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October 29, 1909

NO MORE "RATS" FOR
THE POSTAL GIRLS.

DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENT'S
ORDER EFFECTIVE NOV. 1.

One Will Declare Hair Real, Will
Take Such Commands Only
From Husband and Dares
Investigation.

"On and after November 1, all lady clerks and employes must discontinue the wearing of 'rats' in their hairdress. Please govern yourself accordingly. -- A. B. R., Supt. Dist."

Will the Postal Telegraph Company whose district manager issued the above order, insist that it be obeyed, or will it hearken to the murmurings and declarations of their female employes and forget it?

This is the question which is bothering the girls ever since they received copies of what is declared to be the most famous order ever issued by the local office. That the officials of the company will have no easy time enforcing his order goes without saying. In fact, one of the pretty wire girls declared last evening that she, for one, would resign, and that in a hurry, before she would permit the manager or superintendent to dictate to her the sort of headdress she would wear.

"Why, the first thing we know they will have us in blue uniforms with brass buttons, a la messenger boy style," she said.

TAKEN AS JOKE AT FIRST.

The order was issued Wednesday. The girls, when they received it, took it for a joke, but yesterday when they discovered that it really was in earnest, and that the order meant what it said, there was excitement in plenty. If the ears of Superintendent Richards did not burn and buzz all day yesterday and until well into the night, it was not because the girls were not talking.

More than a score of operators are affected by the order. Half a dozen of these operate keys in various public places about the city, the principal branches being in the Hotel Baltimore, Coates house, Savoy hotel, New York Life building and the Chamber of Commerce. Then there are almost a score of girls employed in the main office of the company.

What objection to the wearing of "rats" can be is known only to Superintendent Richards and as one of the girls expressed it yesterday, "He won't tell because he doesn't know."

"It's nobody's business what is meant by the issuance of that order," said Richards last evening.

"I guess 'A. B. R.' will buy us all new hats. He will have to if he insists on us taking the rats out of our hair," said one of the operators as she adjusted a handsomely plumed beaver.

NOT TO BE COMMANDED.

"Why, we never would be able to wear a stylish-looking hat and I know that I, for one, am not going to let any man dictate to me for a while, yet, as to the sort of hat I wear. Of course, if I get married I may change my mind, but I am still single."

"I threw my order in the waste basket," said another operator,"but on second thought I fished it out and took it home. I may have it framed, or I may send it to a friend in Chicago. I only wish I could say things like a man can. I would certainly talk to 'A. B. R.' "

"Lots of foolish orders are issued at times, but this is the worst I have ever heard of," said another operator. "I wear a rat and have to in order to wear a hat which is in style. If 'A. B. R.' or anyone else thinks that he is going to tell me how to wear my hair he will be disillusioned. If he asks me I will tell him my hair is natural and if he tries to get familiar and ascertain for himself there will be something doing, in which I will not get the worst of it."

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September 23, 1909

ELEVATOR FALLS 8 FLOORS.

Brake Did Not Work and Calvin
Kester, Operator, Was Injured.

Calvin Kester, elevator operator in the New York Life building, was severely injured yesterday morning just before noon when the elevator he was running dropped from the eighth floor to the basement. The elevator left the tenth floor with only the operator in it. When he attempted to stop at the eighth floor the brake failed to work and the car continued its downward flight with increasing velocity.

When the car struck the bottom of the shaft Kester fell unconscious and was carried into the United States Trust Company office. An ambulance was summoned and Dr. Fred B. Kyger had the injured man removed to the emergency hospital. Upon examination Dr. Kyger found the man to be suffering from a strained back, a cut on the left leg and bruises on the body. The surgeon pronounced the injuries to be not serious.

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January 29, 1909

GREEK DENIES VIOLATING LAW.

Claims One Boy Is Over 16, and Other
Is at School.

Charged with employing two boys, Angelo Angelopoulos and Theodore Patrakis, both said to be under 16 years old and causing them to work more than nine hours a day in violation of the child labor law, Peter Maniatos was arraigned in Justice Miller's court yesterday. He declared he was not guilty. Maniatos conducts the bootblack stand on West Ninth street near the New York Life building.

Patrakis claimed he was over 16, and a letter from the boy's father in Chicago, exhibited before the court, showed that he was born in the year 1892. Angelo, though under age, has been attending school regularly, and reports from his teacher showed that the boy was making the best of his opportunities. Justice Miller set the case for Friday, and Maniatos was released on bond of $100. The boys are being held at the McCune home.

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January 9, 1909

INAUGURATION OF
GOVERNOR HADLEY.

Monday, January 11, 1909, at Jef-
ferson City, Mo.

This is to notify all Republicans that desire to be present at the inauguration of the first Republican governor of Missouri since the civil war, that the Republican clubs of Kansas city will have a special train to Jefferson City via the Missouri Pacific railway.

The train will be at readiness to receive passengers at Kansas City Union depot, Sunday evening, January 10, at 11:50, and will arrive at Jefferson City at 7 a. m. Monday.

Tickets will be good going only on the special train.

Excursion tickets can be secured from any of the following members of the Republican special train committee:

Roy S. Davis, 1002 N. Y. Life; E. A. Norris, Ricksecker bldg; H. E. Barker, 15th & McGee; Leo Koehler, city hall; W. E. Griffin, 810 N. Y. Life bldg., or Missouri Pacific city ticket office, No. 901 Main street.

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October 20, 1908

STRAWBERRIES ARE RIPE HERE NOW.

At Least They Are in the Progressive
Thirteenth Ward.

Lister avenue, the thoroughfare that helped much to make the Thirteenth ward famous, has taken unto itself new laurels, or to be precise, new strawberries, for a second crop of that fruit has sprung up in the garden of Louis D. Tolle, a lawyer who lives at No. 1615. His doubting friends are restored to faith by a vine bearing several ripe strawberries which Mr. Tolle is now exhibiting in a glass of water at his office in the New York Life building.

It was in Lister avenue a year or two ago that indignant citizens chopped down overnight telephone poles which they didn't want in front of their residences, and now a very lively local option fight is on in the ward.

"You needn't be surprised at anything that happens in the Thirteenth," Mr. Tolle said last night with a pride that even the humming of the telephone wire couldn't drown. None of P. Connor's frost has yet bitten his strawberry vines and they have no protection, he added.

Of course, the second growth is not prolific, but the little 2-year-old daughter of the Tolle household isn't sorry that she took up her residence in Lister avenue, for she gets the benefit of all the ripe ones.

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December 5, 1908

BOMB IN FIRST
NATIONAL BANK.

EXPLODES, DAMAGES BUILDING
AND INJURES TEN.

BANK'S BASEMENT IS WRECKED.

WAS BOMB PLACED BY INSTITU-
TION'S ENEMY?

This Is Belief of Officers Who Worked
on Case -- Explosion Took Place
When Janitor Closed a
Closet Door.

Mystery which is baffling the entire police and detective forces of Kansas City and the local members of the Pinkerton Detective agency surrounds an explosion in the basement of the First National Bank building, Tenth street and Baltimore avenue, at noon yesterday, which wrecked the basement of the institution and endangered the lives of employes and officers of the bank, as well as pedestrians on the street outside.

The Infernal Machine That Exploded in the First National Bank Building.
INFERNAL MACHINE,
Such As Might Have Caused the Explosion.

That an infernal machine, probably a bomb made of dynamite or nitro-glycerin, caused the explosion, and was set there by an enemy of the bank or a crank, who may have lost money through the failure of financial institutions during the financial stringency, is the belief of nearly every expert or officer who worked on the case yesterday. Another belief is that it may have been a crank who had money in the First National bank and had failed to obtain as much as he wanted during the panic who used this as a means of getting revenge. The officials of the bank are unaware of any person who might be an enemy of the institution and do a thing of this kind.

Damage to Windows Across the Street
DAMAGE TO WINDOWS ACROSS THE STREET.

The explosion was so terrific that it was felt by persons in the offices of the bank building, the New York Life building and the Shubert theater building. A cloud of smoke rose through the windows and up the elevator shaft, which smelled like that of dynamite or nitro-glycerin. Glass in the skylight of the bank building, which is fully 200 feet from the place of the explosion, was shattered. Had not the building been strongly built it would have been blown into a mass of ruins, according to expert builders and architects who made an investigation. They say the structure is absolutely safe, and that the only damage was to the basement, which will not in their estimation exceed $3,000.

As it is only a portion of the basement was wrecked. Two walls, made of tiling marble and concrete, were blown down. One of these walls was 12x18 feet, and the other was 20x18 feet, both being 18 inches thick. An iron beam supporting the ceiling, which is about nine inches wide and two inches thick, was bent and the door casing, which is made of iron, was warped out of shape. A hole two feet in diameter was blown in the wall directly back of the point of explosion, and there is a hole in the concrete floor about four inches deep.

In Wrecked Cellar of Bank.
IN WRECKED CELLAR OF BANK.

There was a row of closets made out of marble, and a wash sink of the same material, in the room, and these were broken into fine pieces. The lockers for employes' clothing, which are made of sheet steel, were bent out of shape and tipped over. There were int eh adjoining room. The iron bars on the windows of the basement were blown across Baltimore avenue and wrecked the windows of the Robert Stone Investment Company. The sewer pipes and water pipes were blown into fragments near where the explosion took place.

ONE MAY DIE.

At the time of the explosion there were about 250 people in the bank. Elbert Ward, a negro porter, was nearest the scene of the explosion. He was closing the door of the toilet room when the explosion took place and probably the door saved his life. He was rendered unconscious and lay partly covered with a pile of debris when he was found by Logan Wilson, a mail clerk in the bank, who helped Ward get to the upper floor. Ward was taken to a hospital. He was very seriously cut about the head and body, a piece of iron was found in his leg and it had severed an artery. He will probably die.

Ward, the porter, is the only one of the injured who is considered in a serious condition. Most of the others were considerable distances from the explosion and their injuries will not prove serious unless some of the pieces of broken tile or glass are embedded in their flesh. The other injured are:

R. H. Klapmeyer, bank clerk, cut on the head by flying pieces of tile or glass.

Charles Grant, a pedestrian on Baltimore avenue, bruised by flying iron.

George Evans of the Evans-Smith Drug Company, who was walking on the opposite side of Baltimore avenue from the bank, cut on the head by flying pieces of tile.

Val Jean Brightwell, clerk, cut on head and fa ce by flying pieces of tiling.

J. D. Wilson, an employe of Bell, Egolf & Co., in the United States and Mexican Trust Company building, cut on face by flying glass.

Joseph Patch, carpenter, living at 1315 Lydia avenue, cut by glass. Not serious. Patch was taken to the emergency hospital, where his wounds were dressed. He was in a dazed condition and told the police that he had been shot.

R. M. Cole, knocked senseless by concussion. On sidewalk.

Jay Donaldson, pedestrian on Baltimore avenue, cut on head.

As soon as the explosion took place the fire department and police headquarters were notified and the patrons of the bank were hurried out of the building, the police working on the theory at that time that persons in the building were responsible for the explosion, which may have been true, although no one was arrested at the time in connection with the case. The street was soon crowded with curious people, including depositors of the bank, and a score of police were employed to watch the building.

THEORIES OF EXPLOSION.

There are several theories about the origin of the explosion, all of which are that it was probably caused by an infernal machine and the explosive used was no doubt dynamite. One theory is that the bomb was taken into the basement by an outsider, which, according to President E. F. Swinney, would be an easy matter on account of the new clerks working in the bank since the increase of business caused by the failure of the National Bank of Commerce, and was placed there with the intention of blowing up the cash fault. That when the stranger got to cellar he became confused because of the winding stairway leading to it and made a mistake in the location of the vault, thinking it directly above where the machine exploded. He is supposed to have thought that an iron door in the wall directly above the spot where the explosion took place, might have a connection with the vault, which led him to believe that to be the location of the money chest of Kansas City's largest bank.

TRYING TO BLOW VAULT?

Surroundings of the scene of the explosion lead officers working on the case to believe this theory and also to point out the operation of the person supposed to have placed the bomb. It is believed the bomb was made of a piece of water pipe, about two inches in diameter and eight inches long; that it contained dynamite which was packed in gun cotton; that the bomb was sealed at each end with some kind of material, such as sealing wax, and at one end was placed a quantity of nitro-glycerin. This bomb could have been placed under the water sink in the toilet room where the explosion took place, and attached to the door in such a way that when the door was moved by some one entering or going out, the infernal machine exploded.

Remains of What Probably Was a Bomb.
REMAINS OF WHAT PROBABLY
WAS A BOMB.

The broken pieces of such a piece of pipe were found in the room next to the scene of the explosion. They had been blown through the wall. They were badly shattered, but the fact that they showed no signs of having been connected with other pipe previous to the explosion leads the police to believe that they were used in making the bomb.

BELIEVE IT WAS GAS.

President E. F. Swinney of the First National bank, and Detectives Dave Oldham and Edward Boyle, who are working on the case, believe it was an explosion of natural gas or sewer gas, but experts who examined the surroundings say this is impossible.

Walter M. Cross, city chemist and an expert on explosives, was asked to examine the bank after the explosion. His statement was that gas could not have caused it because the effect of the explosion was too concentrated; that if it had been caused by gas the whole wall behind would have been pushed out, and not a small hole blown, as it was. He also said that the explosion was too violent to have been caused by gas. He says he believes the explosion was caused by dynamite or nitro-glycerine.

Fire Warden Trickett said: "I am able to arrive at no other conclusion but that the explosion in the First National bank was from dynamite. I made a close examination of premises and the room in which the explosion occurred. There is no gas connection about the building so the explosion could not have been from escaping gas."



AND THEY STICK TO GAS.

Detectives working on the case reported last night that the explosion was caused by natural or sewer gas. Detective Oldham, ho claims to have done some work with a mine drill, gave this as his theory, as did also Boyle, who was formerly a plumber, despite the statement of City Chemist Cross. John Hayes, ex-chief of police, believes it was a bomb set for the purpose of wrecking the institution.

Joseph Patch, a carpenter who was injured and was supposed to have been on the opposite side of Baltimore avenue when the explosion occurred, was arrested last night and taken to the police station, where he was questioned by Assistant Prosecution Attorney Hogan. Ward, the injured negro janitor, also made a statement to Hogan.

Patch, who it was first thought might have had some connection with the affair, because of his story about being shot, and also the fact that he is a union carpenter and the unions have had trouble with the builders of the different bank buildings, was closely questioned by Hogan. Patch has a long police record, most of which was family trouble, but he was released late last night because his testimony led the police to believe that he was not in any way connected with the explosion. His wife was also detained at the police station for a time last night, but she gave no evidence against her husband that would lead the police to believe that he was connected with the affair.

While the gas theory is believed by officers they were ordered to continue working on the case last night, and members of the Pinkerton detective agency also put on the case by the bank. No more arrests had been made at a late hour last night.

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August 2, 1907

A THIEVES' PARADISE.

Ten Robberies in a Night Follow
Demoralization of Police Force.

Taking the reports of robberies and the work of pickpockets on Wednesday night immediately following the removal of Chief Hayes, it would seem that the crooked gentry are fully informed of the Folk police reorganization and the consequent demoralization of the force. Here is a list of one night's robberies:

L. C. Stein, 542 Park avenue, who has an office in the New York Life building, was robbed of a diamond valued at $200 on a street car at Eighth street and Grand avenue in the early evening. No arrests.

The room of Harry B. Monroe, 607 Walnut street, was entered and clothing and $10 taken. No arrests.

The Manhattan Ice Cream Company, 1710 Walnut street, was broken into, and property valued at $28 stolen. No arrests.

A burglar entered the room of Miss Lillian McDonaled, 1214 Troost avenue, and stole three rings valued at $50 and $5.75 in cash. No arrests.

Mrs. J. C. Frailey, also rooming at the foregoing number, lost $75 worth of jewelry by the visit of the same thief. No arrests.

Charles Payne, of Kansas City, Kas., was robbed of a gold watch valued at $40 at Sixth and Wyandotte streets. No arrests.

T. A. Nelson, 1634 Washington street, was robbed of a gold watch valued at $25. No arrests.

The barber shop of Fred Millick, 1507 Grand avenue, was broken into and property valued at $50 stolen. No arrests.

James Dowling, a guest at the Ashland hotel, reported that while asleep in his room a burglar entered and stole from beneath his pillow a watch valued at $100. No arrests.

The office of the Eadle Coal Company, Second and Wyandotte streets, was broken open and brass valued at $15 was stolen. No arrests.

Thomas Randall, a Kansas City, Kas. detective, reported that a man just across the line had been robbed of $220 in cash and the thief had made for Kansas City to be on "neutral ground." The police were given the name of the thief and a complete description of him. They say they are "working on the case." No arrests.

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July 7, 1907

BODY OF JOHN KIRK FOUND.

Is Cigar Stand Proprietor Who Was
Drowned a Month Ago.

The body of John Kirk, proprietor of the cigar stand in the New York Life building, who disappeared June 3, was taken from the Missouri river at Buckner, Mo., yesterday, and positively identified. Kirk is not known to have any relatives in America. He came from Scotland a few years ago. At the time of his disappearance there was talk of foul play, but when the body was discovered yesterday no marks of violence could be found and his watch and $30.15 in money were in his pockets. He was about 40 years old.

The body was taken to Duffy's morgue, and the funeral will be held from there.

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Special Report -- C. W. ANDERSON


WITH 20,000 NAMES

ANDERSON PETITIONS TO BE
SENT TO PRESIDENT TODAY.
ROOSEVELT HEARS OF CASE.

DISCUSSED IT WITH VISITORS AT
WHITE HOUSE YESTERDAY.

In Washington It Is Believed Pardon
Will Be Granted -- Barnes, the In-
former, Hints Darkly of
Sensations Yet to
Come.

A dispatch from Washington last night said that President Roosevelt has not yet received the application for pardon for Charles W. Anderson. However, he discussed the matter yesterday with people who are interested in the case, and while he will not state in advance what action he will take when the application arrives, it is the opinion of his advisers that he will readily grant a pardon.

An Associated Press dispatch from Washington says an application for the pardon of Anderson has reached Washington, and has been referred to the department of justice for examination into the records and for recommendation.

A petition expected to bear at least 20,000 names of people in Kansas City and vicinity, who sanction the release of Charles Anderson from the United States penitentiary at Leavenworth, will be forwarded to Senator William Warner this evening in turn to be submitted to the president. On the 600 or more petitions that have been circulated, more than 15,000 names had been recorded yesterday, and hundreds of letters were received by the legal committee and by those at whose places of business petitions were placed. These letters were from out-of-town people as well as persons living in the city, and all expressed the same sentiment regarding the man's release. Some were from close friends of Anderson and his family, and spoke of the man's good character, his honesty and devotion to his family, and especially his sobriety. Men who had known Anderson in a business way attested convincingly to his honesty , and neighbors to his family devotion.

All day long at places where there were petitions people went to sign. Along Twelfth street, in the neighborhood where Anderson lived and where he had been in business, his arrest and prospective release was the principal topic of discussion. Up to late in the evening people appeared singly and in groups to sign the petition at Phipps & Durbow's grocery store, at Twelfth and Holmes streets. Some of them came from their homes as far as two miles away, and one man, 72 years old, drove from Independence yesterday afternoon to enter his name upon the list of signers.

On a petition circulated yesterday among the lawyers of the city by James Garner, and attorney in the New York Life building, the names of a hundred or so of Kansas City's leading members of the legal profession were signed. Among all of the attorneys approached on the matter by Mr. Garner, but two refused to sign.

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January 8, 1907

HALF THE FINE TO THE BOY.

Careless Coachman Drove Over Bicycle
of a Messenger Boy.

Henry Harris, a coachman in the employ of Elmer williams, president of the Williams Realty Company, was fined $10 in police court yesterday for driving over a bicycle belonging to William Smith, a 14-year-old messenger boy, which was standing in front of the New York life building. Richard C. Patterson, president and general manager of the Union Portland Cement Company, testified in court that he saw the coachman deliberately drive over the wheel and when he asked the coachman why he was not careful was told that he had enough to look after his own business without looking after all of the bicycles in the street.

When Harris started to pay his fine, Judge Kyle ordered him to give half to the messenger boy to pay for repairing the wheel.

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