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November 23, 1909

MIDNIGHT ROBBER
KILLS SALOON MAN.

M. A. SPANGLER MURDERED BE-
HIND HIS OWN BAR.

Drops Dead With Bullet Through
Heart -- Son Shot in Pistol Duel
With His Father's
Slayer.

While trying to grasp the revolver of one of two robbers who "stuck up" his saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue at 12:45 this morning, M. A. Spangler was shot across the bar and instantly killed.

In a pistol duel with his father's murderer, Sam Spangler was shot through both arms.

He believes he shot the robber. The latter and his companion escaped.

The murder and holdup occurred in Spangler's saloon at the northeast corner of Twentieth street and Grand avenue about 12:45.

The Spanglers were getting ready to close the saloon for the night. Sam Spangler had removed the cash from the register and was reading the totals from the detail adder, while the father was writing them on a card.

There were two men in the saloon, Al Ackerman, a friend of the Spangler family, and an old man whose identity is not known. Both were seated at tables in front of the bar.

SHOT THROUGH THE HEART.

At this juncture two men, one short and heavy set and the other tall and thin, entered the saloon. They were roughly dressed, and sauntered up about the middle of the room. The tall man walked as far as the big cannon stove at the rear of the bar, but the short man walked up to a point in front of Spangler.

Whipping out a revolver, the short man flourished it and commanded Ackerman and the old man, "Hands up and line up alongside the bar every one of you."

Ackerman and the old man and young Spangler lifted their hands in a hurry to obey the order. Not so old man Spangler. He had been in the street lunch stand business for years and he was not to be bluffed by the sight of a gun.

"Throw up your hands quick," was the second command, this time directed to Mr. Spangler. The latter evidently had been gauging the distance across the bar. Instead of throwing up his hands he lunged forward, grasping for the revolver. He missed the gun and that instant the robber pulled the trigger.

"Oh!" Spangler cried, and collapsed.

Another shot was fired at him, but it missed. The first one had passed through his heart.

SON TRIED TO AVENGE HIM.

Sam Spangler at the first shot pulled open a drawer in the back bar and grabbed a huge navy revolver. Turning around he faced the robber, and began firing. Both emptied their revolvers, the robber retreating toward the front door as he fired his last shot. Meanwhile the tall, thin robber, who had gotten half way behind the bar, turned and fled toward the rear, when young Spangler started shooting. He escaped through a rear door.

Ackerman, who had been standing near the front of the saloon, ran out of the door at the first shot. When the shooting inside ceased he started back but was met by the robber with the revolver who pressed it against his abdomen.

"Get out of my way before I kill you," cried the robber.

Ackerman got out of the way, and returning to the saloon asked for the big revolver.

Young Spangler put a shell in it by this time and Ackerman started after the robber. He chased him to McGee street and half way down to Twenty-first street pulling the trigger several times on the shell, which proved defective and failed to explode.

When he returned to the saloon, he found Sam Spangler bending over the body of his father. He had been shot in both arms and his blood was mingling with that of his father's.

WHO GOT THE MONEY?

It could not be positively ascertained this morning whether the robber got the money which Spangler had taken from the cash register and placed in a glass. During the excitement it is believed that the money was replaced in the register. This was locked and the keys were taken in charge by the police. The sum is said to have been in the neighborhood of $50.

A riot call was sent to No. 4 police station and a squad of police under Sergeant H. L. Goode drove to the saloon. Young Spangler was taken to the general hospital, where his injuries were dressed.

The body of Mr. Spangler was taken to the Stewart undertaking establishment.

M. A. Spangler was about 50 years old. He lived with his family at No. 1322 1/2 Wyandotte street. He leaves a widow and two sons, Sam and William, both grown. The widow and some relatives are in Glasgow, Mo. A telegram was sent to them immediately after the shooting.

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August 30, 1909

LIEUTENANT RYAN MAY DIE.

In Critical Condition as Result of
an Operation.

Lieutenant M. E. Ryan of the police, is in critical condition at St. Joseph's hospital, following an operation performed yesterday afternoon. The operation was to remove a growth inside his right ear. He was unconscious early this morning. His physicians had little hope of his recovery.

Lieutenant Ryan has been on the police force twenty years, having been appointed a patrolman while Thomas M. Speers was chief of police. He was stationed for years at No. 4 police station at Fifteenth and Walnut streets. A year ago he was removed to police headquarters.. Mr. Ryan lives at 3711 Woodland avenue. He is married and has four children.

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August 11, 1909

PHRENOLOGY NEW WRINKLE
IN DETECTING CRIMINALS.

Latest Study in Criminology More
or Less Success as Practiced by Stone.

Probably the wisest policeman on the force is an officer who has only lately been given command of a station. This particular officer boasts of some ability as a phrenologist, and the poor man unlucky enough to be arrested in his district has to risk the result of an examination of the bumps on his head. The system is a brand new one in metropolitan police circles and has caused a great deal of argument as to its practical results.

Lieutenant DeWitt C. Stone, commanding No. 4 district, is the officer who is said to be an expert phrenologist. When persons are arrested and sent to the station it is said that the lieutenant lines them up in a row against the wall. After studying the frontal appearance of the prisoners, he orders them to turn and face the wall. Then the examination of bumps, ridges and contours of the skull is put into play.

Carefully feeling the shapely craniums of the men, the officer figures out the particular branch of crime in which each person is engaged. Maybe the first prisoner will have a low ridge across the fore part of the skull and if so he is booked on the blotter as a vagrant. Two small round protuberances back of either ear marks a man as a yeggman and his name is so catalogued on the blotter.

But if a ridge, a flat knoll or a depression should be found the man is of a more desperate character and the lieutenant has him booked for investigation. Those who are familiar with the district say that the system has a good effect as the habitues of No. 4 station are afraid the lieutenant might make a mistake and charge them with a more serious crime than they are guilty of.

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July 26, 1909

NORTH END BEATS TAME NOW.

Clean Up's and Better Lighting
Fatal to Police Excitement.

So many years ago that the oldest member of the police department scarcely remembers it, No. 2 police station in the West Bottoms was a busy point and the number of arrests there for a single night ranged from five to forty-five. Now it is a back number and the happy patrolman walking beats in the No. 2 district has a snap equal to that of being a line man for the Marconi system. This is the result of a forgotten clean-up in the early '90s. Such a clean-up is now relegating No. 4 district to an unimportant one in the city.

Captain Thomas Flahive, lately removed to No. 5 station in Westport, used to book all the way from five to twenty-five "drunks" and "vag" at the Walnut street holdover, and Lieutenant C. DeWitt Stone on his advent there promised to increase the average so that no safe limit could be ascribed to it.

"But now there is a slump in crime there," Stone said last night. "We still make arrests but they are invariably tame ones and the time is about here when there will be practically none at all. Drag nets and the brilliant lighting of McGee street, formerly as wicked as any place in the North End, has wrought a change for the better, fatal to the excitement attendant on being an officer."

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May 1, 1909

DEATH OF "PAT" HUNT.

Member of Police Force for Many
Years Dies Suddenly.

"Pat" Hunt, for thirty-five years a member of the Kansas City police force and accounted one of the bravest men who ever wore the star of the department, died yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock at his home, 3272 Oak street. He died in harness, being at the time of his death jailer at the Walnut street police station. Only a few days before his death he was actively attending to his duties.

Patrick H. Hunt was born at Ballylangford, County Kerry, Ireland, and came to this country when a boy. For several years he lived near Corning, N. Y., but about forty years ago came to this city and was one of the grading contractors who helped to construct the Hannibal bridge.

He was made a member of the police force in 1874 and assigned to a beat in "Hell's Half Acre," the toughest district in the city. This hole in the Bottoms was a refuge of thugs, crooks, gamblers and negro bad men. Patrolman Hunt made a record for bravery in this position which has been handed down as a tradition among the class of people with whom he worked. In his declining years every negro who had been brought up in the city doffed his hat to "Pat" Hunt when he entered the Walnut street police station.

Hunt was taken off his beat and made a city detective after six years of service and served in that capacity for twenty years. Former Chief of Police John Hayes, George Bryant and Con O'Hare are some of the men who formerly "worked" with Hunt. When Hunt decided to retire from active work as a detective he was made jailor at the Flora avenue police station, and about five years ago was transferred to No. 4.

He married Miss Madge Sheehan thirty-eight years ago. One child, Henry, was born. Both wife and son are now dead. For thirty-five years, until a year ago, Mr. Hunt lived at 1122 Missouri avenue. A sister, Mrs. Mary Hunt, lives at the Oak street address. No other relatives survive. Funeral arrangements have not been made. Captain Thomas P. Flahive, under whom Mr. Hunt worked for the last five years, said last night:

"I have been intimately associated with 'Pat' Hunt for twenty-seven years, and in my mind there was never a braver or more straightforward man on the Kansas City police force. He was no less beloved for his gentleness and generosity than he was feared for his justness and courage. The police force in Kansas City has lost one of its real heroes.

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