Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

August 8, 1909

CONTRACTOR IS HELD UP.

S. J. Ellis Robbed of $60 and a
Valuable Stick Pin.

Three young men uniformly dressed in loose fitting, shoddy garments and wearing dark slouch felt hats stepped from an alley and leveled three large revolvers at S. J. Ellis, a contractor, as he was returning from a trip from the business district to his home at 3834 Agnes avenue last night. With his hands accommodatingly thrust into the air Mr. Ellis allowed one of the men to rob him of $60 in money and a valuable stick pin. He was then told to hasten home.

Mr. Ellis reported the holdup to No. 9 police station.

Labels: , ,

April 19, 1909

SUICIDE IN SWOPE PARK.

Virne Willard, Despondent Through
Ill Health, Makes Good His
Threat to Die.

With a revolver in the right hand and a bullet hole in the head, the badly decomposed body of Eugene Virne Willard, 417 Lawton place, was found yesterday afternoon in a ditch about a mile east of the main entrance to Swope park, by two small boys, who notified park authorities.

Two patrolmen were sent from No 9 district, and Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, notified. In the man's coat pocket they found a small memorandum book containing a sh ort note, asking anyone who found the body to notify his wife. It was signed, "Eugene Willard, 417 Lawton place."

The park employes did not remember having seen the man, and it could not be determined just when the suicide was committed, but he evidently had been dead several days.

Mrs. Susie Willard, wife of the suicide, when seen in their apartments at 417 Lawton place, last night, said that her husband had been afflicted for some time with tuberculosis and heart disease, and that he complained of his head.

"My husband was about 33 years old. We had been married five years," she said. "He was very nervous, and the fact that of late he was unable to attend to his duties at the stock yards about made him insane.

"Three weeks ago Virne came home and told us all he would kill himself. Later he told my mother, Mrs. Sarah Powell, that he went one time to the Kaw river to jump in, but that he found the water too shallow and too muddy for the plunge and changed his mind. By a statagem we succeeded in getting a hold of his revolver and hiding it under some papers on the cupboard. Last Wednesday we found the weapon missing.

"Thursday morning I asked Virne to go to the store and purchase some ribbon from a sample I gave him. By night he had not returned, so I notified the police. Since then my brother has tramped the outskirts of the city trying to find the body, confident that my husband had killed himself.

When ill health drove the husband to despondency, Mrs. Willard penned the note and placed it in his pocket, giving her address and asking that in case of accident she be notified.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

May 29, 1908

RECORDS PROVE
MEN WERE MOVED.

AFTER BEING THREATENED BY
MEN WITH A "PULL."

ONE ARRESTED
WRONG WOMAN.

SHE HAD BEEN FINED 106 TIMES,
BUT WAS EXEMPT.

"Ain't You Next?" Said O'Hearn's
Friend; "You're to Let Her
Alone." -- More of the Pow-
er of Mickey O'Hearn.

After the order of the board of police commissioners Wednesday a reporter for The Journal had no trouble in seeing the books at No. 4 police station yesterday. And a view of these books proved the charges that every man since the first of the year, who has been active in arresting women "night hawks" has been taken out of plain clothes and removed from the district. One man was left in the district but he was taken from that special duty and put back into uniform.

The records showed that officers had been taken from that duty even before January 1 -- in fact, any man who has been too active since the reorganized police department took charge of affairs after Governor Joseph W. Folk's "rigid investigation" has been shifted. This is not only true of No. 4 district by even in No. 1 district, headquarters. This does not pertain alone to the arresting of dissolute women but to interference with certain saloons which were selling liquor on Sunday. That charge is made in regard to No. 1 district more than any other. Of course, some saloons have been caught; but they are not the influential ones; those run by "our political friends."

While the records at No. 4 station practically prove all the assertions made in regard to that district it is said that no blame can be laid at the door of Captain Thomas P. Flahive. It is not he who has had the men taken out of citizens clothes and transferred Those who know say he has been handicapped by having only a few men to do the work in his district and by an unseen power which has been able to have men removed when they did their full duty.

ARRESTED MANY WOMEN.

The records show that Daniel Doran, who worked there for years, arrested thirty-five women just before January 1. He was threatened by well dressed vagrants and told that he would be moved. And by the grace of the unseen power he was moved January 1, last, going in uniform to No. 9 -- the "sage brush" district.

The commanding officers and sergeants under whom Edward Prewett worked in No. 4 precinct speak well of him. He was there nearly eight years, and it was never said that Prewett did not do his full duty. In fat, it has been said that "Prewett would bring in his grandmother if ordered to do so."

In December, Prewett was detailed alone to bring in women of the streets. In eighteen days he brought in thirty-five of them. But from all sides, even from the women and especially the dude vagrants, he heard, "You won't last beyond January 1." One night Prewett arrested a woman named Kate Kingston. Last year this woman was fined $500 by Police Judge Harry G. Kyle, and at that time the records showed that she had been fined 106 times in police court.

"YOU AIN'T NEXT, ARE YOU?"

As he started away with the woman, "Ted" Noland appeared on the scene. "Turn that woman loose," he said; "you ain't next are you? She's to be let alone." Prewett was not "next," for he was also arrested Noland, and that was his undoing. Noland threatened the officer and told him he would personally see to it that he was moved. And Prewett was moved January 1, going in uniform to No. 6. Noland was fined $50 in police court the day following his arrest.

Noland is well known to the police, and in January, 1907, was fined $500 on a charge of vagrancy. That same Kate Kingston, over whom he threatened the officer, testified then that he and a man named Deerwester had beaten her at Thirteenth and Main streets. Deerwester got a similar fine. Their cases were appealed and the men were soon out out on bond.

Noland is a friend of Alderman "Mickey" O'Hearn, and, until recently, could be seen almost any day about his saloon at 1205 Walnut street; also about the saloon of Dan Leary at Fourteenth and Walnut streets. The records show that Leary has gone the bonds of scores of street women. At one time Judge Kyle objected to the n umber of personal bonds that Leary was signing and required that they be made in cash.

JUST SEE MICKEY.

The influence of Alderman "Mickey" O'Hearn may be better understood when it is known how he is reverenced by many members of the police department. When the Folk "investigation" was begun in May last year the commissions of probably half the department were held up. This conversation was overheard one day between two of the officers out of commissions.

"I'll tell you these are ticklish times," one said. "I have all my friends to work and am assured that I am all right."

"I'm up a tree," the other replied. "I don't know what to do. I have always tried to do my duty and can't imagine why I am held up."

"Why don't you see 'Mickey'?" his friend said with astonishment. "I thought you were wise. You know 'Mickey,' don't you You do; then go and see him and the whole things squared. That's what I did."

From that day to this the word has gone out through the whole department, "See 'Mickey' if you are in bad. He'll fix it."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

May 27, 1908

POLICE REFUSE
TO SHOW BOOKS.

CONTAIN NAMES OF OFFICERS
WHO WERE TRANSFERRED.

THEY ARE PUBLIC PROPERTY.

BUT CONTAIN PROOF OF
PERNICIOUS INFLUENCE.

Matter of Changing Active Officers
Is to Come Before Board Today.
Farce Follows Chief Dan-
iel Ahern's Order.

Not until yesterday was it made known that the records of arrests at police stations in Kansas City, ordinarily believed to be open to public view, are secret, perhaps sacred, reports, wont to be seen by any one not connected with the department until so ordered by the board of police commissioners, or, perhaps, some higher tribunal -- mayhap the mysterious influence behind the present police force.

While the charge has been made that officers who did their full duty in bringing in objectionable women of the streets, in whom well dressed vagrants were interested, had recently been taken out of plain clothes, put back into uniform and transferred to remote districts, it was additionally charged that the records of No. 4 police station for several months would show that every officer who had been active in that work had been removed to another district.

Believing that the records at a police station were as public as those of police court or any other court, a reporter for The Journal called at No. 4 (Walnut street) station yesterday and made this request of Captain Thomas P. Flahive:

"I want to see the record of arrests since January. I want to get the names of the officers working in plain clothes since that time. I want to see how many women each man arrested and find out if those same officers are still in this district, or if they have been removed."

"While our books may be regarded as public records," said Captain Flahive, "I must refuse you access to them unless you bring me an order from Chief Ahern of the board."

"The books are in Captain Flahive's district," said Chief Daniel Ahern later, "if he wants to show them to you he can. He won't, you say? Then I will not let you see them without an order from the board."

GALLAGHER SAYS "NO."

"Not by any means," was the reply of Commissioner A. E. Gallagher. "The matter will be brought to the attention of the board tomorrow."

Commissioner Elliot H. Jones, last night said, when asked whether the records of arrests were public property, "I don't know; I've never thought about it."

"It is my personal opinion, off hand, that such records are open to the public," came from Mayor Crittenden. "However, I am new in the business here and would not like to give a positive opinion. Ask the board tomorrow."

City Counselor E. C. Meservey was called up at his home last night after all of these refusals by public officers to screen police acts and asked whether he regarded the records of a police station as public records. He said promptly: "I see no reason why they should not be just as public as the records of the police court, especially those of past transactions. There is only one reason in my mind why they should be refused and that is where the police saw that the giving of the record would interfere with their duty in arresting law breakers." When told the record that was wanted he said, "that certainly is of past transactions and I think the records should have been produced."

THEY WERE NOT REMOVED.

The records under the Hayes administration will show that for one year previous to his removal by the board, July 31, 1907, only a few men were detailed in plain clothes in No. 4 district to bring in objectionable women and vagrants supported by them, and they were not removed for doing so. They remained at that duty a long time.

On the best information that can be gained without seeing the books, the records since July 31 last year will show that no fewer than from eight to ten different men have been assigned to duty in that district. From memory it can be truthfully said that since January 1 these officers have been detailed there: Edward Prewett, Daniel Doran, Frank M. Hoover, Thomas L. McDonough, Lucius Downey, J. C. Dyson, John Rooth and A. B. Cummings. All of them were active in doint their duty.

Prewett was put back in uniform and sent to No. 6.

Doran got into "harness" and was sent to No. 9, "the woods."

Hoover is now wearing blue at No. 6.

McDonough was taken from that duty, put into uniform but left in the district.

Downey, who had been in plain clothes for nearly three years, was put into a suit of blue he had nearly outgrown and sent to a tough beat in the North end.

Dyson in in blue and brass and is taking a chance at being sunstruck in the tall grass of No. 9.

Rooth and Cummings are still there, but the rumor is that they are slated to go June 1.

THREATENED BY VAGRANTS.

It is known that Downey and Dyson were threatened by thugs, vagrants and a saloonkeeper-politician and told they would be moved May 1. And on that date they were removed. Rooth and Cummings were so often threatened by the same men that they have appealed to the chief for protection. They were told by vagrants they would be moved June 1. Will they?

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory