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February 3, 1910

TO CELEBRATE THE NEW YEAR.

Kansas City's Chinese Colony Be-
ginning to Make Arrangements.
Happy Chinese New Year

"Vely fine happee New Year" will be the common greeting in the Chinese world next Wednesday which marks the beginning of another twelve months for the Mongolian race. The Kansas City colony, the seat of which is West Sixth street, is already making elaborate preparations for the annual festivities. The Moys, the Sings, the Chins, the Lees, the Wahs, the Lungs and all the rest of the representatives of the various provinces of China are combining their efforts to make themselves conspicuous, despite the fact that there are comparatively few Chinamen here.

Spaghetti, Irish stew and bean chili must all sink into the caverns of oblivion as toothsome dishes for a day at least and good, old chop suey, with noodles on the side, together with gloutchew, Oriental prunes and other equally palatable things from the Celestial standpoint, will be in evidence. A large shipment of Chinese fruits, vegetables and wines arrived Monday and is held in readiness for the celebration.

"We feel much glad on New Year," said Kwong Sang, a tea merchant at 113 West Sixth street yesterday afternoon. "We can't have so much big time here as in New York and San Francisco, because there's not enough Chinamen. All same we have much feast and music."

Kwong Sang has commenced to hang decorations in his store and his wife was busy all day yesterday arranging the rear of the room for a banquet table. They expect to entertain a number of their countrymen. The little Sang children have caught the spirit of the occasion and are already crying for goodies they can have only on New Year.

Shung Fung Lung, a dealer in fancy Chinese goods at 123 West Sixth street, has also sent out invitations to several of his out-of-town friends and will assume the role of host in a brand new silk suit just received from China.

"We like the fireworks on New Year," he said yesterday, "but no allow it here. Much sorry."

The warring Tongs, the Hop Sings and the On Loongs, of which there are a few of each here, have apparently patched up their differences sufficiently to permit speaking terms of one day, if no longer. The Yongs, most of whom are laundrymen, are showing a disposition to be clannish and are said to be planning some exclusive parties on East Twelfth street, but their doings will not worry the wealthier merchants and importers of the North End. There is no likelihood of any serious quarrels and it is safe to bet that the local Orientals enjoy a peaceful advent of their New Year.

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January 30, 1910

GIVES HIS HALF TO
MAHONEY CHILDREN.

JUDGE MICHAEL ROSS, SILENT
PARTNER, DISCLAMES SHARE
WORTH $50,000.

"John Was My Friend and
He Would Have Done That
for Me," He Says.

Judge Michael Ross, John Mahoney's silent partner, yesterday startled the court of Van B. Prather, probate judge of Wyandotte county, by announcing he wished to disclaim a $50,000 share in the Mahoney estate so that it would go to his friend's orphans.

John Manoney was the Kansas City, Kas. contractor who, with his wife and foreman, Thomas F. McGuire, met death in an automobile accident on the Cliff drive Monday afternoon Judge Ross has been justice of the peace in the North End for many years.

One feature about Judge Ross's gift is that he wanted no one except the firm's lawyer to know about it. At the opening of the hearing Judge Prather said he understood that a silent partnership existed in the contracting business between Mr. Mahoney and some one else, and that if such was the case it would be necessary to take different action in the appointment of the administrators than if such a partnership did not exist.

"HE WAS MY FRIEND."

At this announcement Judge Ross arose. He said he had been a full partner of Mr. Mahoney in the contracting business, but that he desired to "wipe the slate clean" and give the children his half of the estate. Judge Prather asked Judge Ross to explain more fully.

"John Mahoney was a good friend of mine," the judge began. "He loved his four children dearly, and I am comfortably situated, and I want those little children to have my interest in the estate. And further, if any of the contracts which Mr. Mahoney left unfinished show a loss when they are fulfilled by the administrators I will give my personal check to make up for it. John was my friend and I know he would have done the same for my family."

When Judge Ross had finished speaking there were tears in the eyes of many in the court room. Judge Prather said nothing for a moment then rising, he reached over and grasped Judge Ross's hand.

"I am 60 years old," Judge Prather said. "I have read of such men, and heard of them, but you are the first of this type whose hand I ever have had the privilege to grasp."

1,000 ATTENDED FUNERAL.

The funeral of Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney was held on Friday in Kansas City, Kas. The services were held at the home, 616 North Seventh street and conducted by the Rev. Father James Keegan of St. Mary's Catholic church. It was estimated that more than 1,000 persons gathered about the house during the services. The children at Central school, where the younger Mahoney children attended, stood with bowed heads while the funeral cortege passed.

Nellie Mahoney and her sister, Lillian, age 6, were still in St. Mary's hospital and were unable to attend the services. They were, however, told for the first time of the deaths of their parents. The girls were taken from the hospital to their home in a closed carriage last night. Lillian is now able to walk about, and the attending surgeons say she is recovering rapidly. The girls are being attended at their home by a trained nurse. Mr. Mahoney's sister is in charge of the house.

Judge Prather said yesterday that he would visit the Mahoney home tomorrow morning in order that Nellie might sign a bond and qualify as an administrator.

Mr. Mahoney did not leave a will, at least none has been found.

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December 26, 1909

FREE LIQUOR, MANY SCRAPES.

Broken Heads and Knife Wounds
Result of Saloon Celebrations.

The North End saloons last night gave free liquor to their customers. The result is that there were several broken heads, some cutting scrapes, not to speak of the parched throats to come. A few of the Christmas celebrators were given free rides to the emergency hospital.

Edward Evans, 1077 Grand avenue, a dishwasher at Eighth and Main streets, was cut in the chest with a knife. His cheek also was slit, the knife blade entering his neck and barely missing the jugular vein. After being treated at the emergency hospital he was taken to the general hospital.

Only one saloon in Kansas City was known to be closed yesterday. "Wish you all a Merry Christmas. This place will be closed until Monday morning on account of Christmas day."

This is the inscription which greeted the would-be Christmas patrons of Jack Sheehan's saloon, 2340 Grand avenue. So far as is known, this is the only saloon which observed Christmas by closing.

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December 10, 1909

KNIFE THRUST ENDS SPEECH.

Soldier, Fatally Wounded, Unable to
Make a Statement.

As the result of a fight between privates of Troop F, Fifteenth United States cavalry, which occurred at Twelfth and Central last night, Frank McFadden is at the general hospital with a knife wound below his heart which may prove fatal, and John Chrobel is suffering from a badly gashed back. George Pease, who is supposed to have done the stabbing, was arrested by Patrolman J. J. Lovell and is held at police headquarters.

McFadden was hurried to the emergency hospital. Dr. H. A. Pond, seeing that the man was probably fatally injured, sent for Assistant Prosecutor Norman Woodson. Further examination of the man showed that the vagus nerve had been injured, affecting the vocal chords and rendering him in capable of speech, and the prosecutor could take no statement.

The troops at Fort Leavenworth, where the Fifteenth cavalry is stationed, were paid off yesterday and McFaddden, Chrobel and Pease came to Kansas City together. They spent all day in the North end of town and were on the way to a theater when the quarrel occurred.

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November 30, 1909

JEW AND ITALIAN
DRIVE OUT NEGRO?

DOCTOR SAYS HIS RACE IS LOS-
ING NORTH END.

Suggests 10th to 31st, Troost to
Montgall as Desirable Location,
But Learns It Is
Too Late.

The park board was told yesterday by Dr. M. H. Key, a negro, that there are 35,000 negroes already in Kansas city, and that in a few more years they will number at least 100,000. He said that the proper housing of the race was becoming a serious problem. It is his opinion that the only district left for them to locate in is between Troost, Montgall, Tenth and Thirty-first.

"The negroes are being driven from the West bottoms by the invasion of railroads; from the North end by Jews and Italians, and from other districts by the progress of industry and improvement," said the doctor.

PASEO EXTENSION PROTEST.

The purpose of Dr. Key's explanation was to protest against the condemnation of land occupied by negroes in the vicinity of Twenty-sixth and Spring Valley park for the extension of the Paseo. He feared that their property would be practically confiscated, and that they would not be sufficiently recompensed to find abodes elsewhere.

The members of the board assured Dr. Key that the valuations of the negroes' property would be protected, and that he had come too late with his objections, as both the board and council had approved the proceedings.up to the north park district..

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October 13, 1909

BIG PARADE HELD IN
HONOR OF COLUMBUS.

ITALIAN SOCIETIES COMMEM-
ORATE DISCOVERY.

Replica of Santa Maria, With "In-
dians" Aboard, a Feature --
Music and Speeches at
City Garden.

Columbus day, commemorating the discovery of America on October 12, 1492, was celebrated in Kansas City yesterday for the first time. A bill making October 12 a legal holiday passed the last legislature.

As the great "Christopher Colombo" was an Italian, born in Genoa, Italy, the Italians of Kansas City took the lead yesterday in celebrating the day. Ever since July 4 last the representative Italians of the city have been working on a monster parade, and yesterday the people viewed the result of their labors. The parade formed at the Holy Rosary church, Fifth and Campbell streets, and was headed by a line of carriages. In the first were Mayor Crittenden, Justice Michael Ross and Michael E. Casey, the state senator who drew up the bill making October 12 a holiday. Judge Harry G. Kyle, W. H. Baehr, city treasurer, and other city officials were in the other carriages with representative Italian citizens. Following these were members of many Italian lodges and societies.

SANTA MARIA IN PARADE.

The most attractive feature of the parade was a replica of the Santa Maria, the boat on which Columbus sailed to America. On board were sailors and "Indians." Frank Bascone, dressed to represent Columbus, stood in the boat, telescope in hand, apparently searching for land. Four bands were in the line of march.

After forming at Fifth and Campbell the parade went south to Sixth street, east on Sixth to Gillis, north on Gillis to Fifth and west to Walnut street, thus traversing the very heart of the Italian quarter known as "Little Italy." Crowds lined both sides of the street through the entire North End.

The line of march was continued down Walnut street to Sixteenth, on that street to Grand avenue and thence to the City garden, about Nineteenth and Grand, where the real celebration was held. Mayor Crittenden, Senator Casey and Judge Kyle made speeches in English, the best they could do. Speeches in Italian were made by Professor G. G. Langueri, Rev. Father John Marchello and Rev. Maxdano, minister of the Italian Evangelist church.

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September 11, 1909

WILL SETTLE AN OLD DISPUTE.

City Soon to Know if Armour-Swift
Are on Public Land.

John T. Harding, city counselor, is busy with one of his assistants in getting together data with which to meet the Armour-Swift interests before a commissioner from the federal court, October 1, to settle the long drawn out dispute as to whether Armour-Swift in reclaiming water front lands have not encroached on property owned by the city.

"It is my aim to get this controversy settled either through the medium of the courts or by mutual agreement," said Mr. Harding yesterday. "This dispute has gone unsettled through three preceding administrations, and it is not only embarrassing to the men who want to develop and rehabilitate the North End, but is annoying to the city. If any of the city's rights have been imposed upon, they will be restored, and the city will be in every way safeguarded and protected."

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August 28, 1909

PREACH FOR PRICE OF DRINK.

Street "Missionaries" in Court, One
Being Fined $10.

Preaching on the streets in the North End to secure the price of drinks, has fallen under the ban of municipal court. Yesterday morning two street preachers were on trial for blockading the streets. Chief Frank Snow testified that the men preached until they had a small collection, then closed the ceremonies and hunted the nearest saloon. An hour later the performance would be repeated. One fo the "missionaries" was fined $10.

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August 11, 1909

"MOTHER" WAKEFIELD IS DEAD.

Once Kept a Boarding House for
Benefit of Policemen.

Mrs. Sophia L. Wakefield, "mother" of the police department, died of paralysis at 11 o'clock last night at her home, 2906 Penn Valley park. She was 70 years old and a widow. Her husband, a major in the Union army, was killed in the civil war. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Many of the older members of the police force will remember "Mother" Wakefield, as she was lovingly called in the days when she kept a little boarding house for the benefit of policemen at 206 East Sixth street. No restaurant in the North End, then a better place in which to live than now, could compete with her in the culinary art, and when her pleasant smile of welcome and ready sense of humor were thrown in with the repast, the satisfaction afforded by the meals to the big officers knew no bounds.

Mrs. Wakefiled was born in Chatham, Canada, and came to this city forty years ago. She is survived by two sons, Hank Wakefield, a former circus press agent, and William, a member of a troup of acrobats.

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August 10, 1909

PENNY ICE DISTRIBUTION
SAVES LIVES OF BABIES.

Ensign Heazlitt of Salvation Army
Tells of Good That Is Being
Accomplished.

It was stated yesterday by Ensign Blanche Heazlitt of the Salvation Army, who has charge of the penny ice fund, that more than 400 poor families are now being supplied by that means. The ice distributed in two sections of the city is donated. In the East Bottoms it is donated by the Kansas City Breweries Company through the Heim brewery. In the West Bottoms the Interstate Ice Company gives five tons each day for distribution in that section.

"For the North End, the McClure flats, Warden court and for the homes of many needy intermediate families," said Ensign Heazlitt, "ice is purchased out of the penny ice fund. We are still able to give ten pounds for a penny, and on Saturday we allow them to purchase twenty pounds, as there is no delivery on Sunday.

"The ice so delivered is not to be cracked up and used in drinking water. There are babies at most of the homes and it is used to keep their milk cool and sweet and to preserve what little else perishable the family may have. At first many of the mothers were wasteful, not knowing how to preserve ice, but I made a trip through the penny ice district and taught the mothers how to keep it by means of plenty of old newspaper and sacks.

"Some of them have made rude ice boxes which enables them to keep the ice longer than before. By next year we hope to have depots distributed throughout the district where ice may be secured.

"I have often wished that the subscribers to the fund could have gone with me on my trip. They would be delighted to see the good their money is doing. We consider penny ice the best thing that has ever been done for the unfortunate of this city. Many of the mothers cannot speak English but they all show their gratitude in their worn, wan faces.

"The arrival of the penny ice wagon in a neighborhood is always greeted by the children, who shout, 'Penny ice, penny ice!'

"Next year we want to be able to start out the wagons in time to supply the unfortunate just as soon as warm weather arrives. There is no doubt that the distribution of ice has saved the lives of many helpless little ones this year."

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August 6, 1909

LOOKING FOR MISSING MEN.

Anxious Wives of Four Appeal to
Police for Assistance.

If the police do nothing else but look for missing persons the entire department would be kept busy during the next few days. Four persons were reported as missing form their homes yesterday.

George Mitchell, 2328 McGee street, left for the harvest fields June 15. His wife, who is in destitute circumstances, with two children to support, became anxious yesterday and gave the man's description to the police. She can't understand his protracted absence.

The disappearance of H. W. Rutherford, 415 West Sixth street, Kansas City, Kas., who left his home ten days ago, has worried his friends. the man is 60 years old, is gray headed and weighs 150 pounds. The police were asked to aid in the search today.

Another woman in trouble is Mrs. Julia Johnson, who is stopping at the Helping Hand. She is convinced that her husband is working at some restaurant in the North end but doesn't know where.

Mrs. W. H. Treymeyer, 3143 Summit street, is also in the same dilemma. Theymeyer is 43 years old, is six-feet two inches in height, weighs 170 pounds, has a black moustache and black hair.

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July 26, 1909

NORTH END BEATS TAME NOW.

Clean Up's and Better Lighting
Fatal to Police Excitement.

So many years ago that the oldest member of the police department scarcely remembers it, No. 2 police station in the West Bottoms was a busy point and the number of arrests there for a single night ranged from five to forty-five. Now it is a back number and the happy patrolman walking beats in the No. 2 district has a snap equal to that of being a line man for the Marconi system. This is the result of a forgotten clean-up in the early '90s. Such a clean-up is now relegating No. 4 district to an unimportant one in the city.

Captain Thomas Flahive, lately removed to No. 5 station in Westport, used to book all the way from five to twenty-five "drunks" and "vag" at the Walnut street holdover, and Lieutenant C. DeWitt Stone on his advent there promised to increase the average so that no safe limit could be ascribed to it.

"But now there is a slump in crime there," Stone said last night. "We still make arrests but they are invariably tame ones and the time is about here when there will be practically none at all. Drag nets and the brilliant lighting of McGee street, formerly as wicked as any place in the North End, has wrought a change for the better, fatal to the excitement attendant on being an officer."

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July 13, 1909

FOUGHT OVER 10-CENT MEAL.

Railroad Man and Restaurant Pro-
prietor Land in the Holdover.

A free-for-all fight occurred yesterday afternoon in Main street in front of the city hall, when Harry Fox, a railway laborer, was thrown out of Peter Scando's restaurant, 420 Main street.

The police took all the participants in the fight to headquarters.

Fox, who had been out of employment for several days, as standing in Henry Miller's saloon at 402 Main street when he saw John B. Davis, a clerk for the Burlington camp near St. Joseph. He had worked for Davis two years ago.

"I haven't had anything to eat for two days," declared Fox as he shook hands with Davis. "My pal hasn't had anything either."

Davis consented to buy the two men "the best 10-cent meal in the city," and stopped at 420 Main street. He paid the cashier, and Fox and his friend proceeded to eat.

Both started to leave when they had finished. Alex Feandos, the cashier, halted them at the door.

"Pay me," he said. "Not a step until I get 20 cents."

Fox started to remonstrate when the proprietor jerked off his hat and refused to return it.

"You've eaten about 50 cents worth of food anyway," he said.

Fox picked up a chair and was starting for the cashier when a bottle of ketchup struck the wall near his head. Then Scandos chased him into the street with a double barrel shotgun when the cashier threw him to the sidewalk. He had cocked both barrels of the gun, when Charles Chadwick, a fireman from the station across the street, interfered and took the gun away.

Fox had received a severe beating and was locked up with the proprietor of the restaurant.

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July 9, 1909

CHILDREN SHOUT AT
SIGHT OF PENNY ICE.

CROWD PRECEDES WAGON IN
NORTH END STREETS.

Fund Reached $511 Yesterday With
$20 Contribution from Jour-
nal Employes -- First Deliv-
ery to 190 Families.

With a $20 contribution from employes of The Journal, the campaign of the Salvation Army for penny ice was closed at noon yesterday. the attention of the local corps will now be turned toward the establishment of a more extensive fresh air camp at the terminus of the Swope park car line, or at Seventieth street and Cleveland avenue. for this purpose it will be necessary to raise $2.000, the running expenses of the camp being approximately $1,000 a month.

The Army's one ice wagon was busy all day yesterday, and visited 190 families, distributing more than a ton of ice. As it rumbled down the streets of the North End it was preceded by a crowd of children who ran ahead shouting in order to announce its arrival to their mothers.

The system of distribution is simple and at the same time effective against imposition. Each mother or family head has a card to be punched for 1 cent at each purchase of ten pounds. The card is arranged to last until the end of the hot weather season, or about two months. These cards are sent on recommendation or after the investigation by members of the Salvation Army staff.

"We were just a little imposed on last year. Some people took advantage of our free-for-all system," said Ensign Blanche Haezlett, who has charge of that branch of the Army service here, yesterday.

"We thought it best to be more careful," she continued, "for the undeserving poor were getting the best of the honest poor people and at our expense.

"The Army will put on another wagon, as soon as we can purchase or borrow another horse. Then we can reach the McClure flats, the North End and the East Bottoms every day. It will be a great day for the poor when we have formulated a system that will include all of them in its benevolence. That is our idea and with the help of the good people of Kansas City, sooner or later, it will be carried out."

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July 8, 1909

TO OPEN FIRST MODEL
PLAY GROUND TUESDAY.

Band Music and Flag Raising Pro-
gramme for North End Model
Recreation Park.

There will be many smiling little faces in the North End next Tuesday. This will be the opening of the city's first model playground at Independence avenue and Charlotte street. In the morning there will be a flag raising in which the children will participate. In the evening a band will be on hand to make music for the occasion.

The grounds are situated on a lot 85 x 100 feet. On it is a pretty shelter house, 20 x 75 feet, where children may play out of the sun and where mothers of the neighborhood may rest in the evenings. The place may also be used for neighborhood meetings.

There will be eight shower baths with hot and cold water, an indoor baseball and basket ball court, sand pits where the children may jump, and sand piles where the little ones may play and make tunnels. There will also be teeter-totters, a merry-go-round, a giant slide, hickory turning poles and rings. In all there will be twelve pieces of the most modern outdoor playground apparatus. All of this was made possible by money furnished by the Kansas City Playgrounds Association. The K. C. A. C. will furnish a male director and the Kansas City Women's Athletics club will furnish a young woman to look after the instruction of the girls on the playgrounds.

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July 4, 1909

PROMISES NEW ERA
FOR THE NORTH END.

MIDLAND ARCADE BUILDING TO
START NEXT MONTH.

Three Story Structure at Seventh
and Walnut Will Contain Ten
Stores and Hotel -- Im-
provement Plans.
Proposed Midland Arcade Building.
PROPOSED MIDLAND ARCADE BUILDING, TO BE ERECTED AT SEVENTH AND WALNUT.

The rejuvenation of the North End will begin next month, when work upon the Midland Arcade building will be started. The building, owned by Godfrey A. Jones and the Berlau brothers, will be situated at the northeast corner of Seventh and Walnut streets. It will be an office building and hotel combined. The location is at the entrance to the North End, and Mr. Jones makes it plain that it is an effort to bring into public realization the value of the North End as a business location.

It is also given out that the new Midland Arcade building will be only the first of similar improvements in the locality. The North End is the location of the great produce market of Kansas City, and the produce houses are becoming rapidly overcrowded.

The new building is to be three stories high, and constructed of brick, stone and stucco. The lower floor, which will be given over entirely to stores and an arcade, will be glass. The upper floors will be in the shape of an "L," with the north and east fronts facing the court and will be fitted up for a thoroughly modern European hotel, with outside rooms.

Merchants in the North End are enthusiastic concerning the improvement and all have asserted their willingness and desire to further the work begun by Mr. Jones and his associates. In the district which is now known as the North End, north of Eighth street, are the Hiest building, Water Works building, court house, Temple building and Temple block, Grand opera house, Gilliss theater, city hall, market square and many other places of business interest. The streets in that location are always as busy as any others in the retail district in Kansas City and, it is asserted, just as much money passes hands in business transactions in proportion to the area as does any other part of the city.

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July 3, 1909

HELPING HAND PLANS
BATH FOR NORTH END.

Public Showers From Fire Plug Will
Be Suspended Over Gutter -- Is
Superintendent Brig-
ham's Idea.
'The
The "Brigham Bath" for North End Youngsters.

Large numbers of children living in the North End have been without necessary baths for many moons. With the approach of hot weather the demand for some place where the youngsters of Little Italy and adjoining districts can get enough water to clean and cool their skins has become an imperative, and the Helping Hand institute proposes to come to the rescue with a novel device for free public baths on the street corners.

"The old swimmin' hole is a thing of the past," said E. T. Brigham, superintendent of the institute, last night. "The river is too swift for swimming and free public baths for the North End exist only in the minds of theoretical social workers, as yet, so that some substitute must be found. I have conceived the idea of putting up a half dozen public shower baths where the little ones can get their skins soaked nightly and have a great deal of pleasure besides."

Mr. Brigham has in mind a contrivance which he hopes will answer all the purposes of a miniature Atlantic city for Little Italy. An inch iron pipe will conduct the water from a city fire plug to a point seven feet over the gutter, where a "T" will be formed, the branches containing five horseshoe-shaped showers.

One of the portable baths has already been constructed and will be tried out tonight at Fourth and Locust streets.

Bathers will be expected to wear their ordinary dress, that is, a single garment, which is the mode for children in the North End. Thus the shower will serve the double purpose of a recreation and a laundry.

For years something in the line of this free, open-air public bath has been in operation at Nineteenth and McGee streets in the vicinity of the McClure flats. Nightly during the summer the children collect when the fire plug is to be turned on to flush the gutters, and stand in the stream. The stream is too strong for them to brave it for more than a second at a time, but many of them manage to get a bath which they probably would not get any other way.

"Children are naturally cleanly," said Mr. Brigham. "Although they like to get dirt upon themselves, they also like to get it off. I think the shower bath on the street corner should prove one of the most popular institutions in the North End."

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June 20, 1909

WHEN 'LUCKY NUMBER'
TOM DAVIS WAS BOSS.

WITH "ANDY" FOLEY WAS A
POWER IN POLITICS.

Old-Time Czar of Ninth Ward, Who
Helped Make Political His-
tory in Kansas City,
Is Dead.
The Late Tom Davis, Ninth Ward Political Boss.
THE LATE "TOM" DAVIS.

"Big Tom" Davis, for more than twenty years proprietor of the "Lucky Number" saloon, 1711 Grand avenue, and Democratic boss of the Ninth ward, died of liver complaint at his home, 517 East Seventeenth street, at 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

With the passing of "Andy" Foley of the Second ward, twelve years ago, the number of Kansas City's old-time Democratic ward bosses was limited to two, and now there are none worthy of the name left in the city. Davis's sway in the territory immediately surrounding his place, near Seventeenth and Grand avenue, was, however, just as strong at the time of his death as at any previous time, according to his admirers. Should he have bolted his party at any time in his career, they say, the Ninth ward would have become staunchly Republican.

Thomas Jefferson Davis was born in Alliance, O., fifty-five years ago. At 18 years of age he became a fireman on a locomotive and later an engineer. With Andrew Foley, now dead, former councilman from the Second ward, and Charles A. Millman, former member of the state legislature, he came to Kansas City about May 1, 1883. Millman alone survives.

YELLED COWHERD INTO OFFICE.

"Davis made his debut in ward politics in 1892 in rather a unique manner," said Mr. Millman last night.

"It was the time Henry J. Latshaw was running for nomination against William Cowherd, Thomas Corrigan, now dead, backing the former and Bernard Corrigan, president of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, pulling private wires for the latter.

"The Ninth ward was in the hands of William Abel, a druggist, one time alderman, and had been for years, and it was understood that Abel was going to throw all his influence to Latshaw. On the night before the primaries the Cowherd faction was desperate and a hurried consultation was called among the leaders.

"Finally a deputation, comprised of Frank Rozzelle, after city counselor under Cowherd, and George Hale, chief of the fire department, visited his saloon.

"You are the last hope we have," explained Rozzelle. 'We have come to ask you if you can't help us lick Latshaw in the Ninth.'

" 'I can carry the nomination either way,' replied Davis. 'Only give me a short talk with "Andy" Foley.'

"Nominations were made by 'mob primaries' then, and the crowd that could holler the loudest won viva voce, and there was no appeal provided by the rules after the decision was made.

"At the time for the primaries the next day, a dozen or more moving vans came to the convention loaded with Foley's followers in the North End and Davis's particular crowd from the Ninth ward. The instructions were 'Yell like the devil.' Cowherd owed his nomination as well as his subsequent election to Davis. Likewise the power of William Abel was permanently wrested from him, and Joe Shannon became the czar of the Democrats in the Ninth ward."

Stories of Davis's zeal in advertising his saloon display has character in a different light than those relating to his political moves. It is said that every farmer boy in Jackson county knew of the big saloonkeeper twenty years ago, even though they never tasted his wares.

GANZHORN LOST WHISKERS.

One of his favorite pastimes was to purchase live rabbits, ground hogs, badgers and foxes from the farmer youths, and either put them on exhibition at his place or advertise a hunt and turn them loose in front of a pack of hounds on Grand avenue. For the latter amusement he invariably was arrested, but always paid his fine cheerfully and then seemingly forgot the incident.

Years ago when a former justice, now dead, grew tired of the single life he took his troubles to Tom Davis and was advised by "Tom" to have the vows proclaimed while standing with his bride on a table in the rear of his saloon. His idea in giving the judge this advice is not known, but his best friends say it was another advertising scheme brought to a successful conclusion by the overwhelming eloquence with which the saloonkeeper always presented his ideas.

Later when Davis learned that the bride had taken an aversion to the judge's long beard and mustache he sent for his client and advised him to have them cut and sold at auction at his saloon. This, too, was done, and a vast crowd witnessed the sale and shearing while ten bartenders hired for one day tried to take care of the enlivened trade.

Mr. Davis died after an illness of three months at his residence. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Emma Davis, four brothers and a sister, living in Ohio. He leaves an estate already converted for the most part into cash valued at about $30,000. No arrangements for the funeral have been made.

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June 14, 1909

CONFISCATE 22 CASES OF
BEER AT GALLAGHER'S.

POLICE ARREST 22 IN NORTH
END SUNDAY RAID.

Eight Women Beside Mrs. Gallagher,
Who, With Husband, Is Charged
With Selling Liquor With-
out a License.

Charged with selling liquor without a license, Jack Gallagher, ex-patrolman and former North End saloonkeeper, was arrested and locked up in the holdover at Central police station yesterday in default of $500 cash bond. He was arrested in a raid made by Captain Walter Whitsett on the Star hotel, Oak street and Independence avenue, at 11:30 o'clock yesterday morning.

Since Gallagher's saloon licenses were taken away from him by the board of police commissioners after he assaulted Albert King, a reporter for The Journal, he has been conducting a rooming house in the Star hotel.

Yesterday the lid in the North End was on extremely tight. Gallagher had twenty-two cases of bottled beer in a room in the hotel.

One of the numerous enemies Gallagher had made by his bullying attitude went to police headquarters about 11:00 and reported to Captain Whitsett that Gallagher was violating the excise laws. Calling Sergeant Edward McNamara and ten patrolmen, Captain Whitsett headed the squad in making the raid. Arriving at the Star hotel building, the police found the door leading to the rear stairway locked and barred. Entrance to the hotel was made by the front door.

TWENTY-NINE AND 22 CASES.

The captain and sergeant led the patrolmen in a rush up the stairway. Scattering out the patrolmen searched every room for evidence. Men and women, the police claim, were found drinking beer in several rooms. While searching the house the police discovered one room which was locked. Gallagher said he did not have the key. The prisoners were sent to the station in a patrol wagon which made three trips to take the twenty-nine persons placed under arrest.

When the locked room was entered twenty-two cases of bottled beer were found and sent to headquarters where they are held as evidence. Among the persons arrested were eight women besides Jack Gallagher's wife, who at midnight was released on a cash bond of $500.

All of those arrested said they lived at the hotel. Mrs. Gallagher denied that all of the women lived there, but said only two or three of them were roomers.

When the raid was made, Gallagher threatened to place charges against the police. Their jobs were to be had, according to him, and he told them he would get them. Until he was locked in the holdover Gallagher continued his swaggering tactics. He refused to discuss his arrest.

BEER FOR OWN USE.

Gallagher's wife informed the police that they had a government license, which expired in July. She denied that the police found anyone drinking beer, or that any beer had been sold. Before she was aware that the police had confiscated the beer, she said no evidence had been secured. When asked what they were doing with so many cases in the hotel, she said it was for their private use. Mrs. Gallagher said the police and newspapers were endeavoring to bankrupt them, but that they had plenty left. The habitues were released on $11 bond.

Jack Gallagher has had a varied experience in the North End, having been at various times a policeman, ward politician and saloonkeeper. Following numerous arrests for disturbing the peace, he was finally compelled to serve a term in the workhouse for an assault upon a newspaper man.

The officers participating in the raid under Captain Walter Whitsett were Sergeant Edward McNamara and Patrolmen George Hightower, Daniel Jones, P. J. Murphy, Vincent Maturo, Charles Walters, Walter Doman, Thomas Eads, Thomas Maddigan, Frank Rooth and Patrick Dalton.

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May 28, 1909

BOUNDARIES FOR TENDERLOIN.

Tenement Commission's Advice Con-
cerning "Red Light" Districts.

In a letter to the board of police commissioners yesterday the tenement commission advised the board that conditions on Twelfth street in the neighborhood of Central high school were not ideal, and that many hotels and rooming houses in that neighborhood were frequented by an undesirable class of inmates.

The commission also advised that the "red light" district be segregated to definite boundaries, south of Twelfth street. The letter advised that the boundaries of the district be fixed at Main street on the west, McGee street on the east, Eighteenth street on the south and Fourteenth street on the north. The district in the North End should be bounded on the north by Second street, on the east by Wyandotte street, on the south by Fifth street and on the west by Broadway.

Commissioner Marks was delegated to make an investigation of the matter, and report at the next meeting.

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May 24, 1909

HE CHANGES HIS UNIFORMS.

Letter Carrier Who Believes in
Cleanliness and Neatness.

Should all of the men in the civil service of the United States follow the example of a well known mail carrier in Kansas City the work of tailors would treble and the men would gain fame for their general appearance. The man who sets the pace in neatness is found in the city directory in the following short history: "Harry Feaman, Carrier, P. O. 3217 East Eleventh Street."

This firm believer in the old proverb of "Cleanliness is next to Godliness" works for Uncle Sam for eight hours every day. He carries a mail route in the North End and the city hall. The mail bags are heavy but become burdensome when stuffed with letters and papers. A carrier is constantly waling and is compelled to climb many pairs of stairs in the course of a day.

There is considerable dust flying in the air in the neighborhood of city hall and when Carrier Feaman's work is finished he feels dirty and grimy. He changes his uniform from three to five times a day and tops each change with a cold water bath. In consequence of these many changes this mail carrier always appears neat and tidy, in fact one would believe that he had just stepped out of a band box.

When Feaman gets up in the morning he refreshes himself with a dip in a tub of cold water, dresses and goes to work. Returning home for lunch he again indulges in a plunge and dons clean clothes and a freshly pressed uniform. The work of distributing his mail in the afternoon musses up his garments and so it is bath and change of clothes No. 3 for Mr. Feaman.

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May 22, 1909

ADAM GOD TO DROP
PLEA OF INSANITY?

EARLY TESTIMONY INDICATES
SELF-DEFENSE.

Sharp's Mental Condition Is Not
Seriously Considered -- Witnesses
Describe the City Hall
Riot Scenes.

That the defense of James Sharp, the religious fanatic, charged with the killing of Patrolman Michael Mullane, is to be self-defense was made evident on the first day of the trial, which opened yesterday in the criminal court.

It had been announced and it was the theory of the state that insanity would be pleaded. but during all the evidence heard yesterday there was no mention of Sharp's mental condition save alone in the statement of Virgil Conkling, prosecuting attorney, in which he outlined what the state expects to prove.

Perhaps it was because through Mr. Conkling's statement, reciting incident after incident of Sharp's life, from his religious doings in Oklahoma and Canada, through the city hall riot here December 8 and the subsequent flight of Sharp, ran the suggestion that Sharp was not insane, but, on the contrary, sane and exceptionally acute of mind. Out of every action on the part of Sharp the prosecutor deduced a refutation of the insanity idea.

THE MAYOR A WITNESS.

At the rate of progress made yesterday, it is likely that the trial will consume a greater part of next week. It is the practice of Judge Ralph S. Latshaw to open court early, to take one hour at noon for recess and to adjourn at 5 o'clock. Much time was spent yesterday over each witness.

It was while Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., was on the stand yesterday afternoon that the defense showed its change of front. In arguing for permission to ask the mayor certain questions, A. E. Martin of counsel for the defense said to the court:

"We propose to show that the police and the probation officer incited a riot at the city hall and followed the same persons who participated in the riot and killed one of them in a boat on the river."

The court refused to admit testimony as to what happened on the river front, as happening there were fifteen minutes later than the fight which resulted in the death of Mullane.

DEFENSE'S STATEMENT LAST.

Touching elbows with John P. Mullane, brother of the man with whose death he stands charged, Sharp heard George M. Holt, probation officer, give his testimony. The defense took advantage of its right to reserve its statement until the state shall have finished with its witnesses.

Holt gave his age as 46, his address as 3027 East Nineteenth street and his occupation as probation officer. At noon of the riot, he said, he saw Mrs. Sharp and the children of Louis Pratt singing on the street at that point. He watched them about five minutes, when they started north on Main. Mrs. Sharp, during the meeting, was inviting the public to a gathering at the Workingmen's mission that night. There was a hat on the sidewalk and coin in it. Mrs. Sharp took the hat.

"I followed the band and inquired about whose children they were," said Mr. Holt. "She went into the Workingmen's Mission and I followed about a minute later. Sharp was there talking to his wife when I came in.

"I asked him if this was his wife and children and he said yes. He told me he was Adam God, the father of Jesus Christ."

Hot told Sharp that he would have to keep the children off the streets if he meant to keep them in Kansas City.

THREATENED TO KILL.

" 'What authority have you?' Sharp asked me.

" 'I am an officer,' said I.

" 'Well, you blue coated -----,' said Sharp, 'I'll kill you or any other ----- blue coat that comes in here and interferes with my work in this city.'

"Immediately afterwards, Sharp pulled out a pistol from under his vest. Louis Pratt, who also was there, pulled out a revolver and so did Mrs. Sharp. Her husband put his pistol under my face and forced me out of the mission and as I went out hit me on the head. He called to someone to come out. Then I went to the police station to report. Before I had finished reporting, the shooting had begun."

"What part of the shooting did you see?" asked Mr. Conkling.

"All I saw was someone in the chief's office shooting at Louis Pratt, who was on his knees on the street. Pratt fell."

"How long did the shooting last?"

"Less than five minutes. About twenty-five or thirty shots were fired."

TO REVOLUTIONIZE THINGS.

The Rev. Sherman Short of Clarence, Mo., was at Fifth and Main streets when he heard the children sing and stepped up close enough to hear Mrs. Sharp say:

"The prophet will preach tonight at the Workingmen's mission."

Dr. Short testified yesterday that his curiosity was aroused.

"I went up to the mission and there was Sharp," said Dr. Short. "I asked him if he was the prophet and he said:

" 'My name is Sharp. I am supposed to be King David in the spirit. I am the Lord of the Vineyard myself and the people will soon find it out, for I expect to revolutionize things around here.' "

"Did he talk to you about force or violence?" asked Mr. Conkling.

"No."

"What happened then?"

"While we were talking the Pratt children and came in and said to Sharp: 'The humane officer is after us.' Then Holt came in and asked Sharp if these were his children. Sharp said yes and Holt told him they would have to be kept off the streets, if Sharp proposed to remain in Kansas City. I saw Sharp hit Holt and put him out of the mission. I saw him have a knife and a revolver.

"Sharp then waved his revolver and called out: 'Come on, children!' Mrs. Sharp and Louis Pratt and the two oldest Pratt girls all took out revolvers. They went on the street and formed a circle, facing the west sidewalk on Main."

"What did you do?"

"I went to the police station. I saw police coming out of headquarters. Patrolman Dalbow shook hands with Sharp and they stood there a minute. Then some other man came up. He was in citizen's clothes and he pulled out a revolver. Then there was shooting."

PRATT FIRED FIRST.

"Who fired the first shot?"

"Louis Pratt."

"And then what did you see?"

"I didn't stay long after that. I ran across the street. As I turned around I saw a man lying on the car track, shot. I learned afterwards that it was A. J. Selsor. Later I saw Mrs. Sharp and one of the Pratt girls brought into the station.

"When they formed their circle in the street Sharp, his wife, Pratt and the two oldest Pratt girls had revolvers in their hands. Sharp also had a knife."

Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., said that he was in a council chamber on the fourth floor of the city hall when the riot began. He saw Louis Pratt kneeling, steadying his aim with both arms, shooting at Mullane. There was a little girl near Pratt, holding toward him a revolver, loaded with fresh cartridges. The mayor saw Pratt fall over, as if shot. Then the mayor went downstairs to police headquarters and out on the street.

"My purpose of going towards the river was that I had heard talk of lynching and wanted such an action to be avoided," said the mayor in explanation. He was not allowed to tell what happened at the river front.

MULLANE'S WIDOW ON STAND.

Mrs. Hannah Mullane, weeping quietly on the witness stand, told how her husband had left home on the morning of December 8, 1908, at 6 o'clock, in good health. Mullane died Decemberr 10, two days after the riot.

There was some delay when court opened in the afternoon, while attachments were served on physicians who were state's witnesses, but who failed to be on hand at the proper time.

Dr. William A. Shelton, 3305 Wabash avenue, was the second witness. He is a police surgeon. On the day of the riot he was called to treat Mullane at the city hall and later attended him at St. Joseph's hospital. Mullane, he said, had a bullet wound through his left hand and one through his chest just above the heart. The latter bullet struck Mullane in the back. Dr. Shelton probed for it, but could not locate it. He finally found the bullet on the operating table. The bullet was shown to the jury over objections of Sharp's attorneys.

Dr. Eugene King, surgeon at St. Joseph's hospital, examined Mullane at police headquarters and at the hospital. He testified as to the wounds and said he found the bullet in the patorlman's underclothing on the operating table. The course of the ball, he said, was from front to back. Dr. Shelton came from in a few minutes later, said Dr. King.

THE MORNING SESSION.

The dramatic incident of the morning session yesterday occurred while Mr. Conkling, in his opening statement, was arraigning Sharp as a religious grafter. While the prosecutor was in the middle of the sentence, Sharp jumped up and said:

"Your honor, these words this man speaks he will have to get witnesses to prove."

"Sit down, Mr. Sharp," said Judge Latshaw. "If you have any objections to make, do so through your counsel."

"I want this jury to hear the truth," persisted Sharp. "I didn't take up collections at my meetings."

Then sharp started to leave the court room but was brought back by a deputy marshal.

A short time afterwards, while Mr. Conkling was telling of the death of Patrolman Albert O. Dalbow, Mrs. Dalbow fainted and was carried from the courtroom. With her were a son, 8 years old, and a baby of fourteen months. She sat near the jury, close to a son and daughter of A. J. Selsor, who was killed in the riot.

Before Conkling began his address to the jury, there were brought into the courtroom gruesome reminders of the December tragedy. A rifle used by Mrs. Pratt in her fight on the river when she, with her daughters, Lena and Lulu, tried to escape. Lulu was killed by bullets fired from the bank. Then there were five revolvers, Sharp's large knife and ammunition. Also there was a shotgun and a rifle found in the houseboat of the band. the whiskers Sharp left in the Mulberry street barber shop, neatly garnered into an envelope, also were put on the table in plain view of the jury. In the afternoon the display of weapons was removed.

SHARP MAY TESTIFY.

With a changed plea, it is not so certain now that Adam God will be put on the witness stand. It was the first intention to make him back up the plea of insanity, but with a changed method of attack, this plan may be altered. Sharp is firm in declaring that he will be a witness, and as he seems at times to be not under the control of his counsel, he may make his statement before the evidence closes.

The riot of December 8, it will be remembered, occurred on the northwest corner of the city hall. There were wounded and subsequently died the following: Albert O. Dalbow and Michael Mullane, patrolmen; A. J. Selson, a spectator; Louis Pratt, a member of the religious band. Patrick Clark, a sergeant of police, was slashed on the face by Sharp and lost his right eye.

The trial will be resumed this morning.

At yesterday's trial the bible, which is his constant companion, lay on the table before Sharp, who sat facing the east windows, and therefore with his profile to the audience. From time to time he glanced curiously about him, but if it was with an y emotion, the feeling was not depicted by expression. Most of the time he sat with hands folded, elbows close to his side. Occasionally he stroked his beard or with his fingers combed tangles from his long moustache.

COURT ROOM WAS CROWDED.

Not an any trial since Judge Ralph S. Latshaw has taken his place has there been such a throng to see a trial. Not only all the chairs in the courtroom, but also the aisles, already narrowed by extra seats, held their capacity. Conspicuous among the number were a dozen or more well dressed women, who followed every step of the proceedings with interest. Among these was Miss Selsor, daughter of A. J. Selsor, killed in the riot. As the day wore on the crowd tended to increase rather than diminish.

The orderly quiet of it all was not lost on Adam God. Accustomed for years to rough treatment from crowds and officers of the peace, he seemed to feel the different attitude of the spectators in the court room where he is on trial for his life. Defiance of the law and its officers seemed to have passed from his mind, leaving him although perhaps not resigned to his fate, yet with the feeling that he was among those who meant to treat him fairly. At noon he told the deputy marshal who took him to his cell:

"That's a fine judge. He certainly will see that I get a fair trial."

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May 18, 1909

ONE HUNDRED MULES
BURNED IN STABLES.

GUYTON & HERRINGTON SUF-
FER BIG LOSS BY FIRE.

Animals, Fascinated by Flames, Re-
fuse to Escape -- Two Hundred
Horses, Released From Adjoin-
ing Stable, At Large.

More than 100 mules were burned to death in Guyton & Herrington's stables at Seventeenth and Genessee streets last night. Fascinated by the flames, they made no effort to save themselves, but slowly roasted to death, while hundreds of men stood outside shouting to scare the mules away from their death. The building was completely destroyed.

William L. Orvis, salesman for the firm, said there were 300 in the stable. The number of incinerated animals may reach 150.

Sam and Laurence Crane, who live at 2 Kansas avenue, Kansas City, Kas., were the first to see the flames, which had already gained considerable headway inside the locked building. They began trying to lead the already terrified mules out of the fire.

Companies were hurried from Nos. 1, 7, 9, 15 and 16 stations were sent. The Crane boys were inside the building when the first stream of water hit the windows. One of the sashes was knocked off and fell upon the head of Sam Crane, knocking him unconscious. He was dragged out of the flames by his brother and later revived.

Other men rushed into the furnace-like heat and strove to make the mules run out, but the blinded beasts huddled together. Volunteer horse saves raided the barn of Cottingham Bros., next door, and released more than 200 animals, which scattered in every direction. At midnight only sixty-nine had been recovered. A platoon of eight horses rushed up the viaduct of the Twelfth street trolley line and stampeded Twelfth street to Grand avenue, where they turned left and were lost in the North End.

Cottingham's barn next door was not damaged. Two small stables used by Guyton & Herrington, across the alley on Seventeenth and Wyoming streets, were saved.

A watchman was supposed to sleep in the building. What became of him is not known.

The value of the stable, which was of brick, is estimated at $20,000. The mules were worth from $200 to $250 apiece. The building was the property of the stock yards company and was insured. Both Guyton and Herrington were out of town when the fire occurred. They will continue business in the stables on Wyoming street.

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April 26, 1909

PAID $150 FOR FIRST
COUNTY COURT HOUSE.

DANIEL P. LEWIS BUILT IT OF
HEWN LOGS IN 1828.

Old Building, Now Weatherboarded,
Still Stands at Independence --
Negroes Then Had Their
Own Court.

While Kansas City is considering the erection of a skyscraper court house to take the place of the old building in the North End, it might be of interest to members of the county court to know what was the cost of the first court house to be erected in Jackson county. One can scarcely realize in the present day of a temple of justice being erected at the enormous expenditure of $150, but that was the price which the taxpayers were compelled to pay in 1828.

The old town of Independence, Mo., had grown into quite a village, surrounded by a fairly well settled and wealthy farming community. Justice was dispensed in that early time probably as expeditiously as at present. The need of a building or court house wherein trials and other court procedure could be transacted was decided to be a necessity.

NEGRO HEWED THE LOGS.

The county court entered into a contract with one Daniel P. Lewis. In the fall it was agreed that he was to receive $150 for building a courthouse. In the all of that year Sam Shephard, a negro, hewed logs for the new building. They were dragged by a yoke of oxen to the ground selected as the site for the court house. The lot was No. 57 in the old town, now on the north side of Maple avenue near the square in Independence. The building was only one story and contained one large room, which was used as a courtroom and meeting place for all public discussions and lectures. Later several small rooms for use as offices were added.

The building is still standing in Independence, and the hewn logs of which it was constructed have been weather boarded and the large courtroom divided into small rooms. It is now used as a private dwelling and Christian Ott of Independence is the proprietor. It is understood the proprietor has offered to donate the building to the County Fair Association if it will move it from the lot.

In connection with the negro, Sam Shephard, who cut the logs for the court house, there is a bit of local history. In Independence and the country in the immediate neighborhood the negroes maintained a form of self-government. Each year they gathered together in convention and selected their officers. A judge and a sheriff were the principal offices upon which their government was founded.

PUNISHED BY THEIR OWN RACE.

Recalcitrant negroes and those accused of thefts or other crimes not taken notice of by the white people came under the supervision of the blacks' control. An accused would be summoned to court by the sheriff and the judge selected the jury of negroes from those present. The sessions of the negro court were held in a livery barn or blacksmith shop. If the negro on trial was found guilty after the deliberations of the jury, the sheriff carried out the penalty. As he was vested with powerful muscles as well as the authority of a sheriff, the penalty, which was usually a number of lashes on the bare back, was memorable.

The first judge was Wilas Staples and Sam Shephard was the first sheriff. The latter died in Lawrence, Kas., several months ago.

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March 28, 1909

FOIL MARITAL PLANS OF
AN AGED COUPLE.

RELATIVES RUTHLESSLY BREAK
UP WEDDING FEAST.

Now Jacob Rieger, Aged 75, Is
Speeding Away From His
Intended Bride of
60 Years.

Jacob Rieger, 75 years old, who lives with his son, Alexander Rieger, a wholesale liquor dealer at 4121 Warwick boulevard, believes that at that age he is eligible to the order of benedicts. But others of Mr. Rieger's household had different opinions and as a result a pretty wedding supper was interrupted last Thursday evening at the home of the prospective bride, Mrs. Rosa Peck, 60 years old, a milliner at Sixth and Main streets. Also there is an attachment on $1,100 which Mr. Rieger had in the National Bank of Commerce and a fast train is now hurrying him to New York, where he is to remain until he has outgrown his love for the woman.

Since his wife died a year ago, Mr. Rieger, the elder, has complained of lonesomeness, but could find no one among his near relatives who would even offer a suggestion of a cure.

"It is a pity," he is said to have often remarked, "that an old man like me must stay a widower."

No one, however, paid much attention to the yearnings of the old man. He took his evening walks the same as usual and made no allusion to any woman in particular as a fit subject for his affections, and as he has for several years been a partial invalid no developments were expected.

LOVED HIM AND LIKED HIM.

Up to last Wednesday things went as usual with the old man except it was noticed he had gradually been lengthening his outdoor walks, sometimes absenting himself for hours at a time. Then the word was brought to Alexander Rieger that his father and Mrs. Peck had been to Kansas City, Kas., and obtained a marriage license.

Alexander Rieger immediately went to the telephone and called up his lawyer, Samuel Eppstein of the law firm of Eppstein, Ulmann & Miller, with offices in the Kansas City Life building.

Mr. Eppstein went to see Mrs. Peck that same afternoon in hopes of talking her out of the notion of marrying the elder Mr. Rieger. He told her that her prospective groom, through his retirement from the liquor business, was not exactly in independent circumstances, and that in addition he was suffering from chronic stomach trouble.

Mr. Eppstein is eloquent and talked long and earnestly but by all his entreaties he received a decided "no."

"I love him and I like him," was the double-barreled manner in which Mrs. Peck, in broken German accents, expressed her regard for Mr. Rieger.

"You can't take him from me," she said. "You don't know the love we have for each other, and I wouldnt give him up for $25,000," and there the argument ended.

ATTACHED HIS MONEY.

The day following was stormy, but in spite of this fact the elder Mr. Rieger took a car for downtown early in the day. No one saw him go. It was hours before his absence was noticed and the alert lawyer again notified.

Mr. Eppstein at once hurried to the Sixth and Main street millinery store. He found Mrs. Peck had closed shop and was also missing.

Before starting out to forestall the wedding Mr. Eppstein arranged for a bill of attachment on all money Mr. Rieger had on deposit at the bank. Then he took a fast automobile ride to the home of Rabbi Max Lieberman at 1423 Tracy avenue, where he suspected the marriage ceremony would be performed.

As he expected, Mr. Rieger was there arranging for the nuptuals to be solmnized at 5:30 o'clock. After a good deal of argument Mr. Rieger consented to ride in the automobile back to the home of his son.

This was at 4 o'clock. About 5 o'clock he was again missing. This looked like buisness to Mr. Eppstein and the automobile was again brought into play and headed for the millinery store.

When the door of the living apartments at the rear of the store burst opeon to admit the excited lawyer it found a large table spread with a wedding feast and several guests, relatives of the propective bride assembled.

"This wedding can't go on!" shouted Mr. Eppstein. "I have arranged with the rabbi and he will not come."

LED THE BRIDEGROOM AWAY.

"Oh, yes it will," said the bride calmly. "We'll arange for another minister, won't we, Jacob?"

"No, there is nothing doing in the marriage line," replied the lawyer. "It's all off. You see, it isn't legal because you got the license in Kansas City, Kas. That's the law, you know."

Mr. Eppstein did not wait to hear any more, but took the bridegroom by the arm and led him away.

At midnight he was placed aboard a fast train for New York. Mrs. Alexander Rieger went along for company.

Alexander Rieger has maintained a mail order trade under the name of his father, Jacob Rieger, at Fifteenth and Genesse streets for many years, the father now having no interest in the business. Mrs. Peck has been a milliner in the North End over twenty years and is said to have laid by a snug sum of money. Her husband died many years ago, leaving the business exclusively to her.

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February 13, 1909

ROCK QUARRY SOLVES
"UNEMPLOYED" PROBLEM.

More Than 100 Men, Out of Work,
Have Benefited by Scheme of
Park Board.

The Helping Hand institute, assisted by the park board, has solved the "unemployed" problem of Kansas City. Since Monday more than 100 men have been busy at the rock quarry at Penn Valley park, and it is now the belief of E. T. Brigham, superintendent of the institute, that the situation is well in hand. Though the quarry is operated at a slight loss each day, he believes that in time there will be no public begging in Kansas City.

Several weeks ago, the park board agreed to take all the broken rock that the Helping Hand institute could furnish at $1 per cubic foot. A deserted quarry at the northeast corner of the park was turned over to Mr. Brigham and work began Monday.

Under ordinary circumstances the average man breaks two cubic feet of rock each day. For this he is allowed $1.60, but not in currency, which he might be tempted to spend in the North End saloons. For each box of rock he is allowed a 5-cent ticket. If he fills twenty-four boxes he is given twenty-four tickets, and these he exchanges for meal tickets which are good at three different restaurants or at the Helping Hand institute.

If he is unmarried and has no family to support he is not allowed to work until three days have elapsed, and in the meantime is allowed to look out for permanent employment. The tickets which he accumulates will afford him board and lodging for three days under ordinary circumstances.

At the quarry yesterday eighty-eight men were employed. A dozen of the more experienced were blasting rock; others were carrying the larger stones in wheel barrows to smaller piles. In the long shed which the park board constructed for use in cold weather the time keeper was busy keeping the individual accounts. Every man is furnished a pair of mittens free of charge and is entitled to go in the shed and warm his hands at the coal stove.

The extra expense is due to the number of experienced men who must be employed, Superintendent Brigham explained. One carpenter must be employed to do nothing but repair the boxes and fix hammer handles. An experienced man who understands blasting is also employed and adds to the expense bill.

"We are well pleased," Mr. Brigham said yesterday. "Thanks to the co-operation of the city, we can soon see that no one suffers in Kansas City for the lack of shelter and something to eat."

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January 10, 1909

GIRL ASKS $25,000 DAMAGES.

Claims She Was Decoyed Into a Dis-
orderly Resort.

Claiming that she was detained for eighteen day in the resort of Jennie O'Neill, 205 West Third street, Ceicel Grady, 16 years old, brought suit against the woman yesterday. Damages to the amount of $25,000 are asked in the petition which was filed with the clerk of the circuit court. The suit is brought through Mrs. Mollie Woodward, mother of the girl.

Ceicel says she went to Mrs. O'Neill's place at the woman's invitation, as a domestic. When she discovered the real nature of her surroundings she tried to leave, but her clothing was hidden from her by the defendant, it is alleged.

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January 8, 1909

GREEKS AND SERVIANS
HAVE LATE CHRISTMAS.

JANUARY 7 IS THE DAY THEY
CELEBRATE.

Calendar Is Thirteen Days Behind.
Kansas City Colonies of the
Two Nations Make
Holiday.

Christmas day was observed yesterday by the Servians and Greeks of Kansas City thirteen days later than the American and English Christmas. The day was made a holiday and none of the Greeks and Servians in the Kansas City colonies in the North End and West Bottoms failed to observe the day in some manner. Gifts were exchanged and there was general feasting and merrymaking.

Christmas means the same to the Greeks and Servians as it does to other people, namely the celebration of the birth of Christ, but the calendar used by them is thirteen days behind the calendar in general use. There is one great difference between the manner in which the people observe the day. No gifts are given or expected by anyone not an immediate family member. Friends do not give presents in token of their friendship.

Santa Claus is called "Callkagary," and he is supposed to be a tall man of dark complexion with merry black eyes, who visits all the little children on the night or during the week before Christmas day. He doesn't live at the North pole, but inhabits the clouds.

GATHERED IN GROUPS.

The Greeks, there are about 1,000 of them in a colony around Fifth street and Broadway, gave up the entire day yesterday to revelry and fun. There were no particular ceremonies, the colony has no church, but the men gathered in groups in halls and saloons, while the women and children visited each other.

New Year's day is really the day for gifts by the Greeks, but Christmas day does not lack any of its charm because of that. New Year's day will be one week from yesterday, the first of January, according to the Greek calendar. The Christmas season among the Greeks and Servians is supposed to last during three days, but the colony here will not make today and tomorrow festive days.

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January 8, 1909

WHERE 200 SLEEP IN A ROOM.

Men and Boys Find Refuge From the
Storm at a North End Mission.

There is no better place in Kansas City to see and study types of humanity in varying forms then the one dingy room in the North End called the Poor Man's mission. The room is a small one, about thirty feet in width and probably fifty feet long. In this room last night there were crowded at least 200 men who had sought refuge from the cold. In this room they can sleep on chairs, and on the floor, or one another, without money, and no questions asked. Outside the building there is stretched a large banner which bears the legend: "United we stand, divided we fall." Written across a blackboard just outside the door is an invitation to all poor men who have no other place to rest, to make the Poor Man's mission their refuge. That the invitation is accepted can readily be seen by a casual observer any cold night. A look into the room through the window is sufficient for most.

Inside the unlocked doors last night were fully 200 derelicts of the North End sleeping in grotesque positions. The floor was entirely covered with men and boys, with just enough space left between the bodies of the sleepers for the legs of a few chairs and benches to be placed. They sleep in every imaginable position, arms and legs thrust out at any angle. One man uses his neighbor's chest as a pillow; another prefers to rest his head upon his own arm, and still others are unmindful of a subterfuge for a pillow and allow their heads to rest on the floor.

Among the crowd of sleeping men the professional tramp can readily be detected. He is the man who is sitting up on the floor with his back and head resting against the back and shoulder of a fellow -- so, back to back, the professional tramps sleep.

The young fellow who has just been out on the road for a year or so is a little different. He has chosen a secluded nook or corner in which he sits with head bowed down and arms encircling his knees. Leaning up against him in his corner is another individual, unkempt and unshaven.

The room has no ventilation in which those 200 men were sleeping last night. The air was stifling, heavy, poisonous. The Poor Man's mission is located at 309 Main street and it is maintained by J. C. Creighton, a street evangelist. It was from this place that the Adam God sect emanated on the day they wrought such havoc in the North End.

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December 27, 1908

KIDS TRY TO REPEAT
AT THE GIFT GIVING.

More Presents From Mayor's
Christmas Tree.
It was announced in yesterday's Journal that about 700 children had failed to get a present at the mayor's Christmas tree in Convention hall on Christmas, and that tickets had been given them to return Saturday at 2 p. m., when sacks would be given them. About noon a telephone message was sent to police headquarters that over 2,500 boys were massed at the hall and police were asked for to keep order.

A great many of the policemen who were sent had been on duty there the day before and they recognized scores of boys whom they had seen get a package on Christmas day. When the kids were asked what they were doing there they answered, "We are after what we kin git that's what we're here fer." That class of repeaters were put out of line and only those who had tickets were admitted. With all of that care the little sharpers managed to get in on the second day's festivities.

After the packages fell short Christmas day -- on account of so many children from the outside which were not counted on -- Captain J. F. Pelletier, head of the purchasing committee,, went that evening and bought 1,000 more substantial toys and candy, nuts and fruit to go in the bags. Early yesterday morning, in response to a notice in The Journal, about twenty of the tired women who had worked so hard all week, reported at the hall and when the gifts arrived began work. All was in readiness at 3 p. m., but there was no crowding or jamming in the hall, as only those with tickets were admitted.

J. C. Chafin of the Franklin institute arrived at the hall soon after the long line of boys had been formed. As he walked up the line many of them ducked out, hid their faces and ran to the end of the line and got in again.

"Every child from my district was here yesterday," he said as he came in the hall. "They all got something, for I saw them. They are all outside again."

E. T. Bringham, superintendent of the Helping Hand institute, recognized many familiar faces from the North End which he had seen in the lines with sacks on Christmas day.

Many women came yesterday with one ticket and from two and a half dozen children. They wanted one ticket to admit them all. They swore that they had been overlooked, but when the little fellows were taken aside -- those little ones who know only the truth -- they would tell just what they had got when they were there the day before.

One woman with one little girl and one ticket was admitted. "I have four at home with the whooping cough. I want a bundle for them." She was given four extra bundles, appropriate for the sick ones and asked where she lived. "Over in Armourdale," she said, "and I want one of them whips for each one of them, and one of them tops that dance, and one of anything else you've got." She was given a street car ticket for her little girl and told to try and be satisfied with her five packages. She was mad and showed it by what she said in the most spiteful manner.

Two small boys who had succeeded in washing the stamp from their hands Christmas day in time to get back to the hall and get tickets of admission to yesterday's event, were heard to say after they examined their sacks, "Huh, dis is better'n we got yesterday, ain't it?"

Most of those who were admitted on tickets yesterday and who got sacks were of the very deserving kind. The were of the more timid ones who had been crowded out Christmas day and their joy was depicted in their faces as they marched happily away, bundles in arms. Between 500 and 700 packages were given out yesterday on tickets. The rest were put aside and will be sent out to the homes where there are sick children who could not get to the hall.

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