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February 10, 1910

KLING AT MERCY
OF COMMISSION.

Fans Fear Supreme Body in
Baseball Will Make an
Example of Him.

Will the national commission establish a precedent in organized baseball by rendering a decision unfavorable to Johnny Kling, local billiard man and Cub holdout now on the blacklist, who has applied for readmission to the fold? This is a question that is bothering the fans and judging from talk in baseball circles, the one-time Cub star is certain to encounter rough sledding before he lands back in good standing minus the black mark which now bedecks his name in the records of the court ruled over by Garry Herrmann.

The fat that the national commission is without opposition in the world of baseball at the present time makes it appear certain that it will make use of its authority when the time comes to pass upon the Kling case. Up to this year there existed on the Pacific coast the "outlaw" league, which seriously hampered the work of the commission, and a practice of granting concessions to players who had kicked the traces was followed by those in charge of the affairs of organized baseball.

This was exemplified in the case of Hal Chase, who committed a most flagrant offense by jumping from the New York Americans to the California League, only to be restored to good standing a short time after, none the worse for his rash act. This was done with the one hope of eventually wearing down the opposition to the national agreement and finally proved effectual, as last fall the "outlaws" were taken into the fold, leaving the jurisdiction of the great national game under one tribunal, the national commission.

COMPARE CASE WITH OTHERS.

"Since Kling sent in his request to Garry Herrmann for a consideration of his case with the purpose of seeking the good graces of the high tribunal, stories have sprung up regarding the Chase and Mike Kelley incidents in which the commission fought a losing battle. Chase was out on a charge of contract jumping in the middle of the 1908 season, when he left the Highlanders to play with the California outlaw league. Mike Kelley was in the same boat as Kling at the present time, and his restoration was due more to an error of the St. Louis club than anything else. Kelley refused to report to the St. Louis American in 1905, and as a result was kept out of organized baseball for two seasons, returning when the Mound City club failed to place his name on the reserve list through oversight, practically relinquishing claim to him.

In the face of these two verdicts, principally, it has been stated that the commission is hardly liable to turn around and refuse concessions to Kling that were granted to the others. Conditions have changed since then, however, and apparently this has been overlooked, as the national agreement is now absolute and its power, and for this reason the commission will no longer be forced to take a conciliatory attitude towards violators of the rules that govern baseball.

COMMISSION'S POWER ABSOLUTE.

In the event of Kling being turned down in his request for reinstatement, it will be the first case of this nature in which the commission has won out, due to the fact that opposition to organized ball is a thing of the past, and the trio now headed by Garry Herrman are in a position to govern, absolutely without the wayward players having "outlaw" leagues to fall back upon.

The fate of Kling will probably be known February 23. Mystery surrounds the purpose of the gathering, as Herrmann failed to state anything in detail, but it is taken to mean that the application of Kling will be the principal business to come up for disposal.

The date of the meeting is four days before the departure of the Club squad on their spring training trip to New Orleans and in the event of the commission giving out a decision of the case Kling would know his fate in time to prepare to accompany his old teammates, provided the act of the commission is favorable. There is a possibility, however, of the supreme court of baseball acting upon the case and then withholding their final decision until near the opening of the season.

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January 31, 1910

HOW JUSTICE ROSS
MADE HIS FORTUNE.

DONOR OF MONEY TO MA-
HONEY CHILDREN WAS
ONCE A LAMPLIGHTER.

Formed Partnership With
John Mahoney Twenty-
Five Years Ago.

Justice Michael Ross, of Kansas City, who in the Wyandotte county, Kansas, probate court Saturday gave the children of his dead partner, John Maloney, $50,000, was born in Cincinnati, O., December 19, 1859. His father, Alexander Ross, came to Kansas City in 1866 to aid in the erection of the first gas plant the city had. In June a year later, the family followed him, coming from St. Louis by boat.

"The Missouri was full of boats in those days," said Justice Ross last night, "and was the principal means of navigation between here and St. Louis. Kansas City had a real wharf and it was a busy one."

Two brothers, William J. and James Ross, and a younger sister constituted the children at that time. James was drowned while swimming in the Missouri river in 1872.

"We attended a little frame public school down in the East Bottoms just opposite what was known as Mensing Island," said Justice Ross. "Later we went to Washington school which still stands at Independence avenue and Cherry street. A ward school education was as high as one could go in those days unless he went away, and that was all we received."

After the erection of the gas plant Justice Ross and his brother William secured positions as lamp lighters. It required them to get up at all hours of the night, according to the condition of the weather and the fullness of the moon, both to light and turn out the street lamps. After doing this work at night Justice Ross worked all day on an ice wagon for J. E. Sales. Later on he worked in the old Davis brick yard, which stood about where the Zenith mill now stands in the East Bottoms.

Justice Ross always had in view the day when he would go into business for himself -- be his own boss. With his savings and some help from his mother he started a little grocery and general store on the levee at First and Campbell streets in 1874. After a time his brother, William, was taken into partnership, but remained but a few years. The latter for several terms was a member of the city council.

BOUGHT OTHER STORES.

As the city began to grow away from the river, Justice Ross saw better opportunities and opened a grocery store at 1401-3 East Fifth street, at Lydia avenue, and later another at 1100-2 East Fifth street, at Troost avenue. These two stores were money makers and enabled him later to branch out along other lines.

In September, 1888, Justice Ross was married to Miss Bessie Egan. All of their children, seven boys and four girls, are living, the oldest daughter being away at school near Cincinnati, and the oldest boy at St. Mary's, Kas. Six of the nine children at home attend the Woodland school.

"I knew John Mahoney from the day he came here with the C. & A. railroad," Justice Ross said. "He was doing small jobs of grading in those days and his mother went with him over the country. They used to trade with us at the little store on the levee and when in town Mahoney and his mother stopped at our home."

It was almost twenty-five years ago that Mahoney and Ross went into partnership and the latter has been a silent partner ever since, Mahoney seeing to most of the details and looking after the work. Justice Ross also had other interests, such as tree planting, and planted the trees around the finest residences and along many of the prettiest boulevards. In speaking of some of the work done by himself and Mr. Mahoney, the justice said:

"We built all of the Southwest boulevard, also Fifteenth street, doing the grading work. Roanoke boulevard is another piece of our work, as was the ill-fated Cliff drive, where poor John and his wife met such a tragic fate. We did lots of work on the country roads in Jackson county and built almost all of the roads in Wyandotte county, besides many of the brick-paved streets.

LARGE CONTRACT WORK.

"We also did much work away from here, such as government work on the levee at New Orleans, county roads in Southern Indiana and railroad grading in Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Colorado. Mahoney was a man who made friends wherever he went. I just received a letter from Indiana asking if he and McGuire were the same men who were there asking for all particulars."

As Justice Ross's business ventures thrived he found it impossible to give the time required to his two grocery stores, and a few years ago he disposed of them. Previous to that, however, he had established the Missouri Carriage and Wagon works at 308-10 Broadway, which he still operates.

For many years he has been buying property and erecting modern flats thereon. He does not build flats to sell, but he keeps them for what they bring in. When Admiral boulevard was cut through at Virginia avenue, Justice Ross owned a big row of old flats immediately in the right of way. They are brick and their moving back was the biggest job of that kind ever done in this city. He made them modern and is erecting more flats near them.

The prettiest and most costly structure erected by Justice Ross is a flat building at Benton boulevard and St. John avenue, on a promontory overlooking the entire city. He owns forty or more pieces of improved property in the city.

In the fall of 1898 Michael Ross ran for justice of the peace on the Democratic ticket and was elected. Since then he has held the office for three terms, twelve years, winning each time with ease. He said last night, however, that he would not seek the office again. He intends to build a big home in the southern part of the city and he and Mrs. Ross will devote their time to their children. He now lives at 626 Troost avenue.

"John Mahoney almost decided to go to Jacksonville, Fla., with our party," said the Justice. "The ground was frozen and he could not work. But he was such a home-loving man he hated to leave his family, even for a day. I had a premonition when I left that something would happen. When I got the wire the first thing I thought of was his automobile. We did not get the particulars, however, until we got a paper at Memphis, and did not get full particulars and learn that McGuire was killed and the others hurt until we got The Journal at Paola, Kas.

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January 30, 1910

TINGE OF JEALOUSY IN
ELTINGE GOING ALONE.

His "Hands" at the Theater and
"Loud" Type for Lauder on Bill-
ings Cause Separation Here.

Julian Eltinge and Harry Lauder came to the parting of the ways yesterday. Last night they bade one another adieu and probably will not be seen in the same company again. Mr. Lauder departed for Chicago on a late train and Mr. Eltinge will leave some time today for Excelsior Springs where he will endeavor to take off a few pounds of surplus flesh, after which he will go to New Orleans.

There has been more or less professional jealousy between Messrs. Lauder and Eltinge ever since they were together, the name of Lauder growing larger on the billings, although friends of Mr. Eltinge say that he was the man who got the greater number of "hands" during the performances. This piqued Mr. Eltinge and a couple of weeks ago stories began floating East to the effect that he had severed his connection with the Lauder company. Ted Marks, the advance man and the representative of the Morris interests, was kept busy denying these stories.

The final breach came in Kansas City. Mr. Lauder thought that Kansas City theatergoers did not appreciate his "art" as much as the people in other cities and that Mr. Eltinge got entirely too much attention. Mr. Eltinge saw his name in small type. He believed that he was doing the work that carried the show along. There was but one thing for Mr. Morris to do. That was to separate them.

Both are under contract with him, so now he is taking a chance that they will make more money for him playing individually in different sections of the country than they will together. In any event it will give the theatrical people an opportunity to determine for themselves just how strong Mr. Eltinge is with the masses.

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January 25, 1910

JIM CROW CARS
PLAN REVIVED.

ALDERMEN SHY AT ORDINANCE
AND SPECIAL COMMITTEE
IS APPOINTED.

Success in Southern Cities
and Negroes Approve,
Mr. Logan Said.

When an ordinance was introduced in the upper house of the council last night by Alderman J. E. Logan, making it obligatory on the Metropolitan Street Railway Company to operate cars for negro passengers, or to designate a part of the car for their use if they are to be carried with whites, there was a perceptible dodging of the aldermen to assume responsibility for having a hand in the legislation.

"I'd like to have the ordinance go to the streets, alleys and grades committee," proposed Alderman Logan.

"The streets, alleys and grades committee has all it can attend to now," replied Alderman Wirthman.

"Public improvements committee," suggested somebody.

"That's no place for such an ordinance," pleaded Alderman Baylis Steele. "It should go to the sanitary committee."

DODGING GETS LIVELY.

"The judiciary committee should pass on it," recommended Alderman W. C. Culbertson.

"Alderman Logan is chairman of that committee and he doesn't want it," volunteered Alderman W. A. Bunker.

The dodging began to get livelier.

"How would you like to have me appointed to a special committee, Alderman Logan?" interrogated President R. L. Gregory.

"That would suit me."

"Would you ask that I be put in the committee?"

"Yes, sir."

Gregory took an inventory of the aldermen.

"How do you stand on this proposition?" Gregory asked of Culbertson.

"As I have said before, it looks like a trouble-maker, but," Culbertson was saying when Gregory interrupted.

FAVORS ORDINANCE.

"You have killed yourself," he said, "and I appoint Alderman Thompson, Republican, and Alderman O'Malley, Democrat, and myself on that committee. I'm for the ordinance heart and soul. I think negroes and whites riding on street cars should be separated."

"I'd like to be excused from serving on the committee. I surrender to Alderman Logan," said Alderman Thompson.

"You don't want to serve?"

"No, sir."

"Well, I would like to have a Republican on the committee. How about you, Alderman Bunker?"

"I'm much obliged, but you'll have to excuse me," spoke up Bunker.

"How about you Alderman Tilhoff?"

"What is it you want to know?" innocently asked the alderman.

"We are going to put the negro where he belongs," answered Gregory.

TILHOFF UNWILLING.

"No, I do not wish to serve on the committee," promptly interposed Tillhoff.

"I'll put you on the committee, alderman," addressed Gregory to Alderman Logan. "I had hopes that we should make the committee non-partisan, but I can't get a Republican to serve, so, therefore, I'll draft Alderman Thompson on the committee." Thompson smiled, and did not object to being drafted.

The ordinance was drafted by Walter M. Lampkin, an associate city counselor. He explained its provisions, providing for separate cars for negroes, designation for them in the car if they ride with whites and placing authority in the conductor to seat passengers to fit conditions.

"Suppose passengers will have to stand. How about that?" asked Alderman Culbertson.

TO HAVE MORE CARS.

"That won't happen. We're going to have more cars," replied Counselor Lampkin.

"What's a passenger to do that wants to go forward to the lobby to smoke?"

"I had expected such questions, but I am not prepared to answer them."

"Have you prepared separate straps for negroes and whites?"

Lampkin appeared confused, and Alderman Logan came to his rescue.

"This is no joking matter," said Logan. "No political or racial prejudices should obtain. It is simply intended to facilitate the convenience and comfort of travel in the street cars. It is a success in Atlanta, Birmingham, Jacksonville, Mobile and other Southern cities. Whites as well as negroes vote it a welcome convenience, and if the ordinance is enforced negroes will be grateful recipients.

KANSAS CITY DIFFERENT.

"The purport of the ordinance is the greatest good to the greatest numbers. they have no such law in Northern cities as they they have not the preponderance of negro population that Kansas City has."

Alderman Isaac Taylor asked Counselor Lampkin if the city had a legal right to pass such an ordinance when there is no similar law in force in the state.

Mr. Lampkin answered that his first impression was that the city did not have the right, but upon consulting authorities he found that the city, under the laws of police powers, has the right. He cited the Florida supreme court as giving the cities of that state the authority, under police powers, to enact laws similar to the one proposed for Kansas City, and said that the supreme court of Massachusetts had ruled that school directors could segregate white and negro children attending public schools.

"I can see where good results would obtain by the enforcement of such an ordinance, but it looks like a trouble breeder to me," observed Alderman Culbertson.

LIKE SOUTHERN LAWS.

The ordinance is patterned after the law in force in Southern cities, and provides a fine of $25 for a person refusing to take a seat assigned him by the conductor or after refusal to leave the car for non-compliance of the rule. The company is subject to a fine of $500 if it fails to operate the separate cars, or comply with the required designation.

Should the ordinance become a law the New Orleans plan will be followed. The conductor will designate the seats in accordance with the prevailing conditions. It is proposed to have negroes occupy the front part of the car. Seats for their use will be appropriate labeled, and they must occupy no others. When their allotment of seats becomes filled, and standing in the aisles is necessary, they must keep within the limits of these seats. They must not seat themselves in seats reserved for whites, and any violation of this rule will necessitate the immediate retirement of the offender from the car or his arrest and punishment by a fine of $25 in the municipal court. The same rule applies to whites occupying reservations for negroes.

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November 20, 1909

NEGRO THEATER MANAGER
LOOKED FOR NO PROTEST.

Louis Woods Says His Company In-
vested $5,000 in Contracts for
Rebuilding Synagogue.

Louis Woods of 722 Charlotte street, owner of the Kansas City Son, a negro weekly paper, a negro who leased the Jewish Synagogue at Eleventh and Oak streets to open a theater for negroes, said last night that he was surprised at the opposition the proposed theater has received.

"For years I have been giving this matter much needed thought," he said. "I have seen white play houses in Kansas City prosper and added to every year. I noticed another thing -- that few negroes attend a white theater unless a negro troupe happened to be there. Then the first and second balconies are packed with negroes who pay nearly as much as those on the lower floor. It struck me that as all negro shows that come to Kansas City are liberally patronized by negroes, they might as do as well by a theater managed by a person of their own color.

"I talked with Sam Conkey, advance man for the Cole and Johnson show, with Bob Motts, proprietor of the Pekin, a negro theater in Chicago, and with Sir Green, supreme chancellor commander of the negro Knights of Pythias who just has completed a $100,000 negro theater in New Orleans. We combined on the project. It was our intention to have a chain of negro play houses over the country. We have been looking at a proposition in St. Louis.

"We had no idea that there would be any objection to our going by ourselves. White people usually want the negro to keep to himself, but just as soon as he attempts to do so, they object. We had no idea that we would meet the color objection with this theater.

"The theater was to be an investment. We examined the lease and found it without restrictions as to color. The building and the location were so well adapted to our needs that we put money into the business. We have let several contracts and have spent about $5,000.

"Had we known that our going there would have been offensive, it would have caused us to look for another location. So far as I am concerned I do not wish to raise any strife. I was born and reared in Missouri and expect to live and die here."

When it was known a negro theater was to be near them business men on East Eleventh street got up a petition remonstrating against the lease. It was signed by nearly every business firm near the theater.

A. P. Nichols, a real estate agent, has charge of the synagogue property for the owner who lives in Omaha. The principal objectors are D. O. Smart and the North-Mehornay Furniture Company. Mr. Smart has under erection a five-story building west of the proposed negro theater. There are many retail firms along East Eleventh street, members of all of which are opposing the lease to a negro theater.

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October 28, 1909

GRAY EAGLE BEACHED;
KANSAS CITIANS ABOARD.

Governors Donaghey of Arkansas
and Shallenberger of Nebraska,
Guests -- Fire Grate Bars Fell.

HELENA, ARK., Oct. 27. -- Because of a breakdown in the engine room and the attending danger of the steamer catching fire, the Gray Eagle, one of the fleet of boats accompanying President Taft to New Orleans, having aboard the Kansas City delegation with Governor Donaghey of Arkansas, Governor Shallenberger of Nebraska, Governor Prouty of Vermont, Senator Gore of Oklahoma and Senator Warner of Missouri as guests, was run aground ten miles north of Helena tonight to disembark its distinguished passengers in safety.

The breakdown followed the dropping of the grates in the fire room. The Gray Eagle had been chartered by the Kansas City delegation to the deep waterways convention and was boarded at Alton, Ill., Monday morning. The Gray Eagle is one of the best known boats in the St. Louis harbor. It is the property of the Eagle Packet Company, noted for its speedy boats.

At the time of the accident the boat was running at a speed of fifteen miles an hour. This is faster than the packers ordinarily run.

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October 25, 1909

OFF FOR TAFT RIVER TRIP.

Deep Waterways Cheered as Party of
Kansas City Men Leave for Alton
and St. Louis.

More than a half hundred prominent Kansas City men, comprising the delegation that is to go down the river on the steamboat Gray Eagle in the presidential party, departed last night over the Chicago & Alton railroad on a special train consisting of five sleepers and a baggage car for Alton, Ill., where they will arrive this morning.

Decorators who were sent to Alton in advance, reported last evening to Secretary Cledening of the Commercial Club that the boat will be one of the handsomest in appearance in the big fleet.

It was a merry party which met at the Union depot last evening and as the train pulled out cheer after cheer was heard for the deep waterways convention which will be held in New Orleans Saturday of this week and Monday and Tuesday of next week.

The delegates expect that President Taft will breakfast with them on their boat Tuesday morning either at Cape Girardeau, which will be the first stop after the fleet leaves St. Louis, or between the Cape and Cairo.

The Kansas Cityans will arrive in Alton this morning in time to board the Grey Eagle and be landed at the levee in St. Louis at 9 a. m. They will go to the Coliseum, where President Taft will speak at 11 a. m. The trip down the river will begin at 5 p. m.

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October 24, 1909

FOR TAFT BOAT TRIP
DOWN MISSISSIPPI.

KANSAS CITY DELEGATION
WILL LEAVE TONIGHT.

Will Travel to Alton on Four Spe-
cial Cars -- Decorations for the
"Gray Eagle" Sent
Ahead.

Imbued with the "Kansas City Spirit" and a determination to impress upon the big waterways convention at New Orleans the need of improving the Missouri river, the Kansas City delegation will leave for Alton, Ill., at 9 o'clock tonight on four special Pullman cars by way of the Chicago & Alton railway. Decorators were sent to Alton Friday night and by the time the Kansas City delegation arrives tomorrow morning the Gray Eagle, the boat on which the Kansas City delegation will ride, will be one of the gayest in the fleet. At least that was the declaration last night of E. M. Clendening, secretary of the Commercial Club, who has made all of the arrangements for the trip.

Yesterday it seemed very unlikely that President Taft would be able to accept the invitation of the Kansas City delegation to ride at least part of the way down the river on the Gray Eagle. More than a dozen telegrams were exchanged with the management of President Taft's itinerary, but late last night Secretary Clendening was informed that it would be practically impossible. He still hopes that the president will find time to visit the Kansas City boat and take breakfast on the steamer Tuesday morning.

LEAVE ST. LOUIS MONDAY.

The "Gray Eagle" will reach St. Louis at 9 o'clock Monday morning. President Taft will speak in the Coliseum at 11 o'clock. The party will embark at 4 o'clock in the afternoon for the great trip down the river. The fleet arrives at Cape Girardeau at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning, Cairo, Ill., at noon, and Hickman, Ky., at 4 o'clock. Memphis, Tenn., and Helena, Ark., will be the principal stops on Wednesday. Vicksburg will be the only stop of importance on Thursday with Natchez and Baton Rouge on Friday.

The fleet will arrive in New Orleans early Saturday morning and until the following Tuesday night there will be a continuous round of convention work and receptions in the southern city. Grand opera, addresses by the governors of the different states, inspection of the city, and attendance at the convention will take up about all of the time of the Kansas City delegation. The party will leave New Orleans at 6:20 o'clock Tuesday night.

Besides Secretary Clendening, members of the delegation of seventy include Jerome Twitchell, J. H. Neff, Hon. Edgar C. Ellis, C. S. Jobes, H. F. Lang, W. B. C. Brown, C. D. Carlisle, W. G. Mellier and Hon. W. P. Borland.

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October 2, 1909

JAMES MOSS HUNTON DEAD.

Cousin of Thomas H. Swope Is
Stricken With Paralysis.

While sitting at the dinner table last night at the home of his cousin, Mrs. Logan O. Swope, South Seventh street, Independence, James Moss Hunton was stricken with paralysis and died a few minutes later. He was 62 years old and for many years had made his home with Mrs. Swope and his cousin, Thomas H. Swope.

Mr. Hunton was secretary and director of the Chrisman-Sawyer bank. He was well known in Jackson county and exceedingly popular. He was born in New Orleans and was the son of Judge Logan Hunton, who lived in St. Louis for many years. His mother was a Miss Mary Moss before her marriage.

For many years Mr. Hunton was engaged in the real estate business in St. Louis and for a time lived in Philadelphia. In 1896 he moved to Independence. Mrs. Elizabeth A. Moore, dean of Stephens college, Columbia, Mo., and Mrs. Mary McCune of St. Louis are sisters. The funeral arrangements will not be made until they reach the city.

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October 2, 1909

CALVIN SMITH, MISSOURI
PIONEER, IS DEAD AT 96.

Came to the State With His Father
in 1816 -- Gave Smithville
Its Name.
Calvin Smith, Whose Father Gave Smithville Its Name, Dead at 96.
CALVIN SMITH.

Calvin Smith, who was born December 19, 1813, who perhaps was the oldest living Jackson county pioneer in the point of residence, died at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon at his home, 2495 Harrison street.

Besides a widow, Mr. Smith is survived by six children, Henry, James and Evaston Smith, and Mrs. J. S. Setord, Mrs. Anna Goodenough Smith and Mrs. G. McCleary. Henry and James are lawyer practicing in this city. Burial will be Sunday afternoon in Valley Falls, Kas., under direction of the Masons.

Mr. Smith was born at Humphrey Smith's Mills on Buffalo Creek, New York. His father was a farmer. When tales of the rich French province of Missouri were first wafted East he was quick to catch their inspiration and migrate. In his memoirs written for the benefit of relatives a few years ago, Mr. Smith tells the story of the trip.

"On February 29, 1815," he said, "my father prepared for a trip to the West. He had $4,000 in gold which he put in a belt and buckled it around his waist. In an old style two-wheeled ox cart, drawn by a yoke of oxen, he put his famly and started for Missouri. We went to Olean, a point on the Allegheny river. With his wife and four children he embarked there on a canoe At Pittsburgh, Pa., father had to attach the canoe to a flat bottom boat going to New Orleans.

TO MISSOURI BY BOAT.

"At Louisville, Ky., we met three or four families who were going to the new territory of Missouri. Father chipped in with them and bought a keep boat and we floated down the Ohio river to its mouth.

At the moth of the Ohio river we turned into the Mississippi and the boat was propelled up that river by men who walked along the shore and drew the boat after them, while a man on the boat with a long pole kept it from running ashore.

In time we reached St. Louis, 190 miles from the mouth of the Ohio river. We stopped there two or three weeks. Then we all boarded the keel boat again for another move.

IN CLAY COUNTY IN 1822.

"Eighteen miles brought us to the Missouri river and we went up that river 300 miles to a place called Cole's fort, now Boonville, Mo. We reached there on the first day of July, 1816, just four months to a day from the time we left New York.

"On the 14th day of July my sister, Missouri, was born and about five weeks later, August, 1816, father and his family crossed the Missouri river and settled eight miles east of Old Franklin, Howard co unty. We moved several times, but stayed in that county until 1819. We then moved to Carroll county, Mo. This was during the 'Missouri question,' whether the new incoming state should be a slave state or a free state. The missouri compromise in 1822 settled in favor of a slave state.

"In 1822 father took another move to Clay county, Mo., and settled at a place now called Smithville, in the northwest part of the county. It was then a wilderness, being ten miles to the nearest neighbor."

Mr. Smith came to Kansas City in 1882. Two years later his wife died adn he married a second time in 1889. The second wife, who was Miss Fannie Burton of Kansas City, is living.

During the civil war Mr. Smith sided with the North.

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August 28, 1909

DOWN THE RIVER WITH TAFT.

Steamboat Chester Will Carry Kan-
sas Cityans to New Orleans.

At a meeting held yesterday afternoon the directors of the Commercial Club enthusiastically accepted the invitation from St. Louis to send a steamboat representing Kansas City with the flotilla which will escort President Taft down the Mississippi river from St. Louis to the big waterways convention at New Orleans in October. Secretary E. M. Clendening was instructed to send notification of Kansas City's acceptance and to ask that the Kansas City boat be assigned a good place in the formation of the down-river fleet.

The steamboat Chester will carry the Kansas Cityans to New Orleans. It is the intention to begin the trip at the home dock, make stops at the towns down the Missouri river as far as Jefferson City and join the flotilla at St. Louis. This scheme, it is thought, is preferable to making the start at St. Louis and besides it will afford the Kansas Cityans an excellent opportunity to campaign for river improvement at Lexington, Glasgow, Boonville, Jefferson City and the other towns down the Missouri between here and the state capital.

The Chester has capacity for sixty passengers, and from the way applications for berths are coming in it is probable that they will be engaged long before the trip is to be taken. A band will be on board the boat, which will be gaily decorated. H. G. Wilson, transportation commissioner of the Commercial Club, will be in charge of the arrangements.

The boat will probably leave Kansas City on the afternoon of October 21, will reach St. Louis October 25 and will arrive at New Orleans October 31. It will be used as a floating hotel for the Kansas Cityans while at St. Louis and New Orleans.

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August 24, 1909

WITH 5,000 NEGRO DELEGATES.

SUPREME LODGE WILL OPEN
THIS MORNING.

Every State in Union Wil Be Rep-
resented on Roll Call -- Recep-
tion at Second Bap-
tist Church.

With a delegation of 5,000 negro men and women from every state in the Union, the supreme lodge of negro Knights of Pythias opens this morning in Ivanhoe hall, Nineteenth street and Tracy avenue, and continues until Friday night. It is the largest gathering of its kind ever held in Kansas City. Among the delegates are doctors, lawyers, bankers, merchants, clerks, porters, barbers, teachers, editors, farmers and every other profession, trade and business followed by negroes.

A reception was held last night at the Second Baptist church, Tenth and Charlotte streets. Grand Chancellor A. W. Lloyd of St. Louis presided and music was furnished by the choir of the Second Baptist church.

Nelson C. Crews, chairman of the local committee, made an address of welcome.

A solo by Miss Ennis Collins followed.

Welcome to the state was extended by Professor W. W. Yates, who represented Governor Hadley. His address was short and cordial. A selection by the Calanthian choir then followed.

S. W. Green of New Orleans, supreme chancellor, responded to this address.

S. C. Woodson represented Mayor Crittenden in an address of welcome.

There was a solo by Wiliam J. Tompkins and a selection by the choir, "The Heavens Are Telling." Other addresses were made by Prof. J. R. Jefferson of West Virginia; Dr. J. E. Perry, E. D. Green, of Chicago; Dr. W. P. Curtiss, St. Louis; Dr. J. A. Ward, Indianapolis; Mrs. Janie C. Combs and A. J. Hazelwood.

The Supreme Court of Calanthe will be presided over by John W. Strauther of Greenville, Miss. The session will be held at the Hodcarrier's hall. In this meeting every phase of the negro's home life will be discussed. Strauther is one of the most noted men of his race in the country.

At 2 o'clock this afternoon a band concert will be given at Cap Carrouthers by the Bixton, Ia., band, and dress parade at 5:30 p. m. by the entire uniform ranks.

Rev. B. Hillman of Terra Haute, Ind., made the opening prayer last night.

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August 23, 1909

BOUQUET FROM A STRANGER.

Kansas City's Boulevards and Parks
Accorded High Praise.

"In ten year's time Kansas City will not have a peer in the world as a residence city," declared W. C. Dufour, city councilor of New Orleans, La., who with a party of delegates from that city passed through the Union depot last night on their way home from the Trans-Mississippi Commercial congress which was held at Denver. The party made the trip in A. J. Davidson's private car "Frisco No. 100." After the congress they visited the various points of interest in Colorado.

"Here in Kansas City your park and boulevards boards have taken care of the future. They have planted these long rows of trees on your boulevards, so that in some ten year's time you will have drives which will rival any tropical city for shade.

"Then, too, it is generally admitted that there is not a much finer boulevard system in the world than now exists in Kansas City. You have the hills and the flats, the straight lines and the curves and everywhere there is something that attracts and holds the eye."

In the party besides Mr. Dufour were Beverly Myles, John Phillips, George Janvier, George Lhot and Judge I. O. Moore. All of the party were enthusiastic on the subject of the big river convention which will be attended in New Orleans by President Taft.

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July 10, 1909

KANSAS CITY GIRL SHOT.

Alice Robinson Probably Will Die as
Result of Accident.

SHREVEPORT, LA., July 9. -- Miss Alice Robinson, a vaudeville singer of Kansas City, stopped over here last night to see some friends who were playing at the summer park. She was on her way to New Orleans to fill an engagement.

While she was walking behind the scenes a fancy shot turn was being performed by the Neill pair. There was a miss bullet fired by Miss Neill which hit her friend in the temple, shattering the skull and penetrating the brain.

Miss Robinson is still alive, but no hopes are entertained for her recovery.

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January 11, 1909

BADNESS OF BOYS IS
NOT DUE TO ADENOIDS.

Dr. W. S. Wheeler, City Health Com-
missioner, Declares the New Or-
leans Scheme a Fad.

"Medical inspectors in the public schools have asked the board of education to have surgeons remove adenoids from bad boys to make them good," reads a dispatch from New Orleans.

"Nothing but a fad," said Dr. W. S. Wheeler, city health commissioner, when shown the telegram last night. Though he is an earnest believer in medical inspection of the schools, Dr. Wheeler did not indorse the recommendation of the New Orleans inspectors, which he brands as faddishness.

"It is absurd to say that the removal of adenoids in bad boys will so alter their disposition as to make them good. Adenoids are simply glandular growths in the throat, back of tonsils, and are brought on by sever colds and other causes. Their removal often rids the victim of a certain impediment in speech, but as to any effect on the character of the boy who undergoes the operation, which is a simple one, there is none."

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December 19, 1908

FAMILY REUNITED BY RIOT.

Dr. Harry Czarlinsky Meets Relative
Through Publicity Given Him.

The appearance of the name of Dr. Harry Czarlinsky, deputy coroner, in the local papers following the riot of religious fanatics on December 8 brought about a reunion of half brothers and sisters who had known nothing of of each other for thirty-eight years. A week ago yesterday, three days after the riot, Mrs. Pearl Wheeler of 16 South Bellaire avenue appeared at Dr. Czarlinsky's office in the Commerce building and asked:

"Did you ever know a man named Herman Czarlinsky?"

When the doctor informed Mrs. Wheeler that the man mentioned, who died here January 27, 1899, was his father, he was informed that Herman Czarlinsky was her father also. She said that her brother, William Whippell, who took the name of his stepfather, lived in Englewood station. A meeting was arranged for last Sunday and an impromptu reunion was held at Dr. Czarlinsky's home, 3510 Vine street.

"Shortly after the war," said Dr. Czarlinsky yesterday, "my father married a Miss Goode in New Orleans. She was a Gentile and, on account of religious differences, they separated in 1870. My father came West and settled at Warsaw, Mo., with three of the children, Fannie, G. A. and Charles. Fannie, who is now Mrs. McCubbin, lives at 1625 Jackson avenue. G. A. Czarlinsky lives here and Charles in St. Louis. Two of the children remained with their mother. They were William and Pearl, now Mrs.Wheeler. Father's first wife married again and Will took his stepfather's name of Whippell. Father moved here in 1889.

"Nothing was ever known of the other two children and their mother until Mrs. Wheeler appeared at my office last Friday. She said her mother died January 18, 1899, at Monett, Mo., fourteen days before my father's death.

"By my father's second marriage there were three children, Mrs. Esther Morris, 3517 Vine street; Maud Czarlinsky, who lives with her and myself. We were, of course, reared with the three children who came West with my father, but neither they nor us knew that the other two were living so close at hand. The mention of my name in the papers as deputy coroner in the handling of the riot victims brought about the reunion."

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July 10, 1908

HE WAS HUNGRY FOR
THE COTTON FIELDS.

So Dennis Kane, 93 Years Old, Started
to Walk From Chicago
to Louisiana.

Dennis Kane, aged 93, who in six weeks had walked the entire distance from Chicago, arrived at the Helping Hand yesterday. Bound for Veanvior, La., where he will re-enter the Confederate Soldiers' home, he will again take the road this morning, and expects to have arrived at his destination within five weeks.

During the war Dennis Kane, then in his prime, served with a Confederate company and participated in several leading battles. While the war was in progress he became acquainted with and married one of the prominent women of New Orleans, who died within a year. At the close of the war he entered into the plantation business and for a time prospered Finally ill fortune overtook him and the business was lost.

Without funds the former plantation owner was compelled to seek employment in the capacity of an ordinary laborer of a man whom he had previously employed and trained. Finally this plantation was sold, its owner going North, Dennis Kane went to look for a job elsewhere. Years passed, and finally Kane made application and was admitted to the Confederate home at Veanvoir.

While in this home he heard from his former employe, former employer and friend. He was in Chicago and invited Dennis to come and spend the balance of his days with him. This invitation was accepted, and last February the two old friends were reunited.

Al went well until the death of the friend two months ago, and, although his family endeavored to persuade Dennis to stay with them always, he refused, saying he intended returning to the South. Without funds, therefore, he left them and started afoot across the breadth of the country for the scenes of his boyhood.

"I attribute my health to three things," said Dennis, speaking of himself yesterday. "First, I have never drunk liquor; second, I have never used tobacco, and third, because I believe in Christ and trust Him. There is nothing else to tell," said he. "I am going home and am sure to get there. I am well and strong. I can walk well and will be glad when I arrive once more where I can get a whiff of the cotton fields."

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June 17, 1908

THOMAS MINOGUE IS DEAD.

Prominent in Local Sports for the
Past Twenty Years.

Thomas Minogue, for the last twenty years one of the prominent figures in Kansas City's sportdom, died about 6 o'clock yesterday morning at his boarding house, 1325 Brooklyn avenue. Minogue was 45 years old and Wednesday night was apparently healthy and in prime condition. A hemorrhage of the lungs was the cause of his death. He was unmarried, but leaves a mother and sister in Leavenworth, Kas. At the time of his death, Minogue was assistant superintendent of the streets. He had formerly held the same job under Mayor James A. Reed, when T. J. Pendergast was head of the department. At one time he was a bartender in the Pendergast saloon. When the new administration came in Minogue was given back his job as assistant street commissioner.

Minogue's figure was as well known around the racing stables at New Orleans and in the East as in Kansas City. No wrestling contest or prize fight was complete without him. He sometimes officiated as referee and sometimes as announcer. At various times he became a promoter of prize fighters, but never with striking success.

Among sporting men Minogue was considered a "good Indian." He never "laid down" and never left a friend in the lurch. He was a friend of "Doc." Shively and Dave Porteous, and was looked upon as an authority on boxing. He was a member of the order of Eagles. The funeral arrangements have not been made.

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April 19, 1908

NEW SUGAR CANE HARVESTER.

The Cockrell Company Has Trans-
ferred Its Offices to Kansas City.

The Cockrell Harvesting Company, Ltd., of New Orleans, Louisiana, has transferred its offices from that city to Kansas City and are located permanently in the new Commerce building.

This company controls the patent rights to the first mechanical sugar cane harvester ever built and are at present building the first allotment of these machines for the coming harvest of sugar cane in the South.

F. M. Cockrell, Jr., who is president of the company and inventor of the machine, is a son of Francis M. Cockrell, former United states senator from Missouri and at present a member of the United States interstate commerce commission. E. J. Finneran, a well known newspaperman, is general manager of the company.

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April 17, 1908

IS HENRY T. ZIMMER IN CUBA?

Friends of the Missing Man Believe
He Went There.

The present whereabouts of Ex-State Senator Henry T. Zimmer, who disappeared from his home in Kansas City, Kas., March 21, is still unknown. His friends have communicated with all of the principle cities of the South, but have failed to receive any information which would in any way aid in locating him.

The last word received from Mr. Zimmer by his wife was from Hot Springs, Ark., but before he could be reached there by a friend he had taken his departure. It is believed that he went form the Springs to New Orleans, where he took a boat for Cuba. He had often expressed a desire to visity this part of the country to intimate friends and it is thougth more than probably he was headed for Havana when he left the city.

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October 3, 1907

BOY DIES ON A CAR TOP.

Smoke and Fumes Suffocate
Fred Higgs.

Fred Higgs, 15 years old, who lived with his sister, Mrs. Josie Hall, at 1424 Grand avenue, was found dead on top of an express car at Lamar, Mo., Tuesday. He had been suffocated by the fumes and smoke from the engine. The Higgs boy started to New Orleans in company with Jerry O'Connnor, Burt Tralle and Willie Smith. Jerry O'Connor rode inside, and, at Iron Mountain, Mo., two of the boys were discovered by the conductor and put off the train. The Higgs boy was dead and his legs hanging over the edge of the car when the train stopped at Lamar.

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