolmen George Hightower, Daniel Jones, P. J. Murphy, Vincent Maturo, Charles Walters, Walter Doman, Thomas Eads, Thomas Maddigan, Frank Rooth and Patrick Dalton.

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May 27, 1909

BOY DUPE OF SHARP
BAND IS RELEASED.

WILLIAM ENGHNELL TELLS OF
FAITH IN ADAM GOD.

While on Stand, Prosecutor Dis-
misses Information Against Him.
Fanatic Continues to Inter-
rupt Court Proceedings.
William Enghnell, Member of the Band of Religious Fanatics.
WILLIAM ENGHNELL,
As He Appeared After His Arrest
Following the City Hall Riot.

Acrid exchanges of words between attorneys and the release of William Enghnell, a member of James Sharp's band, from the county jail, brought interest to the closing hour of the Adam God hearing for yesterday.

The day had been one of lagging testimony, largely by deposition, and court and spectators, as well as the jury, were weary when, at 4:30 o'clock, Enghnell, 20 years old, who does not appear bright, marched to the witness stand. He had been brought out of his cell on a former day of the trial, but taken back before he had a chance to testify.

On the stand Enghnell spoke with a pronounced Swedish dialect. He said he had lived in Kitchen county, Minn.

"Who is this?" asked A. E. Martin, counsel for the fanatic, Sharp, indicating the defendant.

"It's James Sharp."

"HE IS THE LORD," SAYS BOY.

"By what other name do you know him?"

"Adam."

"By what other name?"

"Adam."

"By what other name?"

"He is the Lord," said the boy, reverently.

"How long have you known Sharp?"

"I met him a year ago in Kitchen county, and hear him preach."

Judge Ralph S. Latshaw of the criminal court here turned to Enghnell and told him not to testify to anything that might tend to incriminate himself.

Immediately Virgil Conkling, prosecutor, was on his feet.

"If the court please," said he, "the state wishes to dismiss any information that may be pending against Enghnell. The state will not prosecute him for anything. He was not present at the shooting."

Mr. Martin resumed:

"Why are you in jail, Enghnell?"

"They had me arrested for believing the truth and Adam. I met him and God revealed to me that He was Adam, and I got the faith."

The witness started to tell what he saw of the shooting on the river, but was stopped by an objection by Mr. Conkling.

Sharp spoke up and said:

"I object. There you go stopping one of my best witnesses. Object, object," he continued, punching Martin in the back.

"Let him tell what he knows about that killing," shouted Sharp.

"That's the truth," called out the boy in the voice of a zealot.

On cross-examination Mr. Conkling asked:

GUNS TO KEEP OFF EVIL.

"Sharp believed in killing people, didn't he?"

"No," said the boy. "Letting all people alone was our doctrine."

"Why did you have guns?"

"I heard Adam say that all through the South, where he had been preaching, they had been putting him in jail, and he had the guns to keep the evil men off him."

"Now don't let him get more than twenty-five minutes from the shooting," called out Sharp. "They wouldn't let the others tell what happened twenty-five minutes afterward. Why should this boy tell what happened more than twenty-five minutes before the shooting?"

The interruption was too much for Martin, who jumped in and said, "For two or three days I've resisted putting this boy on the stand. I was forced to do so by the defendant."

"Mr. Martin is 21 years old, a member of the bar and ought to be able to conduct a criminal case or resign," said Mr. conkling frigidly. By this time the prosecutor was on his feet and continued: "I don't think you ought to take this position before the jury."

"Are there any other witnesses they are trying to force you to put on, Mr. Martin?" asked Judge Latshaw. "If there are, I will protect you."

"No," said Martin.

"If you object," said Mr. Conkling, "I shall not examine this witness further. I don't want to be unfair."

Martin had none, so the questioning about the guns was resumed by the prosecutor.

GAVE ADAM HIS MONEY.

"Sharp took the guns up town to protect him from the evil man," said the boy Enghnell.

"Did you give him some of the guns?"

"When I got into the faith I gave Adam my two pistols. I saw he was David, the father, and I gave everything I had to him."

"What else did you give him?"

"A $5 bill."

"Because he told you he was Adam?"

"No. God revealed it to me."

"Revealed it to Sharp, too, didn't he?"

"Yes."

"When you offered him the $5, you had a hard time to get him to take it, didn't you?"

"No."

"What did he say about you not having nerve to use pistols?"

"He said I didn't."

As soon as this answer had been given, Mr. Conkling accused Martin of shaking his head at the witness and objected to such alleged acts. martin denied them, but Conkling persisted.

"Did Sharp tell you that if anybody stopped him from preaching there would be war? the prosecutor asked the witness.

"Yes."

"Did he say if they didn't let him do what he wanted he would shoot?"

"Yes, he said that."

"Did Sharp tell you that perhaps this was the town God wanted him to take?"

"Yes."

"Did he say he had to fire the first shot and then they all could shoot?"

ALL GOT REVELATIONS.

"Yes."

"Did he say he proposed never to be put in jail again?"

"Yes."

"Did he tell you he bought the guns to keep the police from arresting him?"

"Yes."

"Were you with Sharp w hen he stood off the Canadian police?"

"Yes."

"Stood them off with a rifle, didn't he?"

"Yes."

"And the next day he stood off several?"

"Yes."

"Then they sent fifty Canadian police after him and he stood them off with a rifle?"

"Yes."

"All of you who joined the band got revelations to give Sharp your money, didn't you?"

"Yes, we got revelations. God showed us."

"Did Sharp say he would do like David did to the Philistine with his knife?"

"Yes."

This concluded the examination of Enghnell, who was set at liberty. He was taken in charge by Mrs. Alice Stultz, a mission worker at 1418 Oak street, who said she would care for him. Court then adjourned for the day.

The reference Enghnell made in his testimony to Sharp taking the city had to do with a claim he made to his followers in connection with Joshua and Jericho.

SHARP NOT ON STAND.

Sharp himself did not take the stand yesterday, and it is possible that neither he nor his wife will be used as witnesses. The case may be finished today, as there remains little evidence to be put before the jury unless the Sharps go on the stand. Mr. Martin was unwilling last night to allow Sharp or his wife to testify, but added that they might override his wishes.

During the afternoon there were read by A. A. Bailey of Sharp's counsel depositions taken early this month in Oklahoma City. L. A. Sheldon, a real estate dealer who was a jailer there in February, 1905, said that the Sharps were in his charge for about sixty days that year. This was just after the naked parade.

"Sharp told me," said Sheldon, "that he came naked into the world and would go out that way. He preached and sang in the jail day and night so that one couldn't sleep in the jail office. He said also he was God and was generally 'nutty' on religion. His mental condition was 'mighty weak'.

"This naked parade was on Broadway in the afternoon. There were four of them in it."

James Bruce of Oklahoma City, who had the contract for feeding prisoners at the jail when Sharp was confined there, said he seemed to be rational on all subjects except religion. Sharp, so said Bruce, had a "very elegant beard," which reached almost to his waist.

"I told him," said Bruce, "that I wanted his whiskers and when I got back there he had cut them off with a pocket knife and had them in an envelope. 'Keep these and they will make you religious,' he said to me. I learned from neighbors that Pratt gave Sharp over $3,000, realized from the sale of Pratt's farm."

ASKED TOO MUCH FOR FARM.


John Tobin, a retired farmer of Oklahoma City, saw Sharp's band in their camp near Oklahoma City in the spring of 1905. He said he wanted to buy the farm (Pratt's), but that Sharp asked $6,000, or $1,000 more than it was worth.

John Ballard, a deputy sheriff, saw the naked parade.

John W. Hanson, assistant county attorney, who was police judge of Oklahoma City in 1905, gave it as his opinion that Sharp was sane.

"He told me," the witness said, "that the constitution of the United States guaranteed him the right to preach on the streets. This was after he had been arrested for blockading the streets."

When Mr. Conkling read this question from the deposition: "It's very common for religious fanatics to claim divine origin, isn't it?" Sharp remarked, loud enough to be heard all over the courtroom:

"No, it is not."

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May 6, 1909

WILL GET $80,000
WHEN HE MARRIES.

PAUL GARVIN, 25 YEARS OLD,
LOOKING FOR WIFE.

Millionaire Uncle in Denver Be-
queaths Fortune to Young Chem-
ist Upon Condition Which He
is Anxious to Fulfill.

Paul Garvin, 25 years old and good looking, who lives at the northwest corner of Fourteenth and Oak streets, yesterday received word of an inheritance of $80,000 from a rich uncle in Denver, who has recently died, but to this fortune is attached the string of matrimony. Mr. Garvin, by the conditions of the will, must marry and settle down before the inheritance is handed over to him. No particular girl was named in the will, and now Mr. Garvin is "setting his cap."

INTENDS TO MARRY.

"Sure, I am going to marry," said he last night while discussing the condition imposed. "Not that I am going to marry for the money alone, but I am about to become 'one of our respected and influential citizens.' There's one drawback, however. I don't know any girl who would have me. I am perfectly 'heart whole and fancy free.' Until now I never had enough money on hand to think of getting married, and girls have not attracted me. But I am looking for 'her' now, and I am going to look fast, too."

Mr. Garvin is wholly at sea in regard to his future wife. He has never had an ideal.

"I don't want to advertise for a wife. I guess I will have to wait until the grand passion seizes me and then I will know all about it."

UNCLE WAS PECULIAR.

Mr. Garvin's uncle was a resident of Denver, having large mining interests. His estate is said to be worth $1,000,000. His name also was Paul Garvin. The will made by Mr. Garvin gives all of his property to his son, with the exception of the bequest made to his namesake. Should Mr. Garvin die, unmarried, the money is to go towards the establishment of a free health resort in Colorado Springs.

"Uncle Paul was peculiar," said Mr. Garvin. "Every time I saw him he would urge me to get married and quit roving. I am a chemist, when there is any desire to work on my part, and he wanted me to take charge of his assaying work for him. But I like to travel, and so I have been doing. I guess he was afraid to give me this money outright, thinking that I might blow it all in traveling.

Mr. Garvin will remain in Kansas City indefinitely.

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May 1, 1909

DEATH OF "PAT" HUNT.

Member of Police Force for Many
Years Dies Suddenly.

"Pat" Hunt, for thirty-five years a member of the Kansas City police force and accounted one of the bravest men who ever wore the star of the department, died yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock at his home, 3272 Oak street. He died in harness, being at the time of his death jailer at the Walnut street police station. Only a few days before his death he was actively attending to his duties.

Patrick H. Hunt was born at Ballylangford, County Kerry, Ireland, and came to this country when a boy. For several years he lived near Corning, N. Y., but about forty years ago came to this city and was one of the grading contractors who helped to construct the Hannibal bridge.

He was made a member of the police force in 1874 and assigned to a beat in "Hell's Half Acre," the toughest district in the city. This hole in the Bottoms was a refuge of thugs, crooks, gamblers and negro bad men. Patrolman Hunt made a record for bravery in this position which has been handed down as a tradition among the class of people with whom he worked. In his declining years every negro who had been brought up in the city doffed his hat to "Pat" Hunt when he entered the Walnut street police station.

Hunt was taken off his beat and made a city detective after six years of service and served in that capacity for twenty years. Former Chief of Police John Hayes, George Bryant and Con O'Hare are some of the men who formerly "worked" with Hunt. When Hunt decided to retire from active work as a detective he was made jailor at the Flora avenue police station, and about five years ago was transferred to No. 4.

He married Miss Madge Sheehan thirty-eight years ago. One child, Henry, was born. Both wife and son are now dead. For thirty-five years, until a year ago, Mr. Hunt lived at 1122 Missouri avenue. A sister, Mrs. Mary Hunt, lives at the Oak street address. No other relatives survive. Funeral arrangements have not been made. Captain Thomas P. Flahive, under whom Mr. Hunt worked for the last five years, said last night:

"I have been intimately associated with 'Pat' Hunt for twenty-seven years, and in my mind there was never a braver or more straightforward man on the Kansas City police force. He was no less beloved for his gentleness and generosity than he was feared for his justness and courage. The police force in Kansas City has lost one of its real heroes.

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April 11, 1909

TWO CAUGHT IN ACT
OF MAKING COINS.

CLAIM THEY WERE TRYING TO
IMITATE MEDALLION.

John Burns and Charles Adams
Made Dash for Liberty When De-
tectives Entered Room -- Moulds
and "Queer" Money Seized.

MEN ARRESTED FOR COUNTERFEITING AND THE
MOLDS CAPTURED BY POLICE

With metal in the melting pot just about hot enough to pour and the moulds on a table ready to receive it, John F. Burns and Charles Adams were surprised yesterday morning in the act of making some sort of coin by Detectives James Fox and William Walsh of Captain Thomas P. Flahive's district. The men were found in the back room of a house at 1732 Oak street. They claim they were merely trying to make a medallion.

At the first intimation of danger, Burns, who was engaged in preparing the moulds, made a dash for the door, ran to the stairs and jumped to the floor below. Detective Walsh followed him, but by a misstep, lost his footing and fell from the top step to the bottom, injuring his leg.

Notwithstanding his injury he pursued the man south on McGee street to Twentieth and back through the alley between Grand and McGee. A small dog guarding the shed, angered by Burns' sudden intrusion, set up a loud barking and snarling. The actions of the dog attracted the attention of Michael Gleason, patrolman in that neighborhood, who immediately ran to the place, arriving there about the same time as Walsh. Walsh fired three shots while pursuing his man. At the station it was found the injury to his leg was so severe that it was necessary to send the detective to his home in an ambulance.

"EXPERIMENT" IS CLAIMED.

Adams, Burns' partner, was finishing his lunch when the police entered. By an oversight, the police declare, the door to the room was left unlocked. The alleged counterfeiters base their one hope of leniency on this fact, asserting that they were simply "experimenting" to find a metal with which they could get a "sharp" reproduction of a medallion by the use of plaster of Paris moulds.

In the room was found two plaster moulds, one with the impression of a silver quarter, and the other a half dollar, together with eight counterfeit half dollars. The coins were fair imitations, but lacked weight and "ringing" qualities. The edges of the coins were still in the rough, just as they were taken out of the moulds.

Files, chisels, and odd-shaped knives, together with a seal, were also found among the paraphernalia confiscated. The scale was a crude affair, made with copper wire and the tops of two tin cans. The can tops served as trays, the whole danging from a nail driven into an upright stick of wood and fastened to a pedestal.

According to Burns and Adams the scale was used to weigh the ingredients for the alloy.

"We got our ideas from books in the public library," said Burns yesterday. "In passing a jewelry store on Main street about three weeks ago w2e saw a medallion of Kansas City displayed in the window. The price was $1.75, and we got an idea that if we could reproduce that medallion for 30 or 40 cents we could make money by the sale of them.

PRAISED BY LANDLADY.

"Not wishing to go to the expense of having a die made, we used the coins , as the book from which we gained our information stated that coins could be used for experimenting purposes. We conducted our experiments openly and made no effort to conceal our actions. Mrs. Nellie Evett, the landlady at 1732 Oak street, saw our toils and the moulds in the room. Our door was never locked and anyone who wanted could come in at any time.

Mrs. Evett said yesterday that she did not know in what work the men were engaged. She dec la4red that she had been in their rooms but once or twice since they took them, six weeks ago. She said further that Burns and Adams had paid her but one week's rent since they came.

"I knew they wre out of work," said she, "and I felt sorry for them. They seemed to be gentlemanly, good boys, and I know they tried to find something to do to earn an honest living."

Captain Flahive called Burns into his private office yesterday afternoon while Mrs. Evett was present. At the end of the interview, Burns took an affectionate leave of his former landlady, pressing her hand and kissing her. Following this, Mrs. Evett was subjected to a rigid cross examination, but convinced of her innocence and ignorance of details regarding the work carried on in her rooms, Captain Flahive allowed her to go.

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April 5, 1909

HOSPITAL PATIENT'S SUICIDE.

Woman Tricks Nurse and Hurls
Herself From Third Story
Window to Death.

Nurses and patients at the general hospital were startled and shocked last night when Effie Sloan, a patient, committed suicide by leaping from a window on the third floor to the ground below. She was dead when assistance reached her side a few seconds after she jumped.

Miss Sloan entered the hospital on March 31. She was assigned to the ward on the third floor in which were other women patients. The woman was very restless on Saturday afternoon and night, but yesterday the physicians noticed that she was very quiet. About 7:00 last night as one of the nurses passed her cot she asked for a glass of milk. the nurse started after the milk, and Miss Sloan arose from her bed.

After getting up the patient walked the length of the ward to a window. She raised it and began climbing up on the sill. Two patients, Misses Cora Smith and Lulu Williams, took in the situation and ran towards her in an effort to prevent her from jumping. As Miss Smith reached the window Miss Sloan threw herself from off the window ledge.

Succeeding in catching only a slight hold of the gown worn by the woman, Miss Smith was not able to hold her long enough to give Miss Williams time to help. Miss Sloan weighed about 160 pounds, and the woman who attempted to hold her against the window sill by her gown weighs 120 pounds.

When Miss Sloan broke from the grasp of Miss Smith, her body shot downward to the turf beneath the window, and the two patients screamed and fainted. The nurse on duty in the ward immediately notified the internes who ran to the woman's aid. It was found that her skull had been fractured and that death was instantaneous.

When Miss Sloan entered the hospital she gave her age as 26 years, and her residence as 1123 Oak street.

The coroner was notified of the suicide by Dr. J. Park Neal and asked to make an investigation.

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March 25, 1909

IS MARRIED BUT NOT
WEDDED, SHE CLAIMS.

JEWISH CEREMONY NECESSARY
TO TIE THE KNOT.

Rabbi's Daughter Seeks Annulment
of Civil Marriage Because, She
Says, Husband Refused to
Keep Agreement.

Daughter of a rabbi, pretty Anna Stopeck told Judge Slover of the circuit court a story yesterday of how her husband wouldn't wed her, although they were married. Explaining this apparent paradox, she added that, being orthodox, she did not consider herself married until after the Jewish ceremony had been performed.

A civil marriage was performed and the annulment of this is the purpose of the young woman's suit. Her father, Rabbi Samuel J. Shapiro, with whom she lives at 502 Oak street, was with her in court. The case is being contested.

Hyman Stopeck, a tailor at 515 Main street, is the husband. He is about 40 years old, while the girl appears half that age. On the witness stand the wife, telling her story in broken English and with confused idioms, said:
GAVE HER DIAMOND RING.
"Mr. Stopeck paid attention to me last spring and summer. He told me he had never been married before, and I liked him. He gave me a diamond ring and on July 30, 1908, at our home, the formal engagement was announced to our friends. It was agreed that there should be a civil and then a Jewish ceremony, my father and all of us being orthodox.

"So on August 4 we went to Kansas City, Kas., and got a marriage license and were wedded. Van B. Prather, judge of the probate court, performed the ceremony. That was about 11 o'clock in the morning.

"After that we returned to my father's home. Mr. Stopeck stayed there for dinner and until 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Then he left. I have not seen h im since August 7, when he came to ask me to return the diamond ring."

"But why did he leave you?" asked Gerston B. Silverman, the wife's attorney.

"Because he asked my father to give him $500 before he would go through the Jewish ceremony. When this was not done, he said:
INTERESTED IN HER HATS.
" 'I'll let her (meaning me) wait for ten years before I'll go through the Jewish ceremony unless I get that $500.' "

Then the girl explained that her belief regarded the Jewish ceremony as essential.

"And was Stopeck ever married?" inquired Mr. Silverman.

"He told me afterwards that he had been married at Rochester, N. Y., and that his wife had secured a divorce from him.

"Why," continued the girl, "he was so attentive before we were engaged. On July 7 he brought me a clipping from a paper. He said: 'Get yourself a hat like this.' "

Here the attorney displayed a two-column portrait of the Princess de Sagan, formerly Anna Gould, wearing a huge Gainsborough.

When court adjouroned for the night it was expected that the trial of the case would occupy all of today.

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March 17, 1909

WM. KENEFICK'S AUTO
SMASHED TO PIECES.

RAILROAD PRESIDENT'S CHAUF-
FEUR WAS HAVING "JOY RIDE."

Limousine Struck by Twelfth Street
Car and Five Occupants Hurled
to Ground -- One Seriously
Injured -- Owner in Paris.

An expensive motor car belonging to William Kenefick, 1485 Independence avenue, was demolished yesterday afternoon at 2:30 by being struck by a street car at Twelfth and Oak streets. Daisy West, 1333 McGee street, who was in the limousine, was seriously injured. The machine was driven by William Tate, a trusted employe of Mr. Kenefick, who is now in Paris. Mr. Kenefick is president of the Missouri, Oklahoma & Gulf railroad.


In the machine at the time of the accident were four friends of Tate' whom he was entertaining.


FOUR FRIENDS WITH HIM.


Taking the machine from the garage yesterday afternoon Tate invited four friends, two men and two women, to go for a ride over the boulevards. Leaving Miss West's home on McGee street, the driver steered the machine over to Oak and started north on that street. As he was crossing the street car tracks on Twelfth street a car going west struck the machine on the right side, just in front of the rear wheels. The machine was thrown over on the side and skidded across the street and onto the sidewalk on the northwest corner of Oak street.


Those persons riding inside of the limousine were thrown from their seats and besides being shaken up were cut by broken glass. Miss West was the only one seriously injured, and she was carried into Hucke's drug store, on the corner, and cared for until an ambulance from Eylar's Livery Company conveyed her to the University hospital.


GIRL SERIOUSLY INJURED.


Dr. George O. Todd was summoned and found the woman to be suffering from a severe wrench of the back, several scalp wounds and possible internal injuries. She was later taken to her home. At the hospital she gave the name of Davis.



The Admiral Auto Livery Company righted the maching and then towed it to the Pope-Hartford Auto Sales Company, 1925 Grand avenue. At the machine shop it was said that the machine was a total wreck and not worth repairing. Thee top was broken and cracked in various places and badly sprung.


NO PERMISSION TO USE CAR?


Mrs. J. W. H offman, 314 West Armour boulevard, a daughter of Mr. Kenefick, last night said that the chauffeur had not informed her of the accident. She said Tate had not been granted permission to use the car and had never before been known to use it secretly. The machine was a Pope-Toledo valued at $6,500 and was about a year old, she said. On Saturday the motor was taken out of the repair shop.


Tate, who is about 27 years old, has worked for Mr. Kenefick since he was 13 years old. Those in the machine at the time of the accident refused to talk aobut it or give their names. Patrolman Patrick Thornton, who walks on Twelfth street, arrived a few minutes after the accident but when the interested parties once refused to talk the patrolman ceased activity. He allowed them to go without getting any of the details as to who they were.

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January 24, 1909

IN BUSINESS TWENTY YEARS.

Fred Wolferman to Celebrate Round-
ing Out of Two Decades.

This week will be somewhat commemorable with housewives and those whose province it is to supply the larder, for Fred Wolferman's grocers and wine merchants at 1108-1110 Walnut street are to celebrate a 20th anniversary.

Old residents of Kansas City remember the early Wolferman's store at the corner of Ninth and Oak streets, where it remained for seven years. Later the concern moved to Walnut street and finally as business expanded, took in the store room next to it.

The Fred Wolferman store has never in any way before featured anniversaries or held "special sales," so that the unusual displays of merchandise in package and other form, and many rare and interesting "Good Things to Eat" shown will undoubtedly draw much favorable attention. Prices have been reduced on many articles for the first five days of this week.

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December 30, 1908

ITALIANS WILL HOLD A
MASS MEETING SUNDAY.

To Raise Money for Relief of Stricken
People -- Many Have Rela-
tives in Sicily.


Local Little Italy, which might more specifically be called Lesser Sicily, since most of its residents come from that stricken island, received the news of the earthquake that killed scores of thousands with an expectant stoicism that utterly belies what books say about the volatile Italian nature. It was expectant, in that the Sicilians and Calabrians of Kansas City are bravely awaiting the horrible details which only days can bring forth. Accounts at best are but meager and the fate of the members of their families cannot be known for a fortnight.

They are not wringing their hands in anguish. Instead, they are occupied with a demonstration much more to the purpose.

"We must get together and raise some money for them," said Dr. L. Laurenzana of 522 East Fifth street, last night. With that he stepped to the telephone and called up the Italian consul, Pietro Isnardi. A business-like conversation in Italian ensued.

MASS MEETING CALLED.

"A mass meeting of all Italians in Kansas City will be held at the hall adjoining the Church of the Holy Rosary at Missouri avenue and Campbell street, Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock," said the doctor as he turned away from the telephone. "We raised nearly $400 for the earthquake sufferers in Calabria, three years ago, and we ought to do better than that this time."

Dr. Laurenzana has a cousin, Anello Alfano by name, who is a railroad contractor at Pizzo on the Calabrian toe of the Italian boot, only four miles and a half from Reggio, where so many thousands were killed Monday.

Walter Randazzo of 104 East Fifth street, too, has a cousin, Cologero Randazzo, who held a government position at Messina, where 12,000 people are said to have lost their lives.

"I came from Palermo," said Mr.Randazzo, "and, as I understand it, the western part of the island, where the city is located, was not badly affected by the quake. Palermo is a long way from Messina. You leave there on the train at night and don't reach Messina until the next morning."

MANY OF THEM HERE.

S. J. Tremonte, proprietor of the Italian Castle cafe at Fifth and Oak streets, comes from Gibbellins, a town of about 15,000 inhabitants, lying forty-four miles from Palermo. His parents and brothers still live there, but he is not apprehensive, as they are not in the affected district.

Pietro Berbiglia, who operates the Milano restaurant at 7 East Eighth street, has been in this country for ten years, and comes from Piggioreallia in Trapani province, not far from Palermo. He served in the Italian army and in 1898 was stationed at Catania, which is almost at the very foot of Mount Aetna, and which with Messina and Reggio suffered perhaps more heavily thatn any of the other cities.

"Catania is a beautiful place," he said last night, "and carries on a large shipping trade with Malta and other points on the Mediterranean. It has about 150,000 inhabitants and the Universita di Catania, with many students, is located there. It has a long and beautiful street which I think is more magnificent than anything even in Rome, called the Corso Garibaldi, running for about four miles along the seashore from Catania proper to Porto Garibaldi. There is also a large garden or park called the Villa Stema d'Italia, that is one of the prettiest in Italy."

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December 13, 1908

ESTABLISHED 43 YEARS.

Spalding's Commercial College to
Celebrate Friday Night.

Founded in the year of the close of the war between the states, Spalding's Commercial college will observe its forty-third anniversary December 18, on the night of which the literary society of the institution will give an appropriate programme at the Spalding auditorium, Tenth and Oak streets. James F. Spalding, one of the pioneer commercial educators of Missouri, is still at the head of the institution, of which he is the founder.

The Spalding Commercial College Literary Society was organized a year after the beginning of the school, and the work which it has carried on has been of much benefit to its members, as that of the institution has been invaluable to its graduates.

Those who will take part in the anniversary programme are: Miss Adeline Nentwig, Miss Phoebe Brooks, Miss Clara Blakeslee, Miss Hazel Kirk, Mrs. Jennie Schultz, Miss Maude Edris Speer, Dale Hartmann, Professor J. M. Greenwood, Walter M. Eby, Harold Nagle and Everett Elliott.

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November 16, 1908

DRUNKEN MAN IS STRANGLED.

Henry Bernard Found Dead in an
Unfinished Building Near Thirty-
Third and Oak Streets.

Boys playing in a building in the course of construction at 3312 Oak street about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon found the body of a man lying in a corner of the building, the head wedged against a wall and the neck pressed against a joist. Death had come apparently from strangulation induced by the position of the man's head. A crowd collected and the body was identified as that of Henry Bernard, 50 years old, a stonemason living at 3228 Summit street.

By the man's side was found a pint bottle with dregs of whisky in it. Bernard had been released from the Walnut street police station yesterday morning at 6 o'clock. The question arises, where did he get the whisky?

Bernard had been locked up for safekeeping. When he was released he had nothing of the sort about him. About noon he appeared at the house of William Gepford, a building contractor, his employer, and received from him $10 which was due him for work done last week. Several times in the next few hours he was seen loafing around the drug store of R. S. McCurdy, at Twenty-third and Oak streets, and was talking to Ray Wells, 3120 Campbell street, and others. About 2 o'clock he appeared to be in an unsettled state of mind and was seen to walk towards the new building of which only the side walls and part of the floors are finished. It is thought that he lay down in a stupor and was strangled by the beam pressing against his throat.

Nominally, the saloons were closed yesterday. Besides, there are no saloons in the neighborhood of Thirty-third and Oak streets. Bernard was not seen to leave the neighborhood from the time he received the money from his employer until the time he was found dead. R. S. McCurdy, the druggist who keeps the drug store at Thirty-third and Oak streets, and the only one in the vicinity, said last night that he had sold whisky to Bernard on prescription, but denied that he had sold any to him that day. He added that neither he nor either of his clerks, Louis Woods and D. Self, had seen Bernard in the store that day.

Bernard leaves a wife and nine children. The body was removed to Lindday's undertaking rooms in Westport and the coroner was notified. He will hold an autopsy this morning at 9 o'clock in the undertaking rooms.

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October 30, 1908

JACK GALLAGHER BEFORE JURY.

Declares All Men Registered From
the Star Hotel Are Voters.

"Men registered from my place are voters just as legally as any silk stockings."

This was, in substance, the statement of "Jack" Gallagher, ex-policeman and saloonkeeper, when the grand jury yesterday questioned him about the registration in the Star hotel, at Independence avenue and Oak street, over a salloon which Gallagher formerly owned. The jury heard other registration evidence. Among other witnesses was the ex-boss gambler of Kansas City.

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September 21, 1908

INVENTOR'S FINGERS HURT.

E. T. Winkler Was Making a Demon-
stration With New Machine.

E. T. Winkler yesterday had the fingers on his left hand badly lacerated by the blades of a revolving fan. He was at his shop, 712 Oak street, working on a new invention which he expects will revolutionize the manufacture of ice. The blades shaved nearly half of each finger off. Dr. George Dagg dressed the injuries at the emergency hospital.

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June 24, 1908

THIS IS THE 'PORT
OF MISSING MEN'

SOME OF THEM HAD MONEY,
SOME HAD NONE.

Two Husbands Are Worrying Two
Faithful Wives and Piling Up
Telephone Bills by Remain-
ing Away From Home.

Mrs. Susie Poser called police headquarters by telephone from Tulsa, Ok., yesterday and asked that her husband, S. Poser, here for three weeks, be sought by the police. He is a plasterer, 30 years old, 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighs 145 pounds. He has light hair, blue eyes and fair complexion. Has been known to drink.

The mother of Samuel Keller, 17 years old, 913 Oak street, said her boy had left home Sunday morning and had not returned.

This report was among the lot of the missing: "Look out for George Wiley, 12 years old, blue overalls, blue blouse, barefooted and red-headed. Left home last Friday and not heard from since. Notify his mother at Independence avenue and Charlotte street, next to drug store."

Probably the most important person the police were asked to find, yesterday, on account of the fact that he was known to have had $868 and some valuable jewelry with him, was Frank Cook of Independence, Kas. His wife telephoned here and asked that he be located by the police.

Last Friday night Cook entered a hack at Fifth street and Grand avenue and asked to be driven to the Union depot to catch a 9 p. m. train. It was late and the train was missed.

"Bud" Landis, the driver, knew that Cook had with him a large sum of money. He drove slowly back uptown and at Seventh and Wyandotte streets called the attention of Patrolman J. F. Murphy and J. F. Brice, to the man in his hack. Cook was asleep. He had been drinking.

When searched at police headquarters, where he was booked as a "safe keeper," he was found to have $808, a valuable gold watch and chain and other jewelry. Cook was released Saturday morning and his money and jewelry returned to him. The missing man is 35 years old, 5 feet 7 inches tall, weighs about 140 pounds, has light hair, blue eyes and fair complexion. His wife said he might be found in a sanitarium.

A doctor at 1306 Garfield avenue asked that the police be on the lookout for W. H. Madden, a patient who took French leave. The doctor said that Madden was demented. He wanted the man detained until he could be notified.

Bert Murray, a "patient" at the city workhouse, while working in the barn there Sunday concluded to leave. He did leave. As his time is by no means up, Patrick O'Hearn, superintendent of that institution, asks the police to locate Murray and return him, not to the barn, but to the workhouse proper.

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June 18, 1908

CITY IN MOVING PICTURES.

Films Will Be Exposed in the Retail
Section Today.

If your wife's new directoire is finished, dress her up and parade her in the downtown district this afternoon.

That is a duty a good citizen owes Kansas City today, of all days in the year, for today the town goes on the motion picture films to be exhibited all over the world.

A special street car carrying the phenomenal machine which puts you and your smile on the films will start at 1:30 o'clock from Thirteenth street and Grand avenue. If you chance to be strolling from the postoffice about this time the face you turn toward the machine will be exhibited in Hale's Tours in amusement places in many countries.

Here is the route of the car: From the start at Thirteenth street and Grand avenue the first run will be on Grand avenue to Fifth street, west on Fifth street to Walnut street. The car will start south on Walnut street at 1:45, 2 o'clock it will run north on Main street to the city hall and at 2:30 o'clock it will run from Wyandotte and Eighth streets east to Oak street. This will end the first day's film making.

Of course this is going to be done only provided the weather is clear. Next week, probably Saturday or Sunday, the machine will be placed on an automobile and pictures made of the boulevards. When the flood waters recede pictures will be made of the manufacturing district in the West Bottoms and later interior views of the banks and other large institutions will be made.

The films are made in sections. As the Kansas City film will appear it will show Kansas City from an inbound Wabash passenger train, giving a glimpse of the intercity viaduct.

The pictures will be made and exhibited by the International Publicity Company.

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June 6, 1908

B'NAI JEHUDAH BIDS
FAREWELL TO TEMPLE.

IT HAS WORSHIPPED THERE FOR
TWENTY-THREE YEARS.

Splendid New Temple at Flora and
Linwood Avenues Is Almost Com-
pleted, and May Be Dedi-
cated in September.

With impressive ceremonies the congregation B'Nai Jehudah gathered for the last time in the temple at Eleventh and Oak streets last night. It was the farewell service of the congregation in the old temple, after having used the building as a house of worship for twenty-three years. The change of the B'Nai Jehudah congregation to the new temple at Linwood boulevard and Flora avenue is one more instance of the passing of the downtown churches There are now but three churches left in the heart of the business district.

A special programme consisting of addresses by the older members of the congregation had been prepared for the occasion. The present of the congregation, Isaac Bachrach, told of the policy of the church; what it had been and what it now is striving to be. He said that the church had never stood for narrow mindedness, and that its rabbi was always given free scope in his sermons. He touched upon the wonderful progress which the congregation had made during the past twenty-three years.

L. L. Lorie, a member of the first confirmation class in the old church, told of the work which was being done by the confirmation teachers; how the little Jewish boy would attend the confirmation class after his regular school course and learn the Hebrew language. In the knowledge of this language Mr. Lorie believed that a boy was given a purer idea of right and wrong.

Mr. Lorie had telegraphed to all of those men who had been rabbis of the B'Nai Jehuda congregation asking them for words of congratulation or the expression of some sentiment which would be appropriate upon such an occasion. Each of the old rabbis responded and each spoke highly of the work and worthiness of the B'Nai Jehudah congregation.

B A. Fieneman, the oldest member of the congregation, read a paper upon the past history of the church, telling how it had grown from two-score persons to several hundred; how it had progressed from abject poverty to affluence. He told of the work of the members of the church and of the church as a whole in charity, which among the Jews is considered higher than missionary work.

The last address of the evening was made by Rabbi H. H. Mayer, for ten years the rabbi of the congregation. He spoke of the work which the church had done for the individual and of the trials which it had passed through.

"B'Nai Jehudah has now reached such a stage," said he, "that churches of other denominations point at us with wonder and ask how we did it. We are considered the leaders of the churches; we set the pace for every church of other denominations."

The new temple at Linwood Boulevard and Flora avenue will be ready for occupancy, it is thought, during the middle of September. Rabbi Mayer said last night that he hoped to set aside September 18-19-20 or September 11-12-13 for the days during which the dedicatory services will be held.

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June 1, 1908

SUICIDE FALLS AT
FEET OF HUSBAND.

MRS. HARRY SETTLE SWALLOWS
ACID AT HER HOTEL.

HAD JUST MADE UP
QUARREL.

COUPLE WAS HERE VISITING
MR. SETTLE'S PARENTS.

All Sunday Morning He Pleaded Out-
side Her Door and at Last
Believed She For-
gave Him.

As an outcome of several months of domestic troubles, Mrs. Mildred Settle, daughter of Richard L. Long, a prominent real estate dealer of Fort Worth, Tex., 18 years of age, committed suicide in her room at the Humbolt hotel at Twelfth and Locust streets yesterday afternoon by drinking carbolic acid. Mrs. Settle and her husband, Harry Settle, had been in Kansas City since Saturday at midnight, having come here to visit Mr Settle's parents, who live at 1308 Oak street. They went immediately to the Humbolt hotel, and nothing more was seen of them until late yesterday morning.

Settle appeared in the dining room of the hotel for breakfast at a late hour without his young wife. After his breakfast he went back to their room to see why she had not come down for breakfast. He found the door locked, and to his knocking he received no reply.

He called repeatedly, and she finally told him to leave her, as she wished nothing more from him. Surprised at this treatment, he began to plead with her, but the young wife would speak to him no more.

After urging a reconciliation for some time, he left the hotel and went to his mother's home. He enlisted her services, and together they went to the hotel, and stood outside of the door, first one pleading with the girl, and then the other. At last Mrs. Settle opened the door and let them in. Mrs. Settle then left the husband with his wife, and soon it appeared that all the trouble was over between them. They left the hotel together, and appeared in a happy frame of mind.

About noon they returned and went directly to their room. Mr. Settle left and went to his mother's home. As he passed out of sight his wife walked form the hotel to Hucke's drug store at Twelfth and Oak streets, where she purchased a vial of carbolic acid.

SHE RAN THROUGH STREETS.

Soon she was seen running through the halls, out of doors and into her father-in-law's home. In the room she found her husband talking with his father and mother. She ran directly up to him, gasping out an almost inarticulate cry: "Oh Harry, Harry," and then fell to the floor at his feet.

The family physician was called and tried to revive the fast falling girl by administering vinegar. His treatment was without beneficial effect and her husbans sent in a call for the police ambulance. At the Walnut street station, the nearest one, the doctor had gone out for lunch, but the ambulance was sent nevertheless.

When it arrived at the house where the unconscious girl lay, she was hastily carried into the carriage and orders were given for a record drive to the emergency hospital, fourteen blocks away.

The girl was almost beyond medical aid before they had reached the hospital and died a few moments after having been taken in charge by the police surgeon.

Just before Mrs. Settle left the hotel she had opened her door and called to Mrs. A. D. Buyas, wife of the proprietor, asking her the date of the month. Remembering this incident, Mrs. Buyas went into the dead girl's room, expecting to find an explanatory note of some kind. As she passed through the door she noticed a leaf of charred paper in the center of the floor with a half burnt match beside it. She stooped to see if she could make out what was written on the sheet and succeeded in deciphering the last word, which was "dead."

BURNED FAREWELL NOTE.

Apparently Mrs. Settle had written a note telling of her suicidal intentions and at the last moment decided to leave it all to the imagination. Mr. Settle says that he was not greatly surprised at his wife's actions, for on the occasion of their last years' visit to Kansas City his wife had bought a bottle of laudanum and announced her intention of committing suicide. He says that he was able to persuade her not to do so at that time, but the threat had been ever ready with her since.

Mr. and Mrs. Settle had lived for two years on a ranch near Amarillo, Tex. While on the ranch his wife had developed a strange fascination, according to him, of breaking broncos. At the beginning of her riding she was thrown violently to the ground, sustaining a serious injury about the head. Her husband thinks that this fall caused her to become despondent and in constant ill health, which made her very irritable at times. This fact he believes caused her to magnify the family troubles, which have frequently arisen.

Harry Settle was well known in college football circles, having been a tackle on the University Medical school football team for three years, 1899-1901. At that time he was reputed to be one of the best tackles in the West. He is a brother of Mrs. E. J. Gump of 105 Spring street in this city.

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April 12, 1908

AN EVENING PAPER QUITS.

The Kansas City World, Established
in 1894, Goes Out of Existence.

The Kansas City World, an evening newspaper owned by Edward W. Scripps and J. G. Scripps, announced in its issue yesterday that it had decided to quit business. The office force was discharged one week ago. It had been known for some time that the paper was gradually going out of business. Several months ago the United Press Association office was removed from Kansas City to St. Louis. The press association is owned by the same people who controlled the World. It is said that about $400,000 was spent on the paper.

The World was established January 11, 1894, by what was known as the World Newspaper Company, with L. V. Ashbaugh and Nain Grute as the principal stockholders. Mr. Grute was the first managing editor, and the paper, an eight-page, eight-column sheet, was edited and published at 815 Walnut street. In 1895 Bernard Corrigan and Dr. W. S. Woods secured controlling interest and the late Arthur Grissom became managing editor. On January 5, 1897, the Scripps-McRae League acquired the plant and made the World one of its string of newspapers. Arthur M. Hopkins was the managing editor. Shortly after the new owners assumed control, the building now occupied by the World was erected at 1116-1118 Oak street and the plant moved there.

Some years later the control of the plant passed into the Clover Leaf League of papers, which company published it for about one year, when it was again taken by E. W. Scripps and his son, J. G. Scripps, on January 5, 1907.

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April 9, 1908

HISTORY OF KANSAS CITY JEWS.

Mrs. Ethel Feineman Writes of Early
Settlers in Reform Advocate.

In the last issue of the Reform Advocate, a Jewish magazine published in Chicago, there appears an interesting article by Miss Ethel Feineman of this city, styled, "A History of the Jews of Kansas City." The article is liberally illustrated, with cuts showing buildings and views of the city, and a fine picture of Convention hall adorns the cover of the page.

Beginning with a brief history of the founding of the city, Miss Feineman goes at once into he subject with sketches of the pioneers among the Jews and shows how active this race has been in the development of this commercial center.

The Jews became identified with Kansas City as early as 1851, when Meyer Kayser and Moses Wolf settled here. M. Eisbach and W. J. Friedsam followed these two later in the same year, and the next year welcomed Herman Ganz. M. Waidsuer and Louis Rothschild. Mr. Ganz still makes this city his home.

B. A. Feineman, Miss Ethel's father, is another one of the old settlers who helped to make history For some years previous to the organization of the the Congregation B'Nai Jehudah, the Jews maintained a temple in which services were held twice a year, but in the fall of 1870, the first congregation was organized and Rabbi M. R. Cohen was called as minister. The Jewish Burial Association was also merged into this congregation. The congregation now has a magnificent house of worship at Oak and Eleventh streets, as have the Keneseth-Israel synagogue, the Tavares-Israel, and the Gomel-Chased congregations in other parts of the city. They also maintain several charitable institutions, and are in many ways interested in philanthropic work.

Among the leaders of the women are mentioned Mrs. H. H. Meyer, Mrs. Leo Lyon, Mrs. Helen Leavitt, Miss L. Hammerslough and Mrs. Ida M. Block. Excellent portraits with brief sketches are given of some thirty or forty of the leaders in society and church work.

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April 5, 1908

JUSTICE AS DISPENSED
TO THE JUVENILES.

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS VISIT
JUDGE M'CUNE'S COURT.

First Two Boys to Go to Parental
Home Are Delos Johnson and
Dan Clark, One a Shirker
and One a Truant.

Bent upon the study of sociology, the senior class of the Manual Training high school, under the guidance of Miss Annie Gilday, visited the children's court yesterday, presided over by Judge H. L. McCune in the second floor of the court house. There were nearly a hundred students, and they completely filled the court room. Among the gems of practical justice which the overheard were these:

Carl Warden, 3 years old, was brought before the court because he habitually runs away from his mother's home at 1212 Oak street and goes to visit Mrs. Joan Moran, police matron. Mrs. Elizabeth Warden, the mother, said that she took in washing for a living because her husband left her four months ago. She has a 3-months-old baby and Carl to provide for. The court has tried to help her before and gives her the laundry work from the Boys' hotel. She said that every time she turns her back on Carl "he scoots out of the house and goes down the alley like a rabbit." She wanted the court to find a place where she could keep him.

"Can you hold him until 10 o'clock tomorrow morning?" inquired Judge McCune.

"I doubt it," she said.

"Tie a clothes line around one leg and lariat him to a bed post," the judge ordered. "By morning we will have found a place, perhaps at the Institutional church, where he can be kept."

"I'll tie him up until an officer comes tomorrow," said the mother.

Carl fell asleep in the "bad boy's chair" while his fate was being decided and, when his mother woke him up, cried lustily.



"This is the first outing I've had in three years," remarked Robert Fisher's mother, when she came to court yesterday to defend the lad. Robert's father reported the boy as incorrigible. The mother told the court that the boy is all right. She said she would rather keep the boy than keep her husband. Judge McCune continued the case to give the officers time to investigate the conflicting stories.



Two boys were given reform school sentences. They are Columbus Pitts, who returned to Kansas City from Coffeyville, Kas., to which town the court a week ago sentenced him for life, and George Saide, a colored boy.



Two lads were sent to the parental home with Thomas N. Hughes and Mrs. Hughes, recently appointed to run the place. They will open the home today, using first a six-room farm house, now standing. The county will erect other buildings as they are needed. There will be a school house for truants by fall. Hughes and his wife attended court yesterday and went away with their boys.

One of the lads is Delos Johnson, who ran away from St. Louis and came to Kansas City last fall. His mother came here to find him and stayed here because he liked this city. She bought furniture on the installment plan, furnished a home at 512 Oak street, and the children's court got Delos a position at $20 a month so that he could help his mother pay for their new home. He quit his hob, because the boss asked him to scrub a floor. A second position he resigned because he was asked to wash a spittoon. There will be floors for him to scrub at the parental home.

The other charter member of the home is Dan Clark of 911 Wyandotte street. There's nothing the matter with Dan, except that he has insisted for two years on playing marbles and shinny, when he should have been attending the Lathrop school.

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