Find Kansas City Antiques and Collectibles at the Vintage Kansas City Marketplace ~ Own a Piece of Old KC

Vintage Kansas City.com

 

THE JOURNAL COMPANY, Publisher
EIGHTH, M'GEE AND OAK STREETS.

Old News
Headlines and Articles from The Kansas City Journal

BELL & HOME TELEPHONES
Business Office...4000 Main
City Editor.....4001 Main
Society Editor....4002 Main

Two cents. Subscription Rates:  By carrier, per week, 10 cents; per month, 45 cents.  By mail, daily and Sunday, one month, 40 cents; three months, $1.00; six months, $2.00; one year, $4.00.  Sunday only, six months, 75 cents; one year, $1.50.  Weekly Journal, 25 cents one year.

As We See 'Em ~ Caricatures of Prominent Kansas Cityans

The Isis Theatre ~ Kansas City, Missouri

The History of Fairmount Park

Claims of Cancer Cured by Dr. Bye in Vintage KC Missouri

Special Cut Prices ~ Always the Same

Blogging Fusion Blog Directory

February 9, 1910

DEAF MUTES AT DANCE.

They Feel Music, Floor Carrying
Vibrations to Their Feet.

Deaf and dumb people are "like the rest of us" except that they dwell apart in a world where there is eternal silence. Just because their language is not ours it does not mean that they do not have a good time occasionally, a truism which was demonstrated last night when seventy of them had a genuine masked ball in the A. O. U. W. hall at Ninth street and Michigan avenue.

The few visitors who attended the hop saw exactly what anyone sees at a function of this kind -- men and women gaily disporting themselves in all kinds of ludicrous costumes. There were smiles and laughter, perhaps, even, flirtations. The eyes behind the ashen mask of the clown sparked brightly through the peep holes at the lustrous orbs of the queen of spades or the kilted chorus girl. Only the hands, quick, sentient members that fluttered constantly, telling stories the tongue was intended to convey. Outside of this slight difference it was all that could be expected of a masked ball.

Miss Mary Annett was the funniest girl on the floor. The three judges decided this with a single gesticulation apiece. She was petite and pretty. An outsider would not have said "funny" but "interesting" in describing her.

She was tricked out in a blue gingham union suit of enormous proportions. As she glided easily to the tune of a waltz, her feet answering in some occult fashion the vibration of the music conducted to them by the floor boards, she was often applauded, but never laughed at. Mary got a hand-painted cracker bowl as a trophy.

Mary had two sisters present who rivaled her for grace and dress. They were Elda and Edna Arnett, both older than she and able to talk.

Leslie B. Honien, dressed as Happy Hooligan, was the funniest man. Honien is a printer. He had "pied" his costume. "Pied," by the way, is a technical term meaning "generally mixed up, presumably by accident."

Others who shared in the prizes awarded were C. O. Duffield and Leonora McGinnis. Goldie Marksbury played the piano.

The remarkable thing about the dance was that everyone knew how and followed the music, despite the fact that they were unable to hear a single note. The floor carried the vibrations to their feet.

The dance was a benefit given under the auspices of the Association of the Deaf. The returns, amounting to $60, are to go to the education of the deaf and dumb.

The judges were the Rev. J. Koehler, Charles Minor and Frank Laughlin.

Labels: , , ,

February 2, 1910

WILL REBUILD AT ONCE.

First Christian Science Church Di-
rectors Authorized to Proceed.

The First Church of Christ, Scientist, Ninth street and Forest avenue, which was burned last Saturday night, is to be rebuilt at once. It is to be an absolutely fireproof structure, and will cost approximately $75,000. Of this amount $10,000 was contributed Sunday night and the board of directors were authorized to start the construction at once. Plans are being prepared by Edwards & Cumberson, architects.

"There will be no trouble whatever in raising the $75,000," said J. K. Stickney, president of the board of directors last night. "There is plenty of money in the congregation and all are willing to do their share.

"The congregation subscribed $42,000 in 1905 and 1906 toward the extension of the mother church in Boston, so there will be no trouble in raising all the funds we need for our own church. We expect to have the new structure completed and ready for occupancy by the first of September. In the meantime we have secured a place for our regular services. On next Sunday the afternoon services and Sunday school will be held in the Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Thirty-second street and Troost avenue, at 3 o'clock. Evening services will be held at 8 o'clock. After next Sunday services will be held at the same hours in the Jewish synagogue, Linwood boulevard and Flora avenue. Wednesday evening services will be held in the synagogue at 8 o'clock."

Labels: , , ,

January 30, 1910

SCIENTIST STONE
EDIFICE BURNED.

THE FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
REDUCED TO CHARRED
WALLS.

Building Supposed to Be
Fireproof When Con-
structed Years Ago.
First Church of Christ, Scientist, Nearly Destroyed by Fire.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST.
Beautiful House of Worship Almost Totally Destroyed Last Night by Fire.

Four charred walls is all that remains of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, at Ninth street and Forest avenue, which cost its congregation $150,000.

Fire broke out in the basement of the building, near the west end, at 8 o'clock last night. Despite the constant playing of ten streams and the concerted action of as many fire companies, it burned steadily and fiercely to the ground, furnishing one of the most spectacular fires which has occurred in Kansas City for many years. The loss is estimated by J. K. Stickney, president of the board of trustees, about $155,000. The insurance was $85,000.

The flames were first noticed by T. Russel, who owns apartments next door to the church at 912 Forest avenue, at 8:05 o'clock. At that time smoke was issuing form a window leading into the boiler rooms. The first alarm brought No. 5 and No. 8 companies.

Firemen broke into the rear of the church on the alley, but at first failed to locate the blaze. So confident were they, however, that it was already beyond control that a second alarm was turned in and companies 14, 10, 11, 25, 2 and 3 were sent. By this time a bright, red glare flamed from the second story followed by tongues of eager flame which reached from the old auditorium toward adjoining apartments.

It was stated by Chief John C. Egner last night that had the church not been located at one of the highest points of the city, where the water pressure is seldom above forty pounds, the fire might have been checked at the outset. Waiting for the heavy engines to be dragged over slippery streets probably doomed the building.

The First Church of Christ, Scientist, was built of gray stone and furnished in Flemish oak. It was considered fireproof when it was erected, thirteen years ago. Because of the many prominent names connected with its building, as well as its maintenance, the fire attracted an unusually large crowd for one so far from the business district. People came from Kansas City, Kas., Sheffield and Westport to see, and stood about, shivering, for nearly three hours.

Labels: , , ,

January 22, 1910

GETS WHAT HE ASKED
FOR WIFE'S AFFECTIONS.

Jury in Five Minutes Gives A. L.
Sherman $50,000 Verdict
Against J. C. Silverstone.

After less than five minutes' deliberation yesterday morning a jury in Judge Thomas J. Seehorn's division of the circuit court gave A. L. Sherman, a Kansas City lawyer, a verdict of $50,000 as a balm for a wound his feelings sustained when his wife lost her love for him in favor of another man three years ago. The suit, for $25,000 exemplary and $25,000 actual damages, was instituted by Attorneys L. C. Boyle and C. M. Howell.

The defendant was J. C. Silverstone, who for several years owned a drug store at Ninth and Wyandotte streets, but is now in Seattle, Was. Silverstone was not present at the opening of the case yesterday, but his lawyers were, and there was some interesting testimony. Mrs. Sherman obtained a divorce a year ago and is not in the city.

According to the testimony of Sherman he and Mrs. Sherman were married in September, 1898. Their life was happy until about January, 1907, when, he testified, Silverstone rose over the domestic horizon and began to shed compliments and other attentions on Mrs. Sherman.

One time Sherman said he asked his wife how it was she could buy millinery and fine dresses without approaching him for a loan. He had noticed for several months past that she was making purchases with out either consulting him or having the bills charged. She told conflicting stories of how she could perform the miracle, Sherman testified. He was not convinced and went to Silverstone's store to see him about it.

Sherman said he seized Silverstone by the throat and forced him back on a barrel in the rear of the drug store. Under threats of killing him, he said he obtained a partial confession and made the druggist beg for his life.

"After that my wife and I had frequent quarrels, and finally she left me, taking our child. The last I heard of her she was in Seattle."

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

December 26, 1909

"BURGLAR" SAVED
AS POLICE COME.

Guest Mistaken by Roomers
for Robber, Imprisoned
in Guarded Closet.

"Come to 912 East Ninth street immediately," came a call late last night to police headquarters. "We've got a burglar locked in a closet."

The patrol wagon made a record run, but when it arrived only a crowd of badly frightened men and women roomers were found. There was no burglar.

"It was just one of the roomers," explained one of the crowd. "A man came out here tonight to visit a friend. He stepped out into the hall to look for a water cooler. The man had been drinking, and in his wandering through the dark halls stepped by mistake into a closet. A roomer, seeing the prowler, slipped up behind him and slammed the closet door."

The cry of "burglars" aroused the roomers. While the men rushed about in search of lodge swords and the women went for hat pins, one of the roomers stood guard with a revolver.

"Come out and I'll shoot," warned the guard in night robe, peering around his fortification, a chimney.

The prisoner took a drink. His courage restored, he shouted, "Help," thinking that he himself was the one being held up.

SOLID PHALANX.

The cohorts of the besiegers were now ranged in solid phalanx in front of the closet. There were all sort and manner of weapons. The men felt the edges of their lodge swords, and the women jabbed at supposed burglars, their forms outlined on the wall. The man with the revolver formed the advance line of attack. The rear was brought up by a boarder with a battle ax, used at a masquerade ball in the '60s.

"Help, burglars," came more audibly from the closet.

The friend in a nearby room was attracted by the noise. He came to the hall armed with a .44, not knowing that his guest was in trouble. He lined up behind the rear guard.

"Help, I'm suffocating," came another cry from the closet, this time more insistent and appealing.

GUARD CALLED OFF.

The roomer recognized the voice as that of his guest. The guard of nightie-clad roomers was called off. The guest with the jag was released.

A clanging of bells was heard in the front of the house. A squad of blue-coats came rushing in at the front door.

"Saved," cried the joyful man, emerging from his prison, mopping his brow.

"Stung," answered the chorus of nighties.

The police returned to headquarters empty-handed.

Labels: , , , , ,

December 24, 1909

GAS COMPLETES RUIN
OF RIALTO BUILDING.

FLAMES UNDER CONTROL WHEN
MAIN BREAKS, EXPLODING.

Firemen Grope Way to Street as
Third Roar Is Heard and Fire
Raging for Hours, Leaves
Only Ice-Coated Walls.
Fire and Explosion Destroy the Rialto Building.
CHARRED WALLS OF THE RIALTO BUILDING, ALL THAT REMAINS OF A "FIRE TRAP."

Flames fed by a broken gas main destroyed the Rialto building at the southwest corner of Grand avenue and Ninth street at 3:30 o'clock yesterday morning. The building was erected in 1887 by Albert Marty, its present owner. The fire started in the basement and raged virtually unchecked for three hours until everything inflammable had been consumed. Nothing remains but the ruined and ice-coated walls. The loss is estimated at $300,000.

The building was one of the few remaining big Kansas City fire traps which are a terror to the fire department. Almost entirely of frame construction inside, it burned like tinder. In the language of Assistant Chief Alex Henderson, "not all the fire companies in Missouri could have stopped it."

The fire was noticed first by J. W. Johnson, a negro janitor, who had for many years been a fixture in the building. Johnson was sitting in one of the offices on the second floor at 3 o'clock in the morning, when he was startled by a rumbling sound like the report of a muffled cannon. He jumped from the chair in which he had been resting after several hours of hard work in policing the building, and bounded down the stairway.

He was confronted by dense smoke, and forgetting everything but that there were several person in the building who were in imminent danger of losing their lives, he bounded up the steps and shouted fire from each landing. In this manner he aroused Dr. J. W. Gaines, Dr. Robert O. Gross, Dr. Emil Thielman, Dr. Oliver F. Jones, Dr. A. Talbot, Dr. B. E. Jordan, Dr. J. B. Jones and Dr. Frank Jones. On the fifth floor Johnson came upon Charles R. Manley, senior physical examiner of the Y. M. C. A., in a semi-conscious condition, the result of striking his head against a post in his efforts to escape while groping his way through the dark, smoke-filled hallways. Johnson himself was beginning to feel the effects of the smoke, but not thinking of his own life in his efforts to save others half carried and dragged Mr. Manley down the stairway and out into the streets to safety. In the meantime, A. E. Perrine, night watchman in the building of McGowan, Small & Morgan, gas grantees, which is the first building south of the Rialto, discovered smoke and noticing the glare of flames which by that time had gained considerable headway in the trunk factory, hastened to a telephone and turned in the alarm.

FIRE FIGHT BEGINS.

The fire department soon was on the scene. The fire at first looked to be easy to extinguish. The firemen had the flames smothered, when a terrific explosion, caused by the breaking of a gas main, shot the flames up through the building to the top floors. At the time of this explosion Assistant Chief Alex Henderson and a squad of men were on the first floor of the building. The force of the explosion shook the entire building and as the flames were spreading to all parts of the structure, it was as much as a man's life was worth to stay inside, as another explosion could be expected at any time. While Chief Henderson and his men were extricating themselves from the trap, Captain Pelletier, with several men, were groping their way about in the basement of the Ninth street entrance. In what seemed to be hours, they emerged through the smoke and debris into the street. It was none too soon, as the third explosion occurred a few minutes later and had any of the firemen remained in the building they would have been buried beneath the floors and walls. By this time twenty companies had arrived and were throwing streams of water into the burning building from all sides, but it was of no use. The interior of the building was mostly wood and the outside wall kept the streams from getting to the center of the building, where the fire was worst.

The Rialto was the only old-time building of any consequence on Grand avenue. Albert Marty, the owner, is an active real estate and building man of Kansas City. He purchased the ground in 1886 and in 1887 constructed a five-story building on the corner. In 1889 he purchased forty-eight feet on the south side of the corner lot and the same year erected the south half of the building which burned yesterday morning.

The building was occupied by many prominent physicians and dentists, some of whom have been in the building twenty-five years.

"The number of occupants is in the neighborhood of 100," said Dr. H. D. McQuade, who had offices in the building for many years. "Many of us will be up against it for offices for some time, but I expect to contract for offices on the fifth floor of the Keith & Perry building tomorrow. Many of us received offers from other physicians to share their offices while looking for locations."

VALUED AT $125,000.

The building was valued at $125,000, although at the time of its erection it cost in the neighborhood of $200,000. That was more than twenty years ago. There was $81,500 insurance carried on the structure. The heaviest loser among the occupants was Hugo A. Brecklein, a druggist, occupying the first floor. Mr. Brecklein estimated his loss at $20,000, with $12,000 insurance.

J. H. Langan, son of John P. Langan, a grocer at 4601 Independence avenue, was walking north on Grand avenue yesterday morning when the fire started, and in attempting to awaken some of the men who were sleeping in the offices, he broke the glass in one of the doors, severely cutting his hand. But he saved the life of a man who was sleeping through all the disturbance, and succeeded in helping him to the street.

At least sixty physicians and twenty dentists lost their office furnishings and instruments in the Rialto building fire yesterday. The average loss for each tenant is said to have been about $700, and that only a small part of it was covered by insurance.

For years the Rialto has been the doctors' office building of Kansas City. Many of the most prominent physicians of the city were established there. Owing to the fact that in many buildings dentists and physicians are not allowed to rent offices, because the odors arising form the mixtures of medicines is objected to by other tenants, this building has long been recognized as the headquarters of men engaged in these two professions.

VALUABLE RELICS LOST.

About 1,000 specimens of prehistoric stone implements and two ancient violins were cherished treasures of Dr. A. H. Cordier, which were lost in the Rialto fire. Dr. Cordier occupied room 310, third floor.

A collector of prehistoric implements, Dr. Cordier, on trips to Mexico, Alaska, Ohio, Kentucky, Arkansas and through Missouri, got several thousand specimens, and he had about 1,000 of them on display in his offices. His is a collector of old violins and had two of these instruments, which he prized highly, in his rooms. Another relic which Dr. Cordier lost was the mounted head of a mountain sheep which he shot while on a hunting trip in British Columbia. Dr. Cordier's office had been in the Rialto building eighteen years.

DR. ANDERSON LUCKY.

A long distance survey of the Rialto ruins makes it appear that Dr. R. V. Anderson, a dentist, is the only tenant of the burned structure whose effects were not destroyed, and he recalls the fact that once before in a fire in the Rialto building he also was lucky.

Dr. Anderson's office has been in the building nearly eighteen years, ever since he began to practice, and some years ago ago fire broke out beneath his office, and his rooms, enveloped in smoke and flame, seemed doomed. The firemen, however, extinguished the blaze before his effects suffered any serious damage.

ORDINANCE NOT ENFORCED.

At the burning of the Rialto building yesterday morning the firemen were greatly handicapped by dangers from exploding gas, and they were in continual danger of being burned by flame of escaping gas. Had the building been equipped with a Siebens' shut-off gas valve it would have been possible for the firemen the moment they reached the fire to turn off the gas in the entire building and thereby lessen the danger occasioned by the escaping gas. The building code requires the installation of gas shut-off devices on all buildings, but for some reason the ordinance has never been enforced.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , ,

December 7, 1909

HIDDEN POUCH FOUND
IN OLD JAMES HOUSE.

FILLED WITH OPENED LETTERS
ADDRESSED TO A. F. GEORGE.

Sack Discovered by Plumber in
Sealed Closet at 1836 East Ninth
Not Like Those Used By Gov-
ernment in Bandit's Time.
Mail Receptacle Found in Jesse James's Old House.
UNLIKE PRESENT DAY POUCHES.

A rendezvous of Jesse James was recalled yesterday afternoon, when E. N. Watts, who runs a plumbing shop at 1836 East Ninth street, discovered in an old house at 1836 East Ninth street a mail pouch upon which human eyes probably had not gazed for years.

Watts was doing extensive remodeling work on the interior of the house preparatory to its occupancy as a pool hall, when he accidentally broke into a little closet which evidently had been sealed for years. In that aperture he found a mail pouch, filled with mail matter. He dragged the sack to the light and after examining it concluded that it must have been a part of the spoils of the James gang.
USED AS A RECEPTACLE.

Mr. Watts notified the postal authorities and a postoffice inspector was soon on the scene. He examined the pouch and its contents, finding the sack was filled with many letters, all of which had been opened and were addressed to "A. F. George, 609 East Fifteenth street, Kansas City, Mo." The inspector's conclusion was that the sack must have been used as a receptacle for the accumulated correspondence of Mr. George, whoever he might have been.

Closet Where the Pouch of Mail Was Found.
CLOSET WHERE THE POUCH WAS FOUND.

The inspector took the sack and contents to the federal building, where officials, who had been in the service as long as twenty years, examined it closely. They said that although the pouch resembled the official style, it lacked certain necessary features that would justify its identification as ever having been owned by the United states government. The officials were at a loss to know why anyone would try to duplicate the official one used years ago.

Labels: , , , , ,

November 13, 1909

NOT CARL ORIN'S GHOST.

Des Moines Man Believed Killed in
Wreck, Is in Kansas City.

"Hello, Harry, is that you? This is Carl -- Carl Orin. Can't you understand -- C -A-R-L, O-R-I-N of Des Moines, Ia. Don't you know we came here together several years ago?"

"Not much you are not Carl Orin. He was killed in a wreck out in Wyoming nearly a year ago. Everybody knows that he's dead."

The foregoing telephone conversation took place about 6 o'clock last night between Harry Ensminger, foreman at the Gump truck factory, Ninth and Main streets, and Carl Orin, who just had arrived here from Oklahoma City.

"If you don't believe I am Carl Orin," said the first speaker, "I will just show you, so long as you are in Missouri. I am coming right over to see you."

"If you do you are Orin's ghost," insisted Ensminger, "for I tell you I know that he is dead. I know his mother is mourning him as dead."

"Quit your kidding," came back from the man at the telephone. "You must be trying to hand me something."

A few minutes later when Carl Orin, alive and well and unmistakably genuine, walked into the presence of Ensminger the latter was astounded. Orin was at once informed that his mother was at 211 Maple street, Des Moines, was at that very moment wearing black, believing him to be the victim of a disastrous railroad wreck which occurred out in Wyoming about ten months ago. One of the badly mangled victims of the wreck, from something on his person, was identified as Carl Orin of Des Moines and his people notified. Since that time, the live man was told his mother had spent a considerable sum of money sending representatives out into Wyoming to get the story of the wreck, and, if possible, make some kind of settlement with the railroad company.

Labels: , , ,

November 5, 1909

MAY DIVORCE JESSE JAMES.

Mrs. Stella S. James Files Suit --
Friends Think James May Re-
Enter the Tobacco Business.
Jesse James, Jr., Kansas City Attorney.
JESSE JAMES.

Jesse James, lawyer, son of the famous bandit, and one of the best known men in Kansas City, was made defendant in a divorce suit filed yesterday by Stella J. James, who says they were married January 24, 1900.

Jesse and his wife were married while he was running a cigar store in the Junction building at Ninth and Main streets. It was not long after his celebrated trial in which he was acquitted of a charge of complicity in the Blue Cut train robbery. Jesse was one of the most talked of men in all the country in those days, and his cigar business prospered.

That he and his wife led a happy married life was the general opinion of their friends. In her petition, however, Mrs. James says that her husband has been getting homo late at night, and on these occasions has refused to tell his wife where he had been. The wife says that she is ill and under a doctor's care and without means of support. Their home is at 809 Elmwood avenue.

Friends of Jesse James have noted a change in his demeanor within the last few days. That he was troubled was apparent. Long ago he quit the cigar business, and for a time was the proprietor of a pawn shop. Then he began to study law, and after his graduation he began to practice in local courts and gave evidence of doing well. He devoted his attention largely to criminal business.

Only a few days ago Jesse confided to friends that he had decided to quit the law and intended to go on the road for the American Tobacco Company. It was Jesse's first intimation that he was not satisfied with the legal profession.

Jesse James was not at the Elmwood avenue address last night, and persons at the house said that Mrs. James was sick in bed and could not discuss the case.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

October 13, 1909

BEER FLOWS INTO SEWER.

Crowd Sees Foaming Ale Wasted.

A beer wagon, driven by Samuel Kroyousky of 1527 West Ninth street was struck by a Wabash train last night at Union avenue and Hickory street and was practically demolished. The barrels of liquor were broken open and a stream of beer poured into one of the catch basins. A big crowd gathered and watched the foaming beer escape.

The driver and team escaped injury.

Labels: , , , , ,

October 7, 1909

SWOPE'S BODY LIES IN STATE.

At 9 o'Clock This Morning Public
Will Be Admitted to Rotunda of
Library to Pay Last Tribute.

The body of Colonel Thomas H. Swope, Kansas City's great public benefactor, now lies in state in the rotunda of the public library building, Ninth and Locust streets. The body rests in a massive state casket with deep scroll mountings. The casket, copper lined, is made of the finest mahogany, covered with black cloth. Solid silver handles extend the full length on each side.

At 9'o'clock this morning the public will be admitted and given an opportunity to look for the last time upon the face of Kansas City's most beloved citizen. Last night the body was guarded by a cordon of police commanded by Sergeants T. S. Eubanks and John Ravenscamp. They will be relieved this morning by others. The police will be on guard until the funeral.

At 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon Mayor Crittenden accompanied by Police Commissioner R. B. Middlebrook and Aldermen O'Malley, Edwards and Wirtman from the upper house and Aldermen Morris and Gilman from the lower house of the council, went to Independence to receive Colonel Swope's body.

It was 4:10 o'clock when Mayor Llewellyn Jones of Independence, accompanied by the city council of that city, made formal delivery of the body. It was carried to the waiting hearse, by G. D. Clinton, J. Wesley Clement, H. A. Major, A. L. Anderson, J. G. Paxon and M. L. Jones, all citizens of Independence.

Ten mounted policemen, commanded by Sergent Estes of the mounted force, acted as convoy to this city. It was at first planned that the Independence officials should accompany the body as far only as their city limits. However, they came to this city and saw the casket placed in state in the library. Those who came from Independence were Mayor Jones and Aldermen E. C. Harrington, J. Wesley Clement. H. A. Major, M. L. Jones, A. L. Anderson and Walter Shimfessel.

Upon arriving at the public library six stalwart policemen removed the casket from the hearse and placed it on pedestals in the rotunda. After giving instructions to the police on guard, Mayor Crittenden and Commissioner Middlebrook left with the members of the council.

Only one relative from out of the city, Stuart S. Fleming of Columbia, Tenn., is at the Swope home in Independence. He arrived yesterday. Colonel Swope was his uncle. Last Friday night, James Moss Hunton, Mr. Fleming's cousin, died at the Swope home. A few hours after he received notice of his death, Mr. Fleming's wife passed away. Sunday night he received notice that his uncle, Colonel Swope, was dead.

"My mother, Colonel Swope's sister, is 77 years old," said Mr. Fleming yesterday. "She is prostrated and was unable to accompany me."

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

September 23, 1909

SET THE HOUSE ON FIRE.

Two Small Children Then Forget to
Tell Their Mother.

Ernest Smith, 4 years old, and Lucille Smith, 2 years old, set fire to the attic of their home, 3027 East Eighth street, yesterday morning. Closing the door, the children laughed and romped downstairs to where their mother was working at her household tasks two stories below.

The children played for a few minutes on the floor of the room in which their mother was working. Neither said anything to their mother about the blazing attic they had left behind. Mrs. Smith worked for ten minutes after the children came downstairs before she noticed the smell of smoke.

Suddenly the little girl said:

"Mamma, Earnest lighted a piece of paper and couldn't blow out the fire."

Neighbors noticed the smoke and flame coming from the roof of the house as Mrs. Smith began to investigate. By the time the fire engines arrived, a great deal of the furniture on the ground floor and the rug had been removed from the living room.

Dr. Charles W. Burrill, 3124 East Ninth street, ran upstairs to locate the fire. When he threw open the door to the attic room the flame flashed out on him. His face was blistered and his hair singed by the fire. His injuries are not serious.

B. G. Smith, the father of the children, is employed in the laboratory of the Snodgrass Drug Company. His loss is about $250. The damage to the house is small.

Labels: , , , ,

September 21, 1909

FRIENDSHIP ENDS IN
MURDER AND SUICIDE.

WILLIAM JACOBIA KILLS MRS.
SADIE STOLL AND HIMSELF.

Young Son of Woman Heard Quarrel
and Shooting -- Risks Life Try-
ing to Protect His
Mother.
Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, Murdered Woman.
MRS. SADIE BROWN STOLL.
Wife of Samuel F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company.

Murder and suicide ended a close friendship last night when William Jacobia, 600 East Ninth street, shot and killed Mrs. Sadie Brown Stoll, 3617 Tracy avenue, during a quarrel in the front hall of the Stoll home at 9 o'clock and a few minutes later committed suicide on the veranda of his wife's residence, 3217 Forest avenue.

Mrs. Stoll was shot through the heart and died at once. Jacobia shot himself in the head.

The only person in the house at the time Mrs. Stoll was murdered was her 14-year-old son Albert. What passed between the couple before the tragedy is not known definitely, but they were quarreling for nearly a half hour before Jacobia fired the shot. Albert Stoll heard part of the conversation between his mother and Jacobia, but was sent to his room by her just before the shooting.


BOY GETS A SHOTGUN.

That the young son expected serious trouble while Jacobia was there is shown by Jacobia's actions, which Albert Stoll graphically described to the police last night. Immediately after firing the shot which killed Mrs. Stoll, Jacobia started up the stairs, threatening to kill Albert, who had provided himself with a shotgun to protect his own life.

Either the shotgun frightened him or the desire to get away from the scene of his crime, Jacobia gave up the pursuit of the boy, and ran from the house, followed by Albert, who gave the alarm by crying for help.

But few minutes elapsed between the first and second shooting. It is only five blocks from the Stoll home at 3617 Tracy avenue to Mrs. Jacobia's suite in the Alabama apartment house, 3237 Forest avenue, and Jacobia ran all the way.


"I HAVE SHOT MRS. STOLL."

A balcony with no outside steps is front of her apartment, which is on the ground floor. Jacobia made his entrance by way of this balcony and in doing so had to climb over a stone balustrade which encloses it. As he entered with much agitation he said to his wife, who had come to let him in:

"Mamma, I had to come home."

She could see that he was greatly excited, and told him to sit down while she got him a glass of cold water.

"No, no!" he protested, excitedly, "I haven't time. I have just shot Mrs. Stoll. It is awful, it is awful."
William Jacobia; Killed His Friend and Then Himself.
WILLIAM JACOBIA.
Slayer of Mrs. Samuel F. Stoll, who committed suicide when the police traced him to his wife's home at 3217 Forest avenue.

Incoherently he was trying to tell her of the shooting when he heard the sound of steps outside.

"There are the officers coming for me," he said.

"Yes, but you will have to nerve yourself and be calm," she told him.

Mrs. Jacobia went to the door to let in Sergeant M. E. Cassidy and Patrolman Isaac Hull of No. 9 station, and as she did so her husband stepped out on the balcony.

"Where is he?" asked Sergeant Cassidy.


WIFE HEARS DEATH SHOT.

Just then they heard a single shot, and the three went hurriedly to the balcony door.

"There he lies," she answered, pointing to the dead body of her husband, prostrate on the stone floor of the porch. The husband of the murdered woman is S. F. Stoll of the Stoll-Moore Drug Company, formerly at Twelfth street and Grand avenue, and now located at 208 and 210 East Twelfth street. He was notified of the death of his wife by W. R. James, 3615 Tracy avenue. Sam Brown Stoll, 18 years old, the oldest son, was at a theater, and friends were unable to reach him by telephone.

According to the facts as told by Albert last night Jacobia telephoned yesterday afternoon about 3 o'clock and asked for Mrs. Stoll. Albert answered the telephone and upon recognizing Jacobia's voice hung up the receiver. About 8 o'clock last night he again called up and was answered by Mrs. Stoll, and a half hour later appeared at the house.

Mrs. Stoll fell dead in the hallway at the foot of the stairs. Her head was lying against the bottom step, while her feet pointed to the front door. Soon after Mr. Stoll reached home he asked neighbors and friends to inform the relatives of his wife of her death. J. H. Brown, a brother, who lives in Atchison, Kas., was informed of the tragedy.

"Tell all of them to come," said Albert, who was telling his father what should be done.

The account of the shooting as told by young Albert Stoll soon after the murder, while not full in all details, shows daring in a boy so young as far as his part was concerned. He said that he and his brother did not like Jacobia, and that a week ago Sam had purchased a shotgun with the intention of killing the man who was his mother's friend. The shotgun had been kept in their room until a day or so ago, when his mother removed it to the attic.

"Yesterday afternoon when Jacobia called up and asked for mamma, I hung up the receiver," said Albert. "Then about 8 tonight he called mother, and soon afterwards he came to the house. I was in my room at the time. When I heard mamma and Jacobia fussing I decided I would get the shotgun, which I did. I took a shell and after taking out the wad and shot I went down to the first landing and stood there.

HEARD HIS MOTHER SHOT.

"I told Jacobia to leave the house, that he did not have any business here anyway. At that he got mad at me and told me to keep still or he would beat me. Then to bluff him I picked up the shotgun and put a load into it. Mamma made me go to my room, saying she would get Jacobia awa.

"I'll not let that little pup talk to me that way," Jacobia is said to have repeated to Mrs. Stoll.

"Just as I reached the upper hall I heard the shot, and then mamma say, 'Albert, he shot me.' 'Yes, and I'll shoot him, too,' I heard Jacobia say as I was hurrying back downstairs. Jacobia was coming up the stairs, and knowing my shell was not good, I ran to my room and put a loaded shell in the gun and then came downstairs.

RAN AFTER JACOBIA.

"As I reached the head of the stairway Jacobia was going out the front door, and I ran down the steps and followed into the yard. He was then going up the street. I cried 'Help, help,' and someone across the street asked, 'What is the matter, Albert?' When I said mamma is shot nearly all of the people started to the house and I came back and called up papa, but he didn't answer. Then someone told the police.

"I wish I had shot him," Albert admitted.

"Oh, God, why didn't you shoot the scoundrel, boy?" Mr. Stoll asked of his son.

Albert insisted that he did not know what his mother and Jacobia were talking about. Whenever Albert endeavored to tell the police just what occurred, and how, Mr. Stoll, who was walking the floor of the lower rooms, would tell him to keep still. Mr. Stoll refused to answer any questions immediately after the murder.

HUSBAND STILL LOVED HER.

"I loved her with every drop of blood in my body," he said, "and I will not say anything against her. I would not say a word that would reflect upon her. Oh, God, why couldn't he have shot me?"

Not until Samuel Stoll, the elder son, came home after the performance at a theater, did he learn of the tragedy. As he hurried up the steps, he was met by J. A. Guthrie, a friend of the family.

"For God's sake, what's the matter?" he said with a perplexed face.

Then he saw the white shrouded figure in the parlor with the undertaker and his assistants standing near. Mr. Stoll, who saw him, threw his arms about the boy's neck and shouted:

"Your friend killed her, that's what he did. And you knew he was coming to see her all the time."

WHEN THE TWO FIRST MET.

Then both were hurried up the stairs by friends.

"I'll kill him myself," said the youth.

"He has done that to save you the trouble," said Mr. Guthrie. "He committed suicide just after he killed your mother."

Then the father upbraided the son for several minutes, but the youth declared he knew nothing about it. Then both began weeping hysterically, and were finally reconciled. But the father could not remain seated. He walked the floor in anguish.

"I knew the first day he saw my wife," he said. "One day when he was building those flats up on Forest avenue, he came in to use the telephone, and my wife met him at the door. He introduced himself, which was the beginning of their acquaintance. I began to get suspicious when I saw him at the house several times.

WAS TOLD TO WATCH WIFE.

"Somehow I had a suspicion that all was not right, and at times I felt sick. On one occasion I asked her about it, but she became angry and upbraided me so much that I felt almost humiliated. She went on occasional visits to Atchison, and I was suspicious every time that she left home.

"On one of the visits to Atchison, I found his picture in the close, and I was so angry when she came home that I could wait no longer. She flew into a rage, and I could do nothing but submit, not wishing to make the affair public.

"My feelings were again wrought to a high pitch when I received an anonymous letter, telling me I ought to watch my wife. I then determined to hire a detective agency to watch her, but after hiring two men I thought differently and canceled my contract with the firm.

"It has been that way for months until tonight when I was called to the telephone and was told that my wife had been shot. I won't harbor any ill will against her for my boys' sake. She was their mother.

Mrs. Stoll was a large woman with a rich mass of dark brown hair. Her face was full and her eyes were dark brown, which matched her olive complexion. She was considered one of the handsomest women in the neighborhood, and always attracted attention on the street by her dignified bearing. A dimple in her cheek was heightened by an engaging smile. She always dressed in clothes of the latest fashion, which while not always expensive, always were tasteful. She was 38 years old.

Mrs. Stoll was the daughter of J. P. Brown, a wealthy man who lived at Atchison, Kas., Her father died about three weeks ago. He was well known in and around Atchison being one of the most prominent men in that community. While the Stolls lived in Atchison Mr. Stoll conducted a drug store there.

JACOBIA 46 YEARS OLD.

William Jacobia, the dead man, was 46 years old and rather stout. Those who had known him in life said last night that he was apparently of a happy disposition, with rare conversational powers. He took uniformly with women and men, the former long remembering his bright wit and ready flow of small talk.

When Mr. and Mrs. Jacobia were married October 8, 1890, he was an engineer on a Kansas branch of the Missouri Pacific railway. Later he left the railroad in favor of the banking business and founded the Farmer's state bank, the stock of which was owned mostly by farmers at Corning, Kas., which was his birthplace. Seven years ago he sold out his interest in the Farmers' bank and came to Kansas City to enter the real estate business.

POLICE "DIDN'T KNOW."

The police notified Dr. B. H. Zwart, coroner, of the double crime and he in turn notified Deputy Coroner Dr. Harry Czarlinsky. The bodies of the murdered woman and suicide were sent to the Carroll - Davidson undertaking rooms by the deputy coroner.

The police who were stationed at the home of Mrs. Stoll and Mrs. Jacobia refused to give any information regarding the tragedy last night. Whenever any of them were asked who shot the woman or why he shot her or an y other question relative to the case the invariable answer was "I don't know."

One policeman was asked if the body lying in the front hall of the Stoll home was a man or woman, and he said, "I don't know."

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

August 4, 1909

START ON TROLLEY LINE.

From Kansas City to St. Joseph in
Fifty-Five Minutes.

Former State Senator Ernest Marshall of Saline county, while in Kansas City yesterday, said that within ten days graders will start work upon one of the proposed trolley lines from St. Joseph to Kansas City.

"This is the company which has its headquarters in St. Joseph," said Senator Marshall. "Nearly all the money we want is in sight. We will come into Kansas City over the Winner bridge piers. It will be forty-eight and a half miles from Ninth and Grand avenue here to Francis street in St. Joseph, and we will carry passengers from one street to the other in fifty-five minutes."

Labels: , , ,

July 21, 1909

AGED BRIDEGROOM DIES.

Veteran of 65 Married Woman of
27 Last May.

Broken alike in health and spirit without his bride of just two months, Henry C. Porter, the lame Civil war veteran, who at the age of 65 married Miss Carrie Clements, 27 years old, in the Moore hotel here May 10, returned to the scene of his nuptials July 10 last and found surcease from sorrow in death at the St. Mary's hospital Friday. On his advent in Kansas City, Porter pawned his watch for $9 in order to pay his room rent at the apartment house of Mrs. Mary A. Millichif at 1231 Walnut street.

"I am a broken down old man and the worst kind of a fool," Porter told Mrs. Millichif as he paid her the money. "I don't want pity; all I want is a little rest and time to think."

The body was taken to Wagner undertaking rooms. Attempts made by the proprietors of the establishment to locate Mrs. Porter have failed. Two brothers of the dead man, R. M. Porter of Williamston, Mich., and F. C. Porter of Englewood, Col., were notified by telegraph and they have replied to the effect that Porter had plenty of money and a pension of $45 a month. Had he lived until August 4 $138 would have been coming to him in accumulated pensions.

The old soldier first appeared here in the early part of last May when he broke into print with the announcement that although 65 years old, with his right leg missing and his right arm paralyzed, he was to marry Miss Clements, lately of Colorado Springs, who was fully a generation his junior.

The ceremony took place in the Moore hotel, Ninth and Central streets. The couple then departed on a tour of the East and were to sail around the Horn of San Francisco later.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

July 19, 1909

SIX MEN HELD UP
IN A SINGLE NIGHT.

IN EVERY INSTANCE ROBBERS
SECURE MONEY AND ESCAPE.

Five Highwaymen With Revolvers
Get Dollar Apiece From One Vic-
tim -- Diamonds and Watches
Among the Loot.

Six holdups occurred in Kansas City Saturday night and Sunday morning. In every case the robbers succeeded in getting money, and some of the victims gave up their watches.

Frank Serrett, 829 South Valley street, Kansas City, Kas., the first victim to complain to the police, reported that two men held him up in the alley between Main and Walnut on Ninth street. While one of the highwaymen searched his pockets, the other man kept him covered with a pistol A watch and $10 comprised the booty.

At 10 o'clock Saturday night George Mangoe, 115 1/2 Central street, Kansas City, Kas., reported that he had been robbed by two men, and his watch stolen. The robbery occurred at Ninth and Wyoming streets.

It took five men to stop and rob James Bone, 4413 Bell avenue, at about 11 p. m., at Forty-first and Bell avenue, at about 11 p. m., at Forty-first and Bell avenue. According to Bone, all of the robbers were armed with revolvers and held them in sight. He gave up $5 to the brigands.

A watch at $7 were taken from J. W. Brown, 1326 Grand avenue, at Thirteenth and Franklin streets by two men.

H. A. Lucius, 215 West Fourteenth street, reported to the police that he had been robbed or $50 near 2854 Southwest boulevard.

G. W. Shaw, Strong City, Kas., entered police headquarters early Sunday morning and informed the police that he had been robbed in front of a saloon near McGee and Third streets. He reported the loss of an Elk's tooth and two unset diamonds.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

July 13, 1909

THINKS RIVERS ARE
AT HIGHEST STAGE.

FORECASTER CONNOR NOW
LOOKS FOR FALL.

At Topeka There Was Fall of 0.7
of Foot and at St. Joseph the
Missouri Is Stationary.
Streets Flooded.
Junction of the Kaw and the Missouri Rivers, Looking Toward Kansas City, Missouri
SKETCH OF THE JUNCTION OF THE KAW AND MISSOURI RIVERS, LOOKING TOWARD KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI.

With a rise of over half a foot in the Missouri river yesterday, Forecaster Connor of the local weather bureau predicted a maximum stage of about 27.2 for this morning, which he believes from the information to hand will be the crest. Mr. Connor bases this prediction o n the assumption that there will be no more rains in the Kaw and Missouri river valleys.

The rise in the Missouri yesterday was rapid until 3 p. m. Since that hour it has remained stationary. This was taken by the observer to indicate that the mass of water due to recent rains had crested, and that now only the rise of the day before at Topeka and St. Joseph is to be felt here. At Topeka there was a fall of .7 of a foot during the day, while at St. Joseph the river was stationary.

The heavy rains at St. Joseph yesterday held the river up at that point, but the forecaster does not think they will influence the river there to any appreciable extent, and that by the evening it will show a good fall. The volume of water in the Missouri and Kaw rivers which must pass Kansas City, he asserts, will keep the river at a high stage for several days at least, although there is a possibility of a fall by this evening.

The West Bottoms are beginning to feel the flood now in earnest. The seepwater and sewage, together with the storm waters yesterday morning gave several sections of that district the appearance for awhile, at least, of being flooded by the river. In the "wettest block" several of the floors were under water for a couple of hours and many o f the business men and merchants in that neighborhood are ready to move if the water should go much higher.

Back water from the sewers yesterday covered sections of Mulberry, Hickory and Santa Fe street between Eighth and Ninth streets. Cellars in this district were all flooded.

The Cypress yards in the packing house district is a big lake. There are from two inches to several feet of water all over the railroad yards. Yesterday the Missouri Pacific had to run through eight inches of water at one place to get trains out from the Morris Packing Company plant. The railroad men say that they will run their trains until the water rises to such a height that the fires in the locomotives will be extinguished.

At the Exchange building at the stock yards several pumps were used to keep the basement free from water which started to come in Sunday night. Several of the cattle pens are flooded so they cannot be used and the Morris plant is almost surrounded by water. It is believed that at the present rate the water will be up to the sidewalks at the Morris plant this morning. It would take six feet more, however, to stop operations at this plant.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

July 11, 1909

BUILT FIRST CITY HOSE CART.

William Henry Brundage Dies at
Age of 64.

William Henry Brundage, who built his own factory the first hose wagon used by the Kansas City fire department, died at his home at 2817 East Ninth street of a complication of diseases at an early hour yesterday morning. He was 64 years old. Mr. Brundage is survived by a widow and a son, W. A. Brundage, who is a traveling salesman for the Anderson Coupling Company.

Coming to Kansas City in the spring of 1870, Mr. Brundage established a wagon factory at 507 Grand avenue in the following year. He manufactured all kinds of equippages, among them hose carts and trucks. When the old volunteer fire company was done away with and the new devices installed Mr. Brundage got the first order for fire trucks and is said to have supplied a very superior article for that time.

Twenty years ago the factory on Grand avenue burned and a new one was built at 1420-22-24 McGee street, where Mr. Brundage was a member of the Commercial Club. After his retirement from business he traveled in the South for his health. He returned a few weeks ago. He has a home at 1849 Independence avenue.

At the time of his marriage in 1868 Mr. Brundage at that time was paymaster in the army under General Curtis.

All attempts to locate the son, who is traveling in Kansas, failed yesterday. The Anderson company, however, assured Mrs. Brundage that he would be found some time today.

Labels: , , , , , ,

July 6, 1909

CHILD HURT TRYING
TO SAVE HER SISTER

ETHEL AND NORINE AINS-
WORTH INJURED BY CAR.

When 6-Year-Old Girl Was Caught
by Fender, Sister, 9 Years Old,
Grabbed Her -- Both
Will Recover.

ETHEL AND NORINE AINSWORTH.

In an effort to save her sister, Norine, 6 years old, from impending death beneath the wheels of a street car at Eighth street and Tracy avenue, yesterday afternoon, Ethel Ainsworth, 9 years old, was struck by the fender and knocked several yards away on the asphalt pavement. The younger girl was rolled beneath the car, and when it was stopped was found wedged under the motor casing of the forward truck. The child was taken from beneath the car after about five minutes' hard work, during which operations were directed by T. P. Wood, a passenger.

Norine's injuries are serious. The child's head was cut, her right arm dislocated, her abdomen injured and the skin torn from her limbs. Ethel's injuries were not so serious. She suffered a slight concussion of the brain, a scalp wound and injuries to her side, arms and limbs.

TRIED TO SAVE SISTER.

Norine and Ethel are the children of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Ainsworth of 1312 East Ninth street. About 5:30 o'clock they left a store at Eighth street and Tracy avenue. Ethel carried the bundles and Norine led the way.

In crossing the street they avoided a westbound street car, but Norine failed to see eastbound car No. 142 on the Independence avenue line, manned by Motorman L. A. Towhouser and Conductor W. H. Donahue. Norine did not hear the warning cry of the motorman, but her sister Ethel did. Norine was struck by the fender and felled. The fender was forced up and the child rolled beneath it. Dropping her parcels, Ethel grabbed for her sister. Just then the front end of the car struck the elder girl, hurling her unconscious into the street.

Motorman Towhouser applied the air and reversed the power, coming to a quick stop. Women in the car fainted when they heard the child's cry.

Volunteers were many in the effort to rescue the imprisoned child. She lay in one of the sunken spots in the paving and it is believed this had much to do with preventing her hips being crushed. She did not lose consciousness, and did much to assist her rescuers in extricating her. The child was seized by the frantic father and carried to her home a block away, where doctors attended her injuries.

DAZED CHILD FORGOTTEN.

Half an hour later neighbors took Ethel home. She was dazed from the shock, but the first question she asked was as to the condition of her baby sister. When told that she would recover, she smiled her satisfaction. The girl had been lost sight of in the excitement which followed the accident, and it was not until neighbors found her wandering about in a dazed condition that it became generally known she had been injured.

"I did not see the car until it was right on us," said Ethel last evening. "Sister was in front of the car, and I knew the motorman could not stop it. I tried to grab her, and then felt something strike me. I do not remember how I got home."

Motorman Towhouser declared that the accident was unavoidable. He said that if his car had not been running slowly the child probably would have been killed.

"I managed to stop the car within ten feet, and this I think saved the child's life," he said.

Labels: , , , , ,

June 24, 1909

WANT A MILE OF QUARTERS.

Masons Solicit for New Home.

A unique collection ins being made by Mason just now, who have set about raising funds for building and furnishing a new temple at Ninth and Harrison streets.

Strips of perforated card have been sent to the places of business of all members, on which are places for twelve coins, and printed on them the legend: "We Want One Mile of Quarters."

There are places for twelve silver quarters on each one foot strip. when the mile of quarters is measured up it will be found to contain $15,840.

Labels: , ,

June 17, 1909

FARE LIFE OF CAR
ENDED BY SUICIDE.

RUNS AWAY AND DASHES IT-
SELF AGAINST POLE.

Deliberately Leaves Barn and Makes
Wild Run Down Ninth Street
Until It Jumps Track at
Wyandotte Street.

Roanoke car No. 604 committed suicide last night at 7:30 o'clock by running down Ninth from Washington street and dashing itself against the trolley pole at the southeast corner of Ninth and Wyandotte streets. So carefully was the act committed that no one was hurt and the tracks were left clear, but the car was smashed to kindling.

No. 604 returned from a hard day's work and was put into the car barn at Ninth and Wyandotte streets by Motorman Floyd Dyer, 809 West Twenty-first street. It was raining and there was a despondency in the air, but the car manifested no signs of the deep design it was nursing within its breast.
INTENT ON SUICIDE
Fifteen minutes later, when none of the street car men was looking, it poked its nose out of the barn and started, gathering speed as it progressed. A girl clerking at a laundry agency across the street from the barn saw it start.

"There was no one on or near the car," she said. "It came out deliberately like a living thing, and ran away before anyone had time to stop it."
Two street car men saw the runaway after it had gone half a block and ran after it. Fortunately there were no cars on the track in front and the rain had driven pedestrians from the streets.
Detective Andy O'Hare, who was waiting for a car at Ninth and Wyandotte streets, saw the car bearing down upon him. The trolley was threshing wildly although it had been on the wire when 604 left the barn.
DASHES ITSELF TO PIECES.
Grinding the speed limit beneath its wheels, the suicide leaped the track at Wyandotte steret, instead of making the turn, and precipitated itself sideways against the granitoid walk at the west side of the Boston Drug Company, on the southeast corner.
It was brought to a stop by an iron trolley pole, and the bed of the car left the trucks and fell sideways on the walk, completely blocking passage. Only two windows in the drug store were damaged. Every window in the car ws broken, the front end was ripped open and a few solid planks were left.
The wreck was entirely clear of the tracks and traffic was not delayed. Dyer, the motorman, is positive that he set the brake before leaving the car.
"Clear case of suicide, probably due to despondency brought on by the whether," was the verdict of the wreckers who cleared the debris away.

Labels: , , , , , ,

June 13, 1909

KANSAS CITY'S CROSSING SQUAD.

A Fine Appearing Body of Men.

CROSSING SQUAD OF THE POLICE DEPARTMENT.

It doesn't take the oldest inhabitant to remember the time when the crossing squad, which now numbers twenty-nine men, was limited to one or two members. At one time Sergeant James Hogan was the whole squad himself with the exception of a patrolman who has been stationed at the Junction for more than twenty years. Kansas City cannot boast of the largest squad in the country, but its members are noted for their general efficiency.

In the mind of the ordinary person the crossing man leads a life of ease. In fact, the majority of the police department envy the crossing men until they have been given a trial. Then it is found that a man must know the location and name of all the office buildings, the streets in every section of the city, the routes of the different street cars and most of the public men.

"Can you tell me the way to the depot?" is a question heard every five minutes.

"Where is the nearest shoe store?" asks a woman.

"Do you know Charley Smith?" asks a farmer who feels hurt when the crossing man shakes his head. "You see he was a great feller to make acquaintances in our town, and I was sure you would know him."

Answering questions, directing the careless drivers who persist in driving on the wrong side of the street and dodging street cars on his own account, are only mere incidents. The constant strain on the system is generally the cause for a man's departure from the squad. Some men ask to be relieved in less than a week.

When the cable cars formerly ran on Ninth street and when some one was injured nearly every week as the cars swept around the corner at high speed, a patrolman was always stationed at that particular spot. The second patrolman to be placed at a crossing was James Hogan, who commenced patrolling the corner at Eleventh and Walnut streets, just eleven years ago.

Four years ago the crossing squad was increased from eight members, who worked from 8 o'clock in the morning until about 7 o'clock in the evening. Patrolman Hogan on account of his seniority and his general knowledge was made a sergeant of the squad.

Two years ago the squad was increased to fourteen members and more crossing were included in the list. But the hours were long and the men asked to be relieved. At last the problem of long hours was solved by Sergeant Hogan, who recommended that the squad be doubled and the hours shortened. Fourteen of the men now go to work at 8 o'clock in the morning and are relieved at 1 o'clock in the afternoon by the other division. After six hours of rest they report at police headquarters and are assigned to the parks and theaters. On the following day the second squad are given the same hours and report at 8 o'clock in the morning, as did the opposite squad on the previous day.

Sergeant Hogan, who has been on the force for nineteen years, probably has a better general knowledge of Kansas City than any other man. One glance through an information guide can tell him whether the pamphlet is up to date or not.

"I don't see the name of the Sharp of finance building," he informed a book dealer the other day when his opinion was asked in regard to the reliability of a guide recently issued. He also knows the name of every street in both Kansas Citys and places of general interest. With such a leader it isn't any wonder that the crossing squad is rated as highly efficient.

Names of the officers, from left to right:

First row -- Crowley, Kennedy, Quayle, Darnell, Rogers, Kincaid.
Second row -- Kearns, Keys, Madigan, Harkenberg, Doman, Nichols.
Third Row -- Lillis, O'Roark, Noland, McCormick, Briden, Jackson.
Fourth Row -- Roach, Coffey, J. T. Rogers, Ryan, McFarland, Hoskins.
Fifth Row -- Hodges, Koger, Sergeant Hogan, Zirschky, Wilhite.

Labels: , , , , , ,

June 5, 1909

YOEMEN TO MINNEAPOLIS.

Two Hundred Members Will Parade
Tonight to Special Train.

A parade of 200 members of the Brotherhood of American Yoemen will take place at 8:30 tonight, preliminary to t heir departure for Minneapolis, Minn., to attend the national conclave. The parade will take the route from the hall, 1013 Holmes street, to Fifteenth street to Grand avenue, then to Twelfth street and over to Main street, where it will turn north to Ninth. Cars for the depot will be boarded at the junction.

In the party going North will be the young women's military drill team, young men's military drill team and the degree staff. They have chartered a special train for the trip.

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

May 20, 1909

KNOCKS ACID FROM HAND.

Girl Thwarts Young Man's Appar-
ent Attempt at Self-Destruction.

C. S. Brown raised a bottle of carbolic acid to his lips in the Union depot yesterday afternoon, but before he could swallow any of the drug Miss Hilo Pickerell, of St. Joseph, knocked the bottle from his hand. A depot patrolman took Brown to No. 2 police station, but on the intervention of Thomas McLane, a St. Joseph shoe salesman, and George Pickerell, he was not locked up. Miss Pickerell told the police that twice before she had knocked carbolic acid bottles from Brown's hand. Brown in an engraver and until one month ago lived in St. Joseph. Recently he has been staying at the Monarch hotel, Ninth and Central streets. He had gone to the depot to see the Pickerells on a train for St. Joseph.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

April 12, 1909

SOLDIERS GO TO CHURCH.

Third Regiment Attends Services at
Central Methodist Episcopal.

Following its annual custom, the Third regiment of the Missouri national guard attended the morning Easter services at Central Methodist Episcopal church, south, Eleventh street and the Paseo. They turned out about 350 strong under command of Colonel Cusil Lechtman and the regimental and company officers. Dr. G. M. Gibson, president of the Central College for Young Women at Lexington, delivered the sermon.

After the services the regiment paraded in full dress north on the Paseo to Ninth street, west on Ninth to Grand avenue, south on Grand to Fourteenth street and east on Fourteenth street to the armory at Fourteenth street and Michigan avenue.

Labels: , , , , , , , ,

April 11, 1909

DEATH OF A PIONEER.

Dr. Thomas W. Radford Came to
Missouri in 1858.

Dr. Thomas W. Radford, 80 years old and a resident of this city since 1880, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. George W. Matthews, 3112 Garner avenue, yesterday at noon.

Dr. Radford was born in Shelbyville, Ky. He graduated in medicine from a college in Louisville, and practiced there for several years. He was for a short time surgeon in a military school at Drenner Springs, Ky., where James G. Blaine was one of the teachers. Four years after his graduation, he decided to come West and visited Kansas City in the spring of 1858. The town didn't seem to be a good location to him then, so he moved to Fayette, Howard county, Mo., and settled there with his wife and slaves.

His practice grew, and soon he and his horse, "Physic," were well known all over the county. The war came on, but Dr. Radford did not enlist with either side, staying at home and attending to his patients, although frequently interferred with by guerillas. That Dr. Radford earned the esteem of his neighbors during these years is shown by the fact that immediately after the war he was elected three times to the office of county treasurer.

In 1880 he moved to Kansas City and opened a downtown office. He continued in practice here until fifteen years ago, when he retired. He was well known to many families in the city.

Dr. Radford attended the First Christian church for many years, but lately had been a regular communicant of the Independence Boulevard Christian church. A widow, seven children, nine grandchildren and two great-grandchildren survive. One son is T. J. Radford, a druggist at Ninth and Locust streets, and another, C. M. Radford of the Radford-Powell Shoe Company.

Funeral services will be held at 3 o'clock this afternoon from the home. Burial at Elmwood cemetery.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

April 4, 1909

OKLAHOMA COUPLE CAUGHT.

Nellie Wylie, 13, of Woodward, Ran
Away With Man of 30 -- Both
Arrested Here.

Three weeks ago Nellie May Wylie, 13 years old, disappeared from her country home near Woodward, Ok. At the same time George Lovett, 30 years old, who had been known to pay the girl some friendly attention, also disappeared.

No trace whatever could be found of the missing girl until recently, when a sister at Woodward got a letter from her postmarked at Broken Bow, Neb. To that she had signed the name of Mrs. Abraham Whistler." The girl's father, L. A. Wylie, placed the matter in the hands of the sheriff at home, and a wire sent to Broken Bow brought the information that the pair had left there and had directed that their mail be sent to Kansas City.

About 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon Patrolman J. R. Robeson of No. 6 station arrested the couple near the postoffice, Ninth street and Grand avenue. To her uncle, E. L. Wylie, who came on from Woodward, his niece is said to have confessed that she and Lovett had not married. She will be taken home this morning by the uncle. Lovett is locked up at police headquarters for investigation.

Labels: , , , , ,

April 3, 1909

WOMEN FIGHT TO SEE
BOY CRUSHED BY CAR.

HYSTERICAL MOTHERS THINK
INJURED CHILD THEIR OWN.

Strong Men Weep as Jimmie
Palermo, Whose Father Saw
Him Hurt, Is Taken From
Under the Wheels.

While running across the street car tracks on Eighth street near Forest avenue about 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, "Jimmie" Palermo, 5 years old, was run down by Independence avenue car 247, westbound, and injured to such an extent that both of his legs had to be amputated above the knee. The operation was performed at the general hospital immediately after the accident. Dr. J. Park Neal, who amputated the boy's legs, reported last night that he had survived the operation in a marvelous manner for one so young, and that he had a fighting chance for his life.

The boy is a son of Salvatore Palermo, an Italian grocer and butcher at 1103 East Eighth street, who lives on the second floor of 1103. The father, with Mack Carter, his butcher, saw the accident. The father ran to the scene, but became frantic when he saw his child pinned down by the front trucks of the car, and had to be taken away.

CROWD WEEPS AT SIGHT.

Two mothers, who thought that the child might be theirs, fought with tiger like ferocity with the crowd until they got to where they could get a look at the pale face of the little fellow.

The boy lay in such a position that he could not be moved until the car was "jacked up." The wrecking crew arrived in a few minutes, and with the aid of volunteers, the car tracks were elevated sufficiently. The boy's arm slipped to his side, and three marbles fell from his nerveless grasp.

"Take hold gently, men, and lift the boy out," said the foreman of the wrecking crew as the ambulance stretcher arrived.

"I just can't do it. I have seen enough to break my heart," said a big workman with sleeves rolled to the elbows, exposing a pair of muscular brown arms. He leaned against a trolley pole and wept bitterly.

As the ambulance was leaving another mother of the neighborhood arrived and battled with the dense crowd to get a look at the injured boy. Every woman in the crowd was crying, as were some of the men, and little brothers and sisters and playmates of the boy screamed with fright and grief.

FATHER SAW THE ACCIDENT.

"Mr. Palermo and I were standing in the door of his store when the accident happened," said Mack Carter, the butcher at the store. "We saw little Jimmie as he started to cross the street from the north to the south side about half way between the alley and Forest avenue. When he saw the car he made a motion as if to turn back. The motorman had slowed down at first, but put on speed again. It looked as if he calculated for the boy to cross the tracks before the car reached him, but Jimmie became confused and was struck by the fender and knocked across the track. It looked like an accident to me."

The grief in the Palermo home was tragic. Between sobs, prayers were said in Italian, and supplication made to Heaven to preserve the boy's life.

SNITCH LATE, BUT THERE.

While the family was in the midst of its grief a stranger appeared. Taking a card from his pocket he said, giving his name:

"Here is my card. I am a lawyer, but I got here a too late to see the accident. Send someone out into the street and get the boy's cap and those marbles. They are excellent evidence before a jury. Get the exact time of the accident , the number of the car and all the witnesses you can. I would like to handle this case for you."

Later in the evening Patrolmen William L. Cox and W. H. Schickhardt boarded car 247 and after riding to the end of the line arrested the conductor, H. E. Stoutz, 4100 East Ninth street, and the motorman, J. E. Warnike, 4600 Independence avenue. At police headquarters they made no statement and were ordered held for investigation, without bond, by Captain Walter Whitsett.

Representatives of the street car company insisted that a charge be placed against their men. Later in the evening an information was secured charging them with manslaughter in the fourth degree, a rather unusual charge while the boy was still living. They were taken to the home of Justice James H. Richardson, 2117 Prospect avenue, and arraigned on that charge. The men were then released on bond signed by representatives of their company. Their preliminary will be later. If the boy does not die, the charge will have to be changed.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

March 17, 1909

FIRE ROUTS HOTEL GUESTS.

Women, Thinly Garbed and Some in
Night Gowns, Rush for Safety
When Alarm Is Given.

Nearly 200 guests of the Hotel Cosby, Ninth street and Baltimore avenue, were routed out of bed at 2 o'clock this (Wednesday) morning by an alarm of fire, which started in the basement of the Linsay Light Company, 113 West Ninth street.

Men half dressed, women with only cloaks over them and a few frightened ones garbed in their flimsy night gowns, rushed to the street entrances of the hotel at the first clang of fire bells.

At 2:30 this morning the hotel seemed to be in no great danger, although the firemen were still fighting the flames.

Everyone was ordered out of the building when the first alarm of fire was given, and there was a a scampering in the rooms and halls that finally resulted in a stampede.

Members of nearly all the theatrical companies playing in Kansas City this week are among the guests at the Cosby, but the major portion of the register is composed of out-of-town merchants and transients.

Many women, after the first fright, began to "pack up" their prized wearing apparel and cherished souvenirs, but at an early hour this morning it was not thought that anything will be damaged in the hotel section of the block.

The cause of the fire is not known. William Ofkelh, a cook in Joe Ziegler's saloon, 109 West Ninth street, discovered the fire and turned in the alarm.

Labels: , , ,

February 27, 1909

WELL, WELL, IT WAS
THE OLD TOWN WELL.

ACCIDENT TO WAGON REVEALS
LONG-HIDDEN LANDMARK.

Supplied Part of Kansas City With
Water 44 Years Ago, When
There Were No Meters
to Watch.

When a heavily-laden wagon broke through the asphalt paving at the corner of Tenth and McGee streets yesterday afternoon and the rear wheels sank into a hole to the hubs little damage resulted. There was a general outpouring of reminiscences, however, from old-timers who witnessed the accident that made the incident an interesting story, for the hole into which the wheels sank is what remains of a well from which the pioneers of Kansas City obtained their drinking water in the early '70s.

Of the history of the old well, J. F. Spalding, president of the Spalding Commercial college and a pioneer of Kansas City, said:

"That hole is the old well which was sunk by Thomas Smart forty-four years ago. Smart purchased the forty acres of Ninth and Fourteenth streets and laid out an addition to Kansas City. There was a lack of good drinking water on the hill and Colonel Smart dug the well at the corner of Tenth and McGee. It was eighty feet deep and contained the finest of water. The settlers of the new addition used the water from the well for years. Finally it was abandoned and partly filled. Later it was cut down when the hill was graded for the old Tenth street cable line. Still later it was covered with an old stone slab and the pavers went right over it. I had almost forgotten about it until I saw that wagon break through there and then I recalled it at once. It was one of the city's landmarks in her infant days."

The hole caused by the wagon disclosed the walls of the old well. The pavement covering it was not more than three-quarters of an inch thick and the wonder is that it did not give away under heavy traffic before.

Labels: , , , , , , ,

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
Share on Facebook
Get the Book
Vintage Kansas City Stories ~ Early 20th Century Americana as Immortalized in The Kansas City Journal
Vintage
Kansas City Stories


More Books

SYNDICATE

Get this feed on your RSS reader

The History and Heritage of Vintage Kansas City in Books
Vintage Kansas
City Bookstore

Powered by Blogger

Vintage Kansas City.com

Vintage Antique Classics ~ Vintage Music, Software, and more Time Travel Accessories

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory