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February 4, 1910

PATRONYMICS OF THE GREAT.

Sly Attempt of Wrongdoers to En-
list Official Sympathy.

"Did it ever occur to you," asked Inspector Edward P. Boyle last night, "how many men when arrested will take the name of the chief of police, the police judge or some other official with whom they have to come in contact? They hope to gain sympathy by that ruse. We got a man yesterday for horse stealing, and, by gosh, he gave the name of Edward P. Boyle, my full name. He is in the county jail now under my name, but when we looked him up in the National Bureau of Identification, we find that he has a goodly supply of names."

"Boyle" was arrested by L. C. Barber, a motorcycle policeman, on complaint of of the Kirby Transfer Company, Missouri and Grand avenues. It appears that he rented a horse and wagon from Kirby to do a huckster business and disposed of the rig.

"Boyle's" picture is in the book sent out by the National Bureau of Identification at Washington. He appears there under the name of James J. O'Neil, which, bu the way, is the name of a former chief of police of Chicago. He also bears the names of Edward Riley and Edward Connors, the last being believed by the police to be his. He has done time in the Rochester, N. Y., Industrial school, the Elmira, N. Y., reformatory, and two years in the Auburn, N. Y., penitentiary. He was five years in Elmira. The man of many "police" names also has done short terms elsewhere.

When Hugh C. Brady was police judge there hardly was a week that some bum did not give the name of "Hugh Brady, sir, yer honor."

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February 3, 1910

KANSAS RABBIT HAIR YARN.

Angora Breed Thrives There and
New Industry May Result.

"Kansas may soon furnish the hair for the very fine Angora rabbit yarn which is now imported from France," said H. Lee Mallory, a manufacturer of New York city, at the Hotel Baltimore last night. Mr. Mallory and his wife are on their way to the coast.

"The finest yarns at present are those of the Angora rabbits. These yarns are woven into the very expensive jersey, or sweater coats, and other articles of apparel. It is a silky yarn, much softer than any other, and very warm. Next to the Angora rabbit comes the llama of South America, the India cashmere and the Angora goat. A few years ago a Kansan happened to be in France at the same time I was, and he took home some of their Angora rabbits. They thrived in Kansas, and the hair he sent me last year was fully equal to the imported hair.

"The automobile is responsible for the popularity of the sweater or jersey coats and costumes," continued Mr. Mallory. "The manufacturers are now turning out complete suits, consisting of helmet caps, or hoods, coats, mittens and slippers. Slumber robes have also been added to the list of articles for the benefit of those who wish to sleep in the open. Dressed in these garments, a person could almost brave a trip to the North pole.

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January 30, 1910

TO BUILD THEATER HERE.

Morris Says Kansas City Will Have
Independent Vaudeville.

"We are here." This was the positive declaration of William Morris, of William Morris, Inc., of New York city, last night, in speaking of the probability of his company establishing a vaudeville house in Kansas City.

"Walter Holt Seeley, our architect," continued Mr. Morris, "will be here from San Francisco in a week or ten days, and he will overlook such sites as are submitted to him and also examine all propositions for theatrical buildings which may be made in the near future.

"Our company has been reaching Westward and we are coming to Kansas City. We need Kansas City worse than it needs us. We need it to break a jump and we believe the people of Kansas City need us because we will give them a class of vaudeville such as no one else is able to furnish.

"We have been looking over the Kansas City field for some time and it is only because of other business that we have not established a house here. We are going to have a theater which will be convenient to every street car line in the city and then when we put on our bills I know that we will get the patronage that we deserve."

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January 26, 1910

MABEL HITE LOVES TO WRITE.

But Refused to Make Out Check for
Furs She Says Were Not Stylish.

NEW YORK, Jan. 25. -- Mabel Hite, formerly of Kansas City, wife of "Mike" Donlin, the former Giant ball player, while not busy "coaching" her husband's "game," loves to write checks. She admitted this in a little by-play while on the witness stand in the Third district municipal court. She was defendant in an action brought for $185 for a fur neck piece and muff ordered last September for her mother. That Mabel's checks are always honored was not questioned. She simply refused to write one, although wanting to, when the furs, she says, did not prove to be of the latest styles. Mrs. Donlin's counsel admonished her several times not to lose her temper during cross-examination.

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January 19, 1910

HEADLESS CAP'S JOURNEY.

Is Making Tour by Tag Via Express
Companies' Lines.

LIBERTY, MO., Jan. 18. -- This express office here received last night the old cap started from Fort Worth, Tex., several months ago. It originally had but one tag on it which reads, "I wish to see the world." The tag was dated and asked that it be returned July 4, 1910. It had thirty tags on it representing different stopping places. It had been to Portland, Ore., New York, and many other large cities. At Liberty it had its first Adams Express is placed on it. After it has run on company's lines for a while it is changed to another. From Liberty it was sent to Cameron Junction.

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January 17, 1910

KANSAS CITY GIRLS
FOR PICKLE FACTORY.

Plant Will Be Only Stage Affair,
But Beauties Will Handle
Real Pickles.

"Working in a pickle factory" will no longer be a joke with a score of pretty young women from various walks of life in Kansas City who will hold forth at the Orpheum theater this week as employes of a pickle factory in Helen Grantley's sketch, "The Agitator," the top liner on the bill. They will handle real pickles and after a week's training and rehearsals and their participation in the show this week it is predicted they will have no difficulty in getting work as experts in the business, should they so desire.

The sketch is based in part on the female suffrage movement. The scene in which the young women work is one in which Miss Grantley makes her plea for a strike. Of course the girls follow their leader, the strike is called and after the usual trials and tribulations of strikers, is won. The sketch created somewhat of a sensation in New York, the play there being made more realistic by the fact that the girls who counterfeited the pickle trimmers were really striking shirt waist makers.

Miss Grantley came here with her company a week ago ahead of her billing so that she might rehearse the score of young women supers, some of whom will be carried with the company at the close of the week.

An advertisement brought half a hundred replies and out of this number Miss Grantley selected a score of girls. Among those selected were stenographers, two high school girls who were "just dying" to go on the stage even if they had to work in a "pickle factory," a telephone girl who had often wished that she might appear behind the footlights, three art students who wanted the work for the "atmosphere," later to be transferred to canvas, and a couple of girls who had not worked anywhere, but who sought this as a stepping stone to the stage.

It was an ungainly and awkward squad, as they lined up for the first rehearsal. Only one of the girls had ever been back of the scenes, and she was fairly lionized by the others. The turn was not a difficult one, and after the story of the play was told, the girls quickly appreciated the points which it was desired to emphasize.

"A trained chorus direct from New York City could not have done any better," declared Miss Grantley last evening. "They still have another rehearsal, but they are letter perfect now and I am sure that some of them will come with me when I leave the city."

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December 13, 1909

STODDARD MEETS STODDARD.

Joplin Drummer and Utica Salesman
Akin in Seventeenth Century.

"Mr. Stoddard, I want you to meet Mr. Stoddard," said Clerk George Mong at the Coates house last evening as he introduced Rock Stoddard of Joplin, Mo., to G. L. Stoddard of Utica, N. Y. The latter had just signed the hotel register, and Rock Stoddard was waiting to pay out.

Both Stoddards are traveling men and it developed that back several centuries their forefathers were related closely. In the seventeenth century three brothers crossed the ocean from England. One settled in New York state, the other in Connecticut and the other in Canada. The descendants of the brother who settled in Connecticut and New York fought in the revolutionary war.

G. L. Stoddard, whose home is in Utica, N. Y., said that the brothers who settled in the States finally drifted together in New York state. Several of the descendants have since gone West and South. He is a descendant of the brother who settled in Connecticut. Rock Stoddard, whose home is at Joplin, is a descendant of the brother who went to Canada.

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December 5, 1909

FORMING AN AERO CLUB.

Kansas City Men Anxious to Join
Advanced Organization.

"George M. Myers has just informed me that he has received the names of twenty-five Kansas City men who are anxious to become charter members of the Aero Club, which is to be formed Monday afternoon at the offices of the Priests of Pallas," said K. L. Bernard of New York city, who is interested in aviation meets to be held in this country next year, and who represents a number of European aviators and manufacturers of heavier than air machines.

"Kansas City people are more enthusiastic over this proposition than I dreamed they would be," said Mr. Bernard. "I will remain here until Tuesday or Wednesday of next week or until the club has been formed and application for the membership made to the Aero Club of America. It is necessary for the club to have a membership of forty, but it is probable that there will be 100 Kansas Cityans as charter members of this club."

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November 20, 1909

SUFFRAGIST TO SPEAK HERE.

Mrs. Anna Spencer Guest of Honor
at Dinner November 29.

Mrs. Anna Garlin Spencer of New York, now engaged in female suffrage work, will be the guest of honor Monday, November 29, at the monthly dinner given at Morton's south side hall by the Woman's Dining Club.

Mrs. Spencer organized the first school of philanthropy in America, and is now one of its lecturers. She also organized the summer school of ethics at the University of Wisconsin.

At this dinner Mrs. Spencer will talk upon the growth of the suffrage movement in America and Europe. Both sides of the question will be discussed.

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November 18, 1909

PROPOSE $14,000 HOME FOR
THE CRITTENTON MISSION.

Fireproof Building at Thirtieth and
Woodland Will Be Ready by Next
Summer.

Captain J. H. Waite, at the head of the Florence Crittenton mission and home, located in an old dwelling at 3005 Woodland avenue, made the statement last night that by next summer the institution hopes to be in a new fireproof building. It is to be erected, he said, on the corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue, where they own 156 feet fronting on the latter street.

"The foundation should be laid within the next ninety days," said Captain Waite, "so that work on the super-structure may begin in the spring. We have planned a building to cost between $10,000 and $14,000. As we want to make it absolutely fireproof and of reinforced concrete, we anticipate that the cost will be nearer $14,000. It is a grand institution and has done and is doing the noblest kind of work."

The Florence Crittenton Mission and Home for unfortunate girls was started in this city on February 4, 1896, with an endowment of $3,000 from Charles N. Crittenton, the millionaire philanthropist of New York, who died suddenly in San Francisco Tuesday. It first was situated on the northeast corner of Fourth and Main streets in a large three-story brick building which now has been torn down to make space for a city market.

After being at the original location for a short time it was decided to abandon the downtown mission work and establish a home. The institution then moved to Fifteenth street and Cleveland avenue into rented property. In June, ten years ago, the property at the southeast corner of Thirtieth street and Woodland avenue was purchased for the home.

"A debt hangs over our heads for some time," said Miss Bertha Whitsitt, superintendent of the home yesterday, "but now we have 156 feet frontage on Woodland avenue on which we expect soon to erect our new building.

"Since the beginning of the mission and home," continued Miss Whitsitt, "we have cared for 582 young women, the majority of them with children. Just during the last year we cared for twenty-eight young women and twenty-three children. When totaled the number of days spent in the home by all of them amounts to 4,612, which we record as so many days of charity work."

Captain J. H. Waite, who has been at the head of the home for many years, said that Mr. Crittenton had given the home and mission $3,000 to start on. When the property at 3005 Woodland was purchased the National Florence Crittenton Home at Washington gave about $1,500 toward buying and improving the property.

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November 6, 1909

CIGARETTES IN 10,000 LOTS.

That Is the Way Louis Curtiss,
Architect, Buys Them.

Louis Curtiss, the architect, is not the champion cigarette smoker of Kansas City, but there is a well grounded belief that he is the champion individual buyer. Asked as to the source of his cigarette supply yesterday, the architect said that he had made his order by a New York manufacturer and made his purchases in lots of 10,000.

"The thousand cigarettes," said Curtiss, "will last me ten months. That would indicated that I smoke a thousand cigarettes a month, but I don't. I give about 25 per cent of them away. I figure that I smoke twenty-five cigarettes each day.

"Hurt me? Not at all. That is the secret of having them made to order. My cigarettes are manufactured of the mildest tobacco on the market and are free from dope. There is nothing in them but pure tobacco. Years ago I used to smoke a readymade brand and frequently suffered from sore throat. Then I turned to the tailor-made article. Cheaper, too. These are as fine a cigarette as a man ever smoked, and they cost, in 10,000 lots, only $18 a thousand. That sounds dirt cheap to me."

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November 3, 1909

NEW THEATER OPENS SUNDAY.

Musical Comedy, Vaudeville With
Burlesque Tinge at the Gayety.

The new Gayety theater will open Sunday afternoon with a matinee by the "College Girls" Company. The house is to be devoted to musical comedy and vaudeville with a burlesque tinge. It is owned by the Kansas City Theater Company of New York and will be managed by Thomas Hodgeman, the present manager of the Majestic theater.

The new theater is at Twelfth and Wyandotte streets and has several innovations. The dressing rooms are all outside the theater proper. On the Twelfth street and Wyandotte street sides business houses will occupy the fronts with the exception of the main entrance on Wyandotte street. The theater is surrounded on four sides by open spaces, which provide four exits from the ground floor and two each from the other two floors, in addition to two emergency exits from each of the top floors.

The interior is finished in "art noveau," the colors being gold and yellow. With the exception of the chairs the theater is entirely fireproof. It will have a seating capacity of 1,650. There are three floors, with 550 chairs on the orchestra floor, 400 on the balcony floor, 600 on the gallery floor and 100 in the twelve boxes. The stage will be protected by an ornamental asbestos curtain.

The auditorium of the theater is 72 by 108 feet, of which 40 by 70 feet is taken up by the stage. Inclines instead of stairs will be used to gain access to the first two floors.

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November 1, 1909

ASHES OF FRIEND TO
POOR ARE SCATTERED.

HEAVENS WEEP AS LAST RITES
FOR DR. OSBORNE END.

Eulogy Spoken on Hannibal Bridge
by Dr. Miller, Who Braves Sick-
ness to Carry Out Wish of
Philanthropist.

"Goodby, Dr. Osborne, may God by with you until we meet again."

Standing on the middle span of the Hannibal bridge at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon Dr. Thomas D. Miller, a physician with offices in the Shukert building, spoke these words.

A minute before Louis Goldblatt, a saloon man on West Ninth street, had unscrewed the top of a fruit jar, and when Dr. Miller spoke, scattering to the winds the ashes which the jar contained.

These ashes were the mortal remains of Dr. E. H. Osborne, friend of the poor; Dr. Osborne, the mysterious, the eccentric.

It was the first time in the history of the Hannibal bridge that the ashes of a human being were thrown from it into the muddy, surging river below.

Fifty persons witnessed the odd spectacle.

A few minutes before they had listened to Dr. Miller make a eulogy on the man whose ashes were to be conveyed to the waters.

The night before, hundreds had gathered at Goldblatt's saloon on Ninth street on a strange mission. They came to view the remains of their dead friend. Many of them were surprised to find no evidence of a casket when they entered, and were more surprised when Mr. Goldblatt pointed to a two-quart fruit jar, filled with what appeared to be white gravel, surrounded by bottles of various brands of whiskey. The saloonkeeper told them that the white substance in the jar was all that was left of their friend.

A large crowd thronged the brilliantly lit saloon that Saturday night. Negroes, Croatians, Greeks and Americans brushed shoulders and laughed and talked as they drank. As Mr. Goldblatt pointed to the odd receptacle among the bottles, he told many interesting stories of the man he had known intimately for twenty years, and nearly all in the large crowd held beer mugs and sipped the beverage as they listened.

A COLLEGE GRADUATE.

"The old doctor and I were friends for many years," he began, "but despite our friendship he told me little of his early history or his people. He came here twenty-five years ago from Brooklyn, where he had owned a drug store. The store was destroyed by fire, and he, disheartened, came here for a fresh start. For a year or two he lived at 1624 West Ninth street, but moved over in Kansas to two little rooms in the rear of 3 central avenue, where he died. He always said he was "Welsh and Saxon, mixed," and that his forefathers settled on Long Island in 1640.

"Dr. Osborne graduated from Columbia University in New York city, and was highly educated. His greatest delight was to argue. He would argue on religion, politics, history, in fact anything he could start an argument about. He believed in a Divine Creator, but did not believe in the scriptures, and had little use for preachers. He could describe the important battles of some of the European wars until I actually believed I could see them. To my knowledge, he has only one living relative, a cousin, Arthur A. Sparks, who lives in Los Angeles, Cal. He was never married and seemed to care but little for the society of women.

WORSHIPPED BY THE POOR.

"The old doctor was a daily visitor to my place," Mr. Goldblatt continued. "He always came in in the evening. We would have a little drink, and then a friendly game of cards, and then he would go home to his bachelor quarters. He practiced among the poorer classes in the West bottoms, and his life record is full of many kinds of deeds for the poor unfortunate ones. That was Dr. Osborne's platform; that was the sentiment that won him everlastingly to the hearts of his people. He was a man of superior knowledge. He mingled with persons far inferior to him in intellect, but he gave them the knowledge that he had, as best he could, and they worshipped him."

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October 16, 1909

TO OPEN SANITARIUM TODAY.

Wm. Volker's Gift Means Much to
Kansas City People.

The opening reception of the tubercular pavilion, Twenty-second and Cherry streets, the gift of Mr. William Volker to the Jackson County Society for the Relief and Prevention of Tuberculosis, is to be held at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

As this is a great event in the history of Kansas City, everyone is cordially invited to be present at the dedication of the sanitarium, which is to be presented by Frank P. Walsh, president of the society, to the city, through its mayor, Thomas T. Crittenden, Jr.

Addresses will be delivered by Professor Charles Zubelin of New York, Mayor Crittenden, Frank P. Walsh and E. W. Schauffler, medical director of the sanitarium.

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October 10, 1909

GEO. P. OLMSTEAD
DIES AT 80 YEARS.

PASSES AWAY WHILE SEATED
AT BREAKFAST TABLE.

Was Connected With Many Promi-
nent Institutions in Kansas City
Where He Lived Nearly
Forty Years.
The Late George P. Olmstead.
GEORGE P. OLMSTEAD.

George P. Olmstead, an octogenarian, half of whose life was lived in Kansas City, died yesterday morning at the breakfast table in his home at 1311 Forest avenue. Until five years ago he was a member of the Cady & Olmstead jewelry firm at 1009-11 Walnut street, which still retains his name. Prior to that he was one of the leading lumbermen of the Missouri valley.

Mr. Olmstead had seated himself at breakfast, and was glancing over the morning paper when his daughter, Mrs. Ben F. Qualtrough, was about to serve the coffee. As she came in she noticed his head was bowed, but thought little of it, as he often became drowsy when sitting.

Mr. Olmstead's head fell lower and touched the paper, and Mrs. Qualtrough became alarmed. Unable to awaken him, she called her husband, but they could do nothing and he had lapsed into unconsciousness. Dr. R. T. Sloan was summoned, but when he arrived the aged man was dead.

Besides his wife he leaves a son and a daughter, C. B. Olmstead and Mrs. Ben F. Qualtrough, both of 1311 Forest avenue, Miss Catherine G. Olmstead, a sister, 88 years old, has been at Wesleyan hospital for three years with a fractured limb.

The funeral will be held from the hours Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Rev. Burris A. Jenkins, pastor of Linwood Boulevard Christian church, in charge. Temporary burial will be in the vault in Forest Hill cemetery.

Mr. Olmstead was born September 17, 1829, at Little Falls, N. Y., where he grew to manhood and learned the carpenter's trade. Early he made the journey by canal, lake, river and gulf to Corpus Christi, Tex., but did not remain there long.

Later he engaged in the lumber business at Pontiac, Ill, where he was married in 1859 to Miss Cornelia E. Hunt, who survives him. He remained there for several years and again removed to Tuscola, where he lived until they came to Kansas City in 1869. Mr. Olmstead built a home at 800 Jefferson street and lived there until 1887, when he bought the present family home at 1311 Forest avenue. The Jefferson street house was sold at the time of the construction of the cable incline.

On coming to Kansas City Mr. Olmstead became a member of the lumber firm of Leach, Hall & Olmstead, all of the members of which are now dead. Their lumber yard was west of the Union depot and the site is now occupied by a number of large wholesale houses. In 1882 he became a partner of L. S. Cady in the jewelry firm of Cady & Olmstead and in 1887 the lumber firm was dissolved. Four years ago he sold his interest in the business of Cady & Olmstead. For a number of years he was identified with R. M. Snyder, now dead, in Texas and Arizona ranch properties.

Current events drew much of Mr. Olmstead's attention and he took a vivid interest in the happenings of the world at large. His large library attests that he was a wide reader and he was known as a close and intelligent student of the Bible. During the pastorate of Rev. T. P. Haley, he was an active member of the First Christian church at Eleventh and Locust streets. Mathematics and astronomy held an odd fascination for him.

Mr. Olmstead was a close friend of Col. R. T. Van Horn and frequently he would contribute keen and well-written comments on public affairs to the columns of The Journal.

Last fall he was invited to Pontiac to attend the fiftieth anniversary of the Masonic lodge there, which he founded, but he was obliged to decline.

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October 9, 1909

DEATH OF MRS. E. CORRIGAN.

WELL KNOWN KANSAS CITY WOMAN
SUCCUMBS TO LONG ILLNESS.
Mrs. E. Corrigan
MRS. E. CORRIGAN.

Mrs. Edward Corrigan, one of the best known women in Kansas City in earlier years, died Monday at the home of a sister in Sandy Hill, N. Y., after an illness of eight months. She was 64 years old. The body will reach Kansas City at 7:16 this evening and will be taken to the home of Mrs. Matt Kinlen, a relative, at 3312 Flora avenue.

Funeral services will be from Mrs. Kinlen's residence at 10:30 Sunday morning, and from St. Vincent's Catholic church, thirty-first street and Flora avenue, at 11 o'clock Burial will be in Mount St. Mary's Cemetery.

Mrs. Corrigan lived in Kansas City for about twenty years, during which time she was at the forefront of almost all Catholic charities and was associated with others in non-sectarian undertakings. She was prominent in church work, one of her munificence being the high alter in St. Patrick's church. Since leaving Kansas City the home of Mrs. Corrigan has been in Chicago, but she has paid frequent visits to her friends here.

Mr. and Mrs. Corrigan had no children. A brother of Mrs. Corrigan, Daniel Quinn, lives in Kansas City. Mr. Corrigan is a brother of Bernard Corrigan, president of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, and Patrick Corrigan, a retired business man.

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October 4, 1909

HE DIDN'T FLATTER HIMSELF.

Colonel Swope Told Kelly Brent He
Was Not the Smart Man Many
Thought Him.

"Many persons think me a smart man but the truth of it is I'm an old fool," Colonel Thomas H. Swope said one day to Kelly Brent.

The two had a real estate deal on, and the colonel concluded at the end of long negotiations not to make the investment.

"Some years ago I concluded to sell off a great deal of my real estate holdings," said Colonel Swope, "and hang me if I didn't sell for a song the best of it. What I sold is worth millions today and a great deal I have left is not worth paying taxes on."

When the park board a few years ago suggested placing of a brass medallion of Colonel Swope at the entrance to Swope park he protested earnestly. He wrote to the board saying that while he lived he wanted no monument to be erected. It was explained that the medallion was not intended as a mark of the memory of the donor of the beautiful park, but as a slight token of appreciation and esteem from the city. After a long parley Mr. Swope reluctantly gave his consent to the installation of the medallion.

No man was more averse to publicity in the making of public bequests than was Colonel Swope. Just a hint being dropped that he contemplated a gift would anger the philanthropist and he would abandon his purpose. Some years ago Colonel Swope visited Roosevelt hospital in New York and asked to be shown through the institution. He incidentally remarked to the attendant that he was from Kansas City and that it was his purpose some day to build a hospital here and present it to the city.

A reporter for The Journal heard of the colonel's intentions and printed the story. The colonel became exasperated over the premature announcement and asked the reporter to visit him at his offices. The reporter to this day remembers the wrath displayed by the colonel and his ears still tingle with the tongue lashing administered.

"By your interference, sir," the colonel loudly declaimed, "you have deprived Kansas City of one of the best hospitals in the country. When people get to knowing my business it is time for me to quit."

It is unnecessary to state that Colonel Swope did not build the hospital, but he did give the ground on which it stands.

"I have known Mr. Swope a great many years, and knew him to be a kind, generous man," said J. J. Swofford last night. "Several times in the past five years I have approached him for donations for the Y. M. C. A. building fund and other funds for the promotion of the association's enterprise. He usually contributed from $100 to $400 a year.

"I know very little of Mr. Swope's business tactics, but I remember a peculiar thing about the manner in which he made these donations. He kept absolutely no account of his charities and when he signed a check to give me for the fund he used a check without a number and stub. He seemed very modest and sensitive about what he gave away.

"About three months ago, I think it was, he made and arrangement with my son Ralph Swofford of Thirty-first and Summit streets, who is president of the executive board of the Franklin Institute, to endow the institution with $50,000 providing as much more could be raised. A campaign has already been started and I believe is pretty well under way to raise the required $50,000.

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October 3, 1909

LORD BERESFORD IS A
KANSAS CITY VISITOR.

FORMER BRITISH ADMIRAL
TRANSACTS BUSINESS HERE.

Meets Manager of Texas Ranches
and Clears Up Accumulated
Business Details -- Drives
Over City Boulevards.
Lord Charles Beresford.
LORD CHARLES BERESFORD.

Lord Charles Beresford, former admiral of the British navy, in company with his solicitor, Orlando Hammond of New York city, dropped into Kansas City from Chicago yesterday morning for a conference with Robert Moss, manager of the Texas and Mexico ranches Lord Beresford owns. Incidentally Lord Beresford received a check, the proceeds of a sale of 1,000 head of cattle which had been sold on the Kansas City market during the last week. The shipment was made from his ranch at Ojitos, Chihuahua, Mexico. Lord Beresford thought when he left Chicago that he might have to make a trip to his ranches to settle some business affairs, but last evening he said he would attend to all of his business in Kansas City.

He and Mr. Hammond were met yesterday morning by Robert Moss, his manager and the trio drove to the Hotel Baltimore, where they breakfasted. They were joined there by J. MacKenzie and T. J. Eamans, who took them for a ride over the boulevards and then for luncheon at the Country Club. Another ride followed and the party returned to the Hotel Baltimore, dust covered and hungry, about 6 p. m. Lord Beresford and Mr. Hammond will remain in the city until Monday evening.

ENJOYED THE PLAYGROUNDS.

"I have been in Kansas City before, but I have never had the pleasure of a trip over your boulevards and through your parks," said Lord Beresford, "until today. Even this morning I feared that I would not have the time to thoroughly enjoy it. I want to say that the ride was a surprise to me. I have been over many drives and boulevards but I cannot recall a city I have ever been in that the boulevards excel those of Kansas City.

"Next to the boulevards, I was impressed with the playgrounds. We drove to each of the playgrounds, and I was greatly interested in watching the children as they scampered about and enjoyed themselves with the swings and apparatus. In this your country is ahead of England. You have so much more room, though, than we have. Ground is so much more expensive in England than it is here, but England has taken the cue from America, and she has begun the establishment of these playgrounds.
MOST PLEASANT TRIP.

"I saw the site of the new depot and the plans were explained to me. I am surprised that Kansas City has gotten along as long as it has with that old excuse for one. You will no doubt appreciate the new one much more, as the contrast will be so great that you will forget all about the inconveniences of the old one.

"Your residence section, especially the newer sections, impressed me greatly. They are different than the sections in the East, where the houses are all crowded on little lots. They remind one more of the English country houses with their wide stretches of lawn and tree-bordered drives and boulevards Altogether I shall remember my trip about Kansas City as one of the most pleasant I have ever taken."

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October 2, 1909

CALVIN SMITH, MISSOURI
PIONEER, IS DEAD AT 96.

Came to the State With His Father
in 1816 -- Gave Smithville
Its Name.
Calvin Smith, Whose Father Gave Smithville Its Name, Dead at 96.
CALVIN SMITH.

Calvin Smith, who was born December 19, 1813, who perhaps was the oldest living Jackson county pioneer in the point of residence, died at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon at his home, 2495 Harrison street.

Besides a widow, Mr. Smith is survived by six children, Henry, James and Evaston Smith, and Mrs. J. S. Setord, Mrs. Anna Goodenough Smith and Mrs. G. McCleary. Henry and James are lawyer practicing in this city. Burial will be Sunday afternoon in Valley Falls, Kas., under direction of the Masons.

Mr. Smith was born at Humphrey Smith's Mills on Buffalo Creek, New York. His father was a farmer. When tales of the rich French province of Missouri were first wafted East he was quick to catch their inspiration and migrate. In his memoirs written for the benefit of relatives a few years ago, Mr. Smith tells the story of the trip.

"On February 29, 1815," he said, "my father prepared for a trip to the West. He had $4,000 in gold which he put in a belt and buckled it around his waist. In an old style two-wheeled ox cart, drawn by a yoke of oxen, he put his famly and started for Missouri. We went to Olean, a point on the Allegheny river. With his wife and four children he embarked there on a canoe At Pittsburgh, Pa., father had to attach the canoe to a flat bottom boat going to New Orleans.

TO MISSOURI BY BOAT.

"At Louisville, Ky., we met three or four families who were going to the new territory of Missouri. Father chipped in with them and bought a keep boat and we floated down the Ohio river to its mouth.

At the moth of the Ohio river we turned into the Mississippi and the boat was propelled up that river by men who walked along the shore and drew the boat after them, while a man on the boat with a long pole kept it from running ashore.

In time we reached St. Louis, 190 miles from the mouth of the Ohio river. We stopped there two or three weeks. Then we all boarded the keel boat again for another move.

IN CLAY COUNTY IN 1822.

"Eighteen miles brought us to the Missouri river and we went up that river 300 miles to a place called Cole's fort, now Boonville, Mo. We reached there on the first day of July, 1816, just four months to a day from the time we left New York.

"On the 14th day of July my sister, Missouri, was born and about five weeks later, August, 1816, father and his family crossed the Missouri river and settled eight miles east of Old Franklin, Howard co unty. We moved several times, but stayed in that county until 1819. We then moved to Carroll county, Mo. This was during the 'Missouri question,' whether the new incoming state should be a slave state or a free state. The missouri compromise in 1822 settled in favor of a slave state.

"In 1822 father took another move to Clay county, Mo., and settled at a place now called Smithville, in the northwest part of the county. It was then a wilderness, being ten miles to the nearest neighbor."

Mr. Smith came to Kansas City in 1882. Two years later his wife died adn he married a second time in 1889. The second wife, who was Miss Fannie Burton of Kansas City, is living.

During the civil war Mr. Smith sided with the North.

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September 29, 1909

KANSAS CITY BUYER A SUICIDE.

Joseph Adler, Wholesale House Em-
ploye, Drinks Poison in New York.

NEW YORK, Sept. 28. -- Joseph Adler, who was a buyer for a wholesale house in Kansas City, Mo., committed suicide in his room in the Hotel Gerard this afternoon by drinking carbolic acid. No reason for the act is known.

According to the police Adler, who is about 40 years old, had been at the Gerard for about a week and occupied a suite of two rooms. This afternoon one of the hotel maids knocked at Mr. Adler's door, wishing to enter the apartment. She received no answer. Later she returned and when again she received no response she tried the door and found it unlocked. She looked into the room and found Adler lying in the same position. The maid hastened to the office and gave the alarm. A clerk went to the room and discovered the suicide.

In the room the coroner's physician found three letters, one of them addressed to "Whom it may concern" in which Adler requests that he be given a simple burial by the nearest undertaker. He also requests that two other letters, which were sealed, one addressed to Hiram Adler of Evansville, Ind., and the other to D. L. & W. P. Haas, 152 State street, Hartford, Conn., be mailed without being opened.

The physicians found nothing in the room that would serve as a clue to Adler's reason for death.

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September 26, 1909

PART OF BARNUM'S
FIRST FREAK SHOW.

PECULIARITIES OF THE LUCASIE
FAMILY, ALBINOS.

Burning of Museum in New York
Sent Joseph to Kansas City,
Where He Died of Dropsy.
Joseph Lucase, Famous Albino Violinist.
JOSEPH LUCASIE.

Joseph Lucasie, the Albino, who died of dropsy at the General hospital Friday morning, had in addition to an exceptional gift of harmony the distinction of having been one of the original exhibitions of P. T. Barnum, the pioneer showman.

It was in 1858 that Barnum heard of the strange family in Holland.

The fact that an Albino named Lucase had married an Albino wife and that both had abundant silken hair was in itself nothing remarkable. Barnum could have placed his hand on at least a dozen such couples in different quarters of the world.

It was the phenomena of two white-haired, pink-eyed children, a boy and a girl, born of this union, that made the Lucasie family worth having. The offspring of Albinos are almost without exception normal in every way, and the condition of being an Albino is said not to be hereditary.

HERALDED FROM MADAGASCAR.

When the Lucasie family was brought over from Holland, Joseph was 8 years old and his sister a few years younger. They were assigned to Barnum's New York city museum in 1859-60, where they were featured as having come from Madagascar and being the last of the great race of Albinos made famous by the writings of H. Rider Haggard. In this role they excited immense interest in the metropolis, attracting large crowds daily.

P. T. Barnum's Famous Albino Family.
FAMOUS ALBINO FAMILY THAT WAS SHOWN BY THE LATE P. T. BARNUM.

When the Barnum museum in New York burned the Lucasie family started out on its own resources and made money. They were picked up by the W. W. Cole circus and taken to Australia, where they were featured with success in a country popularly thought to be the home of the Albino.

After their return to America they hired out to the Lemen Bros.' circus, touring the West with it until 1898. Then, Joseph's father, mother and sister died in quick succession, leaving him practically alone in the world. The disruption of the family, which had been such a drawing card as a whole, left Joseph Lucasie in rather poor circumstances. He had, however, one recourse which stood him in good stead up to the time of his death.


EXPERT VIOLINIST.

During the years he spent with Barnum in the museum business he had learned to play the violin. Later he had improved his talent by constant practice, so that when his father died here ten years ago he was able to go into vaudeville and make good. It is said that there are few professional violinists in the west who are not personally acquainted with Joseph Lucasie.

Mr. Lucasie at his death was large and thick-chested. His luxuriant growth of white hair had been shorn a year previous because it made his head ache and there was little of the Albino distinctions left about him apparently, with the exception of his pink eyes. He was very sensitive and disliked to be alluded to as "the Albino" or have any name applied to him indicating that he was different from other men.

His memory of P. T. Barnum was very vague, owing to the great lapse of time and his extreme youth when he was in the great showman's museum, and he could tell few anecdotes about him. Since 1894 he has lived at 1117 Norton.

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September 24, 1909

A BARNUM ALBINO DYING.

Joseph Lucasie Imported by Show-
man Fifty Years Ago.

Joseph Lucasie, who was one of the Albino family which the late showman P. T. Barnum imported from Belgium to his museum in New York city, over fifty years ago, is dying of dropsy at the general hospital. It was thought last night that he could not survive through today. His hair is white as wool and his eyes are pink.

In his show bills, Barnum advertised the Lucasie family, consisting of four members, as being the last of a famous tribe of Albinos of Madagascar. They were Joseph's father, mother and sister. Joseph was 9, and his sister 12 years old. All were musicians.

Joseph was taken suddenly ill Wednesday afternoon at his home, 1117 Norton street.

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September 18, 1909

LID ON CIGARETTES
FOR CITY PRISONERS.

"MAKINGS" BARRED FROM THE
WORKHOUSE BY PAROLE BOARD.

No Longer May Favored Ones Have
Delicacies at Table, But Must
Masticate Prison Fare --
Guard Discharged.

The board of pardons and paroles took occasion yesterday to issue its first orders governing the future conduct of affairs at the workhouse. the new orders, or rules, were submitted by Secretary L. A. Halbert and approved by the board. They are taken from rules governing houses of correction in Chicago, Ill., Cleveland, O., Elmira, N. Y., and Boston, Mass.

"General order No. 1, section 1," reads" "At no time will cigarettes, cigarette tobacco or papers be permitted in the workhouse, and the smoking of these harmful things by both men and women prisoners must absolutely be prohibited."

Section 2 permits the men prisoners to have chewing and smoking tobacco, but pipes must be used.

Section 3 puts a ban on food, fruit and delicacies being sent in to prisoners by persons on the outside. that custom has been in vogue here ever since there was a workhouse, and the board is informed that this is the only city that permits it. Hardly a day passes that baskets or packages of food or fruit are not received for prisoners. Joseph Mackey is one prisoner who, it is said, does not know what workhouse "grub" tastes like. All his meals come from the outside.

PRISON FARE FOR ALL.

"Prisoners are not allowed to have food in their cells," explained President William Volker, "consequently it was placed on the dining table for them. It is not fair to have a few eating choice viands while the majority of prisoners have to look on. Prison fare is as good for one as another, and should be part of the punishment."

Secretary Halbert was for abolishing tobacco in any form. He never uses tobacco. Neither of the male members of the board are tobacco users but they, with Mrs. Kate Pierson, compromised on abolishing cigarettes. Prisoners will also be permitted to send out for candy, chewing gum and a small amount of fruit which they may have in their cells.

Hereafter prisoners will not be permitted to carry any money or jewelry into their cells with them. Deposits will be made with the clerk. If a prisoner sends out for any of the permitted "luxuries" he will have to give an order on the clerk for the amount and that will be charged against his account.

The board also is working on rules governing the conduct of guards and other employes at the workhouse. they have not been completed. A resolution discharging Joseph Etzel, a guard, was adopted. A prisoner complained that Etzel had abused him. This is the second time the board has dropped Etzel. The first order appeared to have no effect as he kept on working.

During the recent work house investigation Etzel was accused of attempting to intimidate a witness for the board. he was peremptorily ordered dropped. Why he retained his place no one on the board was able to explain. The ordinance giving the board charge of the workhouse gives it the right to hire and discharge guards. It was said yesterday that Etzel is "out for good" this time or the board will know the reason why. When Superintendent Cornelius Murphy informed Etzel that he had been discharged the guard went before the board.

SAYS "INFLUENCE" IS GOOD.

"I haven't done nothing to nobody or violated no rules here and I demand to know why I'm fired," he demanded.

"We don't think you have the proper influence in a place like this," Mr. Voelker informed him.

"My influence is as good as any of 'em," stated Etzel, proudly. "I have as good backing as the best."

"I am not speaking of political influence," replied the president. "We do not consider you a fit man for the place. I do not care to discuss this matter with you further."

Another guard, who was reported to have been involved in a romance with one of the girl prisoners, a sewing machine girl, was called in to explain. He denied being in love and insisted he had made no arrangements to pay the woman's fine. He was told to return to duty.

Five male prisoners and one woman were ordered paroled yesterday. Several applications were deferred until further investigation could be made.

The board made a rule that a prisoner could not receive visitors until they had been there fifteen days. After that the relatives may visit on Sundays only.

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September 18, 1909

MARRIES A MILLIONAIRE.

Miss Florence Oakley Received Stage
Training in Kansas City.

A romance which began over a year ago in the Auditorium theater, Los Angeles, Cal., culminated Thursday at San Rafael, just out of San Francisco, when Miss Florence Oakley, leading woman at the Liberty theater, Oakland, was married to Percival Pryor.

Miss Oakley is a Kansas City girl, and off the stage was known as Miss Florence McKim. Mr. Pryor is the only son of Judge J. H. Pryor, a millionaire of Pasadena, Cal.

While the engagement has been announced for some time, the young couple slipped away form the theater in Oakland in the afternoon and drove to San Rafael in a motor car where they were married. Mr. Pryor is 24 years old and his bride 20.

When Florence McKim, now Mrs. Pryor, was but 10 years old she appeared here in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and made such a hit that she attracted the attention of Miss Georgia Brown, who has a dramatic school. From that time until her first engagement with the Carlton Macy stock company of Cleveland, O., she was a protege of Miss Brown. The young woman had talent and her rise was rapid. While under contract with David Belasco in New York and waiting to be placed, Miss Oakley received an offer of $225 a week from the Blackwood Stock company of Los Angeles to become a leading woman and accepted. It was her guiding star that sent her there, as through that engagement she met, loved, became engaged to and now has married the only son of a millionaire, and "Father" is said to be very fond of her.

"Florence was a dear little girl and a born actress," said Miss Georgia Brown, her instructor, last night.

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September 17, 1909

MISSOURI HORSES TO ISLAND.

Will Be Used in Improving the
Porto Rican Breed.

Missouri horses are to be used in improving the native Porto Rican animals. A dozen or more will be secured here or from the big breeding farms in Missouri by D. W. May, special agent of the United States government in charge of the agricultural experiment station at Mayagues, Porto Rico, and are to be sent to New York and thence to the island.

The Missouri horse, according to Mr. May, has qualities possessed by no other horse in the world. These qualities take in part those of the famous steeds of Arabia, but in addition they have the stamina which the Arab lacks.

"The agricultural department has done a great deal of good in the Islands," said Mr. May last night at the Hotel Baltimore. "We have succeeded in producing a much sweeter grade of sugar cane, the tobacco is much better, and the planters will soon raise coffee which will be sold the the United States. At present all of the coffee is heavy and black, and finds no sale in this country.

"That the island has progressed agriculturally may be gleaned from a glance at the export figures. The value of exports in 1902 were $8,000,000. Since then they have gradually increased annually until last year the value of exports reached $32,000,000."

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September 14, 1909

'CAP' PHELAN, SOLDIER
OF FORTUNE, IS DEAD.

NAME GRAVEN IN WAR HIS-
TORY AS BLOCKADE RUNNER.

Staunch Irish-American Patriot
Mixed in Many Attempts to Free
Ireland -- Stabbed for Expos-
ing Clan ne Gael Plot.
Captain Thomas Phelan, Soldiler of Fortune.
CAPTAIN THOMAS PHELAN.

The death of Captain Thomas Phelan, Irish-American patriot and soldier of fortune, which occurred at 2:30 o'clock last Saturday afternoon, in Bremerton, Wash., ended a life full of romance and a checkered career in war and politics. Early in life he was bitten with the wanderlust, and during the early 60s and 70s helped to make history, not only in America, but in Canada and Ireland. Captain Phelan was 76 years old and leaves a widow and four children.

Being a native of Ireland, Captain Phelan throughout his life and did all in his power to bring freedom to Erin. He was born near the town of Tipperary and came to America about 1857, locating at Independence, Mo. He married Miss Alice Cox of that city.

During the early part of Captain Phelan's life he was embroiled in many attempts to free his native country from the yoke of England. Shortly after his marriage in Independence he enlisted as a volunteer in the Seventh Missouri regiment of the Union army and fought with that regiment throughout the war. He rose from the ranks to a captain. He was in many of the important battles.

NAME IN WAR HISTORY.

One of his daring acts committed during the progress of the war was at the siege of Vicksburg. It was necessary to take a steamboat loaded with cotton and other products, and munitions of war, down the river and Captain Phelan was delegated to run the blockade.

Transferring bales of hay for cotton around the edge of the boat he succeeded in getting safely through the lines. His name appears in Civil war history as that of the man responsible for breaking the blockade.

In the late 60's he gained fame and notoriety by engaging in the Fenian raid from the United States into Canada in a futile attempt to occupy Canada and make it a base of supplies from which to carry on warfare with England for the freedom of Ireland.

The Irish in America congregated about Ridgeway, Canada, for the purpose of an uprising and gaining a stronghold in the Canadian country. Some 1,400 Irish left the United States for this purpose, but boats on the waterways cut off a portion, and they failed to land in Canada. A battle in which many persons were killed on both sides was fought by the Irishmen against the Queen's Own regiment.

While making a visit to his home country, Captain Phelan learned that the Clan na Gael was planning to blow up an English ship named the Queen. Although against England, Captain Phelan did not believe in destroying innocent passengers, and therefore notified the English ship people. In some manner his part became public, and O'Donovan Rossa, editor of the Irishman of New York, attacked his loyalty in the paper.

STABBED THIRTEEN TIMES.

The incident occurred during the term as mayor here of Lee Talbot. Captain Phelan was called to New York to be given an opportunity to explain matters relative to his informing the British of the intended blowing up of the Queen.

Close friendship had before existed between Rossa and Phelan, and the latter did not realize that he was to be the victim of a trap. He went to New York and entered Rossa's office. While there an endeavor to assassinate him was made by an Irishman living in the East. Captain Phelan was stabbed thirteen times and received a broken arm in the attack. He was confined in a hospital in New York for many months on account of his injuries. The news that he gave the information to the English leaked out through a story of the plot printed in Kansas City and written by Frank P. Clarke, a former newspaper man, now living here.

Between the years of 1882 and 1888 Captain Phelan was superintendent of the Kansas City workhouse. He was greatly interested in politics and was a staunch Republican all of his life. When the criminal court was instituted in Jackson county he was appointed clerk of the court and was the first to fill this position. Under Mayor John Moore he served as superintendent of public works. While Colonel R. T. Van Horn was a member of Congress Captain Phelan received the appointment of captain of police of Washington, D. C.

CHALLENGED COUNT ESTERHAZY.

After the civil war he organized Company D of the Third Regiment and was a captain in the regiment for many years. Later he organized Battery B. For the last seven years he had been in charge of a navy yard at Bremerton, Wash., where ships of the United States are repaired. He was holding this position when he died. Captain Phelan belonged to the G. A. R., but was not a member of any other organization.

Captain Phelen also figured very prominently in a duel which was never pulled off. The participants were to have been a Captain McCafferty and Captain Phelan. Rifles were the weapons chosen, and seconds and grounds had been picked when friends interfered.

At one time a number of Irish left America to aid Ireland, whose sons were to rise against England upon a certain day. Chester, England, was the place of the rendezvous for the Irish-Americans. Arms had been secured for their use.

The English troops, however, got wind of the threatened uprising and were sent out in such large forces that the Irish were overawed. The difficulty between Captains McCafferty and Phelan arose out of the means to be used at this time in trying to free Ireland.

Captain Phelan's family resides at 3205 Washington street. Dr. Y. J. Acton of Bremerton notified the family of the death. The body was buried yesterday afternoon in the Soldiers and Sailors' cemetery at Bremerton, Wash., by Captain Phelan's special request.

For many years Captain Phelan traveled over the country giving exhibitions of shooting and fencing. He was a crack shot with pistols and rifles, and was a famous swordsman.

Captain Phelan, while the Dreyfus affair in France was at its height, challenged Count Esterhazy, accuser of Dreyfus, to a duel with swords, to be fought anywhere in the world.

Besides his widow, Mrs. John Young and Miss Annie Phelan, daughters, and two sons, Robert Phelan, a police detective, and Thomas Phelan, survive.

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September 11, 1909

LOVE KNOWS NO BARRIER.

Christian and Hebrew Elope to Live
in Kansas City.

NEW YORK, Sept. 10. -- Cupid mocked religion and nationality, as well as the parental objection, when Leon Cohen of Long Island wed Miss Myrtle Rhoads, the pretty 22-year-old daughter of Mrs. Hulda C. Rhoads. The young couple eloped, were married and left tonight for Kansas City, their future home.


The parental objection to a Jew could not be overcome, so Miss Myrtle decided to run away. She is a member of St. Ann's Catholic church and a talented musician.


Young Cohen is 28 years old and a member of the clothing firm of Cohen & Son of Sayville, L. I. He expects to establish a business in Kansas City.

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September 6, 1909

CUBA PROSPEROUS, HE SAYS.

Dr. Leni A. Beltran Says Present
Crops Will Be Best Ever.

Dr. Leni A. Beltran, a representative of the Cuban government, arrived at the Coates House yesterday and will be in Kansas City for a week. He will examine horses which have been purchased, subject to his approval, for the cavalry force for the island. Dr. Beltran is a native Cuban, but was educated in New York City.

"The strides Cuba is making will surprise the world," he declared yesterday afternoon. "Cuba will have the biggest sugar and tobacco crops of its history this year. Tobacco, which was plentiful and of good quality last year, will be much better and more plentiful this year. This year we believe will be the most prosperous the island has had."

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August 31, 1909

LEFT EAST FOR FRISCO
CLAD IN A PAPER SUIT.

"Hobo Harry" Started From New
York to Walk 3,850 Miles
for a Prize.

"Hobo Harry," who left Madison Square garden in New York June 21, clothed only in seven old newspapers fastened on with a ball of string, reached Kansas City last night at 9 o'clock en route on foot and also "on the bum" to San Francisco.

"Harry" says he is walking for a prize of $2,500 offered by a company of New York publishers. Certain restrictions, which the pedestrian has found hard to meet, were laid down as additional barriers. He must not put up at a hotel nor sleep on a bed; he must not work to earn money n or can he buy anything to sell for a profit.

About the only source of revenue left to him is his suit of clothes. He sells space on his coat, hat and even trousers to those who want to write their signatures as souvenirs in indelible ink.

His paper suit lasted his just three hours and ten minutes had he walked through New York, New Jersey, Arlington and Newark clad in nothing but this journalistic raiment. At Newark he solicited a suit of duck clothing from an obscure philanthropist and the first of his great obstacles was overcome. At Columbus, O., he "bummed" a tough suit of khaki and already this is covered by more than 100 signatures. The highest price he ever received for "advertising space" on his khaki suit was a $2.50 gold piece, he says.

"Harry: says he doesn't allow himself more than eight hours' rest at a time. To win the prize he must make the journey in 156 walking days, Sundays and rainy days are not counted. He says he has reached Kansas City about twenty days ahead of his schedule, based on the total distance of 3,850 miles, as calculated by Weston.

"I am going to beat Weston's first record of 139 days," he said. "Dan O'Leary made the trip in 102 days in '97 and Weston made it again in 105."

He left Lexington, Mo., at 3 o'clock yesterday morning and covered the distance of forty-eight miles to Kansas City by 9 o'clock at night. He will resume his journey Thursday morning at 4 o'clock.

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August 25, 1909

PLAY BALL FOR HOME
TOWN, SAYS BECKLEY.

Ball Player Who Has Observed Trac-
tion Lines Throughout Land
Picks Kansas City
for Home.
Famous Baseball Player Jake Beckley.
JAKE BECKLEY.

Jake Beckley, the idol of local baseball fans and one of the most popular men in the profession, has bought a home.

"I bought it here," said the great ball player, "because here is where I want to live. I have had no home for so long that I lived under my hat. 'Buses mostly were my homes, and never in the same town more than a week. Now I can see where I want to light, and it is right here in Kansas City. They say there are other places better. I want to say after being in all that everybody else has been in and more than only myself and the natives have been in, Kansas City has them all skinned. I am narrowing down the years till we catch up with St. Louis. It is a great town."

"They say it is not, Jake, and that its street cars are on the bum," said a fan who, one of a party of half a dozen, had been listening to the player talk shop.

HAS BOUGHT HOME HERE.

"It is not on the bum, and the town is not. Here is where I have fixed to live. I tell you that I have bought a little home here. I have been all over this continent, from the snow up in Canada to where it was hotter than this in Mexico, and right here is where I camp. I do not like to say how big I think Kansas City will be when I get ready to quit it, for I expect to live to be an old man. I am feeling pretty good now, thank you."

Mr. Beckley was then asked how he happened to pick out Kansas City.

"I picked out Kansas City because I have been in the other towns," said Jake. "I was in New York and got lost as soon as I got off Broadway. They have one street there and if you get of of it you are in the residence district. The natives never go on it and the tourist and the grafters never leave it. There is a procession of street cars along it and everybody there thinks they are wonderful. If a man has to stand up, and I never got to sit down, he pats himself on the head and says he is in a big, hustling city. If he has to stand up at home he growls and says the street car system must be on the bum.

"I go out to the ball park in the 'bus. I always watch the street cars. When I see everybody has a seat and nobody is riding on the footrail or the fender, I know we will be playing to the benches that afternoon. When I see them scrapping with the conductor to get on the roof, 'it's a full house for us, I say Jake, my boy,' and sure enough there is good business. I size up a town from the depot and the hotel lobby first, and then from the street cars."

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August 16, 1909

HUGH C. WARD DIES
IN NEW YORK CITY.

APOPLEXY FOLLOWED HEAT
PROSTRATION A MONTH AGO.

Mrs. Ward and Judge PHilips at His
Bedside -- With Family Was
Spending Summer at Bass
Rooks Point, Mass.
The Late Hugh C. Ward, Prominent Kansas City Attorney.
HUGH C. WARD.

Hugh C. Ward, one of the most prominent attorneys of Kansas City, and a member of a pioneer family of Western Missouri, died from a stroke of apoplexy in New York yesterday morning.

An attack of heat prostration which he suffered in Chicago a month ago was one of the causes which led up to the death of Mr. Ward. He had never fully recovered from this attack, although his condition had improved sufficiently to permit him to continue his journey to New York, accompanied by his wife. With Mr. Ward at his death were Mrs. Ward, Judge John F. Philips and several relatives.


WESTERN TRIP FATAL.

Mr. Ward had taken a cottage for the summer at Bass Rocks Point, near Gloucester, Mass., and he left for that place in June with Mrs. Ward and their four children. Business matters required the presence of Mr. Ward in Kansas City and he came home for a few days in July. He left again for his summer home on July 13, but became ill as a result of becoming overheated in Chicago.

Mrs. Ward was called to his bedside by telegraph, and after a week his physician pronounced him able to travel. Mrs. Ward and her mother, Mrs. J. C. James, started for the East with Mr. Ward, but it was found necessary to make a stop in New York where Mr. Ward was taken to a hospital and given the attention of some of the best specialists of the city.


SUDDEN CHANGE FOR THE WORSE.

His improvement was slow, but a telegram from Mrs. Ward to her father, J. C. James, on Tuesday announced that he was much better. A sudden change occurred, however, and at 4 o'clock Saturday afternoon Mr. James received a message that Mr. Ward had grown much worse. Mr. James left at once for New York.

The announcement of the death of Mr. Ward came in a telegram from L. T. James, Mrs. Ward's uncle, who landed in New York yesterday morning from a European trip.

The funeral services and interment will occur in Kansas City, the details for these to be arranged as soon as Mr. James reaches New york.

In addition to his wife and the children, Hugh Campbell, Jr., James Crawford, Francis and John Harris, Mr. Ward is survived by his mother, the widow of Seth E. Ward, and his brother, John E. Ward.


LEGISLATION AND POLITICS.

Hugh C. Ward was born March 10, 1864 at Westport. His parents were Seth and Mary Frances Ward. Hugh was reared on the farm and received his elementary education at a private school in Westport and his collegiate education at William Jewell Collete, Liberty, Mo., and at Harvard University. He was graduated with honors from Harvard, a bachelor of arts, in 1886. He then entered the St. Louis Law School and in June, 1888, received his diploma. He then was admitted to the bar in Kansas City.

In recognition of his ability as a lawyer came in 1894 his appointment as receiver for the John J. Mastin & Co., banking business, on dissolution of partnership. The property involved consisted mostly of real estate, and amounted to more than $3,000,000.

Aside from his profession Mr. Ward was known in business circles as a director of the National Bank of Commerce, Commerce Trust Company, Kansas City Railway and Light Company, and of the Kansas City Home Telephone Company.

He was long influential in Democratic circles, and in 1892 was elected to the state legislature where he did much work in connection with constructive measures.

In case preparation Mr. Ward was known as thorough and exhaustive, and in presentation before a judge or jury clear and vigorous in expression, and intensely earnest.

As a politician he was equally successful and well known. In the legislature in 1892 besides being made vice chairman of the judiciary committee, he was appointed chairman of the committtee on conditional amendments.

In 1898 he was appoointed police commissioner by Governor Stephens, who also made Mr. Ward a member of his staff, and placed in his hands the organization of the Missouri National Guard. He resigned as police commissionier and retired from politics in 1902.

SOCIAL AND PERSONAL SIDE.

Mr. Ward was a member of the Society of Colonial Wars, deriving his eligibility through the lineal descent from Seth Ward, a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses. H e was also a member of the Elks lodge, the Country Club, the Commercial Club, the Harvard Club of the Southwest and the American Bar Association.

Mr. Ward was married October 26, 1898, to Miss Vassie James, a graduate of Vassar college and a daughter of J. Crawford James.

One of Mr. Ward's last acts was to give $25,000 to the Young Women's Christian Association of Kansas City.

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August 9, 1909

FINDS A CITY TRANSFORMED.

F. S. MacJohnstone Tells of Kansas
City 25 Years Ago.

"Kansas City was a mud hole when my wife and I left it for the West a quarter of a century ago," said F. S. MacJohnstone of Colorado Springs, Col., at the Hotel Moore last night. "Its transformation as we viewed it today from an automobile which whirled us over the magnificent boulevards is wonderful. Twenty-five years ago there were huge, ugly hills with rocks jutting out on every side, steep walks, poor sewerage, hilly paved streets and no park system. Now you have the opposite. In Colorado we have beautiful drives and parks for our natural mountain scenery gives us an unrivaled background.

"Neither my wife nor I deemed it possible that Kansas City could make the strides it has since we left it. We have read of the growth of the city but did not realize its extent. We drove this afternoon through Roanoke. We used to go nutting in what is now one of the prettiest residence districts in the city. At that time it was occupied by a few shacks.

"Although my father and I furnished locks and hardware for the Old Missouri Valley buidling which was located somewhere near Fifth and Delaware streets, the only familiar sight we met of any conssequence was the old Blossom house, opposite the Union depot. The hotel was built before we left Kansas City."

Mr. MacJohnstone is a former alderman of Colorado Springs. With his wife he came to Kansas City to attend the wedding of a cousin, Fred MacJohnstone of Chicago, to Miss Lydia Dunning of Rochester, N. Y. Miss Duning was the guest of the MacJohnstones at Colorado Springs and came to Kansas City with them. The bride and groom departed yesterday for Chicago.

Mr. and Mrs. MacJohnstone left last evening for Denver.

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August 2, 1909

DR. BINNIE TO LONDON.

Summoned to Attend Mrs. Walton
H. Holmes, Jr., Who Is Ill.

Dr. J. F. Binnie left last night for New York, whence he will sail Wednesday to London, whither he has been summoned by the sudden illness of Mrs. Walton H. Holmes, Jr. He expects to reach the British metropolis Sunday.

No details have been received here of Mrs. Holmes's condition. W. S. Woods, her father, received the first cablegram, which asked that Dr. Binnie come to attend her. A later and more imperative cablegram asked that he "come at once."

Mr. and Mrs. Holmes had intended to leave London for home August 25 and that plan will be carried out if her condition will permit.

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July 23, 1909

MISSOURI TO ELLIS ISLAND.

Immigration Bureau Will Be Estab-
lished to Secure Foreigners.

ST. LOUIS, MO., July 22. -- After a conference here today between D. J. Keefe, United STates commissioner of immigration, and John H. Curran, chairman of the Missouri state immigraiton commisison, it was announced that this state will establish an immigration bureau on Ellis Island, N. Y.

There are 11,000,000 acres of unoccupied tillable land in Missouri, according to Mr. Curran, and the purpose of the new bureau will be to get desirable foreigners to cultivate this land.

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July 1, 1909

OFFICIALLY NOT LEON LING.

Japanese Suspect Given Clean Bill
of Health by Inspector Boyle.

Carl Young, the Japanese who was arrested Tuesday night because he looked like Leon Ling, the Chinaman who killed Elsie Sigel in New York, was released at police headquarters yesterday morning. Young is an educated Japanese and proved to the satisfaction of Inspector Edward J. Boyle that he was not the man wanted. The inspector gave him a letter stating that the bearer had been investigated and had proved that he was not Ling. Young said that he had been arrested in St. Louis under the same suspicion. He is a traveling salesman.

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