Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

December 16, 1909

AGAIN HURT GOING TO FIRE.

For Second Time Assistant Chief Is
Thrown From Buggy.

In his second similar accident this month M. M. Mahoney, assistant fire chief at No. 22 station yesterday afternoon while making a run to a fire at 3427 Chestnut street collided with a grocery wagon and was thrown out of his buggy to the pavement, receiving a slight injury on the shoulder and scratches on his face. The ambulance from No. 4 police station went to the scene of the accident, but Mahoney had returned to the fire station.

On December 1 his buggy collided with a motor car while making a run and he was thrown to the ground, but was only slightly injured and went on to the fire.

Labels: , , ,

December 12, 1909

HAND BITTEN BY TAME BEAR.

Frank Lewis Tried to Pet Bruno at
Hippodrome.

A young man walked into No. 4 police station at 11 o'clock last night and asked that one of his hands be given medical attention. While taking in the sights at the Hippodrome in the earlier part of the night he had tried to pet a tame bear which is kept in a cage near the entrance of the Hippodrome. The bear closed down one of his hands and left several deep impressions with its sharp teeth.

The patient gave his name as Frank Lewis, 1617 Genesee street, and said that he was a salesman for Mitchell & Rouse, a commission company at the stock yards. He was attended by Dr. F. A. Hamilton and sent home.

Labels: , , , , ,

December 3, 1909

FORTUNE TELLER ARRESTED.

Man's Complaint Causes Charge of
Not Having City License.

Rosa Adams, 18 years old, who says she has gypsy blood in her veins, and who has been following the occupation of a non-union fortune teller, was arrested by the police yesterday upon complaint of a man who said he paid her fifty cents for a fortune, the result being unsatisfactory.

Rosa and her 2-year-old baby were taken to No. 4 police station, then to Central police station, where they were released on bail. Mrs. Adams told the police matron that she was the sole support of a large family. The charge against the fortune teller is that she does not possess a city license. She says she did not know she needed one.

Labels: ,

November 10, 1909

BOYS CHEERED AS
THEY RODE TO DEATH.

MISUNDERSTOOD WARNINGS OF
HORRIFIED PEDESTRIANS.

Coaster Wagon in Which Kelly and
Eugene Clemonds Were Riding
Hits Street Car -- One Boy
Dead, Other Dying.

Death ended a coasting ride which Kelly C. Clemonds, 15, and his brother, Eugene, 11, were enjoying when their little express wagon glided into the path of a streetcar yesterday evening. The boys received injuries, from which Kelly died an hour later, while but little hope is entertained for the recovery of Eugene.

Both boys resided at Grand Summit, Kas., and were here on a visit at the home of Mrs. James W. Roark, 2919 Flora avenue.

The accident occurred a few minutes before 6 o'clock at the intersection of Twenty-ninth street and Lynn avenue.

The boys had a small coaster express and had been running down the grade on Twenty-ninth street west from Woodland. They had made a number of trips and were laughing and shouting.

When they trudged up the hill when darkness was falling one of the boys suggested that they had had enough fun.

"Let's have just one more," said the other, and turning the wagon at the top of the slope they gave a run and boarding it whirled down at a rapid rate.

As they neared Lynn avenue car No. 555 of the Vine street line, in charge of Motorman Powers and Conductor Everhart, northbound, was approaching.

Pedestrians, attracted by the cheers of the boys, gave a warning cry. the boys, however, did not understand and the wagon kept ahead on its deadly course.

Not until they saw the car loom up before them did they realize their danger. They made a futile effort to swerve the wagon from its path, but were struck with terrific force.

An ambulance was summoned from No. 4 police station and hurried them to the general hospital.

Kelly died at 1:30 o'clock from internal injuries. Eugene, the younger brother, suffered a fracture of the skull, a fracture of the left arm and cuts and bruises. An operation was performed on the skull and the boy rallied, but the physicians have doubts about his recovery.

Dr. Czarlinsky will hold an inquest today.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

August 14, 1909

HEAT OVERCOMES ICEMAN.

While Carrying Cake of Ice Jake
Schuyler is Overcome.

While transferring a cake of ice to a house at Forty-seventh street and Troost avenue at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon, Jake Schuyler, an employe of the City Ice Company, suddenly fell over unconscious.

The police ambulance of No. 4 station was called and Dr. Shiras gave Schuyler emergency treatment for sunstroke. He was taken to the emergency hospital. Schuyler is 25 years old. He lives at 1321 Walnut street.

James Burgess, 3717 Woodland avenue, was affected last night about 8 o'clock. The police station was notified and the operator called Dr. S. S. Morse, 3801 Woodland avenue. Burgess is a foreman of the packing department of the Globe Storage Company, and has complained of the heat for several days. He had recovered in a few hours.

A. M. Kissell, 65 years old, a stationary fireman at the Central Manufacturing Company, First and Lydia avenue, about 9 o'clock was overcome by heat and last night he was taken to the emergency hospital for medical attention.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

July 26, 1909

SORRY SHE TOOK A
SHOT AT HUSBAND.

MRS. FRANK O'NEILL'S BULLET
JUST GRAZED HIS NECK.

Wife Says She Was Nervous and
Excited, and That Shooting in
Muehleback Brewery Was
Only to Frighten Him.

A daintily dressed woman talking through the grate of the cashier's window in the general office of the Muehlebach Brewing Company to her husband, a bookkeeper, at 7:30 o'clock last night, attracted little attention from the beer wagon drivers who happened to be about. Sharp words between members of the opposite sexes in the vicinity of Eighteenth and Main streets even at such an early hour in the evening are not unusual.

Suddenly the woman, Mrs. Mary O'Neill of 431 Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas., opened her chatelaine bag and inserted her hand.

"Mary, what are you going to do?" asked her husband, Frank P. O'Neill, of 3719 Woodland avenue. Mr. and Mrs. O'Neill have been separated since January 1.

The woman drew a small revolver from the bag and fired at close range, the bullet grazing Mr. O'Neill's neck beneath his right ear and lodging inside the neck band of his shirt. Mrs. O'Neill then dropped the weapon and gave herself up to John Glenn, night watchman of the brewery.

JUST SHOOT TO SCARE HIM.

At No. 4 police station Mrs. O'Neill occupied a cell but a few feet from the operating table where Dr. J. M. McKamey was dressing her husband's wound. She was highly excited, nervous and penitent.

"I did not mean to kill him at all," she said, "but he has mistreated me every time I have approached him for money for my support, and I could not help but be on my guard all the time. When he told me to get out of the office tonight I got excited and fired when I only wanted to frighten him.

"My husband and I were married in a Catholic church two years ago," Mrs. O'Neill went on. "He married me without letting me know that he had been married twice before, and that both of these former wives are still living. During the last days of December last year I was sick and somewhat of a burden to him. On the evening of the New Year he left me sick in bed and never came back.

"I have since kept house for my brother, John Semen, at my home on Ann avenue, Kansas City, Kas. The two trips I have taken to see my husband and ask for money from him to buy clothes for myself have not been successful.

NOT SURE HE'LL PROSECUTE.

Frank O'Neill was not sure last night that he would prosecute his wife. His father, Sergeant F. P. O'Neill of No. 6 police station, however, said he would prosecute.

"I have never mistreated my wife," said the son. "It is true that I have been married before. Mary's shooting at me without warning from her, although my mother called me over the telephone half an hour before, and said Mary was on the way to the brewery to kill me."

Dr. McKamey said that O'Neill's would would easily heal.

Mrs. O'Neill is 28 years old.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

April 9, 1909

WORKHOUSE DOORS OPEN
FOR "LIVE EASY" VAGRANTS.

Those Caught in Round-Up in Cap-
tain Flahive's District Fined
From $15 to $100.

In the municipal court yesterday morning, the twenty-five well-dressed vagrants who had been arrested in Captain Flahive's district the night previously, did not fare very well at the hands of Justice Festus O. Miller, who was on the bench. Twenty were fined in sums ranging from $15 to $100, and the majority were sent to the workhouse in the absence of friends who were willing to pay their fines or sign appeal bonds.

The court room was crowded with spectators who had come to the city hall to get a glimpse of men who could live without working. Every one smiled when they were brought before the judge in bunches by Sergeant H. L. Goode and Patrolmen George Brooks and Michael Gleason. The officers have been in the district for many years and their evidence was conclusive in most of the cases. Five of the twenty-five appeared to be under age, but were fair "understudies" of their companions, and were released with an admonition not to be caught in No. 4 district again.

Thomas R. Marks, one of the new commissioners, drifted into the municipal court session. He sat in the front row behind several policemen who were in court to prosecute the well-dressed vagrants.

"I am just looking around," was Marks's explanation of his presence.

Labels: , , ,

April 8, 1909

NEW POLICE BOARD
TO CLEAN UP TOWN.

MAKES FRANK SNOW ACTING
CHIEF, ED BOYLE INSPECTOR.

Flahive Given Pick of Force and
Told to Drive Out District 4's
Tough Gang and Ignore
the Politicians.
The New Police Board.
THE POLICE BOARD AS IT IS NOW COMPOSED.
T. R. MARKS, MAYOR CRITTENDEN, R. B. MIDDLEBROOK.

Captain Frank F. Snow, property clerk at police headquarters, was appointed acting chief of police, and Edward P. Boyle, a detective, was appointed acting inspector of detectives yesterday by the new board of police commissioners.

Captain Thomas P. Flahive of district No. 4 was given his pick of the force, and told to drive out the gang of crooks and undesirables in his district, despite the interference of any politician. Democrat or Republican, and clean up a certain disreputable element that has infested that part of the city for so long a time.

Chief Daniel Ahern was placed in charge of the new district, No. 10, and Inspector Charles Ryan was told that he would be taken care of.

Thomas R. Marks and R. B. Middlebrook, the first Republican police commissioners Kansas City has ever had, being in the majority on the board did not wait for the presence of Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., to start the ball rolling. By appointment they met in the office of Daniel Ahern, chief of police, shortly after noon. Then they sent for Charles Ryan, inspector of detectives.

RYAN IN THE RANKS.

Telling the two officials that they would be cared for in some manner, the commissioners asked for their resignations. In a few minutes, they had them in writing.

Captain Snow and Ed. P. Boyle were sent for and told that Snow was to be made acting chief of police and Boyle acting inspector of detectives.

Later, when the board met with the mayor in the chair, Commissioner Middlebrook presented Ahern's resignation and moved its acceptance. Snow was then formally made acting chief. The same form was gone through in regard to the acceptance of Ryan's resignation and the temporary appointment of Detective Boyle to his place.

The next order of business was to take care of the deposed officers. Ahern was appointed captain of the new police district, to be known as No. 10. Ryan was made a detective, and assigned to duty under Acting Inspector Boyle, his former subordinate.

AHERN IS APPRECIATIVE.

Captain Ahern showed great appreciation when the board cared for him in the manner in which it did.

"I did not expect to remain," said the former chief. "My position belonged to the new commissioners, and they had a right to it. I certainly appreciate the magnificent manner in which I have been cared for, and will show it by doing my full duty and carrying out to the letter every order of the board."

Former Inspector Ryan had little to say except that he would line up with the men he used to boss with such severity, and do the best he could. It was intimated that Ryan may resign from the force later, but that could not be confirmed.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

April 8, 1909

ROUNDUP OF VAMPIRES
IN POLICE DISTRICT 4

TWENTY-SIX WELL DRESSED
VAGRANTS IN DRAGNET.

"Undesirables," Who for So Long
Have Defied Police, Find Their
Protectors Without Power
to Aid Them Longer.

Acting under express orders from the new board of police commissioners, Captain Thomas P. Flahive's men began yesterday to round up a gang of well dressed vagrants who for years have fattened in district No. 4 on the shame of 500 fallen women.

By midnight twenty-six male vampires were under arrest, and scores of other human vampires had fled from the scene of their long connection with the white slave traffic.

These hold degenerates, who aforetime flaunted their misdeeds in the faces of the patrolmen, and dared them to act, found yesterday that their pulls had vanished and that all crooks look alike to the police.

WOMEN GIVE BOND FOR MEN.

Also caught in the same net, which seined Kansas City from Twelfth to Nineteenth streets and from Locust to Wyandotte streets, were three of the women who supported these same well dressed vagrants.

So quickly did news of the crusade spread among the parasites that the officers who constituted the dragnet had to work quickly and silently. Four of those caught were found with suitcases packed, ready to leave the city. Captain Flahive believes that an exodus of vagrants has taken place. Twenty-four does not complete the count of those men known to the police, those men who live from the wages of unfortunate women. But in spite of the close search last night no more vagrants could be found.

Strangely enough the women seemed not to appreciate the work done by the police in delivering them from bondage, or perhaps it was fear. At any rate it was the woman, in most cases, who paid the $26 cash bond which liberated the arrested vagrant. All yesterday the telephone in the Walnut street police station was busy, and at the other end of the line was a woman who wanted to know if the particular vagrant whom she supported was arrested. Upon being in formed that such a person was under arrest, the woman, or her messenger, speedily appeared at the station with the necessary $26 in cash, and the vagrant was released on condition of his appearance in police court this morning.

Once liberated, all trace of the vagrant was lost and the district south of Twelfth street was as clean a district on the streets as any portion of the city.

IN THE RED LIGHT DISTRICT.

One other order given to the police captain by the board was to keep the scarlet woman off the streets at night. This order was obeyed to the letter last night, and the only three who fared forth were promptly arrested. Formerly it would have been impossible to have walked any block of that district after dark without being accosted. Usually he would have been met by groups of women, but it was different last night.

In No. 4 district, it is claimed, there are eighty-nine of the class of rooming houses referred to by the police commissioners in their orders to Captain Flahive yesterday and who are paying a monthly fine to the city. There are also hotels and rooming houses by the score which pay no fine and have been overlooked by the police entirely.

In order that Captain Flahive may make sure work of his cleaning up of the district, the commissioners have given him the pick of the men on the department, and have given him permission to use extra men. This morning the captain will confer with Chief Frank Snow and pick the men who are to fill the places in the cleanup.

At present the district over which Captain Flahive has control is lacking policemen. Several officers are forced to patrol more than one beat, which is a handicap when it comes to competent police protection.

Concerning the work, Captain Flahive said last night:

"I am going to clean this district. Within two weeks there will be no more well dressed vagrants loitering around the saloons and rooming houses. This order from the commissioners is one for which I have long waited."

"Why hasn't this cleanup taken place before?" the captain was asked. Surely other commissioners knew that these conditions existed here."

NOTORIOUS MEN CAUGHT.

"I have never been ordered to do so before," he replied. "But I do not wish to say anything about that. It is all dead, and I am going to carry out my orders now to the letter. This work is not a spurt, but it will be kept up, and this district will not know the well dressed vagrant after we have finished with them."

Among those vagrants who have been caught by the police are notorious men of the district, ringleaders in every kind of offense against decency. Many have been arrested before, but nothing ever came of the arrests. So bold did these vagrants become that they flaunted their misdeeds in the faces of the patrolmen, and then dared them to exercise the right of an officer.

The same tactics were tried yesterday, but without success. This time the patrolmen did not fear the loss of their stars for doing their duty.

The officers who made the arrests of vagrants yesterday are Sergeant Henry Goode and Patrolmen Mike Gleason and George Brooks.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

April 5, 1909

BABY CHOKES TO DEATH.

Small Screw Lodged in Child's
Trachea, Quickly Proves Fatal.

From swallowing a small screw a quarter of an inch long, Laura, the 15-months-old baby of Thomas and Bridget Mullins, 921 East Twenty-first street choked to death at 2:10 o'clock yesterday afternoon.

Everything possible was done to save the child and the ambulance of No. 4 police station, with Dr. H. A. Hamilton, was driven at full speed to the place, but the screw had lodged in the trachea and strangulation followed the accident in twenty minutes. Mrs. Mullins was prostrated last night.

The father is in the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company.

Labels: , , , , ,

April 4, 1909

MYSTERIOUS SHOT
WILL END HIS LIFE.

STRANGER FATALLY WOUNDED
IN WEST FIFTH STREET.

Man Supposed to Be T. J. Heffron
Victim of Unknown Assassin.
Police Seeking Clue to
the Tragedy.

Hearing a shot in the vicinity of Fifth and Wyandotte streets just after midnight this morning, Patrolmen F. J. Smitherman and W. S. Woods reached there in time to see a man stagger from behind some bill boards near the northwest corner and fall in the street. When taken to the emergency hospital it was found that he had been shot completely through the body on the right side. In a dying condition the man was taken to the general hospital. It is not thought he will live until morning.

The man, who is unknown to the police, appears to be a workman about 50 years old. His hair is gray. He wore corduroy trousers and a brown coat and vest.

In a little book in his pocket was found the following, written in a legible hand: "Sister, I am down and out. I want you to send me $5 to clean up and I will give it to you as soon as I can make it." To this is signed "T. J. Heffron." That name appears several more times in the book and the police believe he tried to say that name when asked who he was.

Further on in the book he has written a line of thanks to his sister for the loan of the money. Then follows: "Contract at Armour Junction. McVaugh, 2:30, March 25, 1909."

On a card in his pocket was written the name "William Ellington, 1614 Grand avenue." Police were at once detailed on the possible murder mystery and the officers at the Walnut street station were asked to see what was known of "T. J. Heffron" or any man answering the description of the victim at 1614 Grand avenue.

On the way to the hospital the injured man revived sufficiently to say that he had a brother-in-law on the police force. The police at No. 4 say that Patrolman W. J. Graham, 2339 Terrace street, who works out of No. 3 station, has several brothers-in-law by the name of Heffron, the name found in the book. Graham was not on duty that night.

Labels: , , , , , ,

April 4, 1909

PROMOTED TO LIEUTENANT.

Sergeant Halligan Rewarded for
Twenty-Seven Years' Service.

Sergeant Michael Halligan of No. 4 police station, for twenty-seven years a popular officer of the force, has been appointed to fill the vacancy made by the resignation of Lieutenant H. W. Hammil from that station last Wednesday. The latter is now a special detective at the Baltimore hotel. The appointment was made Wednesday by the police board, but Mr. Halligan did not receive the good news until yesterday when two of his friends from the city hall passed him in a buggy and called out:

"Congratulations, lieutenant!"

Later the official notice was received at the station and it was up to the newly-made lieutenant to buy cigars for everyone from Captain Thomas Flahive down to the reporters of the afternoon papers.

Lieutenant Halligan was born in County Wexford, Ireland, fifty years ago. He came to Kansas City in 1881 and became a member of the police force the year following. Since the day he was entered on the roll of patrolmen, walking beats out of Central station, he has not missed a day and there are no charges of inefficiency marked against him. Next to Captain Frank Snow and Chief Daniel Ahern he is the oldest officer in point of years of service in the department.

Patrolman J. M. Bottoms from No. 5 station has been named to fill the sergeantcy left vacant by the promotion of Lieutenant Halligan.

Labels: , , , , , ,

April 1, 1909

HAMMIL WEARIED OF
SITTING ON A BOMB.

GREW NERVOUS THINKING OF
WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN.

Police Lieutenant Resigns to
Become Private Detective for Hotel
Baltimore -- Succeeds Ed Hickman
at the Hostelry.
FORMER POLICE LIEUTENANT HAMMIL.
FORMER POLICE LIEUTENANT HAMMIL.

Police Lieutenant H. W. Hammil yesterday resigned to become a private detective at the Hotel Baltimore. Hammil succeeds Edward Hickman, who leaves the hotel to go into business with his brother.

Lieutenant Hammil has been a member of the police department for nineteen years. Seven years ago he was promoted to a seargency and two years ago was made lieutenant. While his advancement may not have been as rapid as many who went on the force after he did, there were reasons for it. He was always averse to turning "crooks" loose because some petty or big policeman requested it and he always did his full duty in spit of who it hurt or what political interests were disturbed. That one thing, more than anything else, mitigated against rapid promotion.

REMOVED FROM HEADQUARTERS.

Hammil was made a lieutenant during the Governor Folk "rigid police investigation," while it was in its incipency, in fact. One day an officer who had made charges against John Hayes, then chief of police, was cursing the chief and Frank F. Rozzelle, then a commissioner, down in Central station. Hammil ordered the man to stop such talk or something "would be doing." As soon as Governor Folk had peremptorily removed Commissioner Rozzelle by wire and the new board had been organized and John Hayes dropped from the department, Hammil was ordered removed from headquarters, where he had served the better part of his life, to No. 4 station at Fifteenth and Walnut streets.

The records will show that while other districts, notably headquarters, have had a full quota of men and more, too, No. 4 has been handicapped with barely half enough men to do proper police duty. Hammil's watch, especially, never had a full complement of men the whole time he was there. It is said that if an officer got sick, crippled or otherwise "defunct," he was detailed to Hammil's watch. Handicapped as he was, however, he always went along with out complaint and kept up his end of the string.

As soon as Hickman resigned from the detective position at the Hotel Baltimore, D. J. Dean sent for Hammil and offered him the place. It is better pay and far more pleasant work -- no more knockers, no politics.

GLAD TO GET AWAY.

"I am sorry to leave some of my old friends on the department," Hammil said yesterday, "but I am glad to get away from a place where you felt all along like you were sitting on a dynamite bomb. If one 'crook' was arrested here would come a kick from his political friend, and when another fell into our hands here would come another 'gang' of political kickers. I always let 'em kick, though they always threatened to get my job."

The board took no action on Hammil's successor yesterday, Commissioner Elliott H. Jones being away hunting ducks. It may be left for the new board to fill.

Labels: , , , , , ,

March 22, 1909

INJURED WIFE'S MOTHER
DOESN'T BLAME HUNTER.

MRS. SCANLON TELLS SON-IN-
LAW SHE IS HIS FRIEND.

Husband Declares Reform School
Was Suggested as Place for
Girl -- Tells Story of
Marital Troubles.

Charles Hunter, 19 years old, who shot and dangerously injured his wife, Myrtle Hunter, Friday morning, yesterday told visitors of the trouble that led up to his crime, and which is causing his detention at police headquarters. He said he loved his wife, but her waywardness caused the trouble.

When the boy and his child wife were married by Michael Ross, J. P., the mothers went to the court house with them to give consent. The girl's mother called at police headquarters yesterday afternoon to see Hunter. She told him she was still his friend and would do all she could for him.

"Even if Myrtle dies, Charles, we won't blame you," the prisoner was told.

The reform school was suggested by Mrs. Scanlon as the best place for the girl wife. Hunter informed a visitor yesterday. But he said he loved her and wanted to keep her at home if possible.

THREAT OF REFORM SCHOOL.

She left home one day and the mother announced her intention of having the police find the girl and sending her to reform school according to the story Hunter tells. Instead he asked her to wait and allow him to give her another trial. Hunter promised to find her and keep her at home.

After four days' search he declares he found her at a house on East Eighth street in company with another young woman and two men. While Hunter was in the room a rambler placed his arm around his wife and caressed her, which made him frantic with shame and anger. From there he took his wife home and she promised him she would remain away from her former haunts.

Then he says a clerk in a clothing store began to pay her attentions. Hunter said this clerk went to the Scanlon home last Thursday and asked for Myrtle. He made a second trip to the house in the afternoon. Mrs. Hunter opened the door, but refused to allow him to come in. Hunter said he was at the head of the stairs on the second floor and upon asking who the visitor was started down. The man left and his wife and Mrs. Scanlon prevented Hunter from following him.

WAS DRIVEN TO DESPERATION.

From the trials he had with his endeavors to keep his wife at home and the attempts by the clerk to take her away, Hunter claims that he was made desperate and driven mad. The climax was reached Wednesday night when the man is said to have collected a gang and announced his intention of going to the Hippodrome and going home with Mrs. Hunter.

Hunter and his wife were standing near the skating rink when the persistent admirer came up and spoke to the wife. She tried to avoid him and when she was unable to do so Hunter says he objected.

"I'll take her home if you have to go home in the undertaker's wagon," Hunter said he was told.

According to Hunter, his uncle, Claude Rider, 1728 Troost avenue, stepped up and said he was going to take a hand in the affair. As his uncle came up Hunter declares friends grabbed him and took him across the street while the other men fought. The police arrested them and took them to No. 4 police station where they were charged with disturbing the peace.

"I believe my mother-in-law was trying to arrange to send Myrtle to the reform school when I shot her," Hunter remarked.

He said he got the pistol at the Scanlon house and that it belonged to his wife's father. The condition of Mrs. Hunter was worse yesterday, but it was said that she still has a chance to recover.

Of late years Hunter has been following the skating rinks and in the summer has had charge of the rink at Fairmount park. At one time Hunter was an office boy for an afternoon newspaper and later became an advertising solicitor.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

March 12, 1909

AT 103 HE BEGS A BED
AT A POLICE STATION.

Man Who Can Recall the War of
1812 Gets Shelter for Night
at Police Station No. 4.

A man so old that he can remember the war with Mexico as well as though it occurred yesterday, and dimly recall the war of 1812, wandered into No. 4 police station and gave himself up as a vagrant yesterday afternoon. He was James Forbes Foster, who lives at a rooming house at Eighteenth street and Minnesota avenue, Kansas City, Kas.

According to Foster, his age is 103 years, for he says he was born on Seneca street, Buffalo, N. Y., in 1806. He says further that his grandmother was Mercy Hutchins, a great tribal medicine woman of the Seneca Indians, and that he retains in his memory most of her medicinal traditions.

In personal appearance Foster is erect as a pine tree. His eyes, set in a very wrinkled face, are large and bright, his cheek bones high and his nose a thin, long beak. The lower part of his face is hid in a thicket of wiry whiskers a foot long, and his hair, as white as wool, covered his shoulders.

He tottered up to the sergeant's desk at the station and humbly asked if he might be allowed to sleep over night on the stone floor of a cell.

"I am awfully old," he began, "but I can still sleep anywhere. I am strong, but I am very tired. Give me the hardest piece of flooring you have got and an old coat to throw over me."

"How old are you?" he was asked.

For answer Foster produced a letter from an inside coat pocket bearing a stamp of a generation or two gone and shoved it under the lattice. "I guess from that I am about 20," he said. The letter follows:

Your Excellence: James Foster, who I know well, is a good scout for your armies, having lived among my people over 40 years. He has been West as far as the Mississippi river and so far North as the lakes in all parts. If you want a good scout, take him.
From RED JACKET.
Chief of Seneca Indians.
To President John Knox Polk, Washington, D. C.

The letter was yellow with age, and the envelope worn through in many places, although the old man had it wrapped in oilcloth. He admitted it was a copy m made from the original by the chief.

"Great Scott!" cried Captain Thomas Flahive, after he had glanced at it, "how old are you supposed to be, anyway?"

"Red Jacket, who was the only father I have ever known, told me I was born the last year of the Seneca famine, which was in 1806," was the reply.

"Did you fight in the Mexican war, as a scout?"

"No, I did not go. I knew too much about medicine, and Red Jacket concluded to keep me at home with him. As I remember, President Polk made no reply to the letter.

"In 1861 I was appointed as a spy to serve the government under President Lincoln. See that hand? President Lincoln, the greatest statesman the world ever produced, grasped it once."

In his conversation which somewhat wandered, Foster mentioned some great names in a familiar manner. He said he had dined once with General Winfield Scott, had known General Grant and Elihu Root. Lincoln he spoke of as a friend. He said he tendered his commission to the war department the day after the great emancipator was shot.

The old man speaks German, French and a strange tongue, which he said was the Seneca language. He recites Latin with the rapidity of a co-ed in her last college year and speaks intelligently of botany, chemistry and physics.

"I was educated at Notre Dame college in Montreal," he explained when asked where he accumulated all of his book knowledge. "The intentions of Red Jacket were to make a Catholic priest of me."

He was given a blanket and slept on the concrete floor of his cell much better than a younger man would have done.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

January 27, 1909

TRIES SLEEP FROM A BOTTLE.

Waitress, After Quarreling With Hus-
band Cook, Attempts Suicide.

Because she had quarreled with her husband and feared that he meant to leave her, Dollie Duchaine, 26 years old, 1321 Cherry street, attempted suicide last night by inhaling the fumes from a handkerchief saturated with chloroform. Dr. J. W. Hayward of No. 4 police station attended to the woman.

Duchaine is a cook at Roarke's restaurant. H is wife is a waitress at the same place. James Love, 1000 Independence avenue, who had seen the woman early in the evening, said she told him her husband had become angry over some orders she had given him.

"Words followed," Love said, "and it seems that Duchaine told his wife he was going to leave her. She was down-hearted and depressed when I left her."

A note written by the woman before she took the chloroform was found by Officer Fraser. It was as follows:

"Well, Johnnie if you do what you said you would tomorrow, I don't care what happens to me, so I will take a little sleep from the bottle under my pillow. Your as ever, 'D.' "

Labels: , , , , , ,

October 29, 1908

CAPTAIN WILLIAM J. MORLEY,
OF POLICE FORCE, IS DEAD.

Brave and Efficient Officer, and Had
Been in City's Service
Many Years.

After an illness of more than two months, William James Morley, captain at No. 5 police station, died yesterday afternoon about 5 o'clock. He had been for twenty-two years one of the most efficient members of the police force of the city. He was 57 years old.

Captain Morley was born in Ireland, but emigrated to this country at the age of 18 years. He became a railroad man and soon rose to the position of assistant yardmaster at Binghampton, N. Y. It was there that he married and then moved to Kansas City, coming in at the same time that the C. B. & Q railway did, thirty-two years ago.

He was made yardmaster, a position which he held for ten years. At the end of that time he gave up his position to become a policeman, and was assigned to the Central police station. He was a brave and capable officer and made a number of good captures. At the end of ten years' service as a patrolman he was made a sergeant and stationed at No. 4 station. Seven years ago, as a reward for faithful service, he was made a lieutenant in charge of the desk at the Walnut street station. There he remained until September, 1907, when he was made captain and placed at the Westport station.

Captain Morley was wounded in the service fo the city once, that being during a fight in the West Bottoms, in which he was accidentally shot in the left shoulder by a brother officer while trying to arrest a burglar.

Captain Morley was singularly fortunate in his business ventures. Many years ago he bought a strip of land in the West Bottoms, which the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railway bought from him at an increased price. He also invested in other real estate, and he invariably made a handsome profit on every transaction. Hhis fortune is estimated at $15,000. At the time of his death he owned some business property on Grand avenue and several houses, besides farming land.

Captain Morley's private life was happy. He lived many years in the ho use where he died at 3418 Broadway, an old-fashioned frame house set far back in the yard. Besides his wife his family consisted of five children. Katherine is now in Binghampton, N. Y.; Mrs. P. E. Fagan loves in Kansas City. Louis C. is a steamfitter; John is a farmer in Jackson county and William J. Morely, Jr., is a miner in Ely, Nev. Two grandchildren also survive. Captain Morley was a devout Catholic and a member of the Annunciation parish. He belonged to the order of Heptosophs.

"I worked with Captain Morley for fifteen years," siad Captain Thomas P. Flahive last night, "and I always found him honest, fearless and efficient as well as considerate and kind hearted. The police force of Kansas City has lost one of its finest and truest men."

The funeral services will be held Friday morning at the home, but the exact time has not been determined. Catholic rites will be used.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

July 16, 1908

WAS HIS OBJECT MURDER?

Jack Gallagher Calls on King
and Creates a Disturbance.
Jack Gallagher, Bully and Attacker of Albert King.
JACK GALLAGHER
(From a sketch made in the Police Matron's Room at Central Station Yesterday Afternoon

Following his vicious inclinations, Jack Gallagher attempted to assault Albert King, a reporter for The Journal, who is lying seriously injured as the result of a previous attack made upon him by Gallagher, in Mr. King's apartments at 720 East Fifteenth street yesterday morning at 5 o'clock. Failing in his first attempt to satiate his brutal desires because of arrest, Gallagher returned to Mr. King's rooms after having been released on an $11 bond, and again tried to force entrance into the room, uttering violent threats while trying to break in the door. Again he was arrested, but this time he was held without bond, because he was taken before a police officer who knew his duty.

Shortly after 5 o'clock yesterday morning Gallagher went to the hotel in which Mr. King is staying and asked Mrs. Etta Condon, the proprietress, to show him to Mr. King's room. Mrs. Condon replied that it was too early for visitors, especially too early for a sick man to be awakened. Gallagher and a friend who had gone to the hotel with him insisted, saying that they were very intimate friends of Mr. King from St. Louis, and that they only had an hour to stay in Kansas City.

Mr. King, who is well known in Kansas City, had been receiving many visits from friends since he was injured; so Mrs. Condon said that she would see if Mr. King would see them.

NURSE ORDERED HIM OUT.

Gallagher did not wait until she had awakened the injured man, but brushed past her and stood over his bedside. Mr. King was aroused and turning in bead, saw his former assailant.

"Hello, Albert. How do you feel about it?" asked Gallagher.

"I feel pretty tough since you got through with me," replied King, "and I don't want to talk to you. Get out of here."

"I want to introduce my friend, Mike O'Brien, to you before I go," replied Gallagher, beckoning to the friend who had remained in the doorway. "You remember Mike, don't you, Al?"

King replied that he might have seen O'Brien before but did not recall the circumstance. Then he ordered them out of the room, saying that he did not wish to have anything to do with them. By this time Miss Mayme Lefler, Mr. Kin's nurse, had returned to the room. Noticing that her patient did not treat his visitors in a cordial manner, she bent over them and asked who they were.

Upon being told that one of them was Jack Gallagher she ordered them from the room. Gallagher stood and laughed at her until she finally pushed him towards the doors.

"Oh, I'll step outside and let you all talk it over for a minute," said he; "but I'm goin' to stay here till I see your finish," addressing the last remark to Mr. King.

Once the bully was out of the room, Miss Lefler locked the door and writing a note for passers-by, telling them to call the police station for help, she slipped to the open window ready to drop it out on the street.

Meanwhile Mrs. Condon had gone downstairs to a telephone and called the police. She was followed by O'Brien.

PACED THE HALLWAY.

Mrs. Condon returned to her hotel and saw Gallagher pacing up and down the hallway, bellowing out his mad threats to the closed door. Soon he stopped his loud talking and hid behind a turn in the hall. Every time a door would open or close he would hasten to Mr. King's door to see if King had left the room or if he might be caught in the act of leaving. Mrs. Condon tried to argue with Gallagher, but her words had no effect. Then she tried threats and told Gallagher that if he did not go she would call for help.

"Don't you dare call for help you--" he rasped between his closed teeth. "If you do I'll fix you," and he shook his fist in Mrs. Condon's face.

Just then Officer James Mulloy was seen hurrying across the street. He had been notified by the operator at No. 4 police station that Gallagher was threatening Mr. King. Miss Lefler called out to him and the officer hastened up the steps. When he reached the hallway he heard Gallagher threaten Mrs. Condon. Approaching Gallagher, the patrolman told him to come with him to the police station.

"It will take four of you to take me there," boasted the bully, as he began to beat and kick on Mr. King's door.

"Not this morning," said the officer as he dragged Gallagher to the head of the stairs. There they were met by three officers who had gone to the house with the patrol wagon from the Walnut street police station. Once in the patrol wagon Gallagher quited down.

When he was taken before Patrolman Gus Metzinger, acting desk sergeant, he was charged with disturbing the peace and locked up. His friend, O'Brien, pleaded with Officer Metzinger for his release on bond, saying that he would see that Jack went directly home and did not bother King again. The officer graciously complied and made the bond $11, which Gallagher himself deposited.

Twenty minutes afterwards Gallagher was back at Mr. King's door, demanding entrance. As Gallagher hurried up the hotel steps he was healed by Mrs. Condon, who tried to get him to go back. Finding that her p leas were of no avail she called out in a loud voice so that King could just hear her, "Jack Gallagher, you get out of this house at once."

KING WAS ARMED THIS TIME.

But Gallagher thrust her aside and went directly to the door of King's room. Miss Lefler had locked the door and helped King to a sitting posture in the bed. Armed with a large revolver which had been secured after the first disturbance, King sat ready for his assailant should he manage to break through the door.

Gallagher was demanding entrance, but he got no answer from behind the door. Through the door Mr. King and his nurse could hear Mrs. Condon pleading with him to desist in his bestial endeavors, saying that Mr. King was not in the room and that he had gone home immediately after Gallagher's first visit.

But Gallagher would not be satisfied. He demanded that the door be unlocked. Mrs. Condon replied that the maid had the keys and that he would have to wait until she could be found.

Inside the room, Albert King sat in bed with the revolver pointed at the door.

"I am going to shoot through the door at him," he told his nurse.

"No, don't do that," she cautioned, "you might hit Mrs. Condon. You can't tell just where she might be standing.

As a matter of fact, Mrs. Condon was standing between Gallagher and the door, keeping him from reaching the knob as he had attempted. For five minutes they stood at the door and argued whether or not King was in the room.

"Haven't you enough trouble already?" asked the woman of Gallagher.

"Yes, but King and The Journal have given it all to me, and now I'm going to give King his. He and The Journal run the whole police department, and they have put me down and out, so it's me or King now."

"Well, he's gone home now, out on Wabash avenue, so you can't find him here. You had better go on and leave me alone."

"I don't believe King has gone, I'm going to see, anyhow."

WAS READY TO SHOOT.

The it occurred to Gallagher to look over the transom and see for himself.

"Stand clear of the door," wh ispered Mr. King to Miss Lefler. "The minute his head comes up over that transom I'm going to shoot. I believe that I will be justified in doing so."

Gallagher grasped hold of the knob, with one hand upon the top of the door, which he with his great height could easily reach. He was just in the act of swinging up to the transom when Patrolman W. K. Latcham came bounding up the stairs. He had been called by H. F. Hollecker, a saloonkeeper at 716 East Fifteenth street.

"You're under arrest, Gallagher," he called, being warned by Mrs. Condon that Mr. King was inside the door waiting to shoot at the first opportunity. That stopped Gallagher, and probably saved his life; for if his head had appeared above the transom Mr. King says that he would surely have shot.

Then Gallagher began to beg to get inside the door or to look over the transom. By signs only Mrs. Condon had told Officer Latcham that Mr. King was in the room waiting for a sight of Jack Gallagher. The officer would not allow him to climb up the door.

"You've got to come with me," said the officer, "and you've got to come at once. You know I'm able to take you and take you alone, so come along and behave."

GALLAGHER KNEW HIS MASTER.

Officer Latcham said afterwards: "The coward began to crawl like a whipped cur and came right along, not giving a bit of trouble. I did not even have to draw my revolver on him. When we got downstairs we found the patrol wagon waiting for us and nothing else happened."

At the station the day shift of police had come on and Sergeant Halligan booked Gallagher for disturbing the peace and refused to allow him to be released on bond. He was taken to police headquarters with the rest of the prisoners who had been arrested during the night.

Gallagher said that he would not go in the patrol wagon with the rabble, but he found out that the officers were determined that he should and soon stopped his bullying and took his seat in the wagon beside a drunken man.

"S-a-y," was the word used by Gallagher when he was brought before Theodore Remley, acting police judge.

"Now you keep quiet until your time comes," remonstrated Judge Remley.

"All right, judge," Gallagher replied in his blustering, bullying manner. "I suppose you are going to fine me because Albert King said for you to."

After James Mulloy, the policeman making the arrest, Miss Lefler, the nurse, and several witnesses had told their stories to the court, Gallagher asked permission to ask questions of Miss Lefler.

His first question was so insulting and foreign to the case that Judge Remley told her not to answer.

"That's right," Gallagher snarled at the judge, "you take away my rights after convicting me on their testimony. Now fine me if you dare to."

"Your fine is $500," replied the judge.

"How about signing a personal bond' asked Gallagher.

"Wait a minute, Gallagher, I have another case against you," Cliff Langsdale, the city attorney, said as Gallagher was being led back to the holdover.

"That's right, stick me, fine me another $500, the police and papers are against me and I guess you are, too."

A few necessary steps required by law and Judge Remley levied a fine of $500 on the second charge of disturbing the peace.

Looking over towards the table occupied by the newspaper men, Gallagher said: "I know when the police reporters leave the station They leave here at 2:45." Swearing vengeance against the police and the newspapers, Gallagher was placed in the holdover, later to be removed to the matron's room.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

June 2, 1908

'THERE'S NOTHING
TO IT'; JONES

IT'S NONE OF THE PUBLIC'S
BUSINESS, HE SAYS.

SPEAKING OF
POLICE SCANDAL.

DOESN'T FAVOR ARRESTING THE
PARASITICAL VAGS.

"What Good Would It Do? Listlessly
Inquires the Commissioner --
Mayor Hangs Fire on
Investigation.

Lavender women, their friends the dude vagrants, the thief, the thug and the saloonkeeper, may go on threatening the police; they may predict their removal and the prediction may come true so far as Elliott H. Jones, a member of the board of police commissioners, seems to care.

"There's nothing to it," he said yesterday. "I never met Mickey O'Hearn in my life until inauguration day in April, but a man tells me that he says neither he nor any of his friends ever threatened the police. And Chief of Police Daniel Ahern says he never moved men on Mickey's account -- so that settles it."

"But would you not think it proper to call in the six or eight men who have been taken out of plain clothes in the last six months after they were threatened, told they would be moved, and hear them tell you that they were moved on the very day that certain men and women set for them?' the commissioner was asked.

"It's none of the public's business why men were moved, and I for one shall not ask the chief to give his specific reasons for so doing."

"Do you know that a written resolution which stated that no more men should be moved from one beat or district to another without an absolute order from the board or the chief's written reasons for so doing, was unanimously adopted last July?" Mr. Jones was then asked.

"I BELIEVE GALLAGHER."

"This board is not governed by any orders of the previous board," he said promptly. "Anyway, Commissioner A. E. Gallagher tells me that no such resolution was adopted. I believe him."

When it was known that men were being moved after they had been threatened, Chief Ahern was asked if he moved them without the order of the board.. He said he moved men each month and knew of n o order to the contrary. Then an investigation was made and the following was learned:

James E. Vincil, secretary to the board of police commissioners -- "Yes, I remember the resolution well, but I think it was only made a verbal order to the chief. I have looked and it is not of record."

Former Chief John B. Hayes -- "The resolution was introduced by Frank F. Rozzelle, then a member of the board. It was in writing, as I remember, and was unanimously adopted."

Frank F. Rozzelle, former commissioner -- "During the trial of Captain Weber, Chief Hayes testified that Commissioner Gallagher had ordered men moved from one district to another and the members of the board knew nothing of it. I introduced a resolution in writing, as I remember, to this effect: 'Resolved, That in the future the change of any member of this department from one beat or district to another shall not be made with out the order and full consent of the board.' "

IT WAS IN WRITING.

Former Mayor Henry M. Beardsley -- "I recall that Commissiner Rozzelle introduced the resolution in writing. It was unanimously adopted. As I recall it, the resolution stated that in future no changes of men should be made without the order of the board, or, if it became necessary, for the chief to move a man in an emergency, he was to furnish the board his specific reasons in writing for doing so. I was so sure that such a resolution had been adopted that I asked Secretary Vincil about it and only a short time before I left the mayor's office. He remembered it as much as I did, but, strange to say, it was not of record in his office."

Besides these men of reputation who recall the adoption of the resolution there were at least five newspaper reporters present who remembered the occurrence well -- and the necessity for such a resolution.

According to Commissioner Jones, however, even if such a resolution was adopted by the board as previously constituted, the present "reform" board will not take cognizance of it -- at least, he intimated, that he and his colleague, Mr. Gallagher, would not.

HE'S WILLING, BUT SHY.

"So far as I am individually concerned," said Mayor Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr., "I would favor a thorough investigation into anything concerning the police where serious charges are made. But as I am so new at the business, I would prefer that an older member of the board take the lead."

When Commissioner Jones was told that the police were well acquainted with most all of the well dressed vagrants in No. 4 district, the men whose sole support for years has been fallen women, and was asked if a special order would be issued to arrest all such men and ring them into police court, he replied:

OH, WHAT'S THE USE?

"What good is to be accomplished by it? Other men would take their places and we might fill up our workhouse with men for the city to support."

While Commissioner Jones was talking he had before him a large envelope which contained a record of the changes made in the police department June 1. They had been made by the chief, he said, and he would not know what they were until he had read it. He said that he or other members of the board might request a change, but in the aggregate the board would not know why changes were made unless the chief was asked for his specific reasons, Mr. Jones says, he refuses to make public.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

May 29, 1908

RECORDS PROVE
MEN WERE MOVED.

AFTER BEING THREATENED BY
MEN WITH A "PULL."

ONE ARRESTED
WRONG WOMAN.

SHE HAD BEEN FINED 106 TIMES,
BUT WAS EXEMPT.

"Ain't You Next?" Said O'Hearn's
Friend; "You're to Let Her
Alone." -- More of the Pow-
er of Mickey O'Hearn.

After the order of the board of police commissioners Wednesday a reporter for The Journal had no trouble in seeing the books at No. 4 police station yesterday. And a view of these books proved the charges that every man since the first of the year, who has been active in arresting women "night hawks" has been taken out of plain clothes and removed from the district. One man was left in the district but he was taken from that special duty and put back into uniform.

The records showed that officers had been taken from that duty even before January 1 -- in fact, any man who has been too active since the reorganized police department took charge of affairs after Governor Joseph W. Folk's "rigid investigation" has been shifted. This is not only true of No. 4 district by even in No. 1 district, headquarters. This does not pertain alone to the arresting of dissolute women but to interference with certain saloons which were selling liquor on Sunday. That charge is made in regard to No. 1 district more than any other. Of course, some saloons have been caught; but they are not the influential ones; those run by "our political friends."

While the records at No. 4 station practically prove all the assertions made in regard to that district it is said that no blame can be laid at the door of Captain Thomas P. Flahive. It is not he who has had the men taken out of citizens clothes and transferred Those who know say he has been handicapped by having only a few men to do the work in his district and by an unseen power which has been able to have men removed when they did their full duty.

ARRESTED MANY WOMEN.

The records show that Daniel Doran, who worked there for years, arrested thirty-five women just before January 1. He was threatened by well dressed vagrants and told that he would be moved. And by the grace of the unseen power he was moved January 1, last, going in uniform to No. 9 -- the "sage brush" district.

The commanding officers and sergeants under whom Edward Prewett worked in No. 4 precinct speak well of him. He was there nearly eight years, and it was never said that Prewett did not do his full duty. In fat, it has been said that "Prewett would bring in his grandmother if ordered to do so."

In December, Prewett was detailed alone to bring in women of the streets. In eighteen days he brought in thirty-five of them. But from all sides, even from the women and especially the dude vagrants, he heard, "You won't last beyond January 1." One night Prewett arrested a woman named Kate Kingston. Last year this woman was fined $500 by Police Judge Harry G. Kyle, and at that time the records showed that she had been fined 106 times in police court.

"YOU AIN'T NEXT, ARE YOU?"

As he started away with the woman, "Ted" Noland appeared on the scene. "Turn that woman loose," he said; "you ain't next are you? She's to be let alone." Prewett was not "next," for he was also arrested Noland, and that was his undoing. Noland threatened the officer and told him he would personally see to it that he was moved. And Prewett was moved January 1, going in uniform to No. 6. Noland was fined $50 in police court the day following his arrest.

Noland is well known to the police, and in January, 1907, was fined $500 on a charge of vagrancy. That same Kate Kingston, over whom he threatened the officer, testified then that he and a man named Deerwester had beaten her at Thirteenth and Main streets. Deerwester got a similar fine. Their cases were appealed and the men were soon out out on bond.

Noland is a friend of Alderman "Mickey" O'Hearn, and, until recently, could be seen almost any day about his saloon at 1205 Walnut street; also about the saloon of Dan Leary at Fourteenth and Walnut streets. The records show that Leary has gone the bonds of scores of street women. At one time Judge Kyle objected to the n umber of personal bonds that Leary was signing and required that they be made in cash.

JUST SEE MICKEY.

The influence of Alderman "Mickey" O'Hearn may be better understood when it is known how he is reverenced by many members of the police department. When the Folk "investigation" was begun in May last year the commissions of probably half the department were held up. This conversation was overheard one day between two of the officers out of commissions.

"I'll tell you these are ticklish times," one said. "I have all my friends to work and am assured that I am all right."

"I'm up a tree," the other replied. "I don't know what to do. I have always tried to do my duty and can't imagine why I am held up."

"Why don't you see 'Mickey'?" his friend said with astonishment. "I thought you were wise. You know 'Mickey,' don't you You do; then go and see him and the whole things squared. That's what I did."

From that day to this the word has gone out through the whole department, "See 'Mickey' if you are in bad. He'll fix it."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

May 28, 1908

ORDERS POLICE
TO SHOW BOOKS.

BOARD DECIDES RECORDS ARE
OPEN TO PUBLIC .

ALD. O'HEARN'S ACTIVITY.

ACCUSED OF CAUSING REMOVAL
OF VIGILANT OFFICER.

Remarkable Case of Lisiecki Broth-
er's Saloon, Where a Politician
Is Said to Have Called
Off Besieging Police.

After twenty-four hours deliberation the board of police commissioner came to the conclusion yesterday that records of arrests at the different stations in the city should be declared public, so long as the information desired was of past transactions. May Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr. declared that information of past transactions should be given to any citizen asking it, and the other members of the board concurred, after some discussion.

The board was told that a reporter for The Journal had asked on Tuesday to see the records and had been refused by the captain of No. 4 station and Chief of Police Daniel Ahern.

"What do you want to see the books for?" Mayor Crittenden asked.

"It has been charged that every man since the first of the year who has been active in arresting women who infest the streets in that district has been taken out of plain clothes, and all but the two who are now detailed for that duty, put into uniform and removed from the precinct," the mayor was told. "It is said that the records at the station will show this state of affairs. It is also charged that the removal of the men came after threats from well dressed vagrants and a certain saloonkeeper-politician in that district."

No comment was made upon this statement. Chief Daniel Ahern, who was present, was simply ordered to let the books be examined "in the presence of the officer in charge of the station," and that was all. No hint at an investigation by this board was made.

SIX HAVE BEEN MOVED.

The records show that since January 1 eight men have been detailed in plain clothes in No. 4 district. Their principal duty is to keep the streets clean of undesirable women at night. Six of those men have been removed already, and the two now there have been told that they are to go. One of the men who is said to have threatened policemen who did their duty is Alderman Michael J. O'Hearn, known in a political way as "Mickey" O'Hearn.

The records will show that Frank N. Hoover was removed from No. 4 precinct on March 1. It is well known that this district harbors criminals of all classes and a horde of women who support well dressed vagrants in idleness. The records show that during Hoover's short stay in plain clothes his "cases" included the capture of land fraud sharks, a murderer, one woman who attempted murder, shoplifters working Jones Bros.' department store, clothing thieves, typewriter thieves, "hop" fiends, opium jointists, vagrants -- and a long list of "lavender ladies" who called to men from their windows, and others who walked the streets by night. Scores of these lawbreakers were fined from $5 to $150 in police court on Patrolman Hoover's testimony.

It is alleged that one night when Hoover had arrested a well known vagrant, who for years has lived off the wages of sinful women, he was accosted by O'Hearn, who demanded to know why Hoover was aresting his "friends." One who heard the conversaion said that Hoover told the saloonkeeper that he knew nothing about his "friends"; in fact, that he was doing police duty. O'Hearn, according to report, then told Hoover with a snap of the finger: "We'll see about you later." And he was "seen to" March 1, when he was put into uniform and transferred to a beat in No. 6 district.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

May 27, 1908

POLICE REFUSE
TO SHOW BOOKS.

CONTAIN NAMES OF OFFICERS
WHO WERE TRANSFERRED.

THEY ARE PUBLIC PROPERTY.

BUT CONTAIN PROOF OF
PERNICIOUS INFLUENCE.

Matter of Changing Active Officers
Is to Come Before Board Today.
Farce Follows Chief Dan-
iel Ahern's Order.

Not until yesterday was it made known that the records of arrests at police stations in Kansas City, ordinarily believed to be open to public view, are secret, perhaps sacred, reports, wont to be seen by any one not connected with the department until so ordered by the board of police commissioners, or, perhaps, some higher tribunal -- mayhap the mysterious influence behind the present police force.

While the charge has been made that officers who did their full duty in bringing in objectionable women of the streets, in whom well dressed vagrants were interested, had recently been taken out of plain clothes, put back into uniform and transferred to remote districts, it was additionally charged that the records of No. 4 police station for several months would show that every officer who had been active in that work had been removed to another district.

Believing that the records at a police station were as public as those of police court or any other court, a reporter for The Journal called at No. 4 (Walnut street) station yesterday and made this request of Captain Thomas P. Flahive:

"I want to see the record of arrests since January. I want to get the names of the officers working in plain clothes since that time. I want to see how many women each man arrested and find out if those same officers are still in this district, or if they have been removed."

"While our books may be regarded as public records," said Captain Flahive, "I must refuse you access to them unless you bring me an order from Chief Ahern of the board."

"The books are in Captain Flahive's district," said Chief Daniel Ahern later, "if he wants to show them to you he can. He won't, you say? Then I will not let you see them without an order from the board."

GALLAGHER SAYS "NO."

"Not by any means," was the reply of Commissioner A. E. Gallagher. "The matter will be brought to the attention of the board tomorrow."

Commissioner Elliot H. Jones, last night said, when asked whether the records of arrests were public property, "I don't know; I've never thought about it."

"It is my personal opinion, off hand, that such records are open to the public," came from Mayor Crittenden. "However, I am new in the business here and would not like to give a positive opinion. Ask the board tomorrow."

City Counselor E. C. Meservey was called up at his home last night after all of these refusals by public officers to screen police acts and asked whether he regarded the records of a police station as public records. He said promptly: "I see no reason why they should not be just as public as the records of the police court, especially those of past transactions. There is only one reason in my mind why they should be refused and that is where the police saw that the giving of the record would interfere with their duty in arresting law breakers." When told the record that was wanted he said, "that certainly is of past transactions and I think the records should have been produced."

THEY WERE NOT REMOVED.

The records under the Hayes administration will show that for one year previous to his removal by the board, July 31, 1907, only a few men were detailed in plain clothes in No. 4 district to bring in objectionable women and vagrants supported by them, and they were not removed for doing so. They remained at that duty a long time.

On the best information that can be gained without seeing the books, the records since July 31 last year will show that no fewer than from eight to ten different men have been assigned to duty in that district. From memory it can be truthfully said that since January 1 these officers have been detailed there: Edward Prewett, Daniel Doran, Frank M. Hoover, Thomas L. McDonough, Lucius Downey, J. C. Dyson, John Rooth and A. B. Cummings. All of them were active in doint their duty.

Prewett was put back in uniform and sent to No. 6.

Doran got into "harness" and was sent to No. 9, "the woods."

Hoover is now wearing blue at No. 6.

McDonough was taken from that duty, put into uniform but left in the district.

Downey, who had been in plain clothes for nearly three years, was put into a suit of blue he had nearly outgrown and sent to a tough beat in the North end.

Dyson in in blue and brass and is taking a chance at being sunstruck in the tall grass of No. 9.

Rooth and Cummings are still there, but the rumor is that they are slated to go June 1.

THREATENED BY VAGRANTS.

It is known that Downey and Dyson were threatened by thugs, vagrants and a saloonkeeper-politician and told they would be moved May 1. And on that date they were removed. Rooth and Cummings were so often threatened by the same men that they have appealed to the chief for protection. They were told by vagrants they would be moved June 1. Will they?

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

May 4, 1908

RISKS LIFE TO RECOVER CAP.

Small Boy Pulls Red Wagon in Front
of Street Car.

A toy wagon, a 10-year-old boy and a blown-away cap looming up before a Grand avenue street car just before dark last night, made things look suddenly black for the motorman.

"You didn't stop for me," the boy said, indignantly, after he had been shunted off the track, his back sprained and his left thigh lacerated.

"I thought you'd stop when you saw me, for I had to get my cap," he went on. The boy was David Marcus, son of Aaron Marcus of 42 McClure Flats. His play had taken him to Twentieth street and Grand avenue. On a street car he was taken to a physicians office Four hours later he was still suffering, and Dr. Carl V. Bates from No. 4 police station was called. He says the boys injuries are only superficial.

Labels: , , , , , ,

May 3, 1908

HE FOUND A CAN OF JEWELRY.

And This Honest Boy Turned It Over
to the Police.

The treasure of some modern Captain Kidd in a Weary Willie vase was shoved under Lieutenant Heydon's nose by a 10-year-old boy last night at No. 4 police station.

"Here's something I 'spect you want," the boy said, relieving himself of a rusty, earth-covered tin can.

"Are you kiddin' kid?" the lieutenant wanted to know, as he cocked his eye to get a view of the contents. Something looked like gold, and the officer drew the can to him. Emptied on the desk the can's contents proved to be four ladies' gold watches, three gold breastpins, one gold cross, one gold necklace, one silver cuff link.

The lad, who was John E. Linings, a stepson of Charles Bassott, 317 East Nineteenth street, found the jewelry about 7:30 o'clock in the evening while digging for fishing worms in a vacant lot at the northeast corner of Nineteenth and McGee streets. No part of the jewelry was identified last night. It evidently was not new jewelry and had been in the ground for some time.

Labels: , ,

April 14, 1908

BURNED CHILDREN WITH ACID.

Boys Rubbed It on Their Faces, Caus-
ing Them Much Pain.

Four boys, living in the neighborhood of Fourteenth and Campbell streets, last night took a bottle of carbolic acid and a medicine syringe and spread terror among the girls and smaller children of that section. An alarm reached No. 4 police station and Patrolman T. M. Scott captured one of the boys, Tony Hanson, 1320 Campbell street. His is 11 years old and his companions were about the same age. The names of the others said to have taken part were Chester Cheney, 910 East Fourteenth street; Harry Wintermute, 912 East Fourteenth street and Chester Northfleet, 914 East Fourteenth street.

The boys claimed they secured the bottle in or behind a barn and that they did not know what it contained. Many children were burned by the acid. While one boy used the medicine syringe the others, it is said, would saturate pieces of rag and rub the necks and faces of children they could catch. Ugly burns and much pain followed. Lieutenant Hammil in charge of No. 4 police station did not want to place boys so young in the holdover, so he merely left their names, addresses and other information for Captain Flahive to act upon as he chooses today. Some of the children who were most burned are Florence David, 1431 Campbell street; Winnie Austin, 914 East Fourteenth street, and Edna Barnes, 1425 Campbell street.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

April 3, 1908

UNKNOWN WOMAN
KILLED BY TRAIN.

RUN DOWN ON BELT LINE NEAR
PARK AVENUE.

DIES IN GENERAL HOSPITAL.

REFUSES TO GIVE ANY INFORMA-
TION ABOUT HERSELF.

Carried Sunday School Tract With
Little Girl's Name on It, but
the Owner Does Not
Know Her.

A young woman who was crushed by the wheels of a Belt Line engine last night at 7:30 o'clock, died tow and a half hours later at the city hospital, without being identified. The scene of the accident was where the Belt tracks are fifteen feet below street level, half way between Brooklyn and Park avenues. It is near Nineteenth street.

The woman was walking eastward and must have entered the cut three blocks west, at the street level.

To avoid the Santa Fe local No. 59, westbound, she stepped upon the other main track, and a Milwaukee engine, eastbound, struck her. Pilot Al Williams was riding to work on the engine but neither he nor the engineer, James Spencer, saw her, nor did the fireman But the flagman on the freight train did.

She lay by the track, her left arm almost severed at the shoulder, and with a contusion, possibly a fracture, on each side of her head. A broad leather cushion from the car was brought and she was carried to Eighteenth street and Brooklyn avenue to the office of Dr. I. E. Ruhl, who saw that she was dying. The police ambulance from No. 4 police station, in charge of Patrolman Smith Cook and Dr. C. V. Bates, arrived and she was taken to the general hospital.

She seemed conscious, but could not be induced to talk. The only article she carried was a Sunday school quarterly bearing the name of Loretta Kurster, 1509 East Eighteenth street.

Drs. R. C. Henderson and T. B. Clayton, who operated on the woman at the hospital. said she seemed bright and could use her vocal organs, but evidently was suffering from a skull fracture so such an extent that she did not really understand what was said to her.

Asked if she knew how she had been hurt, she replied, wonderingly, "Hurt? Why, I didn't know anything was the matter." But questions as to her identity she did not attempt to answer, and there was nothing about her person to disclose this, besides the booklet.

In the meantime it had been discovered that Loretta Kursler is a 12-year-old girl who was uninjured and busy in her mother's bakery at the address given in the book. She thought it might be a Sunday school teacher she had met at Central Baptist church, Miss Blanche Wade, but Miss Wade was found safe at her home. She at once, however, went to the hospital to see if she could identify the woman. The quarterly was found to be one pushed by the Christian denomination.

The Kursler child having recently become a pupil at the Forest Avenue Christian church, Miss Wade called Rev. J. L. Thompson of the Forest Avenue church for aid in identifying the woman. Loretta Kursler said her Christian Sunday school teacher was called Grace, but she did not know her last name. The minister accounted for every Sunday school worker by the name of Grace and everyone who teaches girls of that size. Then the chance of discovering before morning who the woman was seemed very slight.

Apparently the woman was 32 to 35 years of age. She was slightly above medium height, was fairly well fleshed, was brunette with abundance of dark hair, had delicate hands, blue-set earrings worn tight to the ear, and wore a tan jacket and a fur neck piece. No hat was taken with her to the hospital. Around her waist was fastened a package containing $8.70.

Dr. Ruhl, who first saw her, thinks it possible that the woman may have been demented, or if an employed woman may have been making a short cut home from work. In the latter case he would believe her hearing defective.

The Kursler family is at a loss to know how a Sunday school book bearing the little girl's name would come to be found in the possession of anyone not her teacher.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory